A genus of gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria causing a proliferative enteritis in animals, especially pigs, deer, horses, and rabbits.
A plant genus of the family LYTHRACEAE that is the source of henna and has cytotoxic activity.
Infections with bacteria of the family Desulfovibrionaceae.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.
A broad range of biologically active compounds which occur naturally in plants having important medicinal and nutritional properties.
Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae best known for cucumber (CUCUMIS SATIVUS) and cantaloupe (CUCUMIS MELO). Watermelon is a different genus, CITRULLUS. Bitter melon may refer to MOMORDICA or this genus.
A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.
Inflammation of any segment of the ILEUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE.
Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
A plant species of the Salvia genus known as a spice and medicinal plant.
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.

Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in porcine intestinal tissues with proliferative enteropathy. (1/67)

Detection method of Lawsonia intracellularis was studied in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded intestinal tissues from 5 naturally infected pigs by immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody against outer membrane protein of L. intracellularis. Warthin-Starry silver stain revealed clusters of argyrophilic, slightly curved rod-shaped organisms in the apical cytoplasm of enterocytes. Immunohistochemical staining with a L. intracellularis-specific monoclonal antibody confirmed the presence of the organism in the apical cytoplasm of hyperplastic enterocytes. The presence of L. intracellularis in the ileum of pig with proliferative enteropathy was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) further on the basis of amplification of 319 base pair products specific for porcine L. intracellularis chromosomal DNA. Immunohistochemistry and PCR may be a complementary method to confirm the diagnosis of L. intracellularis infection in pigs.  (+info)

Gamma interferon influences intestinal epithelial hyperplasia caused by Lawsonia intracellularis infection in mice. (2/67)

Lawsonia intracellularis is a recently identified bacterial pathogen which causes disease in a broad range of animals. Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and the resultant hyperplasia of infected cells are central processes in disease pathogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish whether immunocompetent mice were susceptible to infection and whether gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) contributed to the pathogenesis of infection. Wild-type 129-Sv-Ev mice (129 mice) and IFN-gamma receptor knockout mice based on the 129 background (IFN-gammaR(-)) were challenged orally with approximately 5.5 x 10(7) L. intracellularis cells. Both 129 and IFN-gammaR(-) mice became infected, although the extent of infection (as determined by the proportion of infected crypts) was substantially lower in 129 mice than in IFN-gammaR(-) mice. Despite these differences, infected crypts showed characteristics typical of proliferative enteropathies of other animals, i.e., intracellular colonization of epithelial cells by L. intracellularis with resultant epithelial hyperplasia. Infection in 129 mice was cleared between days 21 and 28 postchallenge, whereas infection in IFN-gammaR(-) mice was evident in 100% of animals from day 21 onward. Additionally, in IFN-gammaR(-) mice the infection was so extensive that fatalities resulted. IFN-gamma therefore plays a significant role in limiting intracellular infection and increased cellular proliferation associated with L. intracellularis. L. intracellularis infection is generally associated with modest cellular infiltration; therefore, further comparative examinations will be necessary to determine pathogenicity factors and define the role of IFN-gamma in controlling this infection.  (+info)

Granulomatous enteritis and lymphadenitis in Iberian pigs naturally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis. (3/67)

Intestinal samples and/or lymph nodes of two Iberian pigs from two different farms were submitted for histopathologic examination. Both pigs had proliferation of ileal and/or cecal crypts with almost complete absence of goblet cells. Infection by Lawsonia intracellularis was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction assay. The mesenteric lymph node of one pig had moderate lymphocyte depletion with granulomatous inflammation of the lymph node parenchyma. Histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells from the lymph node of one pig contained L. intracellularis antigen within the cytoplasm. This pig had also porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) infection, but nucleic acid and antigen of this virus were not demonstrated in the lymph node. The second pig had lymphocyte depletion and marked granulomatous inflammation in Peyer's patches. Histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells in areas of granulomatous inflammation contained L. intracellularis antigen; no PCV-2 nucleic acid or antigen was detected in the tissues of this pig. This is the first description of granulomatous ileitis and lymphadenitis associated with L. intracellularis infection.  (+info)

Application of a 5' nuclease assay for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in fecal samples from pigs. (4/67)

A 5' nuclease assay was developed to detect Lawsonia intracellularis in porcine fecal samples. The specific probe and primers were chosen by using the 16S ribosomal DNA gene as a target. The 5' nuclease assay was used with a total of 204 clinical samples, and the results were compared to those of immunohistochemistry (IM) on ileal sections of the same animals. There was 91% agreement between the results of IM and the 5' nuclease assay. In the 5' nuclease assay, 111 (54%) of the pigs tested positive for L. intracellularis infection, with a mean cycle threshold (Ct) value of 27.2, whereas 98 (48%) of the pigs tested positive by IM. On average, the Ct and DeltaRn values for the positive samples were 27.2 (standard deviation [SD], 3.7) and 1.6 (SD, 0.7), respectively. A Ct value of 27.2 corresponds to a fecal excretion of approximately 10(7) L. intracellularis cells per g of feces. Furthermore, a total of 40 fecal samples derived from a herd known to be free from infection with L. intracellularis all tested negative, with a Ct value of 40. By using a Ct value of 36 as the cutoff limit, the detection limit of the assay was 1 L. intracellularis cell per PCR tube. In conclusion, the 5' nuclease assay that has been developed represents an applicable fast method for detection of L. intracellularis in fecal samples, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to those of IM.  (+info)

