Language Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.Rehabilitation of Speech and Language Disorders: Procedures for assisting a person with a speech or language disorder to communicate with maximum efficiency.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Language Tests: Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Language Therapy: Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Speech Production Measurement: Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.Schizophrenic Language: The artificial language of schizophrenic patients - neologisms (words of the patient's own making with new meanings).Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Motor Skills Disorders: Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Enuresis: Involuntary discharge of URINE after expected age of completed development of urinary control. This can happen during the daytime (DIURNAL ENURESIS) while one is awake or during sleep (NOCTURNAL ENURESIS). Enuresis can be in children or in adults (as persistent primary enuresis and secondary adult-onset enuresis).Aphasia, Broca: An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Sign Language: A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Forkhead Transcription Factors: A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Language Arts: Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Verbal Behavior: Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.ReadingChild of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Communication Barriers: Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.Child, Institutionalized: A child who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Speech Therapy: Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Child, Orphaned: Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.United StatesLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.
... this would be a hyperkinetic disorder combined with a developmental disorder of motor function.) About half of children with ... Hulme, Charles; Snowling, Margaret J. (2009-02-17). Developmental Disorders of Language Learning and Cognition. John Wiley & ... on the basis of concomitant attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental coordination disorder in children who do ... Gothenburg Study of Children with DAMP. Notes[edit]. *^ ... Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) as defined in DSM-IV; ...
"A natural language teaching paradigm for nonverbal autistic children". Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 17 (2): ... Play environments are used to teach pivotal skills, such as turn-taking, communication, and language. This training is child- ... Lynn and Robert Koegel incorporated ideas from the natural language procedures to develop verbal communication in children with ... Koegel RL, Dyer K, Bell LK (1987). "The influence of child-preferred activities on autistic children's social behavior". ...
Pennington BF, Bishop DVM (2009). "Relations Among Speech, Language, and Reading Disorders". Annual Review of Psychology. 60: ... Kid, T; Brose K; Mitchell KJ; Fetter RD; Tessier-Lavigne M (1998). "Roundabout controls axon crossing of the CNS midline and ... the language-disorder candidate gene CMIP, and several others. However, these genes account for a small proportion of variance ... such as speech sound disorder, language impairment, and reading disability, although this is also influenced by diagnostic ...
"Can children with autism spectrum disorders "hear" a speaking face?". Child Dev. 82 (5): 1397-403. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011 ... to develop sign language as a first language, or to develop skills in the spoken language of the hearing community? Researchers ... The role of vision in children aged 1-2 years may be less critical to the production of their native language, since, by that ... Specific Language Impairment: Children with SLI are also reported to show reduced lipreading sensitivity, as are people with ...
Ratner is a specialist in child language disorders. Ratner received her Ed.D. in Applied Psycholinguistics from Boston ... University in 1982, her M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology from Temple University in 1976, and her B.A. in Child Study ... She is a Fellow and Honors recipient of the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association, a fellow of the American ... "Faculty Spotlight: Professor Nan Ratner awarded the Honors of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA)". hesp. ...
Terminology of Communication Disorders:Speech-Language-Hearing. Baltimore: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-4196-3 ... Additional members of the hearing care team can include any of the following: educators of the child who is hard of hearing, ... The speech-language pathologist is typically responsible for evaluating the client's receptive and expressive communication ... The speech-language pathologist also provides training and treatment for communication strategies, speech-perception training ( ...
Topics in Language Disorders. Special Reads for Special Needs, reading materials designed for children and young adults with ... Such disabilities include (but are not restricted to): Specific language impairment, phonological disorder, Language disorder, ... C. Basil & S. Reyes (2003). Acquisition of literacy skills by children with severe disability. Child Language Teaching and ... Children with language difficulties are at increased risk for reading disorders or difficulties that can occur early on in ...
The use of behavioral therapy can mitigate any language disorders, difficulties at school, and socialization. An approach by ... Children with XXY differ little from other children. Although they can face problems during adolescence, often emotional and ... Klinefelter syndrome usually occurs randomly.[3] An older mother may have a slightly increased risk of a child with KS.[3] The ... Klinefelter syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one to two per 1,000 live male births.[3][7] ...
