Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.
Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.
Procedures for assisting a person with a speech or language disorder to communicate with maximum efficiency.
Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.
Tests designed to assess language behavior and abilities. They include tests of vocabulary, comprehension, grammar and functional use of language, e.g., Development Sentence Scoring, Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale, Parsons Language Sample, Utah Test of Language Development, Michigan Language Inventory and Verbal Language Development Scale, Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, Northwestern Syntax Screening Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Ammons Full-Range Picture Vocabulary Test, and Assessment of Children's Language Comprehension.
A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)
Rehabilitation of persons with language disorders or training of children with language development disorders.
The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.
Measurement of parameters of the speech product such as vocal tone, loudness, pitch, voice quality, articulation, resonance, phonation, phonetic structure and prosody.
The artificial language of schizophrenic patients - neologisms (words of the patient's own making with new meanings).
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.
Marked impairments in the development of motor coordination such that the impairment interferes with activities of daily living. (From DSM-V)
Involuntary discharge of URINE after expected age of completed development of urinary control. This can happen during the daytime (DIURNAL ENURESIS) while one is awake or during sleep (NOCTURNAL ENURESIS). Enuresis can be in children or in adults (as persistent primary enuresis and secondary adult-onset enuresis).
An aphasia characterized by impairment of expressive LANGUAGE (speech, writing, signs) and relative preservation of receptive language abilities (i.e., comprehension). This condition is caused by lesions of the motor association cortex in the FRONTAL LOBE (BROCA AREA and adjacent cortical and white matter regions).
The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.
A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)
A system of hand gestures used for communication by the deaf or by people speaking different languages.
The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A subclass of winged helix DNA-binding proteins that share homology with their founding member fork head protein, Drosophila.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.
Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
Skills in the use of language which lead to proficiency in written or spoken communication.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
The relationships between symbols and their meanings.
A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.
Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)
A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.
Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.
The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.
Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.
Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.
A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.
A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.
Conversion from one language to another language.
Treatment for individuals with speech defects and disorders that involves counseling and use of various exercises and aids to help the development of new speech habits.
Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.
Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.
Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.

Specific temporoparietal gyral atrophy reflects the pattern of language dissolution in Alzheimer's disease. (1/424)

The aim of this study was to determine the topography and degree of atrophy in speech and language-associated cortical gyri in Alzheimer's disease. The post-mortem brains of 10 patients with pathologically confirmed Alzheimer's disease and 21 neurological and neuropathological controls were sectioned in serial 3 mm coronal slices and grey and white matter volumes were determined for specific cortical gyri. All Alzheimer's disease patients had prospectively documented impairments in verbal and semantic memory with concomitant global decline. The cortical regions of interest included the planum temporale, Heschl's gyri, the anterior superior temporal gyri, the middle and inferior temporal gyri, area 37 at the inferior temporoparietal junction, areas 40 and 39 (supramarginal and angular gyri) and Broca's frontal regions. Although most patients had end-stage disease, the language-associated cortical regions were affected to different degrees, with some regions free of atrophy. These included Broca's regions in the frontal lobe and Heschl's gyri on the superior surface of the temporal lobe. In contrast, the inferior temporal and temporoparietal gyri (area 37) were severely reduced in volume. The phonological processing regions in the superior temporal gyri (the planum temporale) were also atrophic in all Alzheimer's disease patients while the anterior superior temporal gyri were only atrophic in female patients. Such atrophy may underlie the more severe language impairments previously described in females with Alzheimer's disease. The present study is the first to analyse the volumes of language-associated gyri in post-mortem patients with confirmed Alzheimer's disease. The results show that atrophy is not global but site-specific. Atrophied gyri appear to reflect a specific network of language and semantic memory dissolution seen in the clinical features of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Females showed greater atrophy than males in the anterior superior temporal gyri.  (+info)

"What" and "how": evidence for the dissociation of object knowledge and mechanical problem-solving skills in the human brain. (2/424)

Patients with profound semantic deterioration resulting from temporal lobe atrophy have been reported to use many real objects appropriately. Does this preserved ability reflect (i) a separate component of the conceptual knowledge system ("action semantics") or (ii) the operation of a system that is independent of conceptual knowledge of specific objects, and rather is responsible for general mechanical problem-solving skills, triggered by object affordances? We contrast the performance of three patients-two with semantic dementia and focal temporal lobe atrophy and the third with corticobasal degeneration and biparietal atrophy-on tests of real object identification and usage, picture-based tests of functional semantic knowledge, and a task requiring selection and use of novel tools. The patient with corticobasal degeneration showed poor novel tool selection and impaired use of real objects, despite near normal semantic knowledge of the same objects' functions. The patients with semantic dementia had the expected deficit in object identification and functional semantics, but achieved flawless and effortless performance on the novel tool task. Their attempts to use this same mechanical problem-solving ability to deduce (sometimes successfully but often incorrectly) the use of the real objects provide no support for the hypothesis of a separate action-semantic system. Although the temporal lobe system clearly is necessary to identify "what" an object is, we suggest that sensory inputs to a parietal "how" system can trigger the use of objects without reference to object-specific conceptual knowledge.  (+info)

A problem with auditory processing? (3/424)

Recent studies have found associations between auditory processing deficits and language disorders such as dyslexia; but whether the former cause the latter, or simply co-occur with them, is still an open question.  (+info)

Semantic processing deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease: degraded representation or defective retrieval? (4/424)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether degraded representations (characterized by small differences between word sense frequencies), or defective competitive processes (high levels of word sense lateral inhibition), individually or jointly, can give rise to parkinsonian semantic deficits. DESIGN: Computer model of semantic processing. OUTCOME MEASURES: Correct sense selection, defined by the activation of the word sense unit that first reaches the 0.5 activation threshold. If Parkinson disease (PD)-like errors are observed only at high levels of lateral inhibition, independently of low or high sense frequency deltas (SFDs), this would indicate that a defective competitive process alone could account for the errors. Alternatively, if PD-like errors were observed at any level of lateral inhibition, exclusively with low SFD words, this would indicate that degraded representations alone could account for the errors. RESULTS: Neither degraded representations nor defective competitive processes alone can account for parkinsonian semantic errors. An interaction between the 2, however, correctly reproduces both increased errors and longer latency responses. CONCLUSIONS: Competing explanations for semantic deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease need to be integrated in order to develop effective interventions (e.g., estimating the amount of context required to improve semantic processing performance).  (+info)

Abnormal angular gyrus asymmetry in schizophrenia. (5/424)

OBJECTIVE: Few studies have evaluated the parietal lobe in schizophrenia despite the fact that it has an important role in attention, memory, and language-all functions that have been reported to be abnormal in schizophrenia. The inferior parietal lobule, in particular, is of interest because it is not only part of the heteromodal association cortex but also is part of the semantic-lexical network, which also includes the planum temporale. Both the inferior parietal lobule, particularly the angular gyrus of the inferior parietal lobule, and the planum temporale are brain regions that play a critical role as biological substrates of language and thought. The authors compared volume and asymmetry measures of the individual gyri of the parietal lobe by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. METHOD: MRI scans with a 1. 5-Tesla magnet were obtained from 15 male chronic schizophrenic and 15 comparison subjects matched for age, gender, and parental socioeconomic status. RESULTS: Inferior parietal lobule volumes showed a leftward asymmetry (left 7.0% larger than right) in comparison subjects and a reversed asymmetry (left 6.3% smaller than right) in schizophrenic subjects. The angular gyrus accounted for this difference in asymmetry, with the left angular gyrus being significantly larger (18.7%) than the right in comparison subjects, a finding that was not observed in schizophrenic patients. A further test of angular gyrus asymmetry showed a reversal of the normal left-greater-than-right asymmetry in the schizophrenic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with schizophrenia showed a reversed asymmetry in the inferior parietal lobule that was localized to the angular gyrus, a structure belonging to the heteromodal association cortex as well as being part of the semantic-lexical network. This finding contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of the neural substrates of language and thought disorder in schizophrenia.  (+info)

Pathological switching between languages after frontal lesions in a bilingual patient. (6/424)

Cerebral lesions may alter the capability of bilingual subjects to separate their languages and use each language in appropriate contexts. Patients who show pathological mixing intermingle different languages within a single utterance. By contrast, patients affected by pathological switching alternate their languages across different utterances (a self contained segment of speech that stands on its own and conveys its own independent meaning). Cases of pathological mixing have been reported after lesions to the left temporoparietal lobe. By contrast, information on the neural loci involved in pathological switching is scarce. In this paper a description is given for the first time of a patient with a lesion to the left anterior cingulate and to the frontal lobe-also marginally involving the right anterior cingulate area-who presented with pathological switching between languages in the absence of any other linguistic impairment. Thus, unlike pathological mixing that typically occurs in bilingual aphasia, pathological switching may be independent of language mechanisms.  (+info)

Neuropsychological consequences of cerebellar tumour resection in children: cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome in a paediatric population. (7/424)

Acquired cerebellar lesions in adults have been shown to produce impairments in higher function as exemplified by the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. It is not yet known whether similar findings occur in children with acquired cerebellar lesions, and whether developmental factors influence their presentation. In studies to date, survivors of childhood cerebellar tumours who demonstrate long-term deficits in cognitive functions have undergone surgery as well as cranial irradiation or methotrexate treatment. Investigation of the effects of the cerebellar lesion independent of the known deleterious effects of these agents is important for understanding the role of the cerebellum in cognitive and affective development and for informing treatment and rehabilitation strategies. If the cerebellar contribution to cognition and affect is significant, then damage in childhood may influence a wide range of psychological processes, both as an immediate consequence and as these processes fail to develop normally later on. In this study we evaluated neuropsychological data in 19 children who underwent resection of cerebellar tumours but who received neither cranial irradiation nor methotrexate chemotherapy. Impairments were noted in executive function, including planning and sequencing, and in visual-spatial function, expressive language, verbal memory and modulation of affect. These deficits were common and in some cases could be dissociated from motor deficits. Lesions of the vermis in particular were associated with dysregulation of affect. Behavioural deficits were more apparent in older than younger children. These results reveal that clinically relevant neuropsychological changes may occur following cerebellar tumour resection in children. Age at the time of surgery and the site of the cerebellar lesion influence the neurobehavioural outcome. The results of the present study indicate that the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is evident in children as well as in adults, and they provide further clinical evidence that the cerebellum is an essential node in the distributed neural circuitry subserving higher-order behaviours.  (+info)

The cerebellum contributes to higher functions during development: evidence from a series of children surgically treated for posterior fossa tumours. (8/424)

We present data on the intellectual, language and executive functions of 26 children who had undergone surgery for the removal of cerebellar hemisphere or vermal tumours. The children with right cerebellar tumours presented with disturbances of auditory sequential memory and language processing, whereas those with left cerebellar tumours showed deficits on tests of spatial and visual sequential memory. The vermal lesions led to two profiles: (i) post-surgical mutism, which evolved into speech disorders or language disturbances similar to agrammatism; and (ii) behavioural disturbances ranging from irritability to behaviours reminiscent of autism. These data are consistent with the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum as a modulator of mental and social functions, and suggest that this role is operative early in childhood.  (+info)

Types of Language Disorders:

1. Developmental Language Disorder (DLD): This is a condition where children have difficulty learning language skills, such as grammar, vocabulary, and sentence structure, despite being exposed to language in their environment. DLD can be diagnosed in children between the ages of 2 and 5.
2. Acquired Language Disorder: This is a condition that occurs when an individual experiences brain damage or injury that affects their ability to understand and produce language. Acquired language disorders can be caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other neurological conditions.
3. Aphasia: This is a condition that occurs when an individual experiences damage to the language areas of their brain, typically as a result of stroke or traumatic brain injury. Aphasia can affect an individual's ability to understand, speak, read, and write language.
4. Dysarthria: This is a condition that affects an individual's ability to produce speech sounds due to weakness, paralysis, or incoordination of the muscles used for speaking. Dysarthria can be caused by stroke, cerebral palsy, or other neurological conditions.
5. Apraxia: This is a condition that affects an individual's ability to coordinate the movements of their lips, tongue, and jaw to produce speech sounds. Apraxia can be caused by stroke, head injury, or other neurological conditions.

Causes and Risk Factors:

1. Genetic factors: Some language disorders may be inherited from parents or grandparents.
2. Brain damage or injury: Stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other neurological conditions can cause acquired language disorders.
3. Developmental delays: Children with developmental delays or disorders, such as autism or Down syndrome, may experience language disorders.
4. Hearing loss or impairment: Children who have difficulty hearing may experience language delays or disorders.
5. Environmental factors: Poverty, poor nutrition, and limited access to educational resources can contribute to language disorders in children.

Signs and Symptoms:

1. Difficulty articulating words or sentences
2. Slurred or distorted speech
3. Limited vocabulary or grammar skills
4. Difficulty understanding spoken language
5. Avoidance of speaking or social interactions
6. Behavioral difficulties, such as aggression or frustration
7. Delayed language development in children
8. Difficulty with reading and writing skills

Treatment and Interventions:

1. Speech therapy: A speech-language pathologist (SLP) can work with individuals to improve their language skills through exercises, activities, and strategies.
2. Cognitive training: Individuals with language disorders may benefit from cognitive training programs that target attention, memory, and other cognitive skills.
3. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices: These devices can help individuals with severe language disorders communicate more effectively.
4. Behavioral interventions: Behavioral therapy can help individuals with language disorders manage their behavior and improve their social interactions.
5. Family support: Family members can provide support and encouragement to individuals with language disorders, which can help improve outcomes.
6. Educational accommodations: Individuals with language disorders may be eligible for educational accommodations, such as extra time to complete assignments or the use of a tape recorder during lectures.
7. Medication: In some cases, medication may be prescribed to help manage symptoms of language disorders, such as anxiety or depression.