Comparison of different methods for diagnosis of porcine proliferative enteropathy. (5/67)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to compare 2 methods of serology; (2) to compare 3 histologic techniques; and (3) to compare 2 methods of detecting shedding in pigs experimentally challenged with Lawsonia intracellularis. The sensitivities of these tests were determined by the detection of infection. Forty 5-week-old pigs were inoculated on day 0 with intestinal homogenate from pigs with proliferative enteropathy (PE). Clinical evaluation was done on day 7 and daily from day 14 to 28 postinoculation. Fecal shedding of L. intracellularis was monitored by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and immunoperoxidase staining at 7-day intervals. Serum was obtained on days 0 and 28 for serologic testing by glass slide and tissue culture indirect fluorescent antibody tests. At euthanasia on day 28, gross intestinal lesions were evaluated and ileum samples collected for histologic analyses. Ileal histologic sections from each animal were stained by hematoxylin and eosin, Warthin-Starry silver stain, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Of the 40 pigs, 36 had gross lesions typical of PE at necropsy. The percentage of agreement between the 2 serologic methods was 94.4%. Immunoperoxidase stain of fecal smears was more sensitive than PCR for detecting fecal shedding, especially on day 21 (89.5% and 60.5%, respectively) and day 28 (59.4% and 37.5%, respectively) post-inoculation. The IHC stain was much more sensitive for detecting infection than the routinely used hematoxylin and eosin and Warthin-Starry silver stains. In conclusion, in experimentally infected pigs, both serologic methods were appropriate techniques for detecting infection. For fecal samples, PCR has low sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry is the best diagnostic tool for formalin-fixed samples.  (+info)

LsaA, an antigen involved in cell attachment and invasion, is expressed by Lawsonia intracellularis during infection in vitro and in vivo. (6/67)

Lawsonia intracellularis has been identified recently as the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathies, which are characterized by intestinal epithelial hyperplasia and associated moderate immune responses. This disease complex has been reported in a broad range of animals, prevalently in pigs, and L. intracellularis has been linked with ulcerative colitis in humans. L. intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, and the pathogenic mechanisms used to cause disease are unknown. Using in vitro-grown organisms as a source of genomic DNA, we identified a Lawsonia gene which encodes a surface antigen, LsaA (for Lawsonia surface antigen), associated with attachment to and entry into cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of this protein showed some similarity to members of a novel protein family identified in a number of other bacterial pathogens but for which roles are not fully defined. Transcription of this gene was detected by reverse transcription-PCR in L. intracellularis grown in vitro in IEC18 cells and in bacteria present in ileal tissue from infected animals. Immunohistochemistry with specific monoclonal antibody and immunoblotting with sera from infected animals demonstrated that LsaA protein is synthesized by L. intracellularis during infection. Expression of this gene during infection in vitro and in vivo suggests that this surface antigen is involved during infection, and phenotypic analysis indicated a role during L. intracellularis attachment to and entry into intestinal epithelial cells  (+info)

A comparative study of an indirect fluorescent antibody test and an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay for the diagnosis of porcine proliferative enteropathy. (7/67)

The currently used indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) for the detection of antibodies against porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) was compared to an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA). Serum samples used in this comparison were collected from 5-week-old pigs on day 0 (pre-experimental challenge) and on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after oral inoculation with intestinal homogenate from pigs affected by PPE (28 challenged pigs) and sucrose phosphate glutamate solution (2 control pigs). All animals were euthanized 4 weeks after inoculation. Immunohistochemistry staining was applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of ileum for the detection of Lawsonia intracellularis antigen. The serology results with each method agreed in all samples, except on days 0 and 7 in 1 control animal, which was positive by IPMA, but negative by IFAT. The percentage of agreement between IFAT and IPMA was 98.6%.  (+info)

Serologic follow-up of a repopulated swine herd after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy. (8/67)

Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular organism that causes porcine proliferative enteropathy, a widespread infectious disease. Very little is known about the immune response and the epidemiologic features of the disease in the field. The aims of this study were to evaluate the duration and titers of antibody specific for L. intracellularis in gilts after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy (PHE), to evaluate maternal antibodies in piglets, and to evaluate seroconversion and fecal shedding in growing-finishing pigs. Thirty-six gilts in a herd that had recently experienced an outbreak of PHE, including 13 that had recovered, were bled 3 wk after the beginning of the outbreak and then every 3 wk until they became seronegative in 2 consecutive tests. Fourteen piglets from 5 gilts seropositive at farrowing and 5 piglets from 2 sows that remained seronegative were bled once or twice at the farrowing house and then every 3 wk until they reached market age. Fecal samples from these pigs were tested by polymerase chain reaction at 7 wk of age and then on the days of blood collection. After the PHE outbreak, the gilts had high serum antibody levels; the levels decreased over time, but antibody was still detectable for up to 3 mo in some animals. Four piglets from sows that were seropositive at farrowing had detectable passive antibodies up to 5 wk of age. Some nursery pigs started shedding L. intracellularis around 7 wk of age; peak shedding was observed between 13 and 16 wk. Antibody was not detected until 16 wk of age and was more often detected between 19 and 22 wk.  (+info)

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lawsonia bacteria" is not a recognized or established term in microbiology or medicine. Lawsonia is a genus of bacteria that contains only one species, which is called Lawsonia intracellularis. This bacterium is known to cause a disease in pigs called porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) and in horses called equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE).

However, if you're referring to a different term or concept, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I'm here to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lawsonia plant" is not a recognized medical term. Lawsonia inermis, also known as the henna plant, is sometimes used in traditional medicine and body adornment, but it is not a term that would be found in a standard medical dictionary or resource.