... language and motor development.[59][60] Although it causes significant difficulty, many children with ADHD have an attention ... Normally active young child, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, learning disorder, bipolar disorder[6]. ... Stereotypic movement disorder[2]. *Mood disorders (especially bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder). Boys diagnosed ... Associated disorders[edit]. In children, ADHD occurs with other disorders about two-thirds of the time.[17] Some commonly ...
PubMed Database of Kleffner's works Language Disorders in Children, 1973. ISBN 0-672-61292-5 http://www.downingandlahey.com/ ... His name became well known for a controversial treatment for a disease affecting children under the age of five and causing ... Louis, noted for his contributions in the fields of speech and language pathology and hearing. His work with William Landau and ... An award for excellence in speech-language pathology has been presented annually in his name since 1986. The Frank R. Kleffner ...
International Journal of Language Communication Disorders, 43(1), 77-97. Bedrosian, Jan (2003). "On the subject of subject ... A variety of people attend including professionals and therapists as well as children and adults with complex communication ... CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Anu Klippi, Kaisa Launonen (2008). Research in logopedics: speech and language therapy ... Beukelman, D., & Mirenda, P. (2005). Augmentative & Alternative Communication: Supporting Children & Adults with Complex ...
... specific language disorders, autism, and dyslexia.[7] Many of today's assessment methods for children's language were generated ... Bishop, D. V. M. (1997). Uncommon understanding : development and disorders of language comprehension in children. Hove, East ... Bishop's inquiry and interest in language impairments continues as she tries to understand children's developmental language ... Wong, Wai-Lap (2010). A longitudinal twin study of Chinese children learning to read English as a second language. ora.ox.ac.uk ...
... to young children is a recommended way to instill language and expression, and to promote comprehension of text. ... "Post-stroke language disorders". Acta Clin Croat. 50 (1): 79-94. PMID 22034787.. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link ... Personalised books for children are recommended to improve engagement in reading by featuring the child themselves in the story ... may be a different process than learning to read a native language in childhood. There are cases of very young children ...
The Early Intervention Program helps children with significant oral language disorders. Data on the most effective services is ... children in Dallas, Texas (USA). It gives quick access to the Shelton organizations the Evaluation Center, Speech Clinic, and ...
Multilingual Aspects of Signed Language Communication and Disorder. Communication disorders across languages. Bristol, U.K.: ... and plays in important role in language development and reading in children. It is central to the use of sign language, with a ... Pointing plays an important role in sign language, which as much as 25% of signs being a variation of pointing. Children who ... Initial observations give some indication that deaf children acquiring the use of American Sign Language (ASL) may exhibit self ...
Scarborough, H. S. (1991). Very early language deficits in dyslexic children. Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry & Child ... Topics in Language Disorders, 20(1), 48-58. Patton Terry, N., & Scarborough, H. S. (2011). The phonological hypothesis as a ... Scarborough, H. S. (1990). Very early language deficits in dyslexic children. Child Development, 61(6), 1728-1743. Scarborough ... Journal of Child Language, 19(3), 597-616. Fowler, A. E., & Scarborough, H. S. (1993). Should reading disabled adults be ...
... she began treating other children with speech and language disorders. In 1948, to meet the needs of her growing clientele, she ... By 1954, the Wallace Village for Children was the beneficiary of community support, and with local assistance, the organization ... She also received an appointment to the White House Conference on Services for Handicapped Children, and a presidential ... Wallace received numerous awards during her lifetime related to her work with children with disabilities. These awards included ...
... voice disorders, speech disorders in children, and swallowing dysfunction. The technology involved in these applications has ... Early applications to assess and treat acquired adult speech and language disorders involved the use of the telephone to treat ... To date, applications have been developed to assess and/or treat acquired adult speech and language disorders, stuttering, ... Reports of telerehabilitation applications in paediatric speech and language disorders are sparse. A recent Australian pilot ...
... the effects of Tomatis sound therapy on language in children with autism". Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 38 (3 ... Gilmore, Tim (1999). "The Efficacy of the Tomatis Method for Children with Learning and Communication Disorders: A Meta- ... He recommended reading out loud, not only for children and by children, but also by adults, for 30 minutes a day. He claimed ... reflect a lack of improvement in language using the Tomatis Method for children with autism. However, in 2010 Jan Gerittsen[6] ...
