Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Chronic, non-specific inflammation of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Etiology may be genetic or environmental. This term includes CROHN DISEASE and ULCERATIVE COLITIS.Cecal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CECUM.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Intestinal Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Colitis, Ulcerative: Inflammation of the COLON that is predominantly confined to the MUCOSA. Its major symptoms include DIARRHEA, rectal BLEEDING, the passage of MUCUS, and ABDOMINAL PAIN.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Enema: A solution or compound that is introduced into the RECTUM with the purpose of cleansing the COLON or for diagnostic procedures.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Short Bowel Syndrome: A malabsorption syndrome resulting from extensive operative resection of the SMALL INTESTINE, the absorptive region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Dimethylhydrazines: Hydrazines substituted with two methyl groups in any position.Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.Sigmoid Diseases: Pathological processes in the SIGMOID COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Colonic Polyps: Discrete tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the COLON. These POLYPS are connected to the wall of the colon either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A type of ILEUS, a functional not mechanical obstruction of the INTESTINES. This syndrome is caused by a large number of disorders involving the smooth muscles (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) or the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Senna Extract: Preparations of Cassia senna and C. angustifolia (see SENNA PLANT). They contain sennosides, which are anthraquinone type CATHARTICS and are used in many different preparations as laxatives.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Megacolon: Dilatation of the COLON, often to alarming dimensions. There are various types of megacolon including congenital megacolon in HIRSCHSPRUNG DISEASE, idiopathic megacolon in CONSTIPATION, and TOXIC MEGACOLON.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.1,2-Dimethylhydrazine: A DNA alkylating agent that has been shown to be a potent carcinogen and is widely used to induce colon tumors in experimental animals.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Defecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Sigmoid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SIGMOID COLON.Rectal Diseases: Pathological developments in the RECTUM region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Amylose: An unbranched glucan in starch.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Gastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Diatrizoate Meglumine: A versatile contrast medium used for DIAGNOSTIC X-RAY RADIOLOGY.Sigmoidoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.Actinomycetaceae: A family of bacteria including numerous parasitic and pathogenic forms.Colon, Transverse: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between ASCENDING COLON and DESCENDING COLON. It passes from the RIGHT COLIC FLEXURE across the ABDOMEN, then turns sharply at the left colonic flexure into the descending colon.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction: Functional obstruction of the COLON leading to MEGACOLON in the absence of obvious COLONIC DISEASES or mechanical obstruction. When this condition is acquired, acute, and coexisting with another medical condition (trauma, surgery, serious injuries or illness, or medication), it is called Ogilvie's syndrome.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Proctitis: INFLAMMATION of the MUCOUS MEMBRANE of the RECTUM, the distal end of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Eubacterium: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of man and animals, animal and plant products, infections of soft tissue, and soil. Some species may be pathogenic. No endospores are produced. The genus Eubacterium should not be confused with EUBACTERIA, one of the three domains of life.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Colitis, Ischemic: Inflammation of the COLON due to colonic ISCHEMIA resulting from alterations in systemic circulation or local vasculature.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Intestinal Volvulus: A twisting in the intestine (INTESTINES) that can cause INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Diverticulosis, Colonic: A pathological condition characterized by the presence of a number of COLONIC DIVERTICULA in the COLON. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial, including colon aging, motor dysfunction, increases in intraluminal pressure, and lack of dietary fibers.Cathartics: Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.Triacetin: A triglyceride that is used as an antifungal agent.Clostridium: A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Diverticulum, Colon: A pouch or sac opening from the COLON.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Butyrates: Derivatives of BUTYRIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxypropane structure.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Choristoma: A mass of histologically normal tissue present in an abnormal location.Bifidobacterium: A rod-shaped, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacterium that is a genus of the family Bifidobacteriaceae, order Bifidobacteriales, class ACTINOBACTERIA. It inhabits the intestines and feces of humans as well as the human vagina.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Azoxymethane: A potent carcinogen and neurotoxic compound. It is particularly effective in inducing colon carcinomas.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Deoxycholic Acid: A bile acid formed by bacterial action from cholate. It is usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. Deoxycholic acid acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for intestinal absorption, is reabsorbed itself, and is used as a choleretic and detergent.Adenomatous Polyps: Benign neoplasms derived from glandular epithelium. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Neurogenic Bowel: Loss or absence of normal intestinal function due to nerve damage or birth defects. It is characterized by the inability to control the elimination of stool from the body.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Cholelithiasis: Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, usually in the gallbladder (CHOLECYSTOLITHIASIS) or the common bile duct (CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS).Methylnitrosourea: A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Capsule Endoscopy: Non-invasive, endoscopic imaging by use of VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPES to perform examination of the gastrointestinal tract, especially the small bowel.