Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Thrombasthenia: A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).Antigens, Human Platelet: Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Hirudins: Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Myosin Type III: A subclass of myosins originally found in the photoreceptor of DROSOPHILA. The heavy chains can occur as two alternatively spliced isoforms of 132 and 174 KDa. The amino terminal of myosin type III is highly unusual in that it contains a protein kinase domain which may be an important component of the visual process.Benzamidines: Amidines substituted with a benzene group. Benzamidine and its derivatives are known as peptidase inhibitors.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.Mucopolysaccharidosis III: Mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by heparitin sulfate in the urine, progressive mental retardation, mild dwarfism, and other skeletal disorders. There are four clinically indistinguishable but biochemically distinct forms, each due to a deficiency of a different enzyme.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Blood Platelet Disorders: Disorders caused by abnormalities in platelet count or function.Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Kanamycin Kinase: A class of enzymes that inactivate aminocyclitol-aminoglycoside antibiotics (AMINOGLYCOSIDES) by regiospecific PHOSPHORYLATION of the 3' and/or 5' hydroxyl.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Tyrosine: A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Enoxaparin: Low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, having a 4-enopyranosuronate sodium structure at the non-reducing end of the chain. It is prepared by depolymerization of the benzylic ester of porcine mucosal heparin. Therapeutically, it is used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Ticlopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Immunoelectrophoresis, Two-Dimensional: Immunoelectrophoresis in which a second electrophoretic transport is performed on the initially separated antigen fragments into an antibody-containing medium in a direction perpendicular to the first electrophoresis.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Platelet Function Tests: Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.AmidinesCombined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic: Any form of purpura in which the PLATELET COUNT is decreased. Many forms are thought to be caused by immunological mechanisms.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Whole Blood Coagulation Time: The time required by whole blood to produce a visible clot.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Kluver-Bucy Syndrome: A neurobehavioral syndrome associated with bilateral medial temporal lobe dysfunction. Clinical manifestations include oral exploratory behavior; tactile exploratory behavior; hypersexuality; BULIMIA; MEMORY DISORDERS; placidity; and an inability to recognize objects or faces. This disorder may result from a variety of conditions, including CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; infections; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; PICK DISEASE OF THE BRAIN; and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS.Antithrombins: Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.Glycogen Storage Disease Type III: An autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to deficient expression of amylo-1,6-glucosidase (one part of the glycogen debranching enzyme system). The clinical course of the disease is similar to that of glycogen storage disease type I, but milder. Massive hepatomegaly, which is present in young children, diminishes and occasionally disappears with age. Levels of glycogen with short outer branches are elevated in muscle, liver, and erythrocytes. Six subgroups have been identified, with subgroups Type IIIa and Type IIIb being the most prevalent.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Integrin alpha2: An integrin alpha subunit that primarily combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form the INTEGRIN ALPHA2BETA1 heterodimer. It contains a domain which has homology to collagen-binding domains found in von Willebrand factor.PyrrolidinesSyndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Receptors, IgG: Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).Acute Coronary Syndrome: An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Isoxazoles: Azoles with an OXYGEN and a NITROGEN next to each other at the 1,2 positions, in contrast to OXAZOLES that have nitrogens at the 1,3 positions.Hepatitis A Virus, Human: A strain of HEPATITIS A VIRUS which causes hepatitis in humans. The virus replicates in hepatocytes and is presumed to reach the intestine via the bile duct. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route.Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Fractures, Open: Fractures in which there is an external wound communicating with the break of the bone.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Ristocetin: An antibiotic mixture of two components, A and B, obtained from Nocardia lurida (or the same substance produced by any other means). It is no longer used clinically because of its toxicity. It causes platelet agglutination and blood coagulation and is used to assay those functions in vitro.Clot Retraction: Retraction of a clot resulting from contraction of PLATELET pseudopods attached to FIBRIN strands. The retraction is dependent on the contractile protein thrombosthenin. Clot retraction is used as a measure of platelet function.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Dual Specificity Phosphatase 2: A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES and is primarily localized to the CELL NUCLEUS.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Pipecolic AcidsHemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Uroplakin III: A uroplakin subtype that heterodimerizes with UROPLAKIN IB to form a component of the asymmetric unit membrane found in urothelial cells.Glycogen Debranching Enzyme System: 1,4-alpha-D-Glucan-1,4-alpha-D-glucan 4-alpha-D-glucosyltransferase/dextrin 6 alpha-D-glucanohydrolase. An enzyme system having both 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.25) and amylo-1,6-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.33) activities. As a transferase it transfers a segment of a 1,4-alpha-D-glucan to a new 4-position in an acceptor, which may be glucose or another 1,4-alpha-D-glucan. As a glucosidase it catalyzes the endohydrolysis of 1,6-alpha-D-glucoside linkages at points of branching in chains of 1,4-linked alpha-D-glucose residues. Amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity is deficient in glycogen storage disease type III.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Immunosorbent Techniques: Techniques for removal by adsorption and subsequent elution of a specific antibody or antigen using an immunosorbent containing the homologous antigen or antibody.Salmonella arizonae: Gram-negative rods widely distributed in LIZARDS and SNAKES, and implicated in enteric, bone (BONE DISEASES), and joint infections (JOINT DISEASES) in humans.Mucopolysaccharidoses: Group of lysosomal storage diseases each caused by an inherited deficiency of an enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The diseases are progressive and often display a wide spectrum of clinical severity within one enzyme deficiency.