32,0 32,1 32,2 Tager-Flusberg H, Caronna E (2007). "Language disorders: autism and other pervasive developmental disorders". ... Oswald DP, Sonenklar NA (2007). "Medication use among children with autism spectrum disorders". J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ... "Atypical behaviors in children with autism and children with a history of language impairment". Res Dev Disabil 28 (2): 145-62 ... 7,0 7,1 Howlin P, Goode S, Hutton J, Rutter M (2004). "Adult outcome for children with autism". J Child Psychol Psychiatry 45 ( ...
"Speech and Language Delay and Disorder". Retrieved 2012-04-22. Keep Kids Healthy. "Speech Delay". Retrieved 2012-04-22. . p. 8 ... KidsHealth:Delay in Speech and Language Early Identification of Speech-Language Delays and Disorders The Listen Up Web-Language ... In this case, the child would be attempting to produce an age appropriate amount of language, but that language would be ... Language delay refers to a delay in the development or use of the knowledge of language. Because language and speech are two ...
Reading to young children is a recommended way to instill language and expression, and to promote comprehension of text. ... Gibson CJ, Gruen JR (2008). "The human lexinome: genes of language and reading". Journal of communication disorders. 41 (5): ... Personalised books for children are recommended to improve engagement in reading by featuring the child themselves in the story ... "Post-stroke language disorders". Acta Clin Croat. 50 (1): 79-94. PMID 22034787. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ...
More recently her work has focused on phonological disorders and child language acquisition. Beckman was inducted as a Fellow ... movement was one of the two most important developments during the 1990s in the linguistic subdisciplines that study language ...
Speech and language disorders, known as dysarthria, are common in athetoid CP patients. In addition, ADCP patients may have ... Lundy, C; Lumsden, D; Fairhurst, C (2009). "Treating complex movement disorders in children with cerebral palsy". The Ulster ... respiration and respiratory disorders. Exercises advised by a speech therapist or speech-language pathologist help patients to ... Children with these disabilities rely heavily on visual stimulation, especially those who are also affected by sensory deafness ...
Expressive and receptive language delays and reading disorders are common. Ratcliffe, Shirley G.; Pan, Huiqi; McKie, Mark ( ... If one of these atypical sperm cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra Y-chromosome in ... In 1973, child psychiatrist Herbert Schreier at Children's Hospital told Harvard Medical School microbiologist Jon Beckwith of ... Disorders, National Organization for Rare (2003). NORD Guide to Rare Disorders. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 91. ISBN ...
Senior Judge Linn concurred separately, saying that he was "bound by the sweeping language of the test set out in Mayo."[9] He ... because Sequenom claimed more than it taught: "any diagnosis of any disease, disorder, or condition. . . . impermissible ... a very practical problem accessing fetal DNA without creating a major health risk for the unborn child."[3] In December 2015, ... This case represents the consequence - perhaps unintended - of that broad language in excluding a meritorious invention from ...
Learn about language and speech disorders in children. ... but they need to learn the language or languages that their ... Children are born ready to learn a language, ... Treatment for language or speech disorders and delays. Children ... Language or speech disorders can occur with other learning disorders that affect reading and writing. Children with language ... Having a language or speech delay or disorder can qualify a child for early interventionexternal icon (for children up to 3 ...
Language disorder in children refers to problems with either of the following: ... Language disorders are different than delayed language. With delayed language, the child develops speech and language in the ... In language disorders, speech and language do not develop normally. The child may have some language skills, but not others. Or ... Language and speech disorders in children. www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/language-disorders.html. Updated March 9, 2020. ...
... .smallfont { font-size: 12px; height: 16px ! ... This booklet explains what social communication skills are and how to spot signs of a disorder. It contains checklists of ...
Colombia and Spain contribute experimental reports on language development of children who are acquiring Spanish. The chapters ... children who are at risk and children with language disorders, phonology, semantics, and morphosyntax. These studies will ... children at risk, and children with language disorders ... Language Development and Disorders in Spanish-speaking Children ... Language Development and Disorders in Spanish-speaking Children. Editors. * Alejandra Auza Benavides ...