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Propionates: Derivatives of propionic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxyethane structure.Contraceptives, Oral: Compounds, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. The hormones are generally estrogen or progesterone or both.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Lactulose: A synthetic disaccharide used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy. It has also been used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p887)North CarolinaGastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Cellulose: A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.Bisacodyl: A diphenylmethane stimulant laxative used for the treatment of CONSTIPATION and for bowel evacuation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p871)Hormone Replacement Therapy: Therapeutic use of hormones to alleviate the effects of hormone deficiency.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Adenomatous Polyposis Coli: A polyposis syndrome due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the APC genes (GENES, APC) on CHROMOSOME 5. The syndrome is characterized by the development of hundreds of ADENOMATOUS POLYPS in the COLON and RECTUM of affected individuals by early adulthood.Echogenic Bowel: A PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY finding of excessively dense fetal bowel due to MECONIUM buildup.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Rats, Inbred F344Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Intestinal Atresia: Congenital obliteration of the lumen of the intestine, with the ILEUM involved in 50% of the cases and the JEJUNUM and DUODENUM following in frequency. It is the most frequent cause of INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION in NEWBORNS. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.S100 Proteins: A family of highly acidic calcium-binding proteins found in large concentration in the brain and believed to be glial in origin. They are also found in other organs in the body. They have in common the EF-hand motif (EF HAND MOTIFS) found on a number of calcium binding proteins. The name of this family derives from the property of being soluble in a 100% saturated ammonium sulfate solution.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Ileitis: Inflammation of any segment of the ILEUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Ileus: A condition caused by the lack of intestinal PERISTALSIS or INTESTINAL MOTILITY without any mechanical obstruction. This interference of the flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS often leads to INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION. Ileus may be classified into postoperative, inflammatory, metabolic, neurogenic, and drug-induced.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Fecal Incontinence: Failure of voluntary control of the anal sphincters, with involuntary passage of feces and flatus.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Intussusception: A form of intestinal obstruction caused by the PROLAPSE of a part of the intestine into the adjoining intestinal lumen. There are four types: colic, involving segments of the LARGE INTESTINE; enteric, involving only the SMALL INTESTINE; ileocecal, in which the ILEOCECAL VALVE prolapses into the CECUM, drawing the ILEUM along with it; and ileocolic, in which the ileum prolapses through the ileocecal valve into the COLON.Laxatives: Agents that produce a soft formed stool, and relax and loosen the bowels, typically used over a protracted period, to relieve CONSTIPATION.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Dextran Sulfate: Long-chain polymer of glucose containing 17-20% sulfur. It has been used as an anticoagulant and also has been shown to inhibit the binding of HIV-1 to CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. It is commonly used as both an experimental and clinical laboratory reagent and has been investigated for use as an antiviral agent, in the treatment of hypolipidemia, and for the prevention of free radical damage, among other applications.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid: A reagent that is used to neutralize peptide terminal amino groups.Azathioprine: An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Flatulence: Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.Malabsorption Syndromes: General term for a group of MALNUTRITION syndromes caused by failure of normal INTESTINAL ABSORPTION of nutrients.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Aminosalicylic Acids: A group of 2-hydroxybenzoic acids that can be substituted by amino groups at any of the 3-, 4-, 5-, or 6-positions.Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Sulfasalazine: A drug that is used in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases. Its activity is generally considered to lie in its metabolic breakdown product, 5-aminosalicylic acid (see MESALAMINE) released in the colon. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p907)6-Mercaptopurine: An antimetabolite antineoplastic agent with immunosuppressant properties. It interferes with nucleic acid synthesis by inhibiting purine metabolism and is used, usually in combination with other drugs, in the treatment of or in remission maintenance programs for leukemia.Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion: Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)Gastroschisis: A congenital defect with major fissure in the ABDOMINAL WALL lateral to, but not at, the UMBILICUS. This results in the extrusion of VISCERA. Unlike OMPHALOCELE, herniated structures in gastroschisis are not covered by a sac or PERITONEUM.Enteric Nervous System: Two ganglionated neural plexuses in the gut wall which form one of the three major divisions of the autonomic nervous system. The enteric nervous system innervates the gastrointestinal tract, the pancreas, and the gallbladder. It contains sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons. Thus the circuitry can autonomously sense the tension and the chemical environment in the gut and regulate blood vessel tone, motility, secretions, and fluid transport. The system is itself governed by the central nervous system and receives both parasympathetic and sympathetic innervation. (From Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, Principles of Neural Science, 3d ed, p766)Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Endoscopy of the small intestines accomplished while advancing the endoscope into the intestines from the stomach by alternating the inflation of two balloons, one on an innertube of the endoscope and the other on an overtube.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Antidiarrheals: Miscellaneous agents found useful in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea. They have no effect on the agent(s) that cause diarrhea, but merely alleviate the condition.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Ileocecal Valve: The valve, at the junction of the CECUM with the COLON, that guards the opening where the ILEUM enters the LARGE INTESTINE.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Hypnosis: A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.