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Integrins: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Peptides, Cyclic: Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).Binding Sites, Antibody: Local surface sites on antibodies which react with antigen determinant sites on antigens (EPITOPES.) They are formed from parts of the variable regions of FAB FRAGMENTS.Edetic Acid: A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight: Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Mechlorethamine: A biologic alkylating agent that exerts its cytotoxic effects by forming DNA ADDUCTS and DNA interstrand crosslinks, thereby inhibiting rapidly proliferating cells. The hydrochloride is an antineoplastic agent used to treat HODGKIN DISEASE and LYMPHOMA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Nephelometry and Turbidimetry: Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.Azepines: Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Craniofacial Dysostosis: Autosomal dominant CRANIOSYNOSTOSIS with shallow ORBITS; EXOPHTHALMOS; and maxillary hypoplasia.IraqAtherectomy, Coronary: Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.RNA, Ribosomal: The most abundant form of RNA. Together with proteins, it forms the ribosomes, playing a structural role and also a role in ribosomal binding of mRNA and tRNAs. Individual chains are conventionally designated by their sedimentation coefficients. In eukaryotes, four large chains exist, synthesized in the nucleolus and constituting about 50% of the ribosome. (Dorland, 28th ed)Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.beta-Thromboglobulin: A platelet-specific protein which is released when platelets aggregate. Elevated plasma levels have been reported after deep venous thrombosis, pre-eclampsia, myocardial infarction with mural thrombosis, and myeloproliferative disorders. Measurement of beta-thromboglobulin in biological fluids by radioimmunoassay is used for the diagnosis and assessment of progress of thromboembolic disorders.Xenopus: An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Neoadjuvant Therapy: Preliminary cancer therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone/endocrine therapy, immunotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) that precedes a necessary second modality of treatment.Vinblastine: Antitumor alkaloid isolated from Vinca rosea. (Merck, 11th ed.)Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Immunologic Techniques: Techniques used to demonstrate or measure an immune response, and to identify or measure antigens using antibodies.Sulfisoxazole: A short-acting sulfonamide antibacterial with activity against a wide range of gram- negative and gram-positive organisms.Xenopus laevis: The commonest and widest ranging species of the clawed "frog" (Xenopus) in Africa. This species is used extensively in research. There is now a significant population in California derived from escaped laboratory animals.Alanine: A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Zinc Fingers: Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2Y RECEPTORS. Included under this heading are antagonists for specific P2Y receptor subtypes.Chymotrypsin: A serine endopeptidase secreted by the pancreas as its zymogen, CHYMOTRYPSINOGEN and carried in the pancreatic juice to the duodenum where it is activated by TRYPSIN. It selectively cleaves aromatic amino acids on the carboxyl side.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Vitronectin: A blood plasma glycoprotein that mediates cell adhesion and interacts with proteins of the complement, coagulation, and fibrinolytic cascade. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Crown Ethers: Macrocyclic polyethers with the repeating unit of (-CH2-CH2-O)n where n is greater than 2 and some oxygens may be replaced by nitrogen, sulfur or phosphorus. These compounds are useful for coordinating CATIONS. The nomenclature uses a prefix to indicate the size of the ring and a suffix for the number of heteroatoms.Receptors, Cytoadhesin: A group of INTEGRINS that includes the platelet outer membrane glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX) and the vitronectin receptor (RECEPTORS, VITRONECTIN). They play a major role in cell adhesion and serve as receptors for fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and vitronectin.Endpoint Determination: Establishment of the level of a quantifiable effect indicative of a biologic process. The evaluation is frequently to detect the degree of toxic or therapeutic effect.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Procarbazine: An antineoplastic agent used primarily in combination with mechlorethamine, vincristine, and prednisone (the MOPP protocol) in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Capillary Action: A phenomenon in which the surface of a liquid where it contacts a solid is elevated or depressed, because of the relative attraction of the molecules of the liquid for each other and for those of the solid. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Quinine: An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.Tibial FracturesAdministration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Platelet Factor 4: A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.Burkholderia cepacia: A species of BURKHOLDERIA considered to be an opportunistic human pathogen. It has been associated with various types of infections of nosocomial origin.Lymphatic Irradiation: External or interstitial irradiation to treat lymphomas (e.g., Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and lymph node metastases and also some autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.Acrocephalosyndactylia: Congenital craniostenosis with syndactyly.Dibucaine: A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)Leukemia, Megakaryoblastic, Acute: An acute myeloid leukemia in which 20-30% of the bone marrow or peripheral blood cells are of megakaryocyte lineage. MYELOFIBROSIS or increased bone marrow RETICULIN is common.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.DioxolanesPostoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Thienopyridines: Heterocyclic compounds that contain 4H,5H,6H,7H-thieno[2,3-c]pyridine as part of their structure.Disintegrins: A family of polypeptides purified from snake venoms, which contain the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence. The RGD tripeptide binds to integrin receptors and thus competitively inhibits normal integrin-ligand interactions. Disintegrins thus block adhesive functions and act as platelet aggregation inhibitors.Aminoglycosides: Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Thromboxanes: Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.Biphenyl CompoundsThiazolidines: Reduced (protonated) form of THIAZOLES. They can be oxidized to THIAZOLIDINEDIONES.Creatine Kinase, MB Form: An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.Quinidine: An optical isomer of quinine, extracted from the bark of the CHINCHONA tree and similar plant species. This alkaloid dampens the excitability of cardiac and skeletal muscles by blocking sodium and potassium currents across cellular membranes. It prolongs cellular ACTION POTENTIALS, and decreases automaticity. Quinidine also blocks muscarinic and alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Intracranial Hemorrhages: Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.Mesylates: Organic salts or esters of methanesulfonic acid.Oximes: Compounds that contain the radical R2C=N.OH derived from condensation of ALDEHYDES or KETONES with HYDROXYLAMINE. Members of this group are CHOLINESTERASE REACTIVATORS.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Carboplatin: An organoplatinum compound that possesses antineoplastic activity.Trimethoprim Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of TRIMETHOPRIM.Receptors, Immunologic: Cell surface molecules on cells of the immune system that specifically bind surface molecules or messenger molecules and trigger changes in the behavior of cells. Although these receptors were first identified in the immune system, many have important functions elsewhere.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.