Prognosis and Quality of Life:

The prognosis for individuals with language disorders varies depending on the severity of their condition and the effectiveness of their treatment. With appropriate support and intervention, many individuals with language disorders are able to improve their language skills and lead fulfilling lives. However, some individuals may experience ongoing challenges with communication and social interaction, which can impact their quality of life.

In conclusion, language disorders can have a significant impact on an individual's ability to communicate and interact with others. While there is no cure for language disorders, there are many effective treatments and interventions that can help improve outcomes. With appropriate support and accommodations, individuals with language disorders can lead fulfilling lives and achieve their goals.

There are several types of LDDs, including:

1. Expressive Language Disorder: This condition is characterized by difficulty with verbal expression, including difficulty with word choice, sentence structure, and coherence.
2. Receptive Language Disorder: This condition is characterized by difficulty with understanding spoken language, including difficulty with comprehending vocabulary, grammar, and tone of voice.
3. Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder: This condition is characterized by both receptive and expressive language difficulties.
4. Language Processing Disorder: This condition is characterized by difficulty with processing language, including difficulty with auditory processing, syntax, and semantics.
5. Social Communication Disorder: This condition is characterized by difficulty with social communication, including difficulty with understanding and using language in social contexts, eye contact, facial expressions, and body language.

Causes of LDDs include:

1. Genetic factors: Some LDDs may be inherited from parents or grandparents.
2. Brain injury: Traumatic brain injury or stroke can damage the areas of the brain responsible for language processing.
3. Infections: Certain infections, such as meningitis or encephalitis, can damage the brain and result in LDDs.
4. Nutritional deficiencies: Severe malnutrition or a lack of certain nutrients, such as vitamin B12, can lead to LDDs.
5. Environmental factors: Exposure to toxins, such as lead, and poverty can increase the risk of developing an LDD.

Signs and symptoms of LDDs include:

1. Difficulty with word retrieval
2. Incomplete or inappropriate sentences
3. Difficulty with comprehension
4. Limited vocabulary
5. Difficulty with understanding abstract concepts
6. Difficulty with social communication
7. Delayed language development compared to peers
8. Difficulty with speech sounds and articulation
9. Stuttering or repetition of words
10. Limited eye contact and facial expressions

Treatment for LDDs depends on the underlying cause and may include:

1. Speech and language therapy to improve communication skills
2. Cognitive training to improve problem-solving and memory skills
3. Occupational therapy to improve daily living skills
4. Physical therapy to improve mobility and balance
5. Medication to manage symptoms such as anxiety or depression
6. Surgery to repair any physical abnormalities or damage to the brain.

It is important to note that each individual with an LDD may have a unique combination of strengths, weaknesses, and challenges, and treatment plans should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Early diagnosis and intervention are key to improving outcomes for individuals with LDDs.

1. Articulation Disorders: Difficulty articulating sounds or words due to poor pronunciation, misplaced sounds, or distortion of sounds.
2. Stuttering: A disorder characterized by the repetition or prolongation of sounds, syllables, or words, as well as the interruption or blocking of speech.
3. Voice Disorders: Abnormalities in voice quality, pitch, or volume due to overuse, misuse, or structural changes in the vocal cords.
4. Language Disorders: Difficulty with understanding, using, or interpreting spoken language, including grammar, vocabulary, and sentence structure.
5. Apraxia of Speech: A neurological disorder that affects the ability to plan and execute voluntary movements of the articulatory organs for speech production.
6. Dysarthria: A condition characterized by slurred or distorted speech due to weakness, paralysis, or incoordination of the articulatory muscles.
7. Cerebral Palsy: A group of disorders that affect movement, balance, and posture, often including speech and language difficulties.
8. Aphasia: A condition that results from brain damage and affects an individual's ability to understand, speak, read, and write language.
9. Dyslexia: A learning disorder that affects an individual's ability to read and spell words correctly.
10. Hearing Loss: Loss of hearing in one or both ears can impact speech development and language acquisition.

Speech disorders can be diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist (SLP) through a comprehensive evaluation, including speech and language samples, medical history, and behavioral observations. Treatment options vary depending on the specific disorder and may include therapy exercises, technology assistance, and counseling. With appropriate support and intervention, individuals with speech disorders can improve their communication skills and lead fulfilling lives.

There are several types of apraxias, each with distinct symptoms and characteristics:

1. Ideomotor apraxia: Difficulty performing specific movements or gestures, such as grasping and manipulating objects, due to a lack of understanding of the intended purpose or meaning of the action.
2. Ideational apraxia: Inability to initiate or perform movements due to a lack of understanding of the task or goal.
3. Kinesthetic apraxia: Difficulty judging the weight, shape, size, and position of objects in space, leading to difficulties with grasping, manipulating, or coordinating movements.
4. Graphomotor apraxia: Difficulty writing or drawing due to a lack of coordination between the hand and the intended movement.
5. Dressing apraxia: Difficulty dressing oneself due to a lack of coordination and planning for the movements required to put on clothes.
6. Gait apraxia: Difficulty walking or maintaining balance due to a lack of coordinated movement of the legs, trunk, and arms.
7. Speech apraxia: Difficulty articulating words or sounds due to a lack of coordination between the mouth, tongue, and lips.

The diagnosis of apraxias typically involves a comprehensive neurological examination, including assessments of motor function, language, and cognitive abilities. Treatment options vary depending on the underlying cause and severity of the apraxia, but may include physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy, and medication.

There are several types of aphasia, including:

1. Broca's aphasia: Characterized by difficulty speaking in complete sentences and using correct grammar.
2. Wernicke's aphasia: Characterized by difficulty understanding spoken language and speaking in complete sentences.
3. Global aphasia: Characterized by a severe impairment of all language abilities.
4. Primary progressive aphasia: A rare form of aphasia that is caused by neurodegeneration and worsens over time.

Treatment for aphasia typically involves speech and language therapy, which can help individuals with aphasia improve their communication skills and regain some of their language abilities. Other forms of therapy, such as cognitive training and physical therapy, may also be helpful.

It's important to note that while aphasia can significantly impact an individual's quality of life, it does not affect their intelligence or cognitive abilities. With appropriate treatment and support, individuals with aphasia can continue to lead fulfilling lives and communicate effectively with others.

The following are some common types of motor skill disorders:

1. Dyspraxia: This is a developmental condition that affects the ability to plan and perform movements. Individuals with dyspraxia may have difficulty with coordination, balance, and spatial awareness.
2. Apraxia: This is a neurological disorder that affects an individual's ability to perform voluntary movements despite having the physical strength and coordination to do so.
3. Ataxia: This is a condition that affects an individual's balance, coordination, and ability to perform purposeful movements. It can be caused by injury or disease to the cerebellum or other parts of the brain.
4. Parkinson's disease: This is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement, including fine motor skills such as writing and gross motor skills such as walking and balance.
5. Cerebral palsy: This is a developmental condition that can affect an individual's ability to move and control their body. It can impact both fine and gross motor skills.
6. Stroke: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted, leading to damage to the brain tissue. This can result in difficulty with movement, including fine and gross motor skills.
7. Traumatic brain injury: This occurs when the brain is injured as a result of a blow or jolt to the head. It can lead to difficulties with movement, memory, and other cognitive functions.
8. Spinal cord injury: This occurs when the spinal cord is damaged, either from trauma or disease. It can result in loss of movement and sensation below the level of the injury.
9. Multiple sclerosis: This is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord. It can cause difficulties with movement, balance, and coordination.
10. Spina bifida: This is a congenital condition in which the spine does not properly close during fetal development. It can result in a range of physical and cognitive disabilities, including difficulty with movement and coordination.

It's important to note that these conditions can have varying levels of severity and impact on an individual's ability to move and control their body. Additionally, there are many other conditions and diseases that can affect the nervous system and result in difficulties with movement.

1. Developmental delay: Children may not have the physical or neural maturity to control their bladder functions.
2. Hormonal imbalance: Imbalances in hormones such as antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and oxytocin can lead to enuresis.
3. Constipation: Soft stool can put pressure on the bladder, leading to bedwetting.
4. Urinary tract infection: Infections can irritate the bladder and cause it to contract involuntarily.
5. Sleep disorders: Sleep apnea and other sleep disorders can disrupt normal sleep patterns and lead to enuresis.
6. Family history: Enuresis can run in families, suggesting a possible genetic component.
7. Other medical conditions: Certain conditions such as diabetes, neurological disorders, and spinal cord injuries can increase the risk of developing enuresis.

There are several treatment options for enuresis, including:

1. Behavioral therapy: Techniques such as bladder training, habit reversal training, and stimulus control can help children gain control over their bladder functions.
2. Medications: Drugs such as desmopressin and imipramine can help regulate hormone levels and reduce bedwetting episodes.
3. Lifestyle changes: Making sure the child drinks enough fluids, avoiding caffeine and alcohol, and establishing a regular sleep schedule can help manage enuresis.
4. Alarms: Wearable alarms that detect moisture can alert the child when they are wet and help them learn to awaken when their bladder is full.
5. Surgery: In rare cases, surgery may be necessary to treat enuresis, such as when the condition is caused by a physical obstruction or malformation.

It's important for parents to approach the topic of enuresis with sensitivity and understanding, and to seek professional help if their child is experiencing persistent bedwetting. With appropriate treatment and support, children with enuresis can learn to manage their condition and lead healthy, active lives.

Broca's aphasia is characterized by difficulty speaking in complete sentences, using correct grammar, and articulating words clearly. Individuals with Broca's aphasia may also experience difficulty understanding spoken language, although comprehension of written language may be relatively preserved.

Common symptoms of Broca's aphasia include:

1. Difficulty speaking in complete sentences or using correct grammar.
2. Slurred or slow speech.
3. Difficulty articulating words clearly.
4. Difficulty understanding spoken language.
5. Preservation of comprehension of written language.
6. Word-finding difficulties.
7. Difficulty with naming objects.
8. Difficulty with sentence construction.

Broca's aphasia is often caused by damage to the brain due to stroke, traumatic brain injury, or neurodegenerative diseases such as primary progressive aphasia. Treatment for Broca's aphasia typically involves speech and language therapy to improve communication skills and cognitive rehabilitation to improve language processing abilities.

The symptoms of dyslexia can vary from person to person, but may include:

* Difficulty with phonological awareness (the ability to identify and manipulate the sounds within words)
* Trouble with decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling)
* Slow reading speed
* Difficulty with comprehension of text
* Difficulty with writing skills, including grammar, punctuation, and spelling
* Trouble with organization and time management

Dyslexia can be diagnosed by a trained professional, such as a psychologist or learning specialist, through a series of tests and assessments. These may include:

* Reading and spelling tests
* Tests of phonological awareness
* Tests of comprehension and vocabulary
* Behavioral observations

There is no cure for dyslexia, but there are a variety of strategies and interventions that can help individuals with dyslexia to improve their reading and writing skills. These may include:

* Multisensory instruction (using sight, sound, and touch to learn)
* Orton-Gillingham approach (a specific type of multisensory instruction)
* Assistive technology (such as text-to-speech software)
* Accommodations (such as extra time to complete assignments)
* Tutoring and mentoring

It is important to note that dyslexia is not a result of poor intelligence or inadequate instruction, but rather a neurological difference that affects the way an individual processes information. With appropriate support and accommodations, individuals with dyslexia can be successful in school and beyond.

Bipolar Disorder Types:

There are several types of bipolar disorder, including:

1. Bipolar I Disorder: One or more manic episodes with or without depressive episodes.
2. Bipolar II Disorder: At least one major depressive episode and one hypomanic episode (a less severe form of mania).
3. Cyclothymic Disorder: Periods of hypomania and depression that last at least 2 years.
4. Other Specified Bipolar and Related Disorders: Symptoms that do not meet the criteria for any of the above types.
5. Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: Symptoms that do not meet the criteria for any of the above types, but there is still a noticeable impact on daily life.

Bipolar Disorder Causes:

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors. Some potential causes include:

1. Genetics: Individuals with a family history of bipolar disorder are more likely to develop the condition.
2. Brain structure and function: Imbalances in neurotransmitters and abnormalities in brain structure have been found in individuals with bipolar disorder.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Imbalances in hormones such as serotonin, dopamine, and cortisol have been linked to bipolar disorder.
4. Life events: Traumatic events or significant changes in life circumstances can trigger episodes of mania or depression.
5. Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as multiple sclerosis or stroke, can increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms:

The symptoms of bipolar disorder can vary depending on the individual and the specific type of episode they are experiencing. Some common symptoms include:

1. Manic episodes: Increased energy, reduced need for sleep, impulsivity, and grandiosity.
2. Depressive episodes: Feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest in activities.
3. Mixed episodes: A combination of manic and depressive symptoms.
4. Hypomanic episodes: Less severe than full-blown mania, but still disrupt daily life.
5. Rapid cycling: Experiencing four or more episodes within a year.
6. Melancholic features: Feeling sad, hopeless, and worthless.
7. Atypical features: Experiencing mania without elevated mood or grandiosity.
8. Mood instability: Rapid changes in mood throughout the day.
9. Anxiety symptoms: Restlessness, feeling on edge, and difficulty concentrating.
10. Sleep disturbances: Difficulty falling or staying asleep, or oversleeping.
11. Substance abuse: Using drugs or alcohol to cope with symptoms.
12. Suicidal thoughts or behaviors: Having thoughts of harming oneself or taking actions that could lead to death.