"Polyps in the colon (large bowel)". Retrieved 2010-04-13.. *^ "Colonic Polyps". Retrieved 2010-04-13.. ... Larger tubular adenomatous polyps have an increased risk of malignancy when larger because then they develop more villous ... Commonly occurring, they are experienced by up to 10% of women.[13] They may have a large flat base (sessile) or be attached to ... Inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers, infections, mucosal prolapse Tubular Adenoma (Villous, Tubulovillous) Tubular glands with ...
Truswell, AS (Mar 2002). "Meat consumption and cancer of the large bowel". European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 56 (Suppl 1 ... and that removing this protection accumulates large concentrations of BaP. Unless CYP1B1 is also knocked out, toxicity results ...
This article is about ischemia of the small bowel. For ischemia of the large bowel, see ischemic colitis. ... However, if bowel has become necrotic, the only treatment is surgical removal of the dead segments of bowel. ... and bowel motility decreases, resulting in abdominal bloating, no further bloody stools, and absent bowel sounds on exam. ... Computed tomography (CT scan) is often used.[22][23] The accuracy of the CT scan depends on whether a small bowel obstruction ( ...
Meat consumption and cancer of the large bowel. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002 Mar;56 Suppl 1:S19-24. PMID ...
Large bowel obstruction[edit]. Upright abdominal X-ray of a person with a large bowel obstruction showing multiple air fluid ... Sepsis, bowel ischemia, bowel perforation[1]. Causes. Adhesions, hernias, volvulus, endometriosis, inflammatory bowel disease, ... Proximal obstruction of the large bowel may present as small bowel obstruction.[citation needed] ... Either the small bowel or large bowel may be affected.[1] Signs and symptoms include abdominal pain, vomiting, bloating and not ...
"Do the urinary bladder and large bowel interact, in sickness or in health? ICI-RS 2011". Neurourology and Urodynamics. 31 (3): ... A large body of literature has demonstrated that such ΔFosB induction in D1-type [nucleus accumbens] neurons increases an ...
"Polyps in the colon (large bowel)". Retrieved 2010-04-13. "Colonic Polyps". Retrieved 2010-04-13. "Management of Colonic Polyps ... Larger tubular adenomatous polyps have an increased risk of malignancy when larger because then they develop more villous ... Most polyps are larger than nodules, which are more similar to callouses on the vocal folds. Polyps and nodules can exhibit ... Sessile polyps larger than 2 cm usually contain villous features, have a higher malignant potential, and tend to recur ...
Randal Bollinger R, Barbas AS, Bush EL, Lin SS, Parker W (December 2007). "Biofilms in the large bowel suggest an apparent ... "Largest appendix removed". Guinness World Records. Retrieved 22 May 2017.. *^ a b Golalipour, M.J.; Arya, B.; Jahanshahi, M.; ... The cecum is a pouch-like structure of the colon, located at the junction of the small and the large intestines. The term " ... The appendix is also used as a means to access the colon in children with paralysed bowels or major rectal sphincter problems. ...
