Liquid Ventilation: Artificial respiration (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) using an oxygenated fluid.Fluorocarbons: Liquid perfluorinated carbon compounds which may or may not contain a hetero atom such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur, but do not contain another halogen or hydrogen atom. This concept includes fluorocarbon emulsions and fluorocarbon blood substitutes.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Meconium Aspiration Syndrome: A condition caused by inhalation of MECONIUM into the LUNG of FETUS or NEWBORN, usually due to vigorous respiratory movements during difficult PARTURITION or respiratory system abnormalities. Meconium aspirate may block small airways leading to difficulties in PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE and ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.High-Frequency Ventilation: Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).High-Frequency Jet Ventilation: Respiratory support system used primarily with rates of about 100 to 200/min with volumes of from about one to three times predicted anatomic dead space. Used to treat respiratory failure and maintain ventilation under severe circumstances.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Oleic Acid: An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Chemical Fractionation: Separation of a mixture in successive stages, each stage removing from the mixture some proportion of one of the substances, for example by differential solubility in water-solvent mixtures. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation: Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Hypothermia, Induced: Abnormally low BODY TEMPERATURE that is intentionally induced in warm-blooded animals by artificial means. In humans, mild or moderate hypothermia has been used to reduce tissue damages, particularly after cardiac or spinal cord injuries and during subsequent surgeries.Noninvasive Ventilation: Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Ventilator Weaning: Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio: The ratio of alveolar ventilation to simultaneous alveolar capillary blood flow in any part of the lung. (Stedman, 25th ed)Ionic Liquids: Salts that melt below 100 C. Their low VOLATILIZATION can be an advantage over volatile organic solvents.Space Suits: Pressure suits for wear in space or at very low ambient pressures within the atmosphere, designed to permit the wearer to leave the protection of a pressurized cabin. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)Extravehicular Activity: Activities by crew members conducted outside the pressurized hull of a spacecraft.Space Flight: Travel beyond the earth's atmosphere.Gravity Suits: Double-layered inflatable suits which, when inflated, exert pressure on the lower part of the wearer's body. The suits are used to improve or stabilize the circulatory state, i.e., to prevent hypotension, control hemorrhage, and regulate blood pressure. The suits are also used by pilots under positive acceleration.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Chemical Processes: The reactions and interactions of atoms and molecules, the changes in their structure and composition, and associated energy changes.Weight Lifting: A sport in which weights are lifted competitively or as an exercise.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Anabolic Agents: These compounds stimulate anabolism and inhibit catabolism. They stimulate the development of muscle mass, strength, and power.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Biography as Topic: A written account of a person's life and the branch of literature concerned with the lives of people. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)BiographyAccidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.UtopiasWilliams Syndrome: A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.
It is worn underneath the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG). During the Apollo era, astronauts used urine and fecal ... The MAG absorbs the liquid and pulls it away from the skin. These garments gained attention in February 2007, when astronaut ...
The final item donned before putting on the pressure suit is the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG), which ... as well as ventilation tubes for waste gas removal. After donning the LCVG, the astronaut then puts on the LTA, before entering ... The astronaut then dons the HUT, connects the LCVG umbilical to the umbilical in the HUT, and then locks the two parts of the ... incorporates clear plastic tubing through which chilled liquid water flows for body temperature control, ...
... and water vapor are drawn from the extremities of the suit by the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment or LCVG, which sends ... and water through a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment or Liquid Cooling Garment. two-way voice communication display or ... The removed water is stored and used to supplement the water supply used in the LCVG. The sublimator also cools the remaining ... and circulated water in an open loop through a Liquid Cooled Garment, expelling the water into space, where it turned to ice ...
... over which a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) is worn. The LCVG, resembling a union suit, has tubing sewn into the ...
A liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) has additional crush-resistant ventilation ducts, which draw moist air from the ... A man wearing a liquid cooling and ventilation garment for the Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular ... Astronauts commonly wear a liquid cooling and ventilation garment in order to maintain a comfortable core body temperature ... Making the liquid much colder is not an option since it leads to uncomfortable coldness where the liquid enters the tubes. ...