It's important to note that not everyone with bipolar disorder will experience all of these symptoms, and some people may experience additional symptoms not listed here. Additionally, the severity and frequency of symptoms can vary widely between individuals.

Some common types of mental disorders include:

1. Anxiety disorders: These conditions cause excessive worry, fear, or anxiety that interferes with daily life. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.
2. Mood disorders: These conditions affect a person's mood, causing feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger that persist for weeks or months. Examples include depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder.
3. Personality disorders: These conditions involve patterns of thought and behavior that deviate from the norm of the average person. Examples include borderline personality disorder, narcissistic personality disorder, and antisocial personality disorder.
4. Psychotic disorders: These conditions cause a person to lose touch with reality, resulting in delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized thinking. Examples include schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and brief psychotic disorder.
5. Trauma and stressor-related disorders: These conditions develop after a person experiences a traumatic event, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
6. Dissociative disorders: These conditions involve a disconnection or separation from one's body, thoughts, or emotions. Examples include dissociative identity disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder) and depersonalization disorder.
7. Neurodevelopmental disorders: These conditions affect the development of the brain and nervous system, leading to symptoms such as difficulty with social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Examples include autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Rett syndrome.

Mental disorders can be diagnosed by a mental health professional using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which provides criteria for each condition. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy, depending on the specific disorder and individual needs.

Some common types of anxiety disorders include:

1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): Excessive and persistent worry about everyday things, even when there is no apparent reason to be concerned.
2. Panic Disorder: Recurring panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of intense fear or anxiety that can occur at any time, even when there is no obvious trigger.
3. Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD): Excessive and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which the individual is exposed to possible scrutiny by others.
4. Specific Phobias: Persistent and excessive fear of a specific object, situation, or activity that is out of proportion to the actual danger posed.
5. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD): Recurring, intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions) that are distressing and disruptive to daily life.
6. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): Persistent symptoms of anxiety, fear, and avoidance after experiencing a traumatic event.

Anxiety disorders can be treated with a combination of psychotherapy, medication, or both, depending on the specific diagnosis and severity of symptoms. With appropriate treatment, many people with anxiety disorders are able to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

There are several types of mood disorders, including:

1. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD): This is a condition characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed. It can also involve changes in appetite, sleep patterns, and energy levels.
2. Bipolar Disorder: This is a condition that involves periods of mania or hypomania (elevated mood) alternating with episodes of depression.
3. Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD): This is a condition characterized by persistent low mood, lasting for two years or more. It can also involve changes in appetite, sleep patterns, and energy levels.
4. Postpartum Depression (PPD): This is a condition that occurs in some women after childbirth, characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of interest in activities.
5. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): This is a condition that occurs during the winter months, when there is less sunlight. It is characterized by feelings of sadness, lethargy, and a lack of energy.
6. Anxious Distress: This is a condition characterized by excessive worry, fear, and anxiety that interferes with daily life.
7. Adjustment Disorder: This is a condition that occurs when an individual experiences a significant change or stressor in their life, such as the loss of a loved one or a job change. It is characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of interest in activities.
8. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD): This is a condition that occurs in some women during the premenstrual phase of their menstrual cycle, characterized by feelings of sadness, anxiety, and a lack of energy.

Mood disorders can be treated with a combination of medication and therapy. Antidepressant medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), are commonly used to treat mood disorders. These medications can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain.

Therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT), can also be effective in treating mood disorders. CBT helps individuals identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to their depression, while IPT focuses on improving communication skills and relationships with others.

In addition to medication and therapy, lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep can also be helpful in managing mood disorders. Support from family and friends, as well as self-care activities such as meditation and relaxation techniques, can also be beneficial.

It is important to seek professional help if symptoms of depression or anxiety persist or worsen over time. With appropriate treatment, individuals with mood disorders can experience significant improvement in their symptoms and overall quality of life.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) defines Autistic Disorder as a pervasive developmental disorder that meets the following criteria:

A. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, including:

1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity (e.g., abnormal or absent eye contact, impaired understanding of facial expressions, delayed or lack of response to social overtures).
2. Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships (e.g., difficulty initiating or sustaining conversations, impairment in understanding social norms, rules, and expectations).
3. Deficits in using nonverbal behaviors to regulate social interaction (e.g., difficulty with eye contact, facial expressions, body language, gestures).

B. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., hand flapping, head banging, repeating words or phrases).
2. Insistence on sameness, inflexibility, and adherence to routines or rituals.
3. Preoccupation with specific interests or activities that are repeated in a rigid and restricted manner (e.g., preoccupation with a particular topic, excessive focus on a specific activity).

C. Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period and significantly impact social, occupational, or other areas of functioning.

D. The symptoms do not occur exclusively during a medical or neurological condition (e.g., intellectual disability, hearing loss).

It is important to note that Autistic Disorder is a spectrum disorder and individuals with this diagnosis may have varying degrees of severity in their symptoms. Additionally, there are several other Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) that have similar diagnostic criteria but may differ in severity and presentation. These include:

A. Asperger's Disorder: Characterized by difficulties with social interaction and communication, but without the presence of significant delay or retardation in language development.

B. Rett Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder that is characterized by difficulties with social interaction, communication, and repetitive behaviors.

C. Childhood Disintegrative Disorder: Characterized by a loss of language and social skills that occurs after a period of normal development.

It is important to consult with a qualified professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist, for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

1. Autism spectrum disorder: Children with autism spectrum disorder struggle with social interaction, communication and repetitive behaviors. They may also have delays or impairments in language development, cognitive and social skills.

2. Rett syndrome: A rare genetic condition that affects girls almost exclusively. Children with Rett syndrome typically develop normally for the first six months of life before losing skills and experiencing difficulties with communication, movement and other areas of functioning.

3. Childhood disintegrative disorder: This is a rare condition in which children develop normally for at least two years before suddenly losing their language and social skills. Children with this disorder may also experience difficulty with eye contact, imitation and imagination.

4. Pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS): A diagnosis that is given to children who display some but not all of the characteristic symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Children with PDD-NOS may have difficulties in social interaction, communication and repetitive behaviors.

5. Other specified and unspecified pervasive developmental disorders: This category includes a range of rare conditions that affect children's development and functioning. Examples include;
a) Fragile X syndrome: A genetic condition associated with intellectual disability, behavioral challenges and physical characteristics such as large ears and a long face.
b) Williams syndrome: A rare genetic condition that affects about one in 10,000 children. It is characterized by heart problems, developmental delays and difficulties with social interaction and communication.

These disorders can have a significant impact on the child's family and caregivers, requiring early intervention and ongoing support to help the child reach their full potential.

Pervasive child development disorder is a broad term used to describe a range of conditions that affect children's social communication and behavioral development. There are five main types of pervasive developmental disorders:
1. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD): A developmental disorder characterized by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. Children with ASD may have a hard time understanding other people's perspectives, initiating or maintaining conversations and developing and maintaining relationships. They may also exhibit repetitive behaviors such as hand flapping, rocking or repeating words or phrases.

2. Rett syndrome: A rare genetic disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. It is characterized by difficulties in social interaction, communication and repetitive behaviors, as well as physical symptoms such as seizures, tremors and muscle weakness. Children with Rett syndrome may also experience anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances.

3. Childhood disintegrative disorder: A rare condition in which children develop typically for the first few years of life, but then lose their language and social skills and exhibit autistic-like behaviors.

4. Pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS): A diagnosis given to children who exhibit some, but not all, of the symptoms of ASD. Children with PDD-NOS may have difficulty with social interaction and communication, but do not meet the criteria for a full diagnosis of ASD.

5. Asperger's disorder: A milder form of autism that is characterized by difficulties with social interaction and communication, but not with language development. Children with Asperger's disorder may have trouble understanding other people's perspectives, developing and maintaining relationships and exhibiting repetitive behaviors.

it's important to note that these categories are not exhaustive and there is some overlap between them. Additionally, each individual with a pervasive developmental disorder may experience a unique set of symptoms and challenges.

The exact cause of MDD is not known, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Some risk factors for developing MDD include:

* Family history of depression or other mental health conditions
* History of trauma or stressful life events
* Chronic illness or chronic pain
* Substance abuse or addiction
* Personality traits such as low self-esteem or perfectionism

Symptoms of MDD can vary from person to person, but typically include:

* Persistent feelings of sadness, emptiness, or hopelessness
* Loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyed
* Changes in appetite or sleep patterns
* Fatigue or loss of energy
* Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
* Thoughts of death or suicide

MDD can be diagnosed by a mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, based on the symptoms and their duration. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, and may include:

* Antidepressant medications to relieve symptoms of depression
* Psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), to help identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors
* Interpersonal therapy (IPT) to improve communication skills and relationships with others
* Other forms of therapy, such as mindfulness-based therapies or relaxation techniques

It is important to seek professional help if symptoms of depression are severe or persistent, as MDD can have a significant impact on daily life and can increase the risk of suicide. With appropriate treatment, however, many people with MDD are able to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

There are several types of deafness, including:

1. Conductive hearing loss: This type of deafness is caused by problems with the middle ear, including the eardrum or the bones of the middle ear. It can be treated with hearing aids or surgery.
2. Sensorineural hearing loss: This type of deafness is caused by damage to the inner ear or auditory nerve. It is typically permanent and cannot be treated with medication or surgery.
3. Mixed hearing loss: This type of deafness is a combination of conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.
4. Auditory processing disorder (APD): This is a condition in which the brain has difficulty processing sounds, even though the ears are functioning normally.
5. Tinnitus: This is a condition characterized by ringing or other sounds in the ears when there is no external source of sound. It can be a symptom of deafness or a separate condition.

There are several ways to diagnose deafness, including:

1. Hearing tests: These can be done in a doctor's office or at a hearing aid center. They involve listening to sounds through headphones and responding to them.
2. Imaging tests: These can include X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans to look for any physical abnormalities in the ear or brain.
3. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing: This is a test that measures the electrical activity of the brain in response to sound. It can be used to diagnose hearing loss in infants and young children.
4. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) testing: This is a test that measures the sounds produced by the inner ear in response to sound. It can be used to diagnose hearing loss in infants and young children.

There are several ways to treat deafness, including:

1. Hearing aids: These are devices that amplify sound and can be worn in or behind the ear. They can help improve hearing for people with mild to severe hearing loss.
2. Cochlear implants: These are devices that are implanted in the inner ear and can bypass damaged hair cells to directly stimulate the auditory nerve. They can help restore hearing for people with severe to profound hearing loss.
3. Speech therapy: This can help people with hearing loss improve their communication skills, such as speaking and listening.
4. Assistive technology: This can include devices such as captioned phones, alerting systems, and assistive listening devices that can help people with hearing loss communicate more effectively.
5. Medications: There are several medications available that can help treat deafness, such as antibiotics for bacterial infections or steroids to reduce inflammation.
6. Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat deafness, such as when there is a blockage in the ear or when a tumor is present.
7. Stem cell therapy: This is a relatively new area of research that involves using stem cells to repair damaged hair cells in the inner ear. It has shown promising results in some studies.
8. Gene therapy: This involves using genes to repair or replace damaged or missing genes that can cause deafness. It is still an experimental area of research, but it has shown promise in some studies.
9. Implantable devices: These are devices that are implanted in the inner ear and can help restore hearing by bypassing damaged hair cells. Examples include cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants.
10. Binaural hearing: This involves using a combination of hearing aids and technology to improve hearing in both ears, which can help improve speech recognition and reduce the risk of falls.

It's important to note that the best treatment for deafness will depend on the underlying cause of the condition, as well as the individual's age, overall health, and personal preferences. It's important to work with a healthcare professional to determine the best course of treatment.

1. Predominantly Inattentive Type: This type is characterized by symptoms of inattention, such as difficulty paying attention to details or making careless mistakes. Individuals with this type may have trouble sustaining their focus during tasks and may appear daydreamy or easily distracted.
2. Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: This type is characterized by symptoms of hyperactivity, such as fidgeting, restlessness, and an inability to sit still. Individuals with this type may also exhibit impulsivity, such as interrupting others or speaking out of turn.
3. Combined Type: This type is characterized by both symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity.

The symptoms of ADHD can vary from person to person and may change over time. Some common symptoms include:

* Difficulty sustaining attention during tasks
* Easily distracted or interrupted
* Difficulty completing tasks
* Forgetfulness
* Fidgeting or restlessness
* Difficulty sitting still or remaining quiet
* Interrupting others or speaking out of turn
* Impulsivity, such as acting without thinking

The exact cause of ADHD is not fully understood, but research suggests that it may be related to differences in brain structure and function, as well as genetic factors. There is no cure for ADHD, but medication and behavioral therapy can help manage symptoms and improve functioning.

ADHD can have significant impacts on daily life, including academic and social difficulties. However, with proper treatment and support, many individuals with ADHD are able to lead successful and fulfilling lives.

The exact cause of depressive disorder is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Some common risk factors for developing depressive disorder include:

* Family history of depression
* Traumatic events, such as abuse or loss
* Chronic stress
* Substance abuse
* Chronic illness or chronic pain

There are several different types of depressive disorders, including:

* Major depressive disorder (MDD): This is the most common type of depression, characterized by one or more major depressive episodes in a person's lifetime.
* Persistent depressive disorder (PDD): This type of depression is characterized by persistent, low-grade symptoms that last for two years or more.
* Bipolar disorder: This is a mood disorder that involves periods of both depression and mania or hypomania.
* Postpartum depression (PPD): This is a type of depression that occurs in women after childbirth.
* Severe depression: This is a severe and debilitating form of depression that can interfere with daily life and relationships.