"Polyps in the colon (large bowel)". Retrieved 2010-04-13.. *^ "Colonic Polyps". Retrieved 2010-04-13.. ... Larger tubular adenomatous polyps have an increased risk of malignancy when larger because then they develop more villous ... Commonly occurring, they are experienced by up to 10% of women.[13] They may have a large flat base (sessile) or be attached to ... Sessile polyps larger than 2 cm usually contain villous features, have a higher malignant potential, and tend to recur ...
Large bowel (sigmoid colon) showing multiple diverticula. Note how the diverticula appear on either side of the longitudinal ... If the enterolith stays in place, it may cause no problems, but a large enterolith expelled from a diverticulum into the lumen ... Play media Guttural pouch: A large (300-500 ml), paired, air-filled ventral diverticulum of the auditory tube found in horses ...
"Biofilms in the large bowel suggest an apparent function of the human vermiform appendix". Journal of Theoretical Biology. 249 ... The ancestral caecum would have been a large, blind diverticulum in which resistant plant material such as cellulose would have ... An alternative explanation would be the possibility that natural selection selects for larger appendices because smaller and ... making the ancestor appear larger and scaring off predators. The arrector pili muscle, which is a band of smooth muscle that ...
... consumption and cancer of the large bowel. E. J. Clin. Nutr. 56: S19-S24. Chao, A., M. J. Thun, C. J. Connell, M. L. ... Horses and other large mammals such as reindeer were hunted during the late Paleolithic in western Europe. Dogs are consumed in ... The trend towards selling meat in pre-packaged cuts has increased the demand for larger breeds of cattle, which are better ... However, they concluded that 'the study is not large enough to exclude small or moderate differences for specific causes of ...
Bala M, Appelbaum L, Almogy G (November 2008). "Unexpected cause of large bowel obstruction: colonic bezoar". Isr. Med. Assoc. ... Unfortunately, this treatment can result in the potential of developing small bowel obstruction in a minority of cases, ... June 2003). "Esophageal and small bowel obstruction by occupational bezoar: report of a case". BMC Gastroenterol. 3 (1): 13. ...
"Unexpected cause of large bowel obstruction: colonic bezoar". Isr. Med. Assoc. J. 10 (11): 829-30. PMID 19070299. Pitiakoudis M ... A bezoar in the large intestine is known as a fecalith. A bezoar in the trachea is called a tracheobezoar. Esophageal bezoars ... June 2003). "Esophageal and small bowel obstruction by occupational bezoar: report of a case". BMC Gastroenterol. 3 (1): 13. ...
The triad includes 1). Clinical features suggestive of small bowel obstruction, 2). Radiological features suggestive of large ... This is a surgical emergency that requires urgent resection of gangrenous bowel and untwisting of the volvulus. Raveenthiran V ... bowel obstruction, 3). Inability to negotiate sigmoidoscope or a flatus tube. ...
PHGG is fully fermentable in the large bowel, with a high rate of volatile fatty acid formation. The pH of the feces is lowered ... The seeds of the guar bean contain a very large endosperm. This endosperm consists of a very large polysaccharide of galactose ... Its kernel consists of a protein-rich germ (43-46%) and a relatively large endosperm (34-40%), containing big amounts of the ... Kutch region occupies the largest area (82.1%) under guar cultivation in India. In addition to its cultivation in India and ...
It is also possible to have tactile assessment of large bowel and subdiaphragmatic surfaces using this incision. This incision ... The modified Gibson incision allows proper access to the small bowel and pelvic organs and limited access to omentum. ...
Whole bowel irrigation cleanses the bowel. This is achieved by giving the patient large amounts of a polyethylene glycol ... "Position paper: whole bowel irrigation". J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 42 (6): 843-854. 2004. doi:10.1081/CLT-200035932. PMID ... Humans and animals, lacking this hormone and its receptor, are unaffected by this, and need to ingest relatively large doses ... Biologically speaking, any substance, if given in large enough amounts, is poisonous and can cause death. For instance, several ...
Colectomy specimen showing numerous polyps throughout the large bowel. Because of the way familial polyposis develops, it is ... The APC is a tumour suppressor gene responsible for the production of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a large multifunction ... If the rectum has few polyps, the colon is partly or fully removed and the small bowel (ileum) can be directly connected to the ... If malignancy develops, this may present with weight loss, altered bowel habit, or even metastasis to the liver or elsewhere. ...