What causes language disorders in a child?. Language disorders can have many possible causes. A childs language disorder is ... Key points about language disorders in children. *Children who have a language disorder have trouble understanding language and ... Which children are at risk for language disorders?. The cause often is not known, but children at risk for a language disorder ... Does in other language activities. How are language disorders treated in a child?. To treat your child, the speech-language ...
Children born with a DNA abnormality on chromosome 16 already linked to neurodevelopmental problems show measurable delays in ... processing sound and language, says a study team of radiologists and psychologists. By strengthening the case that the deleted ... Brain imaging links language delay to chromosome deletion in children with neuro disorders. Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia ... Brain imaging links language delay to chromosome deletion in children with neuro disorders CHOP-led study suggests pathway ...
Language Disorders in Children and Adults: Psycholinguistic Approaches to Therapy. Shula Chiat, James Law, Jane Marshall ... Each chapter is written by a speech and language therapist specialising in psycholinguistic approaches to investigation and ... Christopher Lumopship - Developing Phonological Representation in a child With an Auditory Processing Deficit. Maggie Vance, ... Susan Pethers, A Case Study of a Child with Pragmatic Difficulties - Assessment and Intervention. ...
Or the child has trouble speaking with others and expressing thoughts and feelings. ... A language disorder in a child means he or she has trouble understanding words that he or she hears and reads. ... What causes language disorders in a child?. Language disorders can have many possible causes. A childs language disorder is ... Key points about language disorders in children. *Children who have a language disorder have trouble understanding language and ...
... empirically validated treatment.As many as half of children and adolescents presenting for mental health services have language ... Language impairment in childhood and adolescence: presentation, diagnosis, assessment, and ... "Language Disorders in Children and Adolescents is a clear, concise, practical guide that is useful to clinicians in a number of ... Language Disorders in Children and Adolescents von Joseph H. Beitchman, E. B. Brownlie ...
Language development in children with autism spectrum disorders von Oliver Selzer - Englische E-Books aus der Kategorie ... a child may acquire a language in a stage-like order. In each stage, fundamental elements (or rules) of language are being ... Under normal circumstances every child can acquire every existing language, depending on its surrounding (cf. chapter two). ... whereas children with low-functioning type of autism may be challenged with producing language at all. Hence in this paper, I ...
Its purpose is to provide medical staff with concise, accurate information about speech and language delays or disorders: ... IntroductionThe present document was created by members of the department of Speech-Language Pathology at the Montreal ... a language delay or disorder only exists when it is present in the childs best language (a speech-language pathologist should ... Children can be referred to a Speech-Language Pathologist as early as 1 year of age.. A child with significant language ...
Its purpose is to provide medical staff with concise, accurate information about speech and language delays or disorders: ... The present document was created by members of the department of Speech-Language Pathology at the Montreal Childrens Hospital ... Developmental Language Disorder (formerly known as specific/primary language impairment). Developmental Language Disorder is ... a language delay or disorder only exists when it is present in the childs best language (a speech-language pathologist should ...
... of children ages 3-10 and 24.4% of children ages 11-17 affected. Among children ages 3-10, 13.6% had language problems, 6.3% ... One-third of children ages 3-10 with a communication or swallowing disorder had more than one type of disorder during the past ... Percent Distribution of Types of Communication or Swallowing Disorders among Children Ages 3-17 with a Voice, Speech, Language ... one-fourth of children ages 11-17 years with a communication or swallowing disorder had more than one type of disorder during ...
attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. LD - learning disorder. RD - reading disability. WLD - written-language disorder. DSM ... Written-Language Disorder Among Children With and Without ADHD in a Population-Based Birth Cohort. Kouichi Yoshimasu, William J ... Written-Language Disorder Among Children With and Without ADHD in a Population-Based Birth Cohort ... Written-Language Disorder Among Children With and Without ADHD in a Population-Based Birth Cohort ...
Children with Receptive Language Difficulties. by Natasha Boskic. Description. A child has a receptive language disorder when ... It is estimated that between 3% and 5% of children have a receptive or expressive language disorder, or a mixture of both. This ... Language skills below the expected level for their age.. Understanding spoken language is a complicated process. The child may ... Category - 2.8 Children with Communication Disorders: Receptive Language Difficulties. ...