Treatment for depressive disorder typically involves a combination of medication and therapy, such as antidepressant medications and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Other forms of therapy, such as psychodynamic therapy or interpersonal therapy, may also be effective. Lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep, can also help manage symptoms.

It's important to seek professional help if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of depressive disorder. With proper treatment, many people are able to recover from depression and lead fulfilling lives.

The symptoms of PTSD can vary widely and may include:

1. Flashbacks or intrusive memories of the traumatic event
2. Nightmares or disturbed sleep
3. Avoidance of people, places, or activities that remind them of the event
4. Hypervigilance or an exaggerated startle response
5. Difficulty concentrating or memory problems
6. Irritability, anger, or other mood changes
7. Physical symptoms such as headaches, stomachaches, or muscle tension

The exact cause of PTSD is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve changes in the brain's response to stress and the release of chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) that help regulate emotions and memory.

PTSD can be diagnosed by a mental health professional using a combination of psychological evaluation and medical history. Treatment for PTSD typically involves therapy, medication, or a combination of both. Therapy may include exposure therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or other forms of talk therapy. Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and antidepressants may be used to help manage symptoms.

Prevention is an important aspect of managing PTSD, and this includes seeking support from friends, family, or mental health professionals soon after the traumatic event. Self-care practices such as exercise, meditation, or relaxation techniques can also be helpful in reducing stress and promoting emotional well-being.

The exact cause of OCD is not known, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors. Symptoms of OCD can range from mild to severe and may include:

* Recurrent and intrusive thoughts or fears (obsessions)
* Repetitive behaviors or mental acts (compulsions) such as checking, counting, or cleaning
* Feeling the need to perform compulsions in order to reduce anxiety or prevent something bad from happening
* Feeling a sense of relief after performing compulsions
* Time-consuming nature of obsessions and compulsions that interfere with daily activities and social interactions

OCD can be treated with a combination of medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT helps individuals identify and challenge their obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors, while SSRIs help reduce the anxiety associated with OCD.

It's important to note that while individuals with OCD may recognize that their thoughts or behaviors are irrational, they are often unable to stop them without professional treatment. With appropriate treatment, however, many individuals with OCD are able to manage their symptoms and lead fulfilling lives.

Some common types of psychotic disorders include:

1. Schizophrenia: A chronic and severe mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking.
2. Bipolar Disorder: A mood disorder that causes extreme changes in mood, energy, and behavior. It can lead to manic or hypomanic episodes, as well as depression.
3. Schizoaffective Disorder: A mental disorder that combines symptoms of schizophrenia and a mood disorder. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and mood swings.
4. Brief Psychotic Disorder: A short-term episode of psychosis that can be triggered by a stressful event. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
5. Postpartum Psychosis: A rare condition that occurs in some new mothers after childbirth. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
6. Drug-Induced Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by taking certain medications or drugs. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
7. Alcohol-Related Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by alcohol use disorder. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
8. Trauma-Related Psychosis: A psychotic episode caused by a traumatic event. It can cause hallucinations, delusions, and a break from reality.
9. Psychotic Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (NOS): A catch-all diagnosis for psychotic episodes that do not meet the criteria for any other specific psychotic disorder.

Symptoms of psychotic disorders can vary depending on the individual and the specific disorder. Common symptoms include:

1. Hallucinations: Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there.
2. Delusions: False beliefs that are not based in reality.
3. Disorganized thinking and speech: Difficulty organizing thoughts and expressing them in a clear and logical manner.
4. Disorganized behavior: Incoherent or bizarre behavior, such as dressing inappropriately for the weather or neglecting personal hygiene.
5. Catatonia: A state of immobility or abnormal movement, such as rigidity or agitation.
6. Negative symptoms: A decrease in emotional expression or motivation, such as a flat affect or a lack of interest in activities.
7. Cognitive impairment: Difficulty with attention, memory, and other cognitive functions.
8. Social withdrawal: Avoidance of social interactions and relationships.
9. Lack of self-care: Neglecting personal hygiene, nutrition, and other basic needs.
10. Suicidal or homicidal ideation: Thoughts of harming oneself or others.

It's important to note that not everyone with schizophrenia will experience all of these symptoms, and some people may experience additional symptoms not listed here. Additionally, the severity and frequency of symptoms can vary widely from person to person. With proper treatment and support, many people with schizophrenia are able to manage their symptoms and lead fulfilling lives.

Types of Cognition Disorders: There are several types of cognitive disorders that affect different aspects of cognitive functioning. Some common types include:

1. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.
2. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Caused by a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts brain function, resulting in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes.
3. Alzheimer's Disease: A progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory loss, confusion, and difficulty with communication.
4. Stroke: A condition where blood flow to the brain is interrupted, leading to cognitive impairment and other symptoms.
5. Parkinson's Disease: A neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement, balance, and cognition.
6. Huntington's Disease: An inherited disorder that causes progressive damage to the brain, leading to cognitive decline and other symptoms.
7. Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD): A group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by changes in personality, behavior, and language.
8. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): A condition that develops after a traumatic event, characterized by symptoms such as anxiety, avoidance, and hypervigilance.
9. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): A condition characterized by memory loss and other cognitive symptoms that are more severe than normal age-related changes but not severe enough to interfere with daily life.

Causes and Risk Factors: The causes of cognition disorders can vary depending on the specific disorder, but some common risk factors include:

1. Genetics: Many cognitive disorders have a genetic component, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease.
2. Age: As people age, their risk of developing cognitive disorders increases, such as Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia.
3. Lifestyle factors: Factors such as physical inactivity, smoking, and poor diet can increase the risk of cognitive decline and dementia.
4. Traumatic brain injury: A severe blow to the head or a traumatic brain injury can increase the risk of developing cognitive disorders, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).
5. Infections: Certain infections, such as meningitis and encephalitis, can cause cognitive disorders if they damage the brain tissue.
6. Stroke or other cardiovascular conditions: A stroke or other cardiovascular conditions can cause cognitive disorders by damaging the blood vessels in the brain.
7. Chronic substance abuse: Long-term use of drugs or alcohol can damage the brain and increase the risk of cognitive disorders, such as dementia.
8. Sleep disorders: Sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, can increase the risk of cognitive disorders, such as dementia.
9. Depression and anxiety: Mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety, can increase the risk of cognitive decline and dementia.
10. Environmental factors: Exposure to certain environmental toxins, such as pesticides and heavy metals, has been linked to an increased risk of cognitive disorders.

It's important to note that not everyone with these risk factors will develop a cognitive disorder, and some people without any known risk factors can still develop a cognitive disorder. If you have concerns about your cognitive health, it's important to speak with a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and diagnosis.

Types of Substance-Related Disorders:

1. Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD): A chronic disease characterized by the excessive consumption of alcohol, leading to impaired control over drinking, social or personal problems, and increased risk of health issues.
2. Opioid Use Disorder (OUD): A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of opioids, such as prescription painkillers or heroin, leading to withdrawal symptoms when the substance is not available.
3. Stimulant Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of stimulants, such as cocaine or amphetamines, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.
4. Cannabis Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of cannabis, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.
5. Hallucinogen Use Disorder: A chronic disease characterized by the excessive use of hallucinogens, such as LSD or psilocybin mushrooms, leading to impaired control over use and increased risk of adverse effects.

Causes and Risk Factors:

1. Genetics: Individuals with a family history of substance-related disorders are more likely to develop these conditions.
2. Mental health: Individuals with mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety, may be more likely to use substances as a form of self-medication.
3. Environmental factors: Exposure to substances at an early age, peer pressure, and social environment can increase the risk of developing a substance-related disorder.
4. Brain chemistry: Substance use can alter brain chemistry, leading to dependence and addiction.

Symptoms:

1. Increased tolerance: The need to use more of the substance to achieve the desired effect.
2. Withdrawal: Experiencing symptoms such as anxiety, irritability, or nausea when the substance is not present.
3. Loss of control: Using more substance than intended or for longer than intended.
4. Neglecting responsibilities: Neglecting responsibilities at home, work, or school due to substance use.
5. Continued use despite negative consequences: Continuing to use the substance despite physical, emotional, or financial consequences.

Diagnosis:

1. Physical examination: A doctor may perform a physical examination to look for signs of substance use, such as track marks or changes in heart rate and blood pressure.
2. Laboratory tests: Blood or urine tests can confirm the presence of substances in the body.
3. Psychological evaluation: A mental health professional may conduct a psychological evaluation to assess symptoms of substance-related disorders and determine the presence of co-occurring conditions.

Treatment:

1. Detoxification: A medically-supervised detox program can help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of complications.
2. Medications: Medications such as methadone or buprenorphine may be prescribed to manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings.
3. Behavioral therapy: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and contingency management are effective behavioral therapies for treating substance use disorders.
4. Support groups: Joining a support group such as Narcotics Anonymous can provide a sense of community and support for individuals in recovery.
5. Lifestyle changes: Making healthy lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating, and getting enough sleep can help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings.

It's important to note that diagnosis and treatment of substance-related disorders is a complex process and should be individualized based on the specific needs and circumstances of each patient.

Some common examples of phobic disorders include:

1. Arachnophobia (fear of spiders)
2. Acrophobia (fear of heights)
3. Agoraphobia (fear of being in public places or situations where escape might be difficult)
4. Claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces)
5. Cynophobia (fear of dogs)
6. Glossophobia (fear of speaking in public)
7. Mysophobia (fear of germs or dirt)
8. Necrophobia (fear of death or dead things)
9. Ophidiophobia (fear of snakes)
10. Social phobia (fear of social situations or being judged by others)

Phobic disorders can cause significant distress and impairment in an individual's daily life, and can lead to avoidance behaviors that limit their ability to function in various contexts. Treatment for phobic disorders often involves exposure therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or medication.

Articulation disorders can be classified into different types based on the severity and nature of the speech difficulties. Some common types of articulation disorders include:

1. Articulation errors: These occur when individuals produce speech sounds differently than the expected norm, such as pronouncing "k" and "s" sounds as "t" or "z."
2. Speech sound distortions: This type of disorder involves the exaggeration or alteration of speech sounds, such as speaking with a lisp or a nasal tone.
3. Speech articulation anomalies: These are abnormalities in the production of speech sounds that do not fit into any specific category, such as difficulty pronouncing certain words or sounds.
4. Apraxia of speech: This is a neurological disorder that affects the ability to plan and execute voluntary movements of the articulators (lips, tongue, jaw), resulting in distorted or slurred speech.
5. Dysarthria: This is a speech disorder characterized by weakness, slowness, or incoordination of the muscles used for speaking, often caused by a neurological condition such as a stroke or cerebral palsy.

Articulation disorders can be diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist (SLP) through a comprehensive evaluation of an individual's speech and language skills. The SLP may use standardized assessments, clinical observations, and interviews with the individual and their family to determine the nature and severity of the articulation disorder.

Treatment for articulation disorders typically involves speech therapy with an SLP, who will work with the individual to improve their speech skills through a series of exercises and activities tailored to their specific needs. Treatment may focus on improving the accuracy and clarity of speech sounds, increasing speech rate and fluency, and enhancing communication skills.

In addition to speech therapy, other interventions that may be helpful for individuals with articulation disorders include:

1. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems: For individuals with severe articulation disorders or those who have difficulty using speech to communicate, AAC systems such as picture communication symbols or electronic devices can provide an alternative means of communication.
2. Supportive technology: Assistive devices such as speech-generating devices, text-to-speech software, and other technology can help individuals with articulation disorders to communicate more effectively.
3. Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT): This type of therapy focuses on improving the communication skills of young children with articulation disorders by training parents to use play-based activities and strategies to enhance their child's speech and language development.
4. Social skills training: For individuals with articulation disorders who also have difficulty with social interactions, social skills training can help them develop better communication and social skills.
5. Cognitive communication therapy: This type of therapy focuses on improving the cognitive processes that underlie communication, such as attention, memory, and problem-solving skills.
6. Articulation therapy: This type of therapy focuses specifically on improving articulation skills, and may involve exercises and activities to strengthen the muscles used for speech production.
7. Stuttering modification therapy: For individuals who stutter, this type of therapy can help them learn to speak more fluently and with less effort.
8. Voice therapy: This type of therapy can help individuals with voice disorders to improve their vocal quality and communication skills.
9. Counseling and psychotherapy: For individuals with articulation disorders who are experiencing emotional or psychological distress, counseling and psychotherapy can be helpful in addressing these issues and improving overall well-being.

It's important to note that the most effective treatment approach will depend on the specific needs and goals of the individual with an articulation disorder, as well as their age, severity of symptoms, and other factors. A speech-language pathologist can work with the individual and their family to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses their unique needs and helps them achieve their communication goals.