Both large and small bowel can be affected by ischemia. Ischemia of the large intestine may result in an inflammatory process ... Ischemia of the small bowel is called mesenteric ischemia. Brain ischemia is insufficient blood flow to the brain, and can be ...
The man had a perforated small intestine, large intestine and bowel. Goodfellow sutured six holes in the man's organs. ... In large parts of Europe trauma surgeons treat most of the musculoskeletal trauma, whereas injuries to the central nervous ... Over the last few decades, a large number of advances in trauma and critical care have led to an increasing frequency of non- ... Trauma surgeons must be familiar with a large variety of general surgical, thoracic, and vascular procedures and must be able ...
"The Wnt antagonist sFRP1 is downregulated in premalignant large bowel adenomas". Br. J. Cancer. 94 (6): 922-7. doi:10.1038/sj. ... As a result, a large variety of responses could be initiated from the Wnt/Fz interactions. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway starts ...
... (col- + -ectomy) is bowel resection of the large bowel (colon). It consists of the surgical removal of any extent of ... Colon cancer Diverticulitis and diverticular disease of the large intestine Trauma Inflammatory bowel disease such as ... A colectomy is considered a cure for ulcerative colitis because the disease attacks only the large intestine and therefore will ... Bowel infarction Typhlitis Traditionally, colectomy is performed via an abdominal incision (laparotomy), though minimally ...
The changes in the small bowel are typically noninflammatory, while the ones in the large bowel are inflammatory.[17] The ... Gastroenteritis is defined as vomiting or diarrhea due to inflammation of the small or large bowel, often due to infection.[17] ... inflammatory bowel disease, urinary tract infections, and diabetes mellitus.[13] Pancreatic insufficiency, short bowel syndrome ... Inflammatory bowel disease, malabsorption syndrome, lactose intolerance[5]. Prevention. Hand washing, drinking clean water, ...
Drummond, H (1916). "Sacculi of the large intestine with special reference to their relation to the blood vessels of the bowel ... Christensen J (1991) Gross and microscopic anatomy of the large intestine. In The Large Intestine Physiology, Pathophysiology ... Plain abdominal X-ray may show signs of a thickened wall, ileus, constipation, small bowel obstruction or free air in the case ... Smith, AN (1991). "Diverticular disease of the colon" in The Large Intestine. Ed. Phillips SF, Pemberton JH and Shorter RG. ...
The only large insectivorous mammals are those that feed on huge colonies of insects (ants or termites).[33] ... Larger animals, on the other hand, generate more heat and less of this heat is lost. They can therefore tolerate either a ... Many homes have a large eating room or outside (in the tropics) kitchen area devoted to preparation of meals and food, and may ... Leading nutritionists believe that instead of indulging oneself in three large meals each day, it is much healthier and easier ...
Neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) is a particularly common occurrence in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), spina bifida ... encompasses the manifestations of bowel dysfunction resulting from sensory and/or motor disturbances1 due to central ... Menardo G, Bausano G, Corazziari E, et al., Large-bowel transit in paraplegic patients, Dis Colon Rectum, 1987;30:924-8. 36. ... Keywords: Neurogenic bowel dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, hypererflexic bowel, areflexic bowel, upper motor neuron bowel ...
Sexually transmitted diseases are the most common cause, but other causes include inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ... Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). If you have ulcerative colitis or Crohns disease, you may be more vulnerable to proctitis. ... Ulcerative colitis involves inflammation of the inner lining of the large intestine, often including the rectum, the lowest ... In those cases, bowel contents may drain to the skin. Fistulas can lead to life-threatening infections if left untreated. ...
... bowel movement problems in adults,bowel movements,bowel obstruction,bowel pain,bowel pain constipation,bowel problems,bowel ... how to increase male organ size how to increase panis how to increase sex capacity how to increase size of panis how to large ... bowel,bowel constipation,bowel disorders,bowel movement,bowel movement constipation,bowel movement medication,bowel movement ... irritable bowel,irritable bowel constipation,irritable bowel syndrome,irritable bowel syndrome constipation,is being ...
... bowel movement problems in adults,bowel movements,bowel obstruction,bowel pain,bowel pain constipation,bowel problems,bowel ... how to increase male organ size how to increase panis how to increase sex capacity how to increase size of panis how to large ... bowel,bowel constipation,bowel disorders,bowel movement,bowel movement constipation,bowel movement medication,bowel movement ... irritable bowel,irritable bowel constipation,irritable bowel syndrome,irritable bowel syndrome constipation,is being ...