It also serves to transport bacteria from the small intestine to the large intestine and to inhibit the migration of colonic ... Lewis, TD (November 1999). "Morphine and gastroduodenal motility". Digestive diseases and sciences. 44 (11): 2178-86. PMID ... Phase III - A few minutes of peak electrical and mechanical activity, and; Phase IV - Declining activity which merges with the ... "Effectiveness of prokinetic agents against diseases external to the gastrointestinal tract" (PDF). J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 24 ...
This shows as a white blemish on x-rays.) Stage IIIA Lunate collapse and fragmentation, in addition to proximal migration of ... Some Kienböck's patients present with an abnormally large difference in length between the radius and the ulna, termed "ulnar ... Left hand x-ray with Kienbock's Disease showing 4 mm negative ulnar variance and Kienbock's Disease Stage IIIB Left hand x-ray ... Kienböck's disease is a disorder of the wrist. It is named for Dr. Robert Kienböck, a radiologist in Vienna, Austria who ...
Zoonoses and communicable diseases common to man and animals Pfau, C.J., Bergold, G.H., Casals, J., Johnson, K.M., Murphy, F.A ... June 1993 saw a bigger outbreak, as 55 humans died as well as 66 equine deaths[citation needed]. A much larger outbreak in ... 2009). "Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of Mucambo virus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis complex subtype IIIA) in Trinidad ... People with weakened immune systems and the young and the elderly can become severely ill or die from this disease. The virus ...
This large group is found only in eukaryotes and is further divided into two groups.. P5A ATPases (or Type VA) are involved in ... Mutations in these pumps are linked to a variety of neurological diseases. In addition to the subfamilies of P-type ATPases ... P3A ATPases (or Type IIIA) contain the plasma membrane H+-ATPases from prokaryotes, protists, plants and fungi. Plasma membrane ... The P-type ATPases, also known as E1-E2 ATPases, are a large group of evolutionarily related ion and lipid pumps that are found ...
Cancer screening uses medical tests to detect disease in large groups of people who have no symptoms. For individuals with high ... Stage IIIA lung cancer Stage IIIA lung cancer, if there is one feature from the list on each side Stage IIIA lung cancer Stage ... Most cases arise in the larger airways (primary and secondary bronchi). Sixty to seventy percent have extensive disease (which ... In limited-stage disease, PCI increases three-year survival from 15% to 20%; in extensive disease, one-year survival increases ...
Plant Disease 92(6): 976-976. A. E. Mayfield IIIa, J. E. Peñab, J. H. Craneb, J. A. Smithc, C. L. Branchd, E. D. Ottosond, and ... Avocado represents the second-largest fruit crop in Florida, after citrus. In 2007, an avocado tree near Jacksonville, FL was ... Laurel wilt, also called laurel wilt disease, is a vascular disease caused by the fungus Raffaelea lauricola, which is ... The disease affects and kills members of the laurel family. The avocado is perhaps the most commercially valuable plant ...
The patients of this study were in stage IB, II, or IIIA of non-small cell lung cancer. Many patients receive surgery, but the ... It is important to be able to predict APS and venous thrombosis because it will help with the management of the disease. This ... This article was retracted because a large part of the article was based on another article that Potti had written and had ... large specialised databases) as well as bioinformatics occurred. Dr. Robert Califf's comments about TMQF only addresses data ...
40 mg of aspirin a day is able to inhibit a large proportion of maximum thromboxane A2 release provoked acutely, with the ... Platelet aggregation is achieved by mediating expression of the glycoprotein complex GP IIb/IIIa in the cell membrane of ... is probable reason why the TxA is pathogenic in various diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury., hepatic inflammatory ... suppression of platelet thromboxane throughout the dosing interval and appears not to increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) ...
The organisms enter through the digestive tract and must be ingested in large numbers to cause disease in healthy adults. An ... The six main recognised subspecies are: enterica (serotype I), salamae (serotype II), arizonae (IIIa), diarizonae (IIIb), ... 6 and § 7 of the German law on infectious disease prevention, Infektionsschutzgesetz Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ... "Invasive non-typhoidal salmonella disease: an emerging and neglected tropical disease in Africa". The Lancet. 379: 2489-2499. ...
... activated platelets with exposed GPIIb/IIIa can bind fibrinogen to aggregate. GPIIb/IIIa may also further anchor the platelets ... Role in non-hematologic diseasesEdit. InflammationEdit. In addition to being the cellular effector of hemostasis, platelets are ... They gather at the site and unless the interruption is physically too large, they plug the hole. First, platelets attach to ... GPIIb/IIIa activationEdit. Collagen-mediated GPVI signalling increases the platelet production of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and ...
The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and IIIA, ... Low albumin (hypoalbuminemia) may be caused by liver disease, nephrotic syndrome, burns, protein-losing enteropathy, ... Serum albumin is the most abundant blood plasma protein and is produced in the liver and forms a large proportion of all plasma ...
Yu W, Andersson B, Worley KC, Muzny DM, Ding Y, Liu W, Ricafrente JY, Wentland MA, Lennon G, Gibbs RA (Apr 1997). "Large-scale ... and transcription factor IIIA proteins. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants encoding the same protein ... "Lack of association of mutations in optineurin with disease in patients with adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma". Archives ... a high-throughput mutagenesis project to generate and distribute animal models of disease to interested scientists - at the ...
In a larger study from Finland the average size of a male breast cancer lesion was 1.8 cm. Beside the histologic examination ... Locally recurrent disease is treated with surgical excision or radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. Distant metastases ... In IIIA there is breast cancer with axillary lymph nodes clumped together or attached to other structures. In IIIB the tumor ... High estrogen exposure may occur by medications, obesity, or liver disease, and genetic links include a high prevalence of ...