A language disorder is a condition defined as a condition that limits or altogether stops natural speech. A language disorder ... Lahey, Margaret; Bloom, Lois (1988). Language Disorders and Language Development. New York: Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-02-367130-2 ... The following is a list of language disorders. ... Language disorders, Lists of diseases, Communication-related ...
The mission of the DuBard School for Language Disorders at The University of Southern Mississippi is to bring the gift of oral ... The DuBard School for Language Disorders at the University of Southern Mississippi was founded in 1962. DuBard is a clinical ... and written language to individuals with communication disorders and reading disabilities, including dyslexia, through use of ...
... but not with language. Language disorders tend to manifest in two different ways: receptive language disorders (where one ... Language disorders, Communication disorders, Neurological disorders, Speech and language pathology). ... Language disorders can affect both spoken and written language, and can also affect sign language; typically, all forms of ... A developmental language disorder is present at birth while an acquired language disorder occurs at some point after birth. ...
Communication Disorders is a peer-reviewed medical journal that covers topics relevant to speech and language disorders and ... Communication Disorders. doi:10.1111/(ISSN)1460-6984. "International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders". 2018 ... "The King's Speech and Stuttering Research". International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. doi:10.1111/(ISSN)1460 ... It is the official journal of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. The journal is published by Wiley-Blackwell ...
... is a subset of language disorder, which is itself a subset of the broader category of speech, ... 1 speech and language therapy for older children with (developmental) language disorder". International Journal of Language & ... Language Disorders in Children and Adolescents Boston: Hogrefe. ISBN 9780889373389 Paul, Rhea (2007). Language disorders from ... Communication disorders, Language disorders, Developmental disabilities, Speech and language pathology, Aphasias). ...
Auditory processing disorder Speech-Language Pathology Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder "Expressive language ... "F80.1 Expressive language disorder". ICD-10 Version:2010. "Expressive language disorder - developmental". MedlinePlus Medical ... Expressive language disorder is a communication disorder in which there are difficulties with verbal and written expression. It ... Specific language impairments are often secondary characteristics of other disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and ...
Expressive language disorder "Diagnostic criteria for 315.31 Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder". behavenet.com. " ... Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder (DSM-IV 315.32) is a communication disorder in which both the receptive and ... Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder is also known as receptive-expressive language impairment (RELI) or receptive ... Children with mixed receptive-expressive language disorder are often likely to have long-term implications for language ...
Nonverbal learning disorder. Sensory processing disorder. Developmental Language Disorder (DLD). Visual perception deficits. ... Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) research has found that students with developmental coordination disorder and normal ... CS1 Dutch-language sources (nl), Motor control, Neurological disorders, Neurological disorders in children, Special education, ... Developmental Speech and Language Disorder and Developmental Learning Disorder. Collier first described developmental ...
CEBPE Speech-language disorder-1; 602081; FOXP2 Spherocytosis, hereditary, type 5; 612690; EPB42 Spherocytosis, type 1; 182900 ... CTDP1 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ia; 212065; PMM2 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ic; 603147; ALG6 ... ALG3 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ie; 608799; DPM1 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type If; 609180; MPDU1 ... ALG12 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ih; 608104; ALG8 Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ii; 607906; ALG2 ...
Schizophrenic Language Disorder, CLINICAL DESCRIPTION AND THOUGHT DISORDER, p. 167. ISBN 978-0-7020-5556-0. Thought Disorder ( ... Nancy Andreasen preferred to call the thought disorders collectively as thought-language-communication disorders (TLC disorders ... Disorders of the form of thought are objectively observable in patients' spoken and written language. The disorders include ... The term thought disorder is often used to refer to a formal thought disorder. A formal thought disorder (FTD) is a disruption ...
Thought, language, and communication disorders. I. A Clinical assessment, definition of terms, and evaluation of their ... Andreasen, Nancy C. (November 1979). "Thought, Language, and Communication Disorders: I. Clinical Assessment, Definition of ... In a mild manifestation, this thought disorder is characterized by slippage of ideas further and further from the point of a ... Tony Thompson, Peter Mathias, Jack Lyttle, Lyttle's mental health and disorder, Edition 3, Elsevier Health Sciences, 2000, ISBN ...
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. 49 (5): 558-566. doi:10.1111/1460-6984.12092. PMID 24939594. Gomez ... While anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and psychotic disorders can also have an effect on cognitive and memory functions, ... Cognitive disorders (CDs), also known as neurocognitive disorders (NCDs), are a category of mental health disorders that ... Neurocognitive disorders include delirium, mild neurocognitive disorders, and major neurocognitive disorder (previously known ...
These are principally developmental delays and language disorders associated with neglect. Conduct disorders, oppositional ... Several other disorders, such as conduct disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety disorders, post traumatic stress ... Borderline personality disorder, Mental disorders diagnosed in childhood, Human development, Stress-related disorders). ... A disorder in the clinical sense is a condition requiring treatment, as opposed to risk factors for subsequent disorders. ...
Learning disabilities can include developmental speech and language disorders, and academic skills disorders. ADHD, however, is ... anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, substance use disorder, ... Portal: Medicine (CS1 French-language sources (fr), CS1 German-language sources (de), CS1 Spanish-language sources (es), CS1 ... and learning and language disorders. Other conditions that should be considered are other neurodevelopmental disorders, tics, ...
These disorders comprise developmental language disorder, learning disorders, motor disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. ... as Dysgraphia Communication disorders and Auditory processing disorder Developmental coordination disorder Genetic disorders, ... Autism spectrum disorder is a disorder of the many parts of the brain. Structural changes are observed in the cortex, which ... Another area that is affected by these disorders is the social arena for the person with the disorder. Many children that have ...
CS1 maint: others, CS1: long volume value, CS1 German-language sources (de), Eating disorders). ... Defining Purging Disorder in Practice "Professor Identifies New Eating Disorder - Purging Disorder". MedicalNewsToday. ( ... purging disorder is a form of other specified feeding or eating disorder. Research indicates that purging disorder, while not ... Purging disorder is an eating disorder characterized by the DSM-5 as self-induced vomiting, or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, ...
... hearing disorders; speech, language and cognitive disorders; neuropsychological parameters; telerehabilitation; wheelchair ... Graduate programs include: Audiology (AuD)/Speech-Language Pathology (MA/MS, CScD), Communication Science & Disorders (PhD), ... The school also ranked third in Occupational Therapy and Speech-Language Pathology, and seventh in Audiology. SHRS faculty and ... Areas of inquiry include: the measurement and study of motion; balance disorders; human performance; ...
Speech disorders refer to problems in producing the sounds of speech or with the quality of voice, where language disorders are ... Language disorders are usually considered distinct from speech disorders, although they are often used synonymously. ... and are subdivided into articulation disorders (also called phonetic disorders) and phonemic disorders. Articulation disorders ... British Stammering Association FOXP2 SCN3A KE family Language disorder Manner of articulation Motor speech disorders Revoicer ...
Topics in Language Disorders. 18 (4): 30-46. doi:10.1097/00011363-199808000-00005. ISSN 0271-8294. Meier, R. (1991). Language ... Sign languages are natural languages with the same linguistic status as spoken languages. Like other languages, sign languages ... Some of the main sign languages include American Sign Language, British Sign Language and French Sign Language. ASL is mostly ... Bilingual education American Sign Language Classifiers in American Sign Language Language acquisition Deaf Education Language ...
Ganser syndrome Language disorder Lists of language disorders Malapropism Speech disfluency Paragraphia - Similar to Paraphasia ... Post-stroke language disorders. Acta clinica Croatica 50:79-94 Kreisler A, Godefroy O, Delmaire C, Debachy B, Leclercq M, et al ... but for written languages Manasco, Hunter (2014). Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. p. 73. Biran M, Friedmann ... Language, and Hearing Research: 227-238. Berg T (2006). "A structural account of phonological paraphasias". Brain and Language ...
Topics in Language Disorders. 27 (3): 226-241. doi:10.1097/01.TLD.0000285357.95426.72. ISSN 0271-8294. PMC 2804985. PMID ... also known as Autism Spectrum Disorder, is a series of developmental disorders that impair the abilities of communicating and ... Christensen, Deborah (April 1, 2016). "Prevalence and Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 8 Years ... "An Evolution of Virtual Reality Training Designs for Children With Autism and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders". ...
"How Can Comorbidity with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Aid Understanding of Language and Speech Disorders?". Topics ... On the DSM Axis I, major depressive disorder is a very common comorbid disorder. The Axis II personality disorders are often ... OCD and eating disorders have a high rate of occurrence, it is estimated that 20-60% of patients with an eating disorder have ... CS1 uses Russian-language script (ru), CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Wikipedia articles needing page number citations from ...
Topics in Language Disorders. 25 (4): 338-352. Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin; Robinson, Lee A. (2005). "New Dean of Graduate ... "Social Skills of Children with Specific Language Impairment" in Language Speech Hearing Services in Schools Vol. 27, Issue 3 ( ... Much of their work has been published in either the Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders or the Journal of Speech and ... Brinton and Fujiki met while both were Ph.D. students at the University of Utah in speech language pathology. Since their ...
Some examples include expressive language disorder, receptive-expressive language disorder, phonologic disorder, and stuttering ... Speech and communication disorders refers to issues involving language and related areas such as oral motor function. ... "Communication/Speech/Language Disorders". Kennedy Krieger Institute. Retrieved 17 December 2020. "Bogart-Bacall syndrome, ... of the population and can range from muscle tension dysphonia to speech and language disorders. Further studies need to be ...
Meyerson, M. D. (2003). "Book Review: Greene & Mathieson's The Voice and Its Disorders (6th edition)". Topics in Language ... She was elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists in 1957. She was also the editor of its ... The Voice and its Disorders 1960. Learning to Talk. A guide for parents. London, William Heinemann. "RCSLT Honours Roll Call". ... In 1957 Green published The Voice and its Disorders, which represented a major contribution to the clinical assessment and ...
The loss of writing ability may present with other language or neurological disorders; disorders appearing commonly with ... "Post-stroke language disorders". Acta Clin Croat. 50 (1): 79-94. PMID 22034787. Lorch M (August 2013). "Written language ... Pure agraphia is the impairment in written language production without any other language or cognitive disorder. Agraphia can ... "The history of written language disorders: Reexamining Pitres' case (1884) of pure agraphia" (PDF). Brain Lang. 85 (2): 271-9. ...
Topic in Language Disorders. 37, 334-347. Beukelman, D., Hux, K., Dietz, A., McKelvey, M., & Weissling, K. (2015). Using Visual ... was a speech-language pathologist who specialized in augmentative and alternative communication and communication disorders ... He was the Barkley Professor Emeritus of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and used to be the ... ISBN 9781598572681 Management Motor Speech Disorders, Authors Kathryn M. Yorkston, David R. Beukelman, Edythe A. Strand, Mark ...
Language delays may impact expressive language, receptive language, or both. Communication disorders may impact articulation, ... Communication disorders or developmental language delays may occur for several different reasons. Language delays may be ... Differential diagnosis between selective mutism and language delay associated with autism or other disorders is needed to ... Children with autism, categorized as a neurodevelopmental disorder in the DSM-V, often demonstrate language delays. It's ...
Such disabilities include (but are not restricted to): Specific language impairment, phonological disorder, Language disorder, ... Topics in Language Disorders. K.J. Whalon; S. Al Otaiba & M.E. Delano (2009). Evidence-based reading instruction for ... Topics in Language Disorders. Special Reads for Special Needs, reading materials designed for children and young adults with ... or with weaknesses in language that are not severe enough to meet criteria for a clinical diagnosis of a language disorder. ...
Topics in Language Disorders. 23 (2): 134-145. doi:10.1097/00011363-200304000-00006. Koegel, Robert L. & Lynn Kern Koegel (c. ... Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is based on a belief that autism is a much less severe disorder than originally thought. ... Play environments are used to teach pivotal skills, such as turn-taking, communication, and language. This training is child- ... Lynn and Robert Koegel incorporated ideas from the natural language procedures to develop verbal communication in children with ...
Articles with Korean-language sources (ko), Articles with Greek-language sources (el), Articles with French-language sources ( ... Billy Milligan, 59, American criminal defendant diagnosed with multiple personality disorder, cancer. John Persen, 73, ... Articles with Polish-language sources (pl), Articles with German-language sources (de), Articles with Romanian-language sources ... Articles with Swedish-language sources (sv), Articles with Danish-language sources (da), Articles with Chinese-language sources ...
This case represents the consequence - perhaps unintended - of that broad language in excluding a meritorious invention from ... because Sequenom claimed more than it taught: "any diagnosis of any disease, disorder, or condition. . . . impermissible ... "bound by the sweeping language of the test set out in Mayo." He explained also why he considered the Supreme Court's Mayo ... "the Federal Circuit can find some way to rein in the unnecessarily expansive language of Mayo." But if the Federal Circuit is ...
Lily denies being paid, but Amanda, who does not experience emotions due to an unspecified mental disorder, is unfazed. Lily ... 2010s English-language films, 2010s American films, American independent films, 2017 independent films). ...
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2008). NIDCD fact sheet: Noise-induced hearing loss. ... "Recreational Firearm Noise Exposure". American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Retrieved 2019-03-16. ... National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2008). NIDCD fact sheet: Noise-induced hearing loss. ... CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Commons ...
CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Articles with Russian-language sources (ru), Use mdy dates from May 2011, Articles with ... health resort specialises in treatment of patients with diseases of digestion organs as well as those with metabolic disorder. ... Effective as of the day of the official publication.). (Pages with non-numeric formatnum arguments, CS1 uses Russian-language ... Articles containing Russian-language text, All articles with unsourced statements, Articles with unsourced statements from May ...
29 Broadway 18th Floor, New York, NY 10006: Peter Lang. 54.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: location (link) Steinberg, Stacey (28 ... Bradshaw, Samantha; Howard, Philip N. "The Global Disinformation Disorder: 2019 Global Inventory of Organised Social Media ... including language, culture and contextual relevance). The authors argue that "The virtual dimension emerges from the ... Jeder Mensch, "The 6 European Fundamental Rights", https://www.jeder-mensch.eu/informationen/?lang=en, accessed May 22, 2021. " ...
