Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Engraving and EngravingsHemianopsia: Partial or complete loss of vision in one half of the visual field(s) of one or both eyes. Subtypes include altitudinal hemianopsia, characterized by a visual defect above or below the horizontal meridian of the visual field. Homonymous hemianopsia refers to a visual defect that affects both eyes equally, and occurs either to the left or right of the midline of the visual field. Binasal hemianopsia consists of loss of vision in the nasal hemifields of both eyes. Bitemporal hemianopsia is the bilateral loss of vision in the temporal fields. Quadrantanopsia refers to loss of vision in one quarter of the visual field in one or both eyes.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Medicine in ArtEnvironment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.Wavelet Analysis: Signal and data processing method that uses decomposition of wavelets to approximate, estimate, or compress signals with finite time and frequency domains. It represents a signal or data in terms of a fast decaying wavelet series from the original prototype wavelet, called the mother wavelet. This mathematical algorithm has been adopted widely in biomedical disciplines for data and signal processing in noise removal and audio/image compression (e.g., EEG and MRI).Bicycling: The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Disulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Myocardial Bridging: A malformation that is characterized by a muscle bridge over a segment of the CORONARY ARTERIES. Systolic contractions of the muscle bridge can lead to narrowing of coronary artery; coronary compression; MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing: Techniques of nucleotide sequence analysis that increase the range, complexity, sensitivity, and accuracy of results by greatly increasing the scale of operations and thus the number of nucleotides, and the number of copies of each nucleotide sequenced. The sequencing may be done by analysis of the synthesis or ligation products, hybridization to preexisting sequences, etc.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Salts: Substances produced from the reaction between acids and bases; compounds consisting of a metal (positive) and nonmetal (negative) radical. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Electrophoresis, Agar Gel: Electrophoresis in which agar or agarose gel is used as the diffusion medium.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Cysteine: A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Structure Collapse: Failure in built environment with loss of functional integrity.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Cystine: A covalently linked dimeric nonessential amino acid formed by the oxidation of CYSTEINE. Two molecules of cysteine are joined together by a disulfide bridge to form cystine.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Sulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent sulfur bonds -S-. The sulfur atom can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Denture, Partial: A denture replacing one or more (but not all) natural teeth. It is supported and retained by underlying tissue and some or all of the remaining teeth.Static Electricity: The accumulation of an electric charge on a objectDimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.Dithiothreitol: A reagent commonly used in biochemical studies as a protective agent to prevent the oxidation of SH (thiol) groups and for reducing disulphides to dithiols.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Scorpion Venoms: Venoms from animals of the order Scorpionida of the class Arachnida. They contain neuro- and hemotoxins, enzymes, and various other factors that may release acetylcholine and catecholamines from nerve endings. Of the several protein toxins that have been characterized, most are immunogenic.Cytokinesis: The process by which the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided.Protein Structure, Quaternary: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape and arrangement of multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Scorpions: Arthropods of the order Scorpiones, of which 1500 to 2000 species have been described. The most common live in tropical or subtropical areas. They are nocturnal and feed principally on insects and other arthropods. They are large arachnids but do not attack man spontaneously. They have a venomous sting. Their medical significance varies considerably and is dependent on their habits and venom potency rather than on their size. At most, the sting is equivalent to that of a hornet but certain species possess a highly toxic venom potentially fatal to humans. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, p417; Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p503)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Intercellular Junctions: Direct contact of a cell with a neighboring cell. Most such junctions are too small to be resolved by light microscopy, but they can be visualized by conventional or freeze-fracture electron microscopy, both of which show that the interacting CELL MEMBRANE and often the underlying CYTOPLASM and the intervening EXTRACELLULAR SPACE are highly specialized in these regions. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p792)Protein Denaturation: Disruption of the non-covalent bonds and/or disulfide bonds responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional shape and activity of the native protein.Enzyme Stability: The extent to which an enzyme retains its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to storage, isolation, and purification or various other physical or chemical manipulations, including proteolytic enzymes and heat.Sulfhydryl Compounds: Compounds containing the -SH radical.