The microbubble's large size relative to other drug delivery vehicles like liposomes may allow a greater amount of drug to be ... Despite the high shear stress at the thrombus area, the GPIIb/IIIa-targeted microbubbles will specifically bind to activated ... Inflammation: Contrast agents may be designed to bind to certain proteins that become expressed in inflammatory diseases such ... Targeting ligands that bind to receptors characteristic of intravascular diseases can be conjugated to microbubbles, enabling ...
"Hepatitis A." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015. Web. 25 Oct. 2016. ... HAV is excreted in large quantities about 11 days prior to the appearance of symptoms or anti-HAV IgM antibodies in the blood. ... The mean age of genotypes III and IIIA strains has been estimated to be 592 and 202 years, respectively. Hepatovirus A is a ... Hepatitis A is an infectious disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Many cases have few or no symptoms, ...
Yogalingam G, Hopwood JJ (Oct 2001). "Molecular genetics of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and IIIB: Diagnostic, clinical, and ... is a lysosomal storage disease due to impaired degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III includes 4 types, each due to the ... "Analysis of Sanfilippo A gene mutations in a large pedigree". Clinical Genetics. 63 (4): 314-8. doi:10.1034/j.1399-0004.2003. ... but only mild somatic disease. Onset of clinical features usually occurs between 2 and 6 years; severe neurologic degeneration ...
1,082 patients with NSCLC in stages IIIA (non-resectable), IIIB or IV will be evaluated in the study. The study is sponsored by ... or stable disease with standard first-line treatment is underway in Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore ... and is currently being tested in a large, multinational study for the same indication. Gangliosides are concentrated on the ... slowing disease progression and ultimately increasing patient survival. Racotumomab triggers an immune response against the ...
Cardiopulmonary bypass surgery can result in destruction of a large proportion of the patient's platelets and may render the ... and this complicates processing and increases the risk of diseases that can be spread in transfused blood, such as human ... patients are given recombinant human factor VIIa since the underlying cause are antibodies to platelet glycoproteins IIb/IIIa. ... However, with some more severe disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia, transfusions with large amount of platelets may be ...
Metabolic disease (gout, chondrocalcinosis). *Capsulitis, synovitis. *Ankylosis (fibrous or bony). *Fracture. *Absent, large, ... for group IIIa.[10] ... IIIa. Arthralgia: *Pain in one or both joint sites (lateral ... Degenerative joint disease[edit]. The general term "degenerative joint disease" refers to arthritis (both osteoarthritis and ... Rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune joint disease, can also affect the TMJs. Degenerative joint diseases may lead to defects in ...
Jupiter - or Sol V. The largest gas giant in the Sol System. The EMH was developed at Jupiter Station which orbits the planet. ... Ira Graves, a genius physicist who was dying of Varnay's disease. He cheated death by uploading his consciousness into the ... Zek's servant Maihar'du is a Hupyrian.[citation needed] Hurada III Hurkos III - A non-aligned world where the negotiator ... Kolandra - Cardassian controlled planet featured in the DS9 episode "Afterimage." Kolarus III - A planet near the Romulan ...
It is characterized by a defect in GPIIb/IIIa fibrinogen receptor complex. When GPIIb/IIIa receptor is dysfunctional, ... Thrombin has a large array of functions, not only the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the building block of a hemostatic ... In this disease, there is a defect in von Willebrand factor (vWF), which mediates the binding of glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) to ... Von Willebrand disease is due to deficiency or abnormal function of von Willebrand factor, and leads to a similar bleeding ...
The largest "employers" of 1944 were mining (160,000), agriculture (138,000) and the metal industry (131,000). No less than ... A total of 38,383 Soviet POWs were held Stalag II B. Stalag III-A: Mortality rates of Soviet prisoners were extremely high ... The majority of these prisoners (up to 12,000) were killed, starved to death or died from disease. Stalag IV-A: In June- ... In the summer and autumn of 1941, vast numbers of Soviet prisoners were captured in about a dozen large encirclements. Due to ...
... the largest single military effort taken by any European resistance movement during World War II and the largest scale World ... On June 2, 2016, Piotrowski died of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He is survived by his two daughters, Aleksandra and ... Stalag III-A in Luckenwalde 1939-1945] (in German). Metropol. p. 27. ... http://www.lamsdorf.com/history.html Mai, Uwe (1999). Kriegsgefangen in Brandenburg : Stalag III-A in Luckenwalde 1939-1945 [ ...
... activated platelets with exposed GPIIb/IIIa can bind fibrinogen to aggregate. GPIIb/IIIa may also further anchor the platelets ... In the US, a unit of whole blood is placed into a large centrifuge in what is referred to as a "soft spin." At these settings, ... This means that a recipient is not exposed to as many different donors and has less risk of transfusion-transmitted disease and ... They gather at the site and unless the interruption is physically too large, they plug the hole. First, platelets attach to ...
L basic model LA improved L with faired fuselage A.I with Oberursel U.0 engine A.II with Oberursel U.I engine E.III - A Pfalz A ... Built by Morane-Saulnier, large numbers of the Type L were ordered by the French Aviation Militaire at the outbreak of the war ... The Ottoman Army 1914-1918: Disease and Death on the Battlefield. Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing, 1994. ISBN 978-0-87480-923-7. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2008-09-09].. *^ FDA Backgrounder on Platinum in Silicone Breast Implants. U.S. ... V. Perchloric Acid and Chloroplatinic Acid in the Determination of Small Amounts of Potassium in the Presence of Large Amounts ... IIIA. 13 IVA. 14 VA. 15 VIA. 16 VIIA. 17 VIIIA. 18 ...