NOS 424.1 Valvular disorder, aortic, NOS 424.2 Valvular disorder, tricuspid, NOS 424.3 Valvular disorder, pulmonic, NOS 425 ... Late effects of cerebrovascular disease 438.0 Cognitive deficits 438.1 Speech and language deficits 438.10 Speech and language ... Orthostatic hypotension 458.2 Iatrogenic hypotension 459 Other disorders of circulatory system 459.8 Other specified disorders ... 447 Other disorders of arteries and arterioles 447.0 Arteriovenous fistula acquired 448 Disease of capillaries 449 Septic ...
The institute is very famous in India for its treatment, research and training on human mental disorder. The first asylum in ... CS1 Hindi-language sources (hi), Use dmy dates from March 2019, Use Indian English from March 2019, All Wikipedia articles ...
Residents complain of disorder amid sidings and traffic in the area]. O Dia (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro. 14 July 2016. ... Articles containing Portuguese-language text, Commons category link is on Wikidata, 1100 mm gauge railways in Brazil, Tram ... CS1 Portuguese-language sources (pt), Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Official ...
Hunter, William; Moynihan, Berkeley (1 January 1927). "Chronic Sepsis As A Cause Of Mental Disorder". The British Medical ... CS1: Julian-Gregorian uncertainty, CS1 errors: missing periodical, CS1 Serbian-language sources (sr), Articles with short ... praising the latter as a pioneer of surgical interventions in mental disorder, an idea that Hunter had speculated on but with ...
VI Grieving over Disorder (Dao luan) VII Distressed by These Times (Shang shi) VIII Lament for the Year (Ai sui) IX Maintaining ... Articles containing Chinese-language text, Chinese poems). ...
CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Coronavirus ... with additional disordered segments at each terminus. A third small domain at the C-terminal tail appears to have an ordered ... The N protein is composed of two main protein domains connected by an intrinsically disordered region (IDR) known as the linker ...
CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), Infantry divisions of the Soviet Union in World War II, Military units and formations ... battalion was encircled and destroyed in Staryi Rogachik and four more were forced across the river in considerable disorder. ...
CS1 Italian-language sources (it), CS1 Spanish-language sources (es), Articles with short description, Short description is ... as Conte Ottavio Disorder (1962, Franco Brusati) as Bruno La banda Casaroli (1962, Florestano Vancini) as Gabriele Ingenis Ro. ... Articles with Italian-language sources (it), Articles with ISNI identifiers, Articles with VIAF identifiers, Articles with ...
CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), CS1 French-language sources (fr), CS1 maint: url-status, Articles with short description, ... Movement Disorders (in French). 23 (6): 777-783. doi:10.1002/mds.21855. ISSN 1531-8257. PMID 18383531. S2CID 8761403. "Saratov ... Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Latin-language text, Articles using infobox university, All ... Surgery Medical Faculty Dermatovenereology and cosmetology Children's diseases of the medical faculty Foreign languages ...
"e-locos".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link) (CS1 uses Hindi-language script (hi), CS1 Hindi-language sources (hi), CS1 ... Lall, Lemuell (4 October 2014). "Skin disorder hits Itarsi DLS mechanics in MP". India Today. Retrieved 15 December 2021. "लोको ...
Susac to write an editorial in Neurology about the disorder and to use the eponym of Susac syndrome in the title, forever ... ISBN 9783752679120 (CS1 German-language sources (de), Articles needing additional medical references from August 2021, All ... Though the exact pathogenesis of this disorder is unknown, the retinal and brain biopsy findings suggest a small vessel ... "Susac's Syndrome". NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). Retrieved 2016-03-01. Egan RA, Nguyen TH, Gass JDM, Rizzo ...
They are hunted everywhere, and yesterday, in one spot, we captured 119; many more will probably be taken ... Disorder is ... Under his childhood tutor, von Fersen learned several languages including French, Latin, English, German and Italian. His later ... for it is the lowest of the populace who make the disorder. The bourgeoisie was immediately armed and that did much to restore ... CS1 Swedish-language sources (sv), Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Use dmy dates ...
Articles containing Yiddish-language text, Articles containing Hebrew-language text, Articles containing Latin-language text, ... Further disorder and anarchy reigned supreme in Poland during the second half of the 18th century, from the accession to the ... Articles with Polish-language sources (pl), CS1 Polish-language sources (pl), CS1 errors: missing periodical, CS1 maint: uses ... The Polish language, rather than Yiddish, was increasingly used by the young Warsaw Jews who did not have a problem in ...
films, Films about post-traumatic stress disorder, 2000s American films). ... 2000s English-language films, Best Foreign Film César Award winners, American detective films, Fictional portrayals of the ...
Or it might be in someone not understanding the wording of an item because they are not native to that country's language. ... However, some individuals who are morbidly obese and whose obesity is due to a physiological disorder may be protected against ... This might be incorrectly translating the same item to another language such as in an organization that hires both English and ... "The translation and development of a short form of the Korean language version of the multidimensional work ethic profile". ...
Articles containing Korean-language text, HanCinema film ID same as Wikidata, 2000s action drama films, Films directed by Kim ... during which he shows signs of post-traumatic stress disorder. His friends consequently ostracize him and his girlfriend leaves ... Films about post-traumatic stress disorder, Films set in 2002, 2000s South Korean films). ... Ki-duk, South Korean independent films, 2000s Korean-language films, Films about the Republic of Korea Marine Corps, South ...
Liu also consulted Yuan Zuming, one of his supporters who was a subordinate of Wang Wenhua, to sow disorder from within Wang's ... Articles containing Chinese-language text, History of Guizhou, Warlord cliques in Republican China). ...
Menshutkin had suffered for many years from disorder of the kidneys. He survived an attack at the end of 1906, but then ... Articles containing Russian-language text, Commons category link is on Wikidata, Articles with ISNI identifiers, Articles with ...
... mood disorders, personality disorders, and psychiatric disorders). In 2012 a team of psychiatrists, behavioral psychologists, ... Transition to the next stage begins with integration of thought and language which facilitates the use of symbols in speech and ... with patients affected by mental disorders related to the psychotic spectrum using different clusters of disorders and ... schizoaffective disorder, manic depression, delusional disorder, delusions of grandeur, auditory-visual hallucinations, ...
CS1 Swedish-language sources (sv), Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Orphaned ... Savitz, J (2018). "Interoception and Inflammation in Psychiatric Disorders". Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and ... "Altered functional connectivity of interception in illness anxiety disorder". Cortex. 86: 22-32. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2016.10. ...
... bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder), that mass shootings have become more common than other forms of mass murder since ... In February 2021, Psychological Medicine published a survey reviewing 14,785 publicly reported murders in English language news ... However, like the APA, the researchers emphasized that having a formal mental health disorder diagnosis is more predictive of ... and a psychotic disorder in only 3 cases). The survey concludes that given the high lifetime prevalence of the symptoms of ...
When his classmates picked on him due to his speech disorder, his mother decided to withdraw him from the school. He graduated ... Kocha, kradnie, szanuje". nowehoryzonty.pl (in Polish). (CS1 Polish-language sources (pl), All articles with dead external ... and due to a speech disorder, pronounced by him in a way that was considered amusing by others. After Najmrodzki was arrested ...
Compare disorder Somatoparaphrenia]. During the day-long excursion Sparre's consciousness alternated between periods of clarity ... I suddenly spoke to those present in a completely unknown language without looking at anyone present. Unfortunately, I remember ...
Peter Lang. p. 100. ISBN 978-1-4331-0743-6. President Wilson's racist policies are a matter of record. Wolgemuth, Kathleen L. ( ... "disorders of emotion, impaired impulse control, and defective judgment." Anxious to help the president recover, Tumulty, ...
Learn more about language disordersexternal icon.. Language or speech disorders can occur with other learning disorders that ... Language disorders *Aphasia (difficulty understanding or speaking parts of language due to a brain injury or how the brain ... Treatment for language or speech disorders and delays. Children with language problems often need extra help and special ... Language and speech disorders can exist together or by themselves. Examples of problems with language and speech development ...
... is a communication disorder that interferes with learning, understanding, and using language. These language difficulties are ... DLD has also been called specific language impairment, language delay, or developmental dysphasia. It is one of the most common ... such as lack of exposure to language. DLD can affect a childs speaking, listening, reading, and writing. ... developmental disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 14 children in kindergarten. The impact of DLD persists into adulthood. ...
Health Information on Sleep Disorders: MedlinePlus Multiple Languages Collection ... Sleep Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Problemas del sueño: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) ... Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues.. Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information in ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/sleepdisorders.html Other topics A-Z. ...
Researchers are studying the brains response to language and sound. ... Autism Spectrum Disorder and Language Processing. Join a Research Study: Enrolling locally from the Washington, D.C. metro ... Home , Research , Research Conducted at NIMH (Intramural Research Program) , Join a Study , Children , Autism Spectrum Disorder ... Download, read, and order free NIMH brochures and fact sheets about mental disorders and related topics. ...
... language, or hearing? Know the signs, and get help early. ... Language Disorders. Language is made up of the words we use to ... Language includes speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. A child with a language disorder may have trouble with one or ... Early Identification of Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders. Are you worried about your childs speech, language, or ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support ...
Look at the link between some epilepsies and autism spectrum disorder, depression, disorders of brain development, and other ... NANDSC Working Group for Health Disparities and Inequities in Neurological Disorders * NANDSC ME/CFS Research Roadmap Working ...
Could your challenges with language actually be signs of a learning disability known as Language Processing Disorder? Take the ... Language Processing Disorders in Adults Could your challenges with language actually be signs of a learning disability known as ... Language Disorders, self-test, treating adults More Articles Recommended For You. 3 Types of Sensory Disorders That Look Like ... Take this screener test to determine if you may be showing signs of an expressive or receptive language disorder. Any positive ...
Typical/Disordered Language: Phenotype Assessment Tools RFA-DC-05-001. NIDCD ... including child language disorders. This workshop, a follow-up to a May, 2002 workshop, Developmental Language Disorders: From ... To address this critical roadblock in research in child language development and language disorders, the NIDCD and NICHD are ... The investigation of the genetic bases of language and language disorders requires clear delineation of behavioral phenotypes, ...
Austin State University will provide speech and/or language teletherapy beginning June 1 for current clients of all ages and ... The Stanley Center for Speech and Language Disorders at Stephen F. ... The Stanley Center for Speech and Language Disorders at Stephen F. Austin State University will provide speech and/or language ... SFAs speech and language disorders center offering teletherapy this summer. Jo Gilmore, marketing communications specialist ...
Speech-Language Pathology, BS (Communication Sciences and Disorders). School of Allied Health Professions ... Speech-Language Pathology, BS (Communication Sciences and Disorders). School of Allied Health Professions ... Speech-Language Pathology, BS. Program Description. PROFESSION. Speech-language pathologists assess and provide clinical ... Preparation for a graduate program in Speech Language or Audiology; Speech-Language Pathology Assistant. Application Deadlines ...
... have difficulties with spoken language. DLD is caused by multiple risk factors working together. ... language disorder, language impairment, specific language impairment, language disorder and a myriad of other names that made ... What is Developmental Language Disorder (DLD)? Communication Skills. Language and Learning. Speech and Language. Speech Therapy ... People who have developmental language disorder (DLD) have difficulties with spoken language. As children, they may use simple ...
DuBard School for Language Disorders. 118 College Dr. #5215. Hattiesburg, MS 39406 ... to obtain some practicum hours on campus at the DuBard School for Language Disorders. If I have not completed 700 hours of ... Academic Language Therapist (CALT) national credential and membership in the Academic Language Therapy Association (ALTA). We ...
About half of individuals diagnosed with ,i,FOXP2-,/i,SLD have the disorder as the result of a ,i,de novo,/i, pathogenic ... FOXP2- Related Speech and Language Disorder Angela Morgan 1 , Simon E Fisher 2 , Ingrid Scheffer 3 , Michael Hildebrand 4 ... FOXP2- Related Speech and Language Disorder Angela Morgan et al. Free Books & Documents Show details Display options Display ... Clinical characteristics: FOXP2-related speech and language disorder (FOXP2-SLD) is caused by heterozygous FOXP2 pathogenic ...
... moderate-to-severe receptive and expressive language disorder; reading and spelling impairments; and fine motor difficulties. ... CAS also interferes nonselectively with multiple other aspects of language, including phonology, grammar, and literacy. ... Autistic features or a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder have been reported in some individuals. ... a disorder of speech motor programming or planning that affects the production, sequencing, timing, and stress of sounds, and ...
This figure includes voice disorders (3%), specific language impairments (7%) and other speech disorders (i.e. phonology, ... or language disorders. All therapy is conducted in small groups with three to four children and one speech-language pathologist ... A language disorder is an impairment in the ability to understand and/or use words in context, both verbally and nonverbally. ... Some characteristics of language disorders include improper use of words and their meanings, inability to express ideas, ...
Learn how to talk about mental health issues and substance use disorder in a compassionate way. ... Wilson has been providing clinical services in various mental health and substance use disorder treatment settings, including ...
Communication Disorders and Sciences For the Community. SUNY Cortlands Center for Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders ... The Master of Science (M.S.) in Communication Sciences and Disorders education program in speech-language pathology at SUNY ... For SUNY Cortland Students in the Communication Disorders and Sciences Major. The Center for Speech, Language and Hearing ... The American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national accrediting body for the professions of speech-language ...
... language that may be considered stigmatizing is commonly used within social communities of people with substance use disorder, ... and on which terms to avoid using to reduce stigma and negative bias when discussing addiction or substance use disorder with ... clinicians and others can use language that helps to destigmatize it. ... This resource offers background information and tips for providers on how to use person-first language* ...
Descriptions of each edition are found in brief where available. Click details & prices to get more information on a book or to find the best prices for the title ...
... receptive language disorder Develop your Childs Language Skills Many children present with language difficulties. A language ... language/child-speech-language-hearing-literacy-communication-disorders-delays/language-difficulties/specific-language- ... language/child-speech-language-hearing-literacy-communication-disorders-delays/language-difficulties/receptive-language- ... Receptive Language Disorder (Comprehension and Understanding) Children with receptive language disorder have difficulties with ...