The Lawsonia plant contains lawsone, a natural dye that has been used for centuries to stain skin, hair, nails, and wool a reddish-brown color. In some traditional medicine systems, Lawsonia inermis is used as a remedy for conditions such as headache, fever, burns, and skin diseases. However, it's important to note that the use of Lawsonia inermis as a medical treatment has not been widely studied in clinical trials, and its effectiveness and safety are not established by modern medical research.

If you have any questions about the use of Lawsonia inermis or other natural products in medicine, I would recommend consulting with a qualified healthcare provider who can provide guidance based on your individual health needs and circumstances.

Desulfovibrionaceae is a family of gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. While these bacteria are typically harmless and even beneficial to the body in small numbers, they can cause infections under certain circumstances.

Desulfovibrionaceae infections primarily occur in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, cancer, or organ transplants. The bacteria can also cause infections in people who have recently undergone surgical procedures or have other underlying medical conditions.

Desulfovibrionaceae infections can manifest as a variety of symptoms, depending on the location and severity of the infection. Some possible symptoms include:

* Abdominal pain or cramping
* Diarrhea, which may be watery or contain blood
* Fever
* Chills
* Fatigue
* Nausea and vomiting
* Loss of appetite
* Headache

Desulfovibrionaceae infections are typically treated with antibiotics that are effective against anaerobic bacteria. The specific antibiotic used may depend on the location and severity of the infection, as well as the individual's overall health status. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

It is important to note that Desulfovibrionaceae infections are relatively rare, and most people who carry these bacteria in their gut do not develop symptoms. However, if you experience any of the above symptoms and suspect you may have an infection, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Swine diseases refer to a wide range of infectious and non-infectious conditions that affect pigs. These diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, or environmental factors. Some common swine diseases include:

1. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS): a viral disease that causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory problems in piglets and grower pigs.
2. Classical Swine Fever (CSF): also known as hog cholera, is a highly contagious viral disease that affects pigs of all ages.
3. Porcine Circovirus Disease (PCVD): a group of diseases caused by porcine circoviruses, including Porcine CircoVirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) and Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS).
4. Swine Influenza: a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza viruses that can infect pigs and humans.
5. Mycoplasma Hyopneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes pneumonia in pigs.
6. Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes severe pneumonia in pigs.
7. Salmonella: a group of bacteria that can cause food poisoning in humans and a variety of diseases in pigs, including septicemia, meningitis, and abortion.
8. Brachyspira Hyodysenteriae: a bacterial disease that causes dysentery in pigs.
9. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae: a bacterial disease that causes erysipelas in pigs.
10. External and internal parasites, such as lice, mites, worms, and flukes, can also cause diseases in swine.

Prevention and control of swine diseases rely on good biosecurity practices, vaccination programs, proper nutrition, and management practices. Regular veterinary check-ups and monitoring are essential to detect and treat diseases early.

Enteritis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the small intestine. The small intestine is responsible for digesting and absorbing nutrients from food, so inflammation in this area can interfere with these processes and lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss.

Enteritis can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial or viral infections, parasites, autoimmune disorders, medications, and exposure to toxins. In some cases, the cause of enteritis may be unknown. Treatment for enteritis depends on the underlying cause, but may include antibiotics, antiparasitic drugs, anti-inflammatory medications, or supportive care such as fluid replacement therapy.

Phytochemicals are compounds that are produced by plants (hence the "phyto-") for their own defense against predators and diseases. They are found in various plant parts such as fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, and teas. Phytochemicals can have beneficial effects on human health as they exhibit protective or disease preventive properties.

These compounds belong to a diverse group with varying structures and chemical properties. Some common classes of phytochemicals include carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids, organosulfides, and alkaloids. They have been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immune system-enhancing properties, among others.

It is important to note that while phytochemicals can contribute to overall health and wellness, they should not be considered a cure or treatment for medical conditions. A balanced diet rich in various fruits, vegetables, and whole foods is recommended for optimal health benefits.

Gram-negative bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not retain the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining method, a standard technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The primary characteristic distinguishing Gram-negative bacteria from Gram-positive bacteria is the composition and structure of their cell walls:

1. Cell wall: Gram-negative bacteria have a thin peptidoglycan layer, making it more susceptible to damage and less rigid compared to Gram-positive bacteria.
2. Outer membrane: They possess an additional outer membrane that contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are endotoxins that can trigger strong immune responses in humans and animals. The outer membrane also contains proteins, known as porins, which form channels for the passage of molecules into and out of the cell.
3. Periplasm: Between the inner and outer membranes lies a compartment called the periplasm, where various enzymes and other molecules are located.

Some examples of Gram-negative bacteria include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Neisseria meningitidis. These bacteria are often associated with various infections, such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. Due to their complex cell wall structure, Gram-negative bacteria can be more resistant to certain antibiotics, making them a significant concern in healthcare settings.

Intestinal diseases refer to a wide range of conditions that affect the function or structure of the small intestine, large intestine (colon), or both. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. They can be caused by infections, inflammation, genetic disorders, or other factors. Some examples of intestinal diseases include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and intestinal infections. The specific medical definition may vary depending on the context and the specific condition being referred to.

Gram-negative bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-negative bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that do not retain crystal violet dye during the Gram staining procedure used in microbiology. This characteristic is due to the structure of their cell walls, which contain a thin layer of peptidoglycan and an outer membrane composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), proteins, and phospholipids.

The LPS component of the outer membrane is responsible for the endotoxic properties of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the host. Common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens include Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Proteus mirabilis, among others.