Pseudo-von Willibrand Disease) Other Inherited Defects of Platelet Receptors Defects in Signal Transduction Platelet Storage ... Defective Glycoprotein Ib/IX Complex Platelet-Type von Willebrand Disease ( ... Hematologic manifestations of this disease are characterized by the presence of large intracytoplasmic granules in leukocytes, ... GPIIb/IIIa, CD41b »80,000 Fibrinogen, VWF, fibronectin α V β 3 »500 Vitronectin, osteopontin ...
Stage I (T1c)-IIIA disease meeting the following criteria:. - Large enough (> 1 cm) to undergo additional multiple core needle ... pathways important in the genesis and progression of disease in women with stage I-IIIA. breast cancer by examining components ... disease) or full axillary dissection (for patients with node-positive disease) on day 0.. Patients undergo 3-dimensional image ... DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:. - Diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the breast. - ...
RT: EBRT with HDR VBT; if large volume cervix disease, can consider preop RT ... Stage IIIA *Surgery: TH/BSO, infragastric omentectomy, P/PALND, peritoneal cytology. *RT *Serosa alone: pelvic EBT with HDR VBT ...
large cell lung cancer. stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. adenocarcinoma of the lung. bronchoalveolar cell lung cancer. ... DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:. * Histologically or cytologically proven newly diagnosed, stage IIIA (T1-3, N2) non-small cell lung ... Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Carcinoma, Bronchogenic. Bronchial Neoplasms. Etoposide. Antineoplastic Agents, ... Chemotherapy Plus Radiation Therapy With or Without Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer. ...
DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:. - Histologically or cytologically proven newly diagnosed, stage IIIA (T1-3, N2). non-small cell lung ... for nodes larger than 1 cm on contrast CT scan. - Surgery waived if nodes negative or no larger than 1 cm on CT scan. - ... Measurable or evaluable disease on chest x-ray and/or contrast CT scan. - Contrast thoracic CT required to complete staging. - ... No peptic ulcer disease under active treatment. - No other medical illness not controllable by appropriate medical therapy. - ...
stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. squamous cell lung cancer. large cell lung cancer ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Lung Cancer Pulmonary Complications Other: educational intervention Other: ... In both arms, intervention continues in the absence of disease progression or the development of other medical conditions that ... Must have achieved a complete response, partial response, or stable disease after treatment ...
Surgery is more widely used for stage IIIA disease. Patients with nodal stage 2 (N2) disease represent the largest population ... and had a higher incidence of coronary artery disease (42.5% versus 14.6%, p < 0.0001), pulmonary disease (26.6% versus 8.4%, p ... Sclerosing Peritonitis After Kidney Transplantation: A Not-So-Silky Cocoon DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES Morrow, E. H., Gallo ... Patients with HCC larger than the proposed Milan and University of California, San Francisco, criteria experienced good 5-year ...
In both groups, African-American patients had larger and later-stage tumors (IIIA) (adjuvant P=0.017; neoadjuvant P=0.051) and ... These patients had more advanced clinical-stage disease, larger primary tumors, and higher rates of estrogen receptor-negative ... In addition, they wrote "African-American patients had more advanced disease at the time of treatment. We were not able to ... Of the African-American women, 22% had tumors larger than 5 cm compared with 13% of the Caucasian women. In the neoadjuvant ...
AAVrh10 Vector Corrects Disease Pathology in MPS IIIA Mice and Achieves Widespread Distribution of SGSH in Large Animal Brains. ... Epidemiology of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease in Olmsted County.. Suwabe T, Shukoor S, Chamberlain AM, Killian ...
R0/R1 resection is deemed possible but the prognosis is poor: extensive nodal disease; large type-3 or type-4 tumors. ... The patients tested in the ACTS-GC trial were those with a tumor of pathological stage II, IIIA, or IIIB excluding T1, defined ... with unresectable T4b disease, extensive nodal disease, hepatic metastases, peritoneal dissemination, or other M1 disease. ... Incidence of lymph node metastasis from early gastric cancer: estimation with a large number of cases at two large centers. ...
These subspecies were found to cause significantly more frequent invasive disease (e.g., bacteremia) than did Salmonella ... to 60-year-old age group were more likely to have disease caused by subspecies IIIa or IIIb, whereas those ,1 year of age were ... Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed salmonellae data (,75,000 isolates) collected by a large state laboratory over 25 years. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ...
... of the mutations causing MPS IIIA described so far are missense mutations and that recent studies on a large cohort of MPS IIIA ... Similarly, in MPS-IIIA-affected subjects, NAbs in serum were higher than in the CSF, suggesting that the disease did not alter ... Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA), or Sanfilippo syndrome IIIA, is an autosomic recessive LSD caused by the deficiency ... A fluorimetric enzyme assay for the diagnosis of Sanfilippo disease type A (MPS IIIA). J Inherit Metab Dis. 1996;19(3):278-285. ...
... or Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Grade I-IIIa Follicular Lymphoma ... avid disease on PET/CT; patients that have involvement with large cell lymphoma are not eligible ... Patients must have follicular lymphoma (grade I, II or IIIa) confirmed at initial diagnosis and at relapse with identifiable ... All disease must be assessed and documented on the S1608 FDG-PET/CT assessment form ...
ELIGIBLE DISEASE STAGES: Inoperable IIIA and selected IIIB. * Generally, patients entered must be considered unresectable or ... Adenocarcinoma of the Lung Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer Large Cell Lung Cancer Squamous Cell ... Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Carcinoma, Bronchogenic. Bronchial Neoplasms. Carcinoma. Neoplasms, Glandular and ... Patients with contralateral mediastinal disease (N3) are eligible if all gross disease can be encompassed in the radiation ...
A large comprehensive genetic susceptibility study is warranted, in which GSTM1 and CYP1A1 genotypes and microsomal epoxide ... We also examined the presence of rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles in patients stratified by stage of disease at diagnosis (stage Ia, 14 ... stage Ib, 60; stage II, 19; stage IIIa, 50; stage IIIb, 43; and stage IV, 47), histological subtype (squamous cell carcinoma, ... Several minisatellites associated with specific genes have been involved in diverse diseases, such as HRAS1 in multiple cancer ...