Start Over You searched for: Language English ✖ Remove constraint Language: English Subject Substance-Related Disorders ✖ ... Remove constraint Subject: Substance-Related Disorders Subject Alcoholism ✖ Remove constraint Subject: Alcoholism Genre ...
Lexical-semantic deficits in developmental language disorder: the role of statistical learning ... Children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have severe difficulty with the acquisition of language. One hypothesis ... Children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have severe difficulty with the acquisition of language. One hypothesis ... Lexical-semantic deficits in developmental language disorder: the role of statistical learning ...
... to 7-year-old children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have difficulties explaining actions in terms of intentions ... This study aimed to establish whether 5- to 7-year-old children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have difficulties ... Can Children with Developmental Language Disorder Explain Actions in Terms of Intentions? ... Descriptors: Intervention, Teaching Methods, Children, Language Impairments, Language Acquisition, Intention, Task Analysis, ...
Overt Subject Pronouns Diagnose Kids with Developmental Language Disorder/SLI. February 14 2023. April 10, 2023. ... Excellent use of variationist morphosyntactic research techniques with spontaneous production data from atypical language ...
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) Language Disorder(s) Literacy and Phonological Awareness School-Based SLP Collection Social, ... California Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Board: SpeechPathology.com is approved by the California Speech-Language ... Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of child language development and disorders, autism, and augmentative ... Speech-Language and Audiology Canada. Clinically certified members of Speech-Language and Audiology Canada (SAC) can accumulate ...
Associations between self-perceived voice disorders in teachers, perceptual assessment by speech-language pathologists, and ... instrumental voice analysis, perceptual voice assessment, school teacher, voice disorders Persistent URL doi.org/10.3109/ ... perceptual assessment by speech-language pathologists, and instrumental analysis. International Journal of Speech-Language ... Purpose: The three aims of this study were to assess agreement between self-perceived voice disorders, perceptual and ...
Self-compassion and satisfaction with life in Danish adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD): `We are all in the ... Self-compassion and satisfaction with life in Danish adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD): `We are all in the ... Self-compassion and satisfaction with life in Danish adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD): `We are all in the ... Self-compassion and satisfaction with life in Danish adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD): `We are all in the ...
This CME/CE activity highlights your role in helping destigmatize addiction and substance use disorder and reduce negative bias ... This CME/CE activity highlights your role in helping destigmatize addiction and substance use disorder and reduce negative bias ... Your Words Matter - Language Showing Compassion and Care for Women, Infants, Families, and Communities Impacted by Substance ... Your Words Matter - Language Showing Compassion and Care for Women, Infants, Families, and Communities Impacted by Substance ...
Poor sign language production in children with autism spectrum disorder may contribute to their poor gestural learning/ ... Additionally, the deaf children with autism spectrum disorder had poor receptive language skills and this strongly correlated ... Our findings have therapeutic implications for children with autism spectrum disorder when teaching sign language. ... Keywords: autism spectrum disorder; children; deaf; fingerspelling; praxis; receptive communication; sign language. ...
Both the parents discipline style and nonuse of figurative language were related to conduct problems in conduct disordered ... The inability to use figurative language was found to be positively related to ratings of conduct problems. ... The relationship between the literal language and conduct problems among conduct disordered adolescents was examined in 109 ... Both the parents discipline style and nonuse of figurative language were related to conduct problems in conduct disordered ...
  • DLD has also been called specific language impairment, language delay, or developmental dysphasia. (nih.gov)
  • Williams Syndrome, Fragile X, autism, specific language impairment), develop of new models and methods for the genetic investigation, and new quantitative techniques for estimation of genetic effects and effect sizes. (nih.gov)
  • Over the years, developmental language disorder has been called many things: language disorder, language impairment, specific language impairment, language disorder and a myriad of other names that made diagnosing DLD confusing. (boystownhospital.org)
  • Some children have what is called a Specific Language Impairment (SLI). (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • Forty-six participants, from 4 years 6 months to 7 years 5 months old, 12 with expressive Specific Language Impairment (DLD), and 35 with mixed DLD, were recruited through our learning disorder clinic, and compared to 23 normally developing children aged 3 years and a half. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although the term Specific Language Impairment (SLI) has been the most frequently used in the scientific literature so far, terminology has been the subject of recent debates [ 3 ], leading to a change in both definition and terminology in the Diagnosis Statistical Manual (DSM 5) [ 4 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In September, 2003, a workshop 'The Relationship of Genes, Environments, and Developmental Language Disorders: Planning for the Future' brought together leaders from various scientific disciplines relevant to child development and disorders of childhood, including child language disorders. (nih.gov)
  • Developmental Language disorders (DLD) are developmental disorders that can affect both expressive and receptive language. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Developmental Language Disorders (DLD) are one of the most frequent causes of consultation in child psychiatry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders are caused by complex interactions between genes and the environment that change brain development. (nih.gov)
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders tend to run in families. (nih.gov)
  • In addition, other potentially related neurodevelopmental disorders, such as dyslexia or autism, are more common in the family members of a child with DLD. (nih.gov)
  • In the DSM-5 [ 4 ], "Language Disorders" are included in the neurodevelopmental disorders category. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Deciphering the Diversity of Mental Models in Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Knowledge Graph Representation of Public Data Using Natural Language Processing. (bvsalud.org)
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) represent a group of diagnoses , affecting up to 18% of the global population , involving differences in the development of cognitive or social functions. (bvsalud.org)
  • This ideally involves multidisciplinary care by speech-language pathologists (to individualize care, which may include use of nonverbal support or alternative means of communication), developmental pediatricians (to help guide parents through appropriate behavior management strategies and individualized education plans), occupational therapists (to address fine motor impairments), and mental health specialists (to address issues such as anxiety and depression, which can occur). (nih.gov)
  • Autism & developmental language impairments. (nih.gov)
  • in addition, language disorders can be associated with other diagnoses, such as autism spectrum disorders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Other individuals also have delayed development of motor skills such as walking and tying shoelaces, and autism spectrum disorders, which are conditions characterized by impaired communication and social interaction. (nih.gov)
  • Additional features that are sometimes associated with FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder, including delayed motor development and autism spectrum disorders, likely result from changes to other genes on chromosome 7. (nih.gov)
  • Communicating thoughts using language (expressive language). (cdc.gov)
  • In reality, these problems may be symptoms of an expressive or receptive language disorder, a set of learning disabilities that make it difficult for you to use language to communicate with others or make yourself understood. (additudemag.com)
  • Take this screener test to determine if you may be showing signs of an expressive or receptive language disorder. (additudemag.com)
  • Sometimes a child will have greater receptive (understanding) than expressive (speaking) language skills, but this is not always the case. (connectability.ca)
  • A language difficulty can be expressive (the language they use when they talk) and/or receptive (their understanding of language). (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • In the International Classification of Diseases (ICD10) as well as in the DSM IV-R, the definition of "Specific Disorder of Language Acquisition" focuses on the specific nature of the disorder, and a distinction is made between expressive (ELD) and mixed expressive-receptive (MLD) types of language impairment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A language disorder is an impairment in the ability to understand and/or use words in context, both verbally and nonverbally. (connectability.ca)
  • Information on age, gender, area of residence, chief complaint / manifestation of language impairment, etiologic diagnosis, and speech-language and hearing impairment was collected. (bvsalud.org)
  • Indeed, adolescents with a preschool history of speech impairment have good psychiatric outcomes if their language delay had been resolved by age 5, whereas they have significant attention and social difficulties in adolescence if they still have language difficulties [ 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Different terminologies have been used to describe language impairment in children, focusing on different aspects of these disorders. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In both definitions, the diagnosis comes with certain exclusion criteria, such as neurological disorders, hearing impairment, or intellectual disability, and language disorder has a significant impact on the child's global functioning. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Children with receptive language disorder have difficulties with the comprehension of language, understanding words, sentence structures or concepts. (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • SUNY Cortland's Center for Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders provides evaluation and therapy services free of charge to children and adults with a variety of speech, language, and hearing delays or disorders. (cortland.edu)
  • The Center for Speech, Language and Hearing Disorders is the campus training site for graduate student clinical experiences at SUNY Cortland. (cortland.edu)
  • If a doctor, teacher, or parent suspects that a child has DLD, a speech-language pathologist (a professional trained to assess and treat people with speech or language problems) can evaluate the child's language skills. (nih.gov)
  • These tools allow the speech-language pathologist to compare the child's language skills to those of same-age peers, identify specific difficulties, and plan for potential treatment targets. (nih.gov)
  • Children with developmental disabilities including autism spectrum disorder may also have difficulties with speech and language. (cdc.gov)
  • These language difficulties are not explained by other conditions, such as hearing loss or autism, or by extenuating circumstances, such as lack of exposure to language. (nih.gov)
  • Children with DLD are more likely than those without DLD to have parents and siblings who have also had difficulties and delays in language development. (nih.gov)
  • Although some late talkers eventually catch up with peers, children with DLD have persistent language difficulties. (nih.gov)
  • Language difficulties may be misinterpreted as a behavioral issue. (nih.gov)
  • When a child is struggling at home or in school, it is important to determine if language difficulties may be part of the problem. (nih.gov)
  • People who have developmental language disorder (DLD) have difficulties with spoken language. (boystownhospital.org)
  • Speech disorders refer to difficulties producing speech sounds or problems with voice quality. (connectability.ca)
  • This might be characterized by an interruption in the flow or rhythm of speech, such as stuttering (dysfluency), problems with the way sounds are formed (articulation or phonological disorders), or difficulties with the pitch, volume or quality of the voice. (connectability.ca)
  • A child with speech or language delays may present a variety of characteristics, including the inability to follow directions, slow and incomprehensible speech, or pronounced difficulties in syntax and articulation. (connectability.ca)
  • OSLA represents, promotes, and supports its members in their work on behalf of all Ontarians, especially those with communication disorders, swallowing difficulties, or hearing health care needs. (connectability.ca)
  • Many children present with language difficulties. (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • Many children present with language difficulties (delay or disorder), and these difficulties can present and affect language in different ways. (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • This study aimed to establish whether 5- to 7-year-old children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have difficulties explaining actions in terms of intentions and if so, to elucidate the nature of such difficulties. (ed.gov)
  • Despite changes in definition and terminology, the clinical questions raised on the subject of children with language difficulties remain the same. (biomedcentral.com)
  • How do children with major language difficulties develop their thought processes, and how do they learn and interact with others? (biomedcentral.com)
  • Articulation disorders are characterized by the substitution of one sound for another, or the omission, or distortion, of certain sounds. (connectability.ca)
  • Background: Adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) are at risk of emotional health problems and low self-esteem. (aau.dk)
  • The present study compared self-compassion and satisfaction with life reported by Danish adolescents with DLD compared to typically developing (TD) peers, and whether severity of language difficulty is associated with SC and SWL. (aau.dk)
  • SC and SWL was strongly correlated with language abilities for the DLD group, but not for the TD group.Conclusions: Results from our pilot study showed that Danish adolescents with DLD reported being less harsh on themselves. (aau.dk)
  • The relationship between the literal language and conduct problems among conduct disordered adolescents was examined in 109 subjects. (usu.edu)
  • Both the parents' discipline style and nonuse of figurative language were related to conduct problems in conduct disordered adolescents. (usu.edu)
  • These include depression and bipolar disorder (also called manic depression). (nih.gov)
  • Typical voice disorders include hoarseness, breathiness, or sudden breaks in loudness or pitch. (connectability.ca)
  • Voice disorders are frequently combined with other speech problems to form a complex communication disorder. (connectability.ca)
  • and to determine which associated factors would serve as an initial screening tool for ascertainment of the presence or absence of voice disorders among teachers. (eur.nl)
  • Agreements between GRBAS scale, self-reported voice disorders and instrumental analysis were determined by unweighted Coheńs Kappa coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves. (eur.nl)
  • Result: There was no agreement between self-reported voice disorders and GRBAS assessments. (eur.nl)
  • Maximum phonation time showed a slight agreement with perceptual assessment of voice disorders. (eur.nl)
  • Conclusion: Since these three methods offer different information, it is advisable to include all methods in ascertainment of voice disorders among teachers at work. (eur.nl)
  • NACOGDOCHES, Texas - The Stanley Center for Speech and Language Disorders at Stephen F. Austin State University will provide speech and/or language teletherapy beginning June 1 for current clients of all ages and anyone receiving services through the school system or other clinics closed due to COVID-19. (sfasu.edu)
  • Like other health service providers, the Stanley Center for Speech and Language Disorders has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. (sfasu.edu)
  • Since 1980, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, and behavior therapists from the Center for Speech, Language, Occupational Therapy, and Applied Behavior Analysis (CSLOT) have been serving the communication, movement, and behavior needs of children and adults in the San Francisco Bay Area. (cslot.com)
  • The mission of the Center for Speech, Language, Occupational Therapy, and Applied Behavior Analysis is to provide communication and movement to those who have lost or have not yet acquired these skills. (cslot.com)