Gram-negative bacterial infections can cause a wide range of clinical syndromes, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections, bloodstream infections, meningitis, and soft tissue infections. The severity of these infections can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the patient's immune status, the site of infection, and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

Effective antibiotic therapy is crucial for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, but the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains has become a significant global health concern. Therefore, accurate diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship are essential to ensure optimal patient outcomes and prevent further spread of resistance.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

'Cucumis' is a genus of plants that includes various species of fruits and vegetables, such as cucumbers, melons, and gourds. The most common species in this genus are Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cucumis melo (melon), and Cucumis metuliferus (horned melon or kiwano). These plants are native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the world, and they are widely cultivated for their edible fruits.

Cucumis species are annual or perennial herbaceous vines that can grow quite large, with some varieties trailing up to 10 feet or more in length. They have large, lobed leaves and produce yellow or white flowers that develop into the characteristic fruit. The fruits of Cucumis plants are typically fleshy and contain numerous seeds enclosed in a thin skin.

Cucumis fruits are popular for their refreshing taste and high water content, making them a staple ingredient in many cuisines around the world. They are also rich in nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber, and have been used in traditional medicine to treat various health conditions.

In summary, 'Cucumis' is a genus of plants that includes several species of fruits and vegetables, known for their refreshing taste, high water content, and nutritional benefits.

'Coriandrum' is the medical term for a plant species that belongs to the family Apiaceae, also known as the carrot or parsley family. The most common and well-known member of this genus is Coriandrum sativum, which is commonly referred to as coriander or cilantro.

Coriander has been used for centuries in cooking and traditional medicine. Both its leaves and seeds have a distinct aroma and flavor that are widely used in various cuisines around the world. The leaves are often called cilantro, especially in North America, while the seeds are known as coriander.

In addition to its culinary uses, coriander has been reported to possess several medicinal properties. It has been traditionally used to treat digestive disorders such as nausea, bloating, and flatulence. Some studies suggest that coriander may have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects, although more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits.

It's worth noting that while 'Coriandrum' is a medical term for the plant genus, it is not typically used in clinical or medical contexts unless discussing its medicinal properties or potential therapeutic applications.

Ileitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the ileum, which is the last part of the small intestine. The condition can have various causes, including infections, autoimmune disorders, and inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease.

The symptoms of ileitis may include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, weight loss, and nausea or vomiting. The diagnosis of ileitis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies such as CT scans or MRI.

Treatment for ileitis depends on the underlying cause of the inflammation. In cases of infectious ileitis, antibiotics may be used to treat the infection. For autoimmune or inflammatory causes, medications that suppress the immune system may be necessary to reduce inflammation and manage symptoms.

In severe cases of ileitis, surgery may be required to remove damaged portions of the intestine or to drain abscesses. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of ileitis, as early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Spirochaetales is an order of bacteria that includes several species known to cause infections in humans. The term "Spirochaetales infections" generally refers to diseases caused by these spirochete bacteria. The most well-known Spirochaetales infections include:

1. Syphilis - Caused by Treponema pallidum, syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that can have serious consequences if left untreated. It progresses through several stages, with symptoms ranging from painless sores to rashes, and may eventually affect the heart, brain, and other organs.

2. Lyme disease - Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted through tick bites, Lyme disease is an inflammatory illness that can cause a variety of symptoms, such as rash, fever, fatigue, and joint pain. In later stages, it may lead to neurological and cardiac complications if not treated promptly.

3. Leptospirosis - Caused by Leptospira spp., leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease that humans usually acquire through exposure to infected animal urine or contaminated water. Symptoms can range from mild flu-like illness to severe complications, such as kidney and liver failure, meningitis, and respiratory distress.

4. Relapsing fever - Caused by Borrelia recurrentis and transmitted through the bite of lice, relapsing fever is characterized by recurring episodes of high fever, chills, headache, and muscle aches. The disease can be severe and may lead to complications such as myocarditis, hepatitis, and neurological issues.

5. Pinta - Caused by Treponema carateum, pinta is a tropical skin infection that primarily affects the outer layers of the skin, causing lesions and discoloration. While not typically life-threatening, it can lead to significant disfigurement if left untreated.

Treatment for Spirochaetales infections generally involves antibiotics, such as penicillin or doxycycline, depending on the specific infection and its severity. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, using insect repellent to prevent insect bites, avoiding contact with potentially infected animals, and seeking prompt medical attention if symptoms develop after potential exposure.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

'Salvia officinalis', also known as garden sage or common sage, is not a medical condition but an herb that has been used in traditional medicine. Here's the botanical definition:

Salvia officinalis, commonly known as sage, garden sage, or common sage, is a perennial, evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers. It belongs to the Lamiaceae family, also known as the mint family. The plant is native to the Mediterranean region and has been cultivated throughout the world for its aromatic leaves, which are used in cooking, cosmetics, and medicinal preparations.

In traditional medicine, sage leaves have been used to treat various conditions, such as sore throats, coughs, colds, and digestive issues. However, it is essential to note that the effectiveness of sage for these uses has not been thoroughly studied in clinical trials, and its use should not replace conventional medical care. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new treatment or therapy.

I understand you are asking for a medical definition of "Horse Diseases." However, it's important to note that there isn't a specific medical field dedicated to horse diseases as we typically categorize medical fields by human diseases and conditions. Veterinary medicine is the field responsible for studying, diagnosing, and treating diseases in animals, including horses.