The large bowel is also called the large intestine or colon. ... bowel resection is surgery to remove all or part of your large ... Large bowel resection is surgery to remove all or part of your large bowel. This surgery is also called colectomy. The large ... The large bowel connects the small intestine to the anus. Normally, stool passes through the large bowel before leaving the ... Most people who have a large bowel resection recover fully. Even with a colostomy, most people are able to do the activities ...
... large bowel). You may also have had a colostomy. This article describes what to expect after surgery and how to take care of ... You had surgery to remove all or part of your large intestine ( ... large bowel). You may also have had a colostomy. This article ... Hard stools, or you may not be able to have a bowel movement at all. ... You had surgery to remove all or part of your large intestine ( ... Not had a bowel movement 4 days after leaving the hospital. * ...
If the growth arises from the large bowel or colon it is a colonic polyp. Find out about the types of colonic polyp. ... The larger the polyp and the nearer the anus or end of the bowel the more likely the patient will notice symptoms. By far the ... Polyps in the colon (large bowel). A polyp is a general name for a benign warty growth of the lining of any organ. If the ... Clearly the larger the polyp the greater the risk.. Surgery. Occasionally a polyp is too large to be removed endoscopically ...
... of large Phase III clinical trials by significantly alleviating diarrhea and abdominal pain associated with irritable bowel ... to treat diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-d), a debilitating bowel disorder that affects about 28 million ... Feb 4 (Reuters) - An experimental drug developed by Furiex Pharmaceuticals Inc met the main goal of a pair of large Phase III ... clinical trials by significantly alleviating diarrhea and abdominal pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome, the company ...
Large-bowel obstruction (LBO) is an emergency condition that requires early identification and intervention. The etiology of ... This chest radiograph demonstrates free air under the diaphragm, indicating bowel perforation in a patient with large-bowel ... Enterocolic intussusceptions involve both the small bowel and the large bowel. These are composed of either ileocolic ... Large-Bowel Obstruction. Updated: Dec 29, 2017 * Author: Christy Hopkins, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM ...
... following material represents a subset of chemotherapy regimens that are used for the treatment of patients with small bowel ... Treatment protocols for small and large bowel cancer. Authors. Tim Brenner, PharmD, BCOP. Tim Brenner, PharmD, BCOP ... regimens that are considered by the authors and editors to be commonly used and important for the care of patients with bowel ... following material represents a subset of chemotherapy regimens that are used for the treatment of patients with small bowel ...
Bowel resection may be required electively or acutely. Colonic stenting has an increasing role in the management of large bowel ... Postoperative histology is useful to exclude primary large bowel pathology such as inflammatory bowel disease and neoplasia. In ... Those patients with evidence of colonic involvement on pancreatic imaging warrant further large bowel evaluation. Bowel ... Large Bowel Obstruction, a Delayed Complication of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis. Neeraj Lal,1 John Whiting,1 Rahul Hejmadi,1 ...
Large-bowel obstruction.. The differential diagnosis includes bowel ischemia, bowel perforation, necrotizing enterocolitis ( ... Large-bowel obstruction (LBO) is much less common than small bowel obstruction but is considered an abdominal emergency. The ... Although much less common than small-bowel obstruction, large-bowel obstruction can occur in the pediatric population and is an ... Large-bowel obstruction. Radiopaedia. https://radiopaedia.org/articles/large-bowel-obstruction. Jones J, et al. Accessed 1/22/ ...
... hard and infrequent bowel movements, are those rich in fibers, such as whole wheat bread, cereals, fruits andvegetables.... ... Physicians recommend incorporating 20 to 35 grams of fiber into the daily diet to aidmovement of bowels. Whole wheat bread, ... Foods that help alleviate constipation, which is characterized bylarge, hard and infrequent bowel movements, are those rich in ... Other knowncauses for constipation include irritable bowel syndrome, drugs, inadequate intake of fiber-rich foods and fluids, ...
Multicentre Clinical Trial to Prevent Large Bowel Adenomas: Melbourne Arm Lead researcher. Dr F A Macrae, Dr J R Lambert ...