  • FOXP2- related speech and language disorder ( FOXP2- SLD) is caused by heterozygous FOXP2 pathogenic variants (including whole- or partial- gene deletions). (nih.gov)
  • The core phenotype of FOXP2- SLD is childhood apraxia of speech (CAS), a disorder of speech motor programming or planning that affects the production, sequencing, timing, and stress of sounds, and the accurate sequencing of speech sounds into syllables and syllables into words. (nih.gov)
  • About half of individuals diagnosed with FOXP2- SLD have the disorder as the result of a de novo pathogenic variant . (nih.gov)
  • Several different changes affecting chromosome 7 can result in FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder. (nih.gov)
  • FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder is an uncommon condition that affects the development of speech and language starting in early childhood. (nih.gov)
  • All of the genetic changes that underlie FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder disrupt the activity of FOXP2 , a critical gene for normal speech and language development. (nih.gov)
  • Some individuals with FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder have a deletion that removes a small segment of chromosome 7, including the FOXP2 gene and several neighboring genes. (nih.gov)
  • Less commonly, FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder results from a rearrangement of the structure of chromosome 7 (such as a translocation) or from inheriting two copies of chromosome 7 from the mother instead of one from each parent (a phenomenon called maternal uniparental disomy or maternal UPD, which is described in more detail with Russell-Silver syndrome, below). (nih.gov)
  • For example, in affected individuals with a deletion involving chromosome 7, a loss of FOXP2 is thought to disrupt speech and language development, while the loss of nearby genes accounts for other signs and symptoms. (nih.gov)
  • People with maternal UPD for chromosome 7 have FOXP2 -related speech and language disorder as part of a larger condition called Russell-Silver syndrome (described below). (nih.gov)
  • Difficulty understanding figurative language. (nih.gov)
  • The NIDCD and NICHD jointly are providing $500,000 to support R21 Developmental/Exploratory grant awards to begin the process of adapting, norming, and/or developing language measures that can be used in the characterization of the behavioral phenotypes of language disorders and specific aspects of typical language acquisition. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, the NIDCD and NICHD are seeking exploratory/ developmental applications to address adapting, norming, and/or developing language measures that can be used in the characterization of the behavioral phenotypes of language disorders and specific aspects of typical language acquisition. (nih.gov)
  • Aphasia (difficulty understanding or speaking parts of language due to a brain injury or how the brain works). (cdc.gov)
  • Some children are good at compensating for a receptive language difficulty by being able to pick out key words in sentences and follow non-verbal clues such as the gesture or eye gaze of the speaker. (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • Children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have severe difficulty with the acquisition of language. (lotpublications.nl)
  • The problems with language may transfer into their reading comprehension and written communications as well. (boystownhospital.org)
  • In 2017 there was a concerted effort among English-speaking countries to create a standard term for these disorders and to adopt universally recognizable standards for diagnosis. (boystownhospital.org)
  • Autistic features or a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder have been reported in some individuals. (nih.gov)
  • 1 For example, "person with a substance use disorder" has a neutral tone and distinguishes the person from his or her diagnosis. (nih.gov)
  • We have been providing comprehensive diagnosis and therapeutic services to children and adults with communication disorders since 1960. (csun.edu)
  • A child with DLD often has a history of being a late talker (reaching spoken language milestones later than peers). (nih.gov)
  • A child's communication is considered delayed when the child is noticeably behind his/her peers in the acquisition of speech and/or language skills. (connectability.ca)
  • Since children's language develops in interaction with their parents, caregivers and peers, language disorders cannot be studied without considering the processes at play in language development. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Look at the link between some epilepsies and autism spectrum disorder, depression, disorders of brain development, and other mental health issues. (nih.gov)
  • Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), or the deliberate injuring of one's body without intending to die, has been shown to exhibit many similarities to substance use disorders (SUDs), for example comorbidity with anxiety and depression. (nih.gov)
  • Stuttering may spontaneously disappear by early adolescence, but speech and language therapy should be considered. (connectability.ca)
  • It provides intensive therapy programs for children, ages three to ten, with moderate to severe speech and/ or language disorders. (connectability.ca)
  • The loss of multiple genes can cause a more severe form of this disorder called Greig cephalopolysyndactyly contiguous gene deletion syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • Children with autism spectrum disorder present with a variety of social communication deficits such as atypicalities in social gaze and verbal and non-verbal communication delays as well as perceptuo-motor deficits like motor incoordination and dyspraxia. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • The Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology program begins in the autumn quarter and is based on the completion of two years of prerequisite course work at any accredited college or university. (llu.edu)
  • The American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) is the national accrediting body for the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology. (cortland.edu)
  • The Master of Science (M.S.) in Communication Sciences and Disorders education program in speech-language pathology at SUNY College at Cortland is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700. (cortland.edu)
  • Instead, DLD is a risk factor for learning disabilities since problems with basic language skills affect classroom performance. (nih.gov)
  • Below are some signs of speech, language, and hearing problems. (asha.org)
  • Feeling stigmatized can reduce the willingness of individuals with substance use disorder to seek care for substance use problems, prenatal needs, basic primary health, or mental health. (nih.gov)
  • Below are some commonly described language problems. (icommunicatetherapy.com)
  • The inability to use figurative language was found to be positively related to ratings of conduct problems. (usu.edu)
  • These problems can occur at any stage in life and include birth defects of the reproductive system, pregnancy complications, early puberty, developmental disorders, low birth weight, preterm birth, reduced fertility, impotence, and menstrual disorders. (nih.gov)
  • I know when I try to learn a second language, one of my problems is I can't understand the language very well. (nih.gov)
  • In some affected individuals, problems with speech and language are the only features of the condition. (nih.gov)
  • People with this form of the disorder have characteristic developmental problems involving the limbs, head, and face, along with seizures, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. (nih.gov)
  • A language development specialist like a speech-language pathologist external icon will conduct a careful assessment to determine what type of problem with language or speech the child may have. (cdc.gov)
  • CAS also interferes nonselectively with multiple other aspects of language, including phonology, grammar, and literacy. (nih.gov)
  • Inherited blood disorders are caused by changes in the structures of your genes (called mutations) before you are born. (nih.gov)
  • Language or speech disorders can also be present with emotional or behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or anxiety . (cdc.gov)
  • The investigation of the genetic bases of language and language disorders requires clear delineation of behavioral phenotypes, identification of neurocognitive substrates, synthesis of emerging discoveries across different clinical diagnoses (e.g. (nih.gov)
  • Despite ongoing progress, there remain many factors that impede the research, the most fundamental roadblock being the limited number of robust assessment tools with which to define behavioral phenotypes in language and language disorders. (nih.gov)
  • This activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, pharmacists, registered nurses, nurse practitioners/other APRNs, and dentists engaged in the care of patients with substance use disorders. (nih.gov)
  • Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), or the deliberate injuring of one?s body without intending to die, has been shown to exhibit many similarities to substance use disorders (SUDs), including population-level characteristics, impulsivity traits, and comorbidity with other mental disorders. (nih.gov)
  • Speech-language pathologists assess and provide clinical services to people who cannot communicate clearly. (llu.edu)
  • After completing a one-year clinical fellowship, the graduate is eligible to apply for California licensure and for certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). (llu.edu)
  • The program is approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing to prepare students for the California Clinical Rehabilitative Services Credential in Language, Speech, and Hearing. (llu.edu)
  • Dr. Wilson has been providing clinical services in various mental health and substance use disorder treatment settings, including inpatient, outpatient, residential, recovery high school, and community mental health since 2006. (indychamber.com)
  • It is the clinical training site for graduate students in the Communication Disorders and Sciences Department. (cortland.edu)
  • All clinical services are supervised by New York State-licensed, ASHA-certified speech-language pathologists and audiologists. (cortland.edu)
  • The CSUN Language, Speech and Hearing Center (LSHC ) is a non-profit, university-based clinical facility on the CSUN campus in the San Fernando Valley. (csun.edu)
  • NEI supports basic and clinical research into diseases and disorders of the visual system and the special needs of people with impaired vision or who are blind. (nih.gov)
  • Although some language that may be considered stigmatizing is commonly used within social communities of people with substance use disorder, clinicians and others can use language that helps to destigmatize it. (nih.gov)
  • This resource offers background information and tips for providers on how to use person-first language* and on which terms to avoid using to reduce stigma and negative bias when discussing addiction or substance use disorder with pregnant women and mothers. (nih.gov)
  • For people with substance use disorder, stigma might include inaccurate or unfounded thoughts (e.g., people with substance use disorder are dangerous, incapable of managing treatment, or at fault for their condition). (nih.gov)
  • Stigma against pregnant women and mothers with substance use disorder appears in many forms, such as the use of erroneous language and terminology, delivery and belief of misinformation about substance use, punishment of substance use, and belittling of a mother's relationship with her child. (nih.gov)
  • Stigma against people with substance use disorder may stem from antiquated and incorrect beliefs that addiction is a moral failing, instead of what we know it to be: a chronic, treatable brain disease from which patients can recover and continue to lead healthy lives. (nih.gov)
  • How does stigma affect people with substance use disorder? (nih.gov)
  • How does stigma uniquely affect pregnant women and mothers with substance use disorder? (nih.gov)
  • The adoption of addiction and recovery language in NSSI communities may help them cope with self-injury, buffer against self-stigma, and encourage adoption of common SUD recovery strategies. (nih.gov)
  • Learning a language takes time, and children vary in how quickly they master milestones in language and speech development. (cdc.gov)
  • They may not master the language milestones at the same time as other children, and it may be a sign of a language or speech delay or disorder. (cdc.gov)
  • Overall, learning more than one language does not cause language disorders, but children may not follow exactly the same developmental milestones as those who learn only one language. (cdc.gov)
  • For more detailed information, click for a Boys Town Hospital's list of speech and language development milestones . (boystownhospital.org)
  • Research has further shown that people who self-injure adopt language common in SUD recovery communities (e.g., {``}clean{''}, {``}relapse{''}, {``}addiction,{''} and celebratory language about sobriety milestones). (nih.gov)
  • SC and SWL was strongly correlated with language abilities for the DLD group, but not for the TD group. (aau.dk)
  • Additionally, the deaf children with autism spectrum disorder had poor receptive language skills and this strongly correlated with their praxis performance and autism severity. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • Speech-language pathologists help clients develop, or recover functional communication skills so they can fulfill their rolls in society. (llu.edu)
  • However, even if you have a clotting disorder, you may not ever develop a blood clot. (nih.gov)
  • Developmental language disorder (DLD) is a communication disorder that interferes with learning, understanding, and using language. (nih.gov)
  • They counsel individuals and their families concerning communication disorders and help them learn to cope with the stress and misunderstanding that often accompany these disorders. (llu.edu)
  • Speech-language pathologists (speech therapists) diagnose and treat or remediate communication disorders in children. (connectability.ca)
  • The Toronto Children's Centre is a specialty service for children with communication disorders. (connectability.ca)
  • The schedule for these services is changeable so for appointments or more information, please contact the Communication Disorders and Sciences Department at 607-753-5423. (cortland.edu)
  • For appointments or more information, contact the Communication Disorders and Sciences Department at 607-753-5423. (cortland.edu)
  • Geller and Foley [ 6 ] therefore underlined the need to incorporate mental health constructs such as the attachment theory into the study of communication disorders, and to work from a relationship-based perspective with children who are language-impaired. (biomedcentral.com)
  • One, or a combination, of these characteristics may occur in children who are affected by language learning disabilities or developmental language delay. (connectability.ca)
  • The voice samples were perceptually evaluated by a speech-language pathologist with the Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain (GRBAS) scale and objectively with an automated voice analysis for fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer and maximum phonation time. (eur.nl)
  • These results show that while people who self-injure may contextualize their disorder as an addiction, their posting habits demonstrate comorbidities with other mental disorders more so than their counterparts in recovery from SUDs. (nih.gov)
  • Some characteristics of language disorders include improper use of words and their meanings, inability to express ideas, inappropriate grammatical patterns, reduced vocabulary, and inability to follow directions. (connectability.ca)
  • Mood disorders can increase a person's risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Exposure to environmental pollutants can lead to diseases, disorders, and conditions that affect the function of male and female reproductive systems. (nih.gov)
  • In this study, we focus on 2 NDDs, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which involve multiple symptoms and interventions requiring interactions between 2 important stakeholders parents and health professionals. (bvsalud.org)
  • These findings extend the evidence for dyspraxia in hearing children with autism spectrum disorder to deaf children with autism spectrum disorder. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • Our findings have therapeutic implications for children with autism spectrum disorder when teaching sign language. (autismsciencefoundation.org)
  • This CME/CE activity highlights your role in helping destigmatize addiction and substance use disorder and reduce negative bias among pregnant women and mothers. (nih.gov)
  • Children's language and brain skills get stronger if they hear many different words. (cdc.gov)
  • Some languages are visual rather than spoken. (cdc.gov)
  • For multilingual children, DLD will impact all languages spoken by a child. (nih.gov)
  • At any age, they may have a hard time understanding spoken language or following verbal directions. (boystownhospital.org)
  • Using machine learning based natural language processing algorithms, we automatically identify shared language across the NSSI and SUD communities, which includes SUD recovery language in addition to other themes common to support forums (e.g., requests for help and gratitude). (nih.gov)