Here's a general definition of 'Horse Diseases':

Horse diseases are health issues or medical conditions that affect equine species, particularly horses. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections; genetic predispositions; environmental factors; and metabolic disorders. Examples of horse diseases include Strangles (Streptococcus equi), Equine Influenza, Equine Herpesvirus, West Nile Virus, Rabies, Potomac Horse Fever, Lyme Disease, and internal or external parasites like worms and ticks. Additionally, horses can suffer from musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis, laminitis, and various injuries. Regular veterinary care, preventative measures, and proper management are crucial for maintaining horse health and preventing diseases.

Gram-positive bacteria are a type of bacteria that stain dark purple or blue when subjected to the Gram staining method, which is a common technique used in microbiology to classify and identify different types of bacteria based on their structural differences. This staining method was developed by Hans Christian Gram in 1884.

The key characteristic that distinguishes Gram-positive bacteria from other types, such as Gram-negative bacteria, is the presence of a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Additionally, Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria.

Examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis. Some Gram-positive bacteria can cause various human diseases, while others are beneficial or harmless.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

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... is caused by the bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis. Inflammatory bowel disease does not associate with Lawsonia ...
The majority are sulfate-reducing, with the exception of Lawsonia and Bilophila. All members of this order are obligately ... Desulfovibrionales are a taxonomic order of bacteria belonging to the phylum Thermodesulfobacteriota, with four families. They ... List of bacterial orders List of bacteria genera Waite DW, Chuvochina M, Pelikan C, Parks DH, Yilmaz P, Wagner M, Loy A, ...
... is a disease in the animal's intestines caused by the bacteria, Lawsonia intracellularis. Wet-tail is a stress related ...
... faecal shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis and average daily weight gain". Preventive Veterinary Medicine. 123: 52-59. doi: ... Hafnia alvei is a food grade bacteria. It is not listed in the Novel Food catalogue of the European Commission. It is listed on ... Some Enterobacterales bacteria, such as Hafnia alvei have been shown to naturally regulate the appetite. More specifically, the ... Hafnia alvei is a psychrotrophic bacterium, it originates in raw milk and continues to grow in cheeses such as Camembert. The ...
Lawsonia bacteria (Thermodesulfobacteriota) MeSH B03.660.125.500 - myxococcales (Myxococcota) MeSH B03.660.125.500.605 - ... Gordonia bacterium MeSH B03.510.024.049.475 - micrococcaceae MeSH B03.510.024.049.475.050 - Arthrobacter MeSH B03.510.024.049. ... gram-negative chemolithotrophic bacteria MeSH B03.440.400.450.800 - Thiobacillus MeSH B03.440.400.645 - Thiotrichaceae MeSH ...
... bacterium), a genus of bacteria in the order Desulfovibrionales Lawsonia, Maryland, a town in Maryland Lawsonia, a golf course ... Lawsonia may refer to: Lawsonia (plant), a genus of plants in the family Lythraceae Lawsonia (beetle), a genus of beetle in the ... in Wisconsin This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Lawsonia. If an internal link led you here, you ...
September 2008). "Lawsonia intracellularis contains a gene encoding a functional rickettsia-like ATP/ADP translocase for host ... The phylogeny is based on phylogenomic analysis: List of bacterial orders List of bacteria genera Oren A, Garrity GM (2021). " ... nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent at Guaymas ... The Thermodesulfobacteriota are a phylum of thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. A pathogenic intracellular ...
Bacteriophages are able to infect most bacteria and are easily found in most environments colonized by bacteria, and have been ... Macrolides are also extremely useful in the effective treatment of some Mycoplasma species in poultry, Lawsonia in pigs, ... triggering cellular responses in the bacteria that allow them to survive. These bacteria can then reproduce and spread their ... Bacteria can alter their genetic inheritance through two main ways, either by mutating their genetic material or acquiring a ...
... secretions can inhibit the growth of some bacteria and fungi; antibacterial components from the bed bug could be used ... Lawsonia inermis or camphire); "infused oil of Melolontha vulgaris" (presumably cockchafer); fly agaric (Amanita muscaria); ...
Webarchive template wayback links, Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Bacteria ... a Danish bacteriologist Lawsonia - G. H. K. Lawson, an American bacteriologist Leadbetterella - Edward R. Leadbetter, an ... list of accepted bacterial and archaeal names List of Archaea genera List of Bacteria genera List of bacterial genera named ... genera named after institutions List of bacterial genera named after mythological figures List of clinically important bacteria ...
Methanolic extracts of the leaves of Ricinus communis were used in antimicrobial testing against eight pathogenic bacteria in ... "Preliminary investigation of the effects of topical mixture of Lawsonia inermis L. and Ricinus communis L. leaves extract in ...
"Lawsonia Bacteria" by people in this website by year, and whether "Lawsonia Bacteria" was a major or minor topic of these ... "Lawsonia Bacteria" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Lawsonia Bacteria" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Lawsonia Bacteria". ...
Lawsonia intracellularis is a species of bacterium. It is obligately intracellular and was isolated from intestines of pigs ... "Lawsonia intracellularis in a dog with inflammatory bowel disease." Veterinarni Medicina-UZPI 48 (2003). "Lawsonia ... Lawsonia intracellularis is highly pathogenic. The species has been associated with outbreaks of bacterial infection-associated ... McORIST, S.; Gebhart, C. J.; Boid, R.; Barns, S. M. (1995). "Characterization of Lawsonia intracellularis gen. nov., sp. nov., ...