Hepatitis Irritable Bowel Syndrome Lupus Lyme Disease Multiple Sclerosis Ostomies Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis ... Fibromyalgia General Chronic Illness GERD & Acid Reflux Headaches & Migraines Hepatitis Irritable Bowel Syndrome Lupus Lyme ...
Pathophysiological aspects of diverticular disease of colon and role of large bowel motility.. Bassotti G1, Chistolini F, ...
The metabolic end products of the large bowel microbiota contribute significantly to human health. After weaning to solid foods ... Resistant starch, large bowel fermentation and a broader perspective of prebiotics and probiotics Benef Microbes. 2010 Nov;1(4 ... Dietary RS intakes and faecal butyrate levels are high in populations at low risk of diet-related large bowel diseases. ... The metabolic end products of the large bowel microbiota contribute significantly to human health. After weaning to solid foods ...
Examines the occurrence of pseudo-obstruction of the large bowel due to clonidine. Symptoms of bowel obstruction; Effect of ... Focuses on pseudo-obstruction of the large bowel. Description of the condition; Presence of bowel distension by radiological ... Large bowel obstruction is a rare and difficult diagnosis in pregnancy. Common causes are caecal and sigmoid volvulus and less ... Large bowel obstruction in pregnancy: a rare entity, an unusual cause. Mirza, Muhammad S.; Mulla, Mubashir; Hall, Richard I ...
Hyperactive, high-pitched bowels sounds at the beginning and then hypoactive bowel sounds as obstruction progresses and bowel ... Large bowel obstruction showing dilated colon.. F. Over-utilized or "wasted" diagnostic tests associated with this diagnosis.. ... "The use of computed tomography in the detection and characterisation of large bowel obstruction". N Z Med J. vol. 30. 2009. pp ... Diagnostic Confirmation: Are you sure your patient has a large bowel obstruction?. A. History Part I: Pattern Recognition:. *. ...
Concurrent GIST of large & small bowel: A rare case. R Gokul.k.shanker, MS, Praveen Patil, MS, Hariprasad D, MS, Vg Mohanprasad ... Laparotomy revealed large polypoidal growth of 7×4 cm size in ascending colon with concurrent growth in small bowel of 4×3 cm ... Incidence of concurrent GIST in large & small bowel is unreported.In any case of GIST surgeon should be alert to recognise a ... Concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumour(GIST) in large & small bowel is unreported in the literature.Over the last years the ...
another way your doctor might want to look at your large intestine is with an x-ray called a lower gi series, or barium enema. ... What tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome?. *When might you need a colonoscopy if you think you have irritable bowel ... More Answers On Irritable Bowel Syndrome. *Do I have to go through all these tests to find out if I have IBS? ... Your doctor might want to look at your large intestine with an X-ray called a lower GI series, or barium enema. For this test, ...
Metabolic Epidemiology of Dietary Factors in Large Bowel Cancer Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ... Metabolic Epidemiology of Dietary Factors in Large Bowel Cancer. Michael J. Hill ...
Results: In the bowel sections from patients developing anastomotic leakage, decreased levels of collagen I and III, and a ... distribution and expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 13 in patients with anastomotic leakage after large-bowel ...
I am wondering how much of the large intestine one can lose before experiencing an increase in the frequency of bow... ... I may be having part of my large and small intestines removed due to chrons disease. ... Communities>Gastroenterology>How much of my large intestine can I have removed before noticing a change in bowel habits? ... I am wondering how much of the large intestine one can lose before experiencing an increase in the frequency of bowel movements ...
Increased Chromogranin A Cell Density in the Large Intestine of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome after Receiving Dietary ... The large intestine contains five types of endocrine cells that regulate its functions by sensing its luminal contents and ... Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that is present in almost one-third of consultations ... M. El-Salhy, D. Gundersen, J. G. Hatlebakk, and T. Hausken, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Nova Scientific, New York, NY, USA, 2012. ...
  • Mechanical obstruction results in the dilatation of the proximal large bowel, leading to an increase in intraluminal pressure. (daspite.com)
  • In a laparoscopic colectomy, the surgeon uses a camera to see inside your belly and small instruments to remove the part of your large bowel. (drugster.info)
  • Compared with single cancers, they tended to be smaller, better differentiated, less extensive in their spread and had a stronger association with adenomas of the large intestine. (nus.edu.sg)