A child who cannot hear well or at all will have trouble learning, copying, and understanding language. Speech delays may also ... There are many reasons for delays in speech and language. Hearing loss is a common reason. ... Children with delayed language learn words and grammar much more slowly than other children. ... Delayed language Children with delayed language learn words and grammar much more slowly than other children. There are many ...
Furthermore, older children showed better overall performance than younger children. The difference between children with ASD ... Furthermore, older children showed better overall performance than younger children. The difference between children with ASD ... Thus, the cognitive factors found to affect the interpretation of temporal language in children with ASD are likely to apply in ... These cognitive functions are more likely to be impaired in children with ASD than in TD children, which could account for ...
You are here: Home / Autism / Brain Imaging in Children with Neurological Disorders Links Language Delay to Chromosome Deletion ... Brain Imaging in Children with Neurological Disorders Links Language Delay to Chromosome Deletion. February 20, 2015 , by Jenny ... Only 20% of the children had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses: 11 of the 43 with the deletion and 2 of the 23 with the ... Researchers are planning a very small pilot study of children with autism spectrum disorder who have the M100 response latency ...
... designed to teach receptive language skills to children with autism spectrum disorder based on the principles of... ... use in children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder: An observational study. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 30 ... An Evaluation of a Mobile Application Designed to Teach Receptive Language Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. ... designed to teach receptive language skills to children with autism spectrum disorder based on the principles of applied ...
... in children from three different special clinical populations: (1) older children with persistent speech errors, (2) children ... The nature of speech sound errors in children with cleft palate. *Perceptual, articulatory, and phonological approaches in ... Advancing the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology through education, advocacy, leadership, and collaboration ... Why traditional approaches often dont work with older children with speech errors ...
... and related signs or symptoms for Neurological disorders causing receptive and expressive language disorders in children. ... List of 7 disease causes of Neurological disorders causing receptive and expressive language disorders in children, patient ... Neurological disorders *Language disorders (122 causes) *Receptive *Language *Language symptoms (122 causes) *Language disorder ... Receptive and expressive language disorders in children (4 causes) *Receptive and expressive language disorders (4 causes) * ...
... and related signs or symptoms for Phonation disorders causing receptive and expressive language disorders in children. ... List of disease causes of Phonation disorders causing receptive and expressive language disorders in children, patient stories ... Phonation disorders causing receptive and expressive language disorders in children: Phonation disorders causing receptive and ... Receptive and expressive language disorders in children (4 causes) *Receptive and expressive language disorders (4 causes) * ...
... and age at diagnosis according to childs race/ethnicity and primary household language. From the 2009-2010 National Survey of ... We examined prevalence of diagnosed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ... Aspergers disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, or other autism spectrum disorder?" and if YES, "Does [CHILD] currently ... Age at Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnosis by Race, Ethnicity, and Primary Household Language Among Children with Special ...
... those with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) and those with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), in schools and by external ... those with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) and those with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), in schools and by external ... independent of childrens language, literacy, cognitive scores and behaviour. Driving amount of provision by diagnostic ... independent of childrens language, literacy, cognitive scores and behaviour. Driving amount of provision by diagnostic ...
... and pragmatic aspects of language performance. (Author/CL) ... past 10 years documents the multidimensional nature of language ... Disorders of Communication: Investigating the Development of Language of Mentally Retarded Children. ... and pragmatic aspects of language performance. (Author/CL) ... past 10 years documents the multidimensional nature of language ...