Causes: Bacterium - Lawsonia intracellularis; poor hygiene.. Effects: Diarrhoea, wasting, pallor, black dung, sudden death. ... Proliferative Enteropathy is caused by a bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis, which reproduces in cells. It is a Gram negative ... The bacteria enter cells lining the intestine, usually those of the end of the small intestine (ileum) and sometimes those in ... The commonest underlying condition is Lawsonia intracellularis infection which is spread from pig to pig via infected faeces, ...
23. Proliferative enteropathy in a foal caused by Lawsonia intracellularis-like bacterium. 254-6页 作者:N M,Williams; L R,Harrison ... 19. Proliferative enteritis associated with Lawsonia intracellularis (ileal symbiont intracellularis) in white-tailed deer. 250 ...
The etiological agent is the obligate intracellular bacteria Lawsonia intracellularis. L. intracellularis infects enterocytes ... The bacteria is taken into cells and start to replicate and cause a massive proliferation of immature enterocytes. There are ... It has been suggested that the uptake of bacteria could be a type of receptor mediated endocytosis and that the massive ... As an example, it is not yet established how the bacteria invade cells. How the massive proliferation of enterocytes is induced ...
AnimalsAnti-Bacterial AgentsBacteriaDrug Resistance, Multiple, BacterialDrug SynergismDrug Therapy, CombinationHemolysisIndia ... Lawsonia inermis , Mangifera indica , Punica granatum , Cichorium intybus and Delonix regia. In addition, these extracts showed ... MIC values ranged from 0.32-7.5 mg/ml against MRSA and 0.31-6.25 mg/ml against ESbetaL-producing enteric bacteria. The overall ... MIC values ranged from 0.32-7.5 mg/ml against MRSA and 0.31-6.25 mg/ml against ESbetaL-producing enteric bacteria. The overall ...
Lawsonia is a really unique bacteria and that means we just dont know a whole lot about how it actually causes an infection ... Lawsonia intracellularis is a common bacteria that reduces the ability of the intestines of pigs to absorb nutrients, resulting ... What you do, in terms of Lawsonia, is let the bacteria interact with an intestinal cell and then they also use antibodies from ... Its also a very difficult bacteria to work with in the lab because it has to infect a cell before it can even grow so theres ...
Foal Diarrhea Caused by Lawsonia August 27, 2012 A fairly new intestinal disease of young horses is caused by the bacterium ... Ringworm is a fungus, and rain scald is caused by a bacterium that is normally present on horses skin but it does not cause a ... Canker results from a bacterium that causes the tissue in the frog and heel bulb region of a horses foot to grow or ... Most cases of placentitis are caused by bacteria that have ascended from the mares vulvar area up to and through the cervix. ...
... including increased levels of Lawsonia and Pyrolobus bacteria and decreased levels of Alistipes and Alloprevotella. ... They observed that a high-fructose diet led to an increase in Bacteroidetes bacteria and a decrease in Firmicutes bacteria in ... Tags: gut bacteria, gut health, heart health, high blood pressure, hypertension, probiotics ... but the mechanics behind how gut bacteria influence blood pressure remain somewhat mysterious. ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
LAWSONIA. Lawsonia Bacteria. PASTEURELLA HAEMOLYTICA. Mannheimia haemolytica. SALMONELLA SCHOTTMUELLERI. Salmonella paratyphi B ...
Bacteria Impacts of microbiome labs/ megasporebiotic. If you find any studies of this specific probiotic impacting other ... WARNING:There are 3 possible histamine producing bacteria in this product. It may impact allergies, mast cell and histamine ... Lawsonia 100. 0. Leclercia 0. 100. Lelliottia 0. 100. Lentibacillus 100. 0. ...
... the bacterium that causes necrotic enteritis in poultry. Selected samples were then tested in two series of in vivo chicken ... the obligatory intracellular Lawsonia intracellularis but it turned out to be unsuccessful. Poultry - necrotic enteritis: All ...
Detection of necrotic ileitis caused by Lawsonia intracellularis in pigs from well managed farms in the Lima area. Sonia Calle ... Detección de ileitis necrótica causada por lawsonia intracellularis en porcinos de granjas tecnificadas de la zona de lima. ... Detection of necrotic ileitis caused by Lawsonia intracellularis in pigs from well managed farms in the Lima area. ...
Frequency of seroreactors to Lawsonia intracellularis in commercial pig farms. Astrid Calderón, A., Sonia Calle, E., Marlon ... Frequency of seroreactors to Lawsonia intracellularis in commercial pig farms. Astrid Calderón, A., Sonia Calle, E., Marlon ... Frecuencia de serorreactores a Lawsonia intracellularis en granjas porcinas tecnificadas. Translated title of the contribution ...
Gram-Negative Oxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria (0) * Helicobacter (1) * Lawsonia Bacteria (0) * Methylosinus (0) ... I feel that I am not being taken seriously since the doctor has never heard of this bacteria. How long is the culture on stools ... should take? would the doctor order a different test? Would a blood test be more accurate?. Because that bacteria is also found ...
Lawsonia (bacteria) (fr) * Legionella (fr) * Leuconostoc (fr) * Listeria (fr) * Megasphaera (fr) * Methanobacteriaceae (fr) ...
Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae) commonly known as Hennais a well-known plant used in the Indian medicine. ... The ethyl acetate extract of L. inermis was found to be the most active against all the bacteria in the test system (42). ... Lawsonia inermisis a glabrous branched shrub or small tree (2 to 6 m in height). Leaves are small, opposite, entire margin ... Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae) commonly known as Hennais a well-known plant used in the Indian medicine. Various parts of this ...
Characterization of Lawsonia intracellularis gen. nov., sp. nov., the obligately intracellular bacterium of porcine ... nov., a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a deep subsurface aquifer. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2009; 59:3100-3104. https ... Sulfate-Reducing bacteria that produce exopolymers thrive in the calcifying zone of a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat. Front. ... nov., a piezophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from the Indian Ocean and reclassification of four Desulfovibrio spp. Int J Syst ...
  • Lawsonia inermis (Lythraceae) commonly known as 'Henna'is a well-known plant used in the Indian medicine. (pharmatutor.org)