The guidelines also recommend a consultation with a radiation oncologist for stage IIIA disease to see if there is a role for ... Both large national data collections and individual trial data demonstrate that postoperative radiotherapy for patients who had ... To those who are still going to say that disease-free survival is not the proper endpoint, I ask you to both listen and speak ... These results do two things: justify testing in every patient with resected lung cancer for EGFR-mutant disease, and if so, ...
Background Treatment with anti-B cell antibody rituximab may ameliorate the disease course in a subgroup of patients with ... Moreover, other studies with relatively large sample sizes found similar associations of rituximab efficacy in patients with ... Correlation of FcγRIIA-R/H131 and FcγR IIIA-F/V158 polymorphisms with treatment response. Six patients (22%) had an FcγRIIA-R/ ... Fcγ receptor IIIA genotype is associated with rituximab response in antimyelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy ...
... and dose-dependent reduction of underlying disease pathology,... ... and dose-dependent reduction of underlying disease pathology ... ABO-102 results presented at WORLDSymposium for Lysosomal Diseases show significant time- ... ABO-102 results presented at WORLDSymposium for Lysosomal Diseases show significant time- ... "The large reductions in heparan sulfate in both CSF and urine, significant organ changes and demonstration of neurocognitive ...
large platelets; deficiency of glycoprotein Ib (GpIb), the receptor for vWF. Bruton disease. pan hypogammaglobulinemia but ... lack of the platelet membrane glycoprotein GPIIb- IIIa; failure of clot retraction; AR genetic disorder that presents with ... Association of congenital heart diseases: TORCH?. PDA. Association of congenital heart diseases: CHARGE?. TOF and septal ... Association of congenital heart diseases: Mothers with DM?. TGA, CoA. Association of congenital heart diseases: Phenytoin and ...
... disease (COPD) noticed gradually increasing lumps in her neck for about 1 month. She also complained of decreased appetite but ... diffuse large B cell lymphoma with clinical stage IIIA disease. Her IPI score was 1 and she was started on standard ... diffuse large B cell lymphoma with clinical stage IIIA disease. Her IPI score was 1 and she was started on standard ... The 2-year event-free survival and OS were significantly better in patients with early PET-negative disease compared with PET- ...
The Italian patient had recently begun chemotherapy (Table footnote) for stage IIIA diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which had ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control ... Barbara L. Herwaldt, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Parasitic Diseases, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Mailstop ... Herwaldt is a medical epidemiologist in the Parasitic Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Division of Parasitic Diseases, Centers for ...
Most cases of stage IIIA NSCLC are not surgically resectable because of the large extent of disease. Stage IIIA NSCLC often ... Stage IIIA Lung Cancer. Stage IIIA NSCLC is a large tumor with invasion or lymph node involvement in the central chest region ( ... Second line treatment is treatment for disease progression or recurrence. The physician does a complete review of the disease, ... If the disease recurs at the same site, the area may be treated with local radiation therapy. Patients may be asked to ...
A two-stent strategy should be considered upfront for lesions with difficult wiring or large SB with extensive disease ... ACT, activated clotting time; GPIIb/IIIa, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa; IABP, intra-aortic balloon pump; IVUS, intravascular ... 15 The risk of perforation is also increased when treating complex coronary disease (CTOs) and concomitant use of GPIIb/IIIa ... Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibition with coronary stenting for acute myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med 2001;344:1895- ...
But it has two very large targets-the cure for MPS IIIA and MPS IIIB and revolutionizing the $1.5 billion ($1.5B) plasma space ... I also want to point out both MPS IIIA and MPS IIIB received the orphan drug and rare pediatric disease designations. Recently ... Plus, it can license its antibody library at a large profit.. TLSR: Are there any other companies you want to talk about today? ... CL: It is intended to completely cure MPS IIIA, as well as MPS IIIB, with a single dose! PlasmaTech is meeting with the FDA ...
... diagnosis of the disease still rests on the identification of the Reed-Sternberg cell. This distinctive, though nonspecific, ... Although there have been many advances in the treatment of Hodgkins disease, ... Nodular sclerosis Hodgkins disease may be difficult to distinguish from large-cell lymphoma, especially if there are many ... Stein RS, Golomb HM, Wiernik PH, et al: Anatomic substages of stage IIIA Hodgkins. disease: Follow-up of a collaborative study ...