  • Seminar paper from the year 2012 in the subject Pedagogy - Pedagogic Psychology, grade: 2,0, University of Cologne, language: English, abstract: The development or acquisition of language separates the human being from any other mammal, enabling him to efficiently communicate and socialize with every other member of the same race. (exlibris.ch)
  • Abstract: Children with DLD of schoolage are at risk of poorer outcomes into adulthood. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • As each child heard a series of tones, the MEG machine analyzed changing magnetic fields in the child's brain, measuring an auditory processing delay called the M100 response latency. (eurekalert.org)
  • Because the severity of neurodevelopmental symptoms did not correlate with the length of the auditory processing delay, the M100 delay may not become a clear-cut diagnostic biomarker in neurological disorders, but it may be a clue to an important common pathway in neurobiology. (eurekalert.org)
  • Christopher Lumopship - Developing Phonological Representation in a child With an Auditory Processing Deficit. (wiley.com)
  • Other names for receptive language disorder include central auditory processing disorder or CAPD (see full Glossary ) and comprehension deficit (see full Glossary ). (ubc.ca)
  • Auditory Evoked M100 Response Latency is Delayed in Children with 16p11.2 Deletion but not 16p11.2 Duplication. (highlighthealth.com)
  • In contrast to the situation of typically developing children, they use different modalities for comprehension (auditory) and expression (visual). (cambridge.org)
  • Childhood is a critical period for language development and maturation of the central auditory system. (bvsalud.org)
  • Her work is examining auditory feedback in children with SLI and those with typical development. (blogspot.com)
  • This study therefore focused on investigating differences between monolingual and bilingual children with DLD and their TD peers in the ability to learn different types of non-linguistic sequences in the visual and auditory modality. (utupub.fi)
  • Visual and auditory sequence learning were separately compared between children with DLD and their TD peers using ANCOVAs (with age as a covariate) with language status (monolingual, bilingual) and sequence learning task type (adjacent dependency learning, non-adjacent dependency learning, exemplar-based learning) as the other two between-subjects factors. (utupub.fi)
  • Method A total of 103 children were included in the study: 44 children with feeding and swallowing disorders and 59 children without any such disorders. (asha.org)
  • Results The odds of excessive cerumen ( p = .0000, small effect size), middle ear dysfunction ( p = .0148, small effect size), and hearing screening failure ( p = .0000, large effect size) were 22.14%, 2.97%, and 13.5% higher, respectively, in children with feeding and swallowing disorders compared with typically developing children. (asha.org)
  • Conclusion The significantly higher prevalence of hearing problems in children with feeding and swallowing disorders compared with typically developing children suggests that inclusion of an audiologist on the interdisciplinary team is likely to improve overall interventional outcomes for children with feeding and swallowing disorders. (asha.org)
  • Speech pathologists have expertise in diagnosing, assessing and treating language, communication and swallowing disorders. (health.gov.au)
  • Swallowing disorders are also called dysphagia. (chw.org)
  • https://lshss.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1779828 Legal, Ethical, and Financial Aspects of Providing Services to Children With Swallowing Disorders in the Public Schools The public schools must follow laws that deal with services for children who meet the legal requirements for having a disability. (asha.org)
  • Children who have swallowing disorders that require the services of a speech-language pathologist typically meet the definition of a child with a disability. (asha.org)
  • SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) , December 2005, Vol. 14, 19-24. (asha.org)
  • SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) , March 2004, Vol. 13, 7-9. (asha.org)
  • SIG 13 Perspectives on Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (Dysphagia) , October 2003, Vol. 12, 12-17. (asha.org)
  • In 2012, 7.7% of children aged 3 to 17 years had communication or swallowing disorders. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Anxiety in Preschool Children provides a comprehensive, integrated, and scientifically current resource for both clinicians and researchers who work with or encounter anxiety in preschool-aged children. (routledge.com)
  • A few clinics that specialize in fluency disorders may use computerized analysis. (kidshealth.org)
  • https://ajslp.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=1774265 A Fluency Disorders Prevention Program for Preschoolers and Children in the Primary Grades A fluency disorders prevention program for classroom use, designed to develop the feeling of fluency control in normally fluent preschool and primary grade children, is described. (asha.org)
  • A fluency disorders prevention program for classroom use, designed to develop the feeling of fluency control in normally fluent preschool and primary grade children, is described. (asha.org)
  • Although the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision , 5 defines WLD as a "specific spelling disorder," which excludes children who also have RD, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), 6 defines WLD as a "disorder of written expression," without such exclusion criteria. (aappublications.org)
  • The Tomatis Listening Therapy has demonstrated its effectiveness in helping people who suffer from autism and associated behavioral disorders (for example, Asperger's syndrome). (kidslanguagearts.com)
  • Hence in this paper, I will examine this deviant development by looking closely into the fundamental rules of language in 'typical' and autistic learners. (exlibris.ch)