  • Lawsonia inermis Linn (Lythraceae) is a perennial plant commonly called as Henna, having different vernacular names in India viz. (pharmatutor.org)
  • Lawsonia inermis is a glabrous branched shrub or small tree (2 to 6 m in height). (pharmatutor.org)
  • Lawsonia inermis is a well known ethnomedicinal plant used cosmetically and medicinally for over 9,000 years. (pharmatutor.org)
  • That being said, lawsonia inermis do not show any harmful effects yet, but that is still under studies, and may prove to be harmful one day, in which many factors may have played roles. (herbconer.com)
  • Barzegar H, Alizadeh behbahani B, Noshad M. Evaluation of total phenol and flavonoid contents, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of Lawsonia inermis aqueous extract against some gram- positive and gram- negative bacteria. (ac.ir)
  • In this study, the antimicrobial effect of Lawsonia inermis aqueous extract was investigated against Escherichia coli , Salmonella typhimurium , Staphylococcus epidermidis , and Listeria innocua , by disc diffusion agar, well diffusion agar, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration methods. (ac.ir)
  • S. Shahabinejad and A. Kariminik, "Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Lawsonia inermis against uropathogenic bacteria", MicroMedicine , vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 31-36, Jun. (tmkarpinski.com)
  • Avicennia marina (gray mangrove), Fagonia indica , Lawsonia inermis (henna), Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), Salvadora persica , Ziziphus spina-christi (Christ's thorn jujube), and Asphodelus tenuifolius . (herbs.news)
  • Proliferative Enteropathy is caused by a bacterium, Lawsonia intracellularis , which reproduces in cells. (pigprogress.net)
  • The obligate intracellular Lawsonia intracellularis (LI), the etiological agent of proliferative enteropathy (PE), is an economically important disease in the swine industry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PE) is caused by Lawsonia intracellularis (LI), an obligate intracellular bacterium, commonly occurring in swine herds. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE), also known as ileitis, is an infectious enteric disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Lawsonia intracellularis . (lawsonia.net)
  • Lawsonia intracellularis is the bacterium responsible for the condition known as Equine Proliferative Enteropathy (EPE) which affects weanlings and yearlings primarily. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • For the treatment of Porcine Proliferative Enteropathy (PPE) associated with Lawsonia intracellularis in pigs. (pharmgate.com)
  • Despite high herd prevalence of LI infection in growing-finishing pigs, its pathogenic mechanisms remain speculative due to difficulty of in vitro culture of this obligate intracellular bacterium. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The commonest underlying condition is Lawsonia intracellularis infection which is spread from pig to pig via infected faeces, usually between pigs at mixing. (pigprogress.net)
  • Treatment and prevention of Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis (Ileitis) associated with Lawsonia intracellularis. (farmacy.co.uk)
  • Lawsonia is a really unique bacteria and that means we just don't know a whole lot about how it actually causes an infection and, if you don't know what causes an infection, it's really hard to prevent the infection in the first place. (swineweb.com)
  • You might know that this bacteria uses a specific protein to cause an infection and you can create a vaccine that targets that protein so we decided to use a technique called reverse vaccinology. (swineweb.com)
  • Infection with Salmonella can result from consumption of contaminated feed or water or contact with carrier animals which shed the bacterium in their faeces. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • The etiological agent is the obligate intracellular bacteria Lawsonia intracellularis. (slu.se)
  • Poultry - necrotic enteritis: All 500 REPLACE samples were screened for their effect on the growth in vitro of Clostridium perfringens, the bacterium that causes necrotic enteritis in poultry. (europa.eu)
  • Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile are anaerobic bacteria which may be found in the environment, particularly soil, and in the intestinal tract of healthy horses and other animals. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • As an antimicrobial agent, henna prevented the growth of bacteria 0n the wounded surfaces. (herbconer.com)
  • A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria in the family Desulfovibrionaceae. (uams.edu)
  • Infections with bacteria of the family Desulfovibrionaceae. (uchicago.edu)
  • Much effort was expended in trying to develop an in vitro model to work with another pig-gut pathogen, the obligatory intracellular Lawsonia intracellularis but it turned out to be unsuccessful. (europa.eu)
  • In vitro Synulox is active against a wide range of clinically important bacteria. (farmacy.co.uk)
  • It may even work together with particular strains of bacteria to create mixed infections with varying adverse effects. (herbs.news)
  • Each capsule contains thirty-billion cfu of active bacteria and ten powerful probiotic strains to help keep you feeling your best. (vita-shoppe.com)
  • Lawsonia intracellularis is a common bacteria that reduces the ability of the intestines of pigs to absorb nutrients, resulting in slower weight gain. (swineweb.com)
  • In some horses, for reasons that are not entirely clear, these bacteria may cause a severe, and sometimes fatal, diarrhoea. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • The bacteria enter cells lining the intestine, usually those of the end of the small intestine (ileum) and sometimes those in the large intestine, and multiply, causing the cells to become immature in appearance, eliminating the absorptive villi and encouraging the crypts between them to lengthen, thus making the intestinal lining non-absorptive, thick and lumpy in infected areas. (pigprogress.net)
  • What you do, in terms of Lawsonia, is let the bacteria interact with an intestinal cell and then they also use antibodies from an infected pig and they look at what Lawsonia proteins are targeted by those antigens, so antibodies from infected animals but also interact with the host cell. (swineweb.com)