  • Beginning within 24 hours of the first dose of chemotherapy, patients undergo induction radiotherapy 5 days a week for 5 weeks in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients with unresectable disease or who are medically unfit for or refuse resection receive 2 additional courses of chemotherapy alone beginning immediately after completion of course 2. (knowcancer.com)
  • This randomized phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab with or without umbralisib, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. (cancer.gov)
  • It is not yet known whether giving obinutuzumab with or without umbralisib, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma. (cancer.gov)
  • For such disease, various treatment modalities may be used, such as systemic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). (oncotarget.com)
  • Over the past 5 years, results from several large trials assessing the use of adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer have become available. (jnccn.org)
  • Both large national data collections and individual trial data demonstrate that postoperative radiotherapy for patients who had mediastinal lymph nodes at surgery also improved outcomes, both local and systemic. (medscape.com)
  • Staging of the disease followed by CAT scanning of the upper and lower abdomen and of the retroperitoneal space showed multiple, enlarged bilateral para-aortic, and mesenteric lymph nodes. (ispub.com)
  • Only 5 to 10% of breast cancers occur in women with a clearly defined genetic predisposition for the disease. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • GSD III is a genetic disorder and it is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease. (agsdus.org)
  • Previous findings surrounding this genetic variant have been inconsistent and the study at King's represents the first large-scale meta-analysis of the literature, including over 50,000 participants from a combined total of 82 studies. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • A team of Canadian and Japanese researchers has identified the genetic mutation responsible for glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit in northern Quebec, Canada, in a study published in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal ). (news-medical.net)
  • This discovery will help interested families and communities receive genetic counselling and screening to help identify and manage the disease,' states Dr. Celia Rodd, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. (news-medical.net)
  • The researchers suggest that early screening, including genetic testing of family members of affected children, may detect the disease in people who were asymptomatic as babies. (news-medical.net)
  • CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 02, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:SRPT), the leader in precision genetic medicine for rare diseases and Aldevron, the leading producer of custom nucleic acids, proteins, and antibodies for the biotechnology industry, announced today that they have entered into a long-term strategic relationship for the supply of plasmid DNA to fulfill Sarepta's needs for its gene therapy clinical trials and commercial supply. (ptcommunity.com)
  • Sarepta is at the forefront of precision genetic medicine, having built an impressive and competitive position in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and more recently in gene therapies for 5 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy diseases (LGMD), Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT), MPS IIIA, Pompe and other CNS-related disorders, totaling over 20 therapies in various stages of development. (ptcommunity.com)
  • Sarepta is fueled by an audacious but important mission: to profoundly improve and extend the lives of patients with rare genetic-based diseases. (ptcommunity.com)
  • Genetic diseases are determined by the combination of genes for a particular trait that are on the chromosomes received from the father and the mother. (rarediseases.org)
  • People interested in obtaining more specific information about genetic testing and/or carrier screening for MPS IIIA should speak with a genetics professional. (cdc.gov)
  • Although there have been many advances in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, diagnosis of the disease still rests on the identification of the Reed-Sternberg cell. (cancernetwork.com)
  • This article proposes a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease in the UK based on the best available evidence to date, and highlights areas of practice where evidence is anecdotal or based on retrospective data. (bmj.com)
  • Despite intensive research into the illness the cause remains unknown, and although there have been significant improvements in diagnosis and treatment of children with the disease there are still a number of important unanswered questions regarding therapy. (bmj.com)
  • There is no diagnostic test for KD, therefore diagnosis is based on clinical criteria (table 1) 2 and the exclusion of other diseases, particularly sepsis. (bmj.com)
  • One patient developed a diffuse large cell lymphoma 48 months after the diagnosis of HD. (nih.gov)
  • A clear understanding of HCC stages at first diagnosis and most frequent primary treatments may help guide clinical practice when treating and managing this complicated disease. (oncotarget.com)
  • The American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines was formed to make recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • Unstable angina (UA) and the closely related condition non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are very common manifestations of this disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • Aspirin (or another oral antiplatelet drug) is protective in most types of patient at increased risk of occlusive vascular events, including those with an acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke, unstable or stable angina, previous myocardial infarction, stroke or cerebral ischaemia, peripheral arterial disease, or atrial fibrillation. (bmj.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Serum specimens from the patients were tested at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in serial fourfold dilutions by indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) testing for reactivity to B. microti ( 11 ), WA1 ( 8 ), and B. divergens antigens. (cdc.gov)
  • MPS IIIA is caused by mutations in the SGSH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. (cdc.gov)
  • These subspecies were found to cause significantly more frequent invasive disease (e.g., bacteremia) than did Salmonella subspecies I strains. (cdc.gov)
  • Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium that can cause listeriosis, a life-threatening invasive disease in humans and animals. (asm.org)
  • An invasive disease is one that spreads to surrounding tissues. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Therefore, we decided to investigate methylation of multiple genes in a large sample collection of primary resected NSCLCs and their associated nonmalignant lung tissues, for which we also had clinical data and results about certain other molecular abnormalities. (aacrjournals.org)
  • We have many case series (from my institution and elsewhere) and some trials showing that gefitinib and erlotinib clearly improved disease-free survival [in lung cancer]. (medscape.com)
  • These results do two things: justify testing in every patient with resected lung cancer for EGFR -mutant disease, and if so, treatment. (medscape.com)
  • In five to 10 years, as the Baby Boomers age, cancer may be treated as an ordinary disease. (equities.com)
  • In 2017, there were an estimated 222,500 new cases and 155,870 deaths due to the disease, representing approximately 25.9% of all cancer related deaths, and 6% of all deaths in the U.S. Deaths from lung cancer exceed the combined deaths from breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • The term "oncotarget" encompasses all molecules, pathways, cellular functions, cell types, and even tissues that can be viewed as targets relevant to cancer as well as other diseases. (oncotarget.com)
  • Stroke is the third largest cause of death after heart disease and cancer. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • We remind investors that the drug is already approved for seven types of cancer indications in several settings including first-line melanoma and recently approved cervical cancer and large-cell lymphoma. (zacks.com)