Advanced suits better regulate the astronaut's temperature with a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) in contact with ... Air, LCVG cooling water, and power are open loop systems, provided through an umbilical. The suit contains a Mac mini computer ... The Mark III suit has a backpack filled with about 12 pounds of liquid air, as well as pressurization and heat exchange.[7] ... No snap freeze effect occurs because all heat must be lost through thermal radiation or the evaporation of liquids, and the ...
Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG). LCVG is a set of Nylon tricot and spandex long underwear that is laced with ... Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) - removes excess body heat produced by the astronaut during spacewalks ...
Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA). 2006-07-17 ... a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series of tubes through which cooling water is ... The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the ... Current space suits used by NASA circulate the ventilation stream via a ball-bearing supported centrifugal fan. As NASA enters ...
It is worn underneath the Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG). During the Apollo era, astronauts used urine and fecal ... The MAG absorbs the liquid and pulls it away from the skin. These garments gained attention in February 2007, when astronaut ...
A liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) has additional crush-resistant ventilation ducts, which draw moist air from the ... A man wearing a liquid cooling and ventilation garment for the Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular ... Astronauts commonly wear a liquid cooling and ventilation garment in order to maintain a comfortable core body temperature ... Making the liquid much colder is not an option since it leads to uncomfortable coldness where the liquid enters the tubes. ...
An EMU flow test was also performed on EMU 3003 and FE-5s Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) was filled using EMU ... Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Liquid Cooling Ventilation Garment (LVCG) Water Fill. *Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ...
... which is wearing a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG). The LCVG removes sensible heat to keep the human core temp in ... Each CEM system consists of a liquid mass flow controller (H2O), a gas mass flow controller (CO2), a Controlled Evaporator ... Bronkhorst High-Tech BV the leaders in Mass Flow Meter / Mass Flow Controller technology for gases and liquids, Pressure ...
Advanced suits better regulate the astronauts temperature with a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) in contact with ... Air, LCVG cooling water, and power are open loop systems, provided through an umbilical. The suit contains a Mac mini computer ... The Mark III suit has a backpack filled with about 12 pounds of liquid air, as well as pressurization and heat exchange.[7] ... No snap freeze effect occurs because all heat must be lost through thermal radiation or the evaporation of liquids, and the ...
Additionally, both crewmembers filled their backup Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garments (LCVGs). Due to the amount of time ... LCVG Fill [Complete]. *EVA Procedure Print [Complete]. *WHC Manual Fill [Complete]. *COĐ– Maintenance [Complete] ...
A liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) offers protection from temperatures that can reach 135 oC in the Suns glare, ... But not all the choices are ideal: a Spandex LCVG has rather poor wicking and ventilation properties. Indeed, a reanalysis from ... A survey of evidence for the memory of liquid water casts little light on its putative role in homeopathy.. I suspect it will ... There are many good reasons - too many to fit in this column - to doubt that water molecules in the liquid state could mimic ...
The extravehicular activity suit currently used by the United States in space includes a liquid cooling and ventilation garment ... Subjects wore and tested three garments: 1) a spandex garment without any cooling device (Normal); 2) a simulated LCVG (s-LCVG ... Humidity in the SPEC-W was significantly lower than that in s-LCVG. Discussion: This preliminary study suggests that SPEC-W is ... This decrease was significantly larger than that achieved using s-LCVG. ...
... and a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment (LCVG).. From January to June 2020 we also created a self-sufficient Martian city ...
  • The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. (sae.org)
  • A new and advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for space suit surface exploration will require a durable, compact, and energy efficient system to transport the ventilation stream through the space suit. (sae.org)
  • In situations where the wearer must stay in place inside a vehicle, heavy but long-term-operation heat exchangers can be used, such as a refrigeration system to cool the liquid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each CEM system consists of a liquid mass flow controller (H 2 O), a gas mass flow controller (CO 2 ), a Controlled Evaporator Mixer , and a readout/control unit . (bronkhorst.com)