  • Other enteroinvasive bacteria pathogens such as Listeria and Shigella are randomly detected in the intestinal cell cytoplasm [ 3 ], while LI is largely present in the apical region of enterocytes [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Lawsonia intracellularis is highly pathogenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • it is used to identify the presence of pathogenic bacteria, and to understand the mechanism of action for some viruses. (interesjournals.org)
  • They observed that a high-fructose diet led to an increase in Bacteroidetes bacteria and a decrease in Firmicutes bacteria in the mice's gut. (studyfinds.org)
  • Twelve extracts showing broad-spectrum activity were tested against specific multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESbetaL)-producing enteric bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • MIC values ranged from 0.32-7.5 mg/ml against MRSA and 0.31-6.25 mg/ml against ESbetaL-producing enteric bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • For a complete taxonomy, refer to The Taxonomic Outline of Bacteria and Archaea, Release 7.7. (namesforlife.com)
  • Synulox boluses have a notably broad spectrum of bactericidal activity against bacteria commonly found in calves. (farmacy.co.uk)
  • More recently, in April 2017 China banned the use of colistin, as a consequence of the resistance of the E. coli bacteria found in 2015. (pigprogress.net)
  • Like other macrolide antibiotics, clarithromycin generally is bacteriostatic and works by inhibiting protein synthesis within susceptible bacteria. (wedgewoodpharmacy.com)
  • Rifampin is either a bacteriostatic or bactericidal antibiotic that inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in susceptible bacteria. (wedgewoodpharmacy.com)
  • Like in humans, using antibiotics that kill the healthy bacteria in a horse's gut can lead to problems, including colitis. (relievet.com)
  • Bacteria are exposed to an enormous selection pressure due to the massive use of antibiotics in the host. (pigprogress.net)
  • This has led to the so-called "superbug," bacteria that cannot be killed by standard antibiotics. (herbs.news)
  • Many antibiotics were shown to be ineffective against these bacteria, making therapeutic intervention much more difficult. (springeropen.com)
  • Like bacteria, viruses can infect a horses gut and cause colitis. (relievet.com)
  • In search of broad-spectrum antibacterial activity from traditionally used Indian medicinal plants, 66 ethanolic plant extracts were screened against nine different bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Of these, 39 extracts demonstrated activity against six or more test bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Gram-positive and Gram-negative MDR bacteria are almost equally sensitive to these extracts/fractions, indicating their broad-spectrum nature. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • AU - Aqil,F, AU - Ahmad,I, PY - 2007/4/19/pubmed PY - 2007/6/27/medline PY - 2007/4/19/entrez SP - 79 EP - 92 JF - Methods and findings in experimental and clinical pharmacology JO - Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - In search of broad-spectrum antibacterial activity from traditionally used Indian medicinal plants, 66 ethanolic plant extracts were screened against nine different bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The extracts also killed bacteria that complicate Candida -related diseases. (herbs.news)
  • A genus, in the family HYPHOMICROBIACEAE , comprised of ovoid-shaped bacteria with polar growth and a characteristic vegetative growth cycle. (nih.gov)
  • Efforts to develop a protein-based subunit vaccine to prevent Lawsonia intracellularis are showing progress. (swineweb.com)
  • The bacteria is taken into cells and start to replicate and cause a massive proliferation of immature enterocytes. (slu.se)
  • It has been suggested that the uptake of bacteria could be a type of receptor mediated endocytosis and that the massive proliferation is the result of a bacterial regulation of cell differentiation- and/or apoptosis genes. (slu.se)
  • A large group of facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. (wakehealth.edu)
  • QSI marking cyclic peptide-mediated QS in Gram-positive bacteria is an effective tool to overcome the crisis of antibiotic-dependent chemotherapy due to the emergence of drug resistance strain, e.g., methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE). (springeropen.com)
  • Ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol fractions of more than six plants indicated that the active phytocompounds were distributed mainly into acetone and ethyl acetate fractions, whereas they were least prevalent in methanol fractions as evident from their antibacterial activity against MDR bacteria. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • As these bacteria can be found in the faeces of healthy horses, bacterial culture alone is not diagnostic and detection of the toxins associated with the disease is required. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • A number of novel findings, including identification of the disease rate among naturally exposed horses, warrant additional work as they may help to identify potential risk factors for L.intracellularis exposure and/or the reservoir host(s) of the bacterium. (uky.edu)
  • Widely distributed unicellular or multicellular bacteria. (nih.gov)
  • Because that bacteria is also found in the natural flora of the intestine would this give a false-positive result? (lookformedical.com)
  • Lawsonia intracellularis in a dog with inflammatory bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resistance of bacteria can be simply explained and is a normal natural phenomenon ( Figure 1 ). (pigprogress.net)
  • As an example, it is not yet established how the bacteria invade cells. (slu.se)
  • This bacterium cannot be cultured in the laboratory as it only grows inside living cells, therefore, PCR testing is required to detect the DNA of the organism in faeces. (irishequinecentre.ie)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Lawsonia Bacteria" by people in this website by year, and whether "Lawsonia Bacteria" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (uchicago.edu)
  • Characteristics and Constituents : The leaves of lawsonia alba have certain medicinal properties. (seedvendor.com)
  • The leaves have also been shown to have some action against tubercular and other bacteria, and in typhoid and haemorrhagia. (seedvendor.com)