  • Regular screening and being attentive to the symptoms of ovarian cancer is one of the best ways to prevent the disease taking hold. (amazonaws.com)
  • Colorectal cancer is a disease originating from the epithelial cells lining the colon or rectum of the gastrointestinal tract, most frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway that increase signaling activity. (amazonaws.com)
  • Objective: This retrospective study evaluates the survival impact of the residual margin disease after bronchial resection for cancer and suggests tactics in cases of microresidual disease. (elsevier.com)
  • Lung Cancer Diseases and Conditions. (medtronic.com)
  • The Gerson therapy is a complex regimen advocated by its supporters to treat cancer and other degenerative diseases. (uwhealth.org)
  • Gerson observed that cancer patients exhibited markedly degenerated organs, especially the liver, presumably caused by the clearing of toxic materials of an unknown type that the disease produced. (uwhealth.org)
  • After a few decades of focused research and awareness campaigns, it's true that breast cancer isn't the death sentence it used to be - mortality rates in the United States are currently 24 percent lower than they were just 17 years ago, thanks in large part to recent advancements in diagnostic and treatment tools. (redbookmag.com)
  • If you have a strong family history of the disease - two or more first-degree family members, like your mom or sister, have been diagnosed - ask your doctor about more specific diagnostic tests like BRCA gene testing, which looks for hereditary gene mutations that are linked with breast cancer. (redbookmag.com)
  • We conducted a retrospective study on the disease in patients treated at a single cancer institution to determine predictors of outcome. (jcdr.net)
  • The disease is metastatic breast cancer, not bone cancer. (newyorkoncology.com)
  • Here, we demonstrate that intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) administration of serotype 9 adenoassociated viral vectors (AAV9s) encoding sulfamidase corrects both CNS and somatic pathology in MPS IIIA mice. (jci.org)
  • Correction of CNS storage pathology after i.c. delivery of AAV9- Sgsh to male MPS IIIA mice. (jci.org)
  • The third type of Hodgkin's disease, mixed cellularity, has much more variation in cell type, has rare Reed-Sternberg cells, and may be confused with other lymphomas, especially peripheral T-cell lymphoma. (cancernetwork.com)
  • During early years of infancy and childhood, the disease may present clinically just like Type I GSD: small stature, large liver, poor muscle tone (hypotonia) and hypoglycemia. (agsdus.org)
  • Investigators have found evidence in vivo of excess thromboxane release in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular disease. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This population consisted of type 1 and type 2 diabetic men and women, about 48% of whom had a history of cardiovascular disease. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • As the name implies, cells biopsied from this type of chondrosarcoma appear clear with many large vacuoles. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Recently, Carbone et al found that the CD40 antigen is strongly represented on the surface of Reed-Sternberg cells and can help in the distinction between nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease and other lymphoid malignancies . (cancernetwork.com)
  • MacLennan et al have divided nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease into grade-1 and grade-2 histology because they found differences in disease-free and overall survival rates between the two grades . (cancernetwork.com)
  • Aldevron has made significant investments in people, processes and facilities to support the pre-clinical, clinical and commercial production of new, genetically-based therapies that have significant potential in transforming disease. (ptcommunity.com)
  • Limited data are available, however, on the degree to which these guideline-recommended therapies are used consistently in ACS patients with prior vascular disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease is now widely regarded as a B-cell lymphoma and is the only subtype for which the cell of origin is known, although some investigators contest this conclusion [6- (cancernetwork.com)
  • Nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's disease may be difficult to distinguish from large-cell lymphoma, especially if there are many lacunar cells. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Finally, the lymphocyte-depleted form of Hodgkin's disease is rare, partly because many of the cases described in the early literature were mistaken for large-cell lymphoma. (cancernetwork.com)
  • The large reductions in heparan sulfate in both CSF and urine, significant organ changes and demonstration of neurocognitive benefits represent important findings that support our path to regulatory guidance later this year. (globenewswire.com)
  • ABO-102 continues to demonstrate significant dose-dependent and time-dependent responses in measured biomarkers, including rapid and sustained reductions of heparan sulfate (HS), the sugar molecule that is the hallmark of MPS IIIA, in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and urine. (globenewswire.com)
  • Under the terms of the agreement, Aldevron will provide GMP-grade plasmid for Sarepta's micro-dystrophin Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene therapy program and Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) programs, as well as plasmid source material for future gene therapy programs, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth, MPS IIIA, Pompe and other CNS diseases. (ptcommunity.com)
  • A 69-year-old woman with history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) noticed gradually increasing lumps in her neck for about 1 month. (healio.com)
  • and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (healthcanal.com)
  • MPS IIIA male mice were treated with either 5 × 10 9 (low dose, LD) or 5 × 10 10 (high dose, HD) vg of AAV9 vector encoding for murine sulfamidase ( Sgsh ) under the control of a ubiquitous promoter (CAG) or with 5 × 10 10 vg of a noncoding (MPS IIIA-null) vector as a control. (jci.org)
  • In addition to recognition of the Reed-Sternberg cell, the background cells and their ratio to Reed-Sternberg cells are important in the classification of Hodgkin's disease . (cancernetwork.com)
  • The Rye modification divides Hodgkin's disease into four histologic types, named according to their characteristic features: (1) lymphocyte-predominant, (2) nodular sclerosis, (3) mixed cellularity, and (4) lymphocyte-depleted. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Hodgkin's disease is an uncommon disorder. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Even at that point, the benefit of disease-free survival was such that the trial needed to be unblinded and reported. (medscape.com)
  • I was not surprised by the results that showed substantial improvement in disease-free survival, which to me is the absolute most critical thing in these types of trials. (medscape.com)
  • To those who are still going to say that disease-free survival is not the proper endpoint, I ask you to both listen and speak with your patients about their goals of care. (medscape.com)
  • In the case of HIV, using survival as an endpoint would have made drug trials too time-consuming due to the lengthy disease course, too costly due to the high number of required patients, and unethical due to the use of placebo in a lethal condition. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It helps explain how many people are diagnosed with this disease and general survival rates. (cancer.net)
  • Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. (deepdyve.com)
  • Two variants of lymphocyte-predominant disease (nodular and diffuse) have been identified based on different phenotypes and behavioral characteristics. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Muscle weakness (GSD IIIa) is commonly present in childhood and can, at times, become severe in adult age (requiring use of a wheel chair for mobility by 50-60 years). (agsdus.org)
  • 2 Direct person to person spread is not observed, although in Japan the disease occurs more commonly in siblings of index cases with an estimated peak incidence of 8-9% in siblings under the age of 2 years. (bmj.com)
  • At the proximal jejunum there was a larger polypoid haemorrhagic mass about 2,5 cm in diameter (Fig. 1). (ispub.com)