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Trypsin: A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Poetry as Topic: Literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Protein Multimerization: The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.Cross-Linking Reagents: Reagents with two reactive groups, usually at opposite ends of the molecule, that are capable of reacting with and thereby forming bridges between side chains of amino acids in proteins; the locations of naturally reactive areas within proteins can thereby be identified; may also be used for other macromolecules, like glycoproteins, nucleic acids, or other.Spinal Cord Regeneration: Repair of the damaged neuron function after SPINAL CORD INJURY or SPINAL CORD DISEASES.Protein Stability: The ability of a protein to retain its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to physical or chemical manipulations.Pepsin A: Formed from pig pepsinogen by cleavage of one peptide bond. The enzyme is a single polypeptide chain and is inhibited by methyl 2-diaazoacetamidohexanoate. It cleaves peptides preferentially at the carbonyl linkages of phenylalanine or leucine and acts as the principal digestive enzyme of gastric juice.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Catalytic Domain: The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.Denture, Partial, Fixed, Resin-Bonded: A commonly used prosthesis that results in a strong, permanent restoration. It consists of an electrolytically etched cast-metal retainer that is cemented (bonded), using resins, to adjacent teeth whose enamel was previously acid-treated (acid-etched). This type of bridgework is sometimes referred to as a Maryland bridge.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Chemistry: A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.Arginine: An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.Ribosome Subunits, Large, Bacterial: The large subunit of the eubacterial 70s ribosome. It is composed of the 23S RIBOSOMAL RNA, the 5S RIBOSOMAL RNA, and about 37 different RIBOSOMAL PROTEINS.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Chymotrypsin: A serine endopeptidase secreted by the pancreas as its zymogen, CHYMOTRYPSINOGEN and carried in the pancreatic juice to the duodenum where it is activated by TRYPSIN. It selectively cleaves aromatic amino acids on the carboxyl side.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.PeptidoglycanConserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Cyanogen Bromide: Cyanogen bromide (CNBr). A compound used in molecular biology to digest some proteins and as a coupling reagent for phosphoroamidate or pyrophosphate internucleotide bonds in DNA duplexes.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Alanine: A non-essential amino acid that occurs in high levels in its free state in plasma. It is produced from pyruvate by transamination. It is involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases IMMUNITY, and provides energy for muscle tissue, BRAIN, and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Chemical Phenomena: The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Lysine: An essential amino acid. It is often added to animal feed.Anaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following METAPHASE, in which the CHROMATIDS separate and migrate to opposite poles of the spindle.Protein Engineering: Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Trypsin Inhibitors: Serine proteinase inhibitors which inhibit trypsin. They may be endogenous or exogenous compounds.Aspartic Acid: One of the non-essential amino acids commonly occurring in the L-form. It is found in animals and plants, especially in sugar cane and sugar beets. It may be a neurotransmitter.Cardiovascular Physiological Processes: Biological actions and events that support the functions of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Protein Subunits: Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric PROTEINS. Multimeric proteins can be composed of identical or non-identical subunits. One or more monomeric subunits may compose a protomer which itself is a subunit structure of a larger assembly.Chromatography, Gel: Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.Models, Structural: A representation, generally small in scale, to show the structure, construction, or appearance of something. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Crystallography: The branch of science that deals with the geometric description of crystals and their internal arrangement. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular: NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Guanidine: A strong organic base existing primarily as guanidium ions at physiological pH. It is found in the urine as a normal product of protein metabolism. It is also used in laboratory research as a protein denaturant. (From Martindale, the Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed and Merck Index, 12th ed) It is also used in the treatment of myasthenia and as a fluorescent probe in HPLC.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.MercaptoethanolEscherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Bacteriocins: Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Ions: An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.Alkylation: The covalent bonding of an alkyl group to an organic compound. It can occur by a simple addition reaction or by substitution of another functional group.Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs: Protein modules with conserved ligand-binding surfaces which mediate specific interaction functions in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS and the specific BINDING SITES of their cognate protein LIGANDS.Electrophoresis: An electrochemical process in which macromolecules or colloidal particles with a net electric charge migrate in a solution under the influence of an electric current.Chondroitin ABC Lyase: An enzyme that catalyzes the eliminative degradation of polysaccharides containing 1,4-beta-D-hexosaminyl and 1,3-beta-D-glucuronosyl or 1,3-alpha-L-iduronosyl linkages to disaccharides containing 4-deoxy-beta-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl groups. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Thioredoxins: Hydrogen-donating proteins that participates in a variety of biochemical reactions including ribonucleotide reduction and reduction of PEROXIREDOXINS. Thioredoxin is oxidized from a dithiol to a disulfide when acting as a reducing cofactor. The disulfide form is then reduced by NADPH in a reaction catalyzed by THIOREDOXIN REDUCTASE.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.alpha-Amylases: Enzymes that catalyze the endohydrolysis of 1,4-alpha-glycosidic linkages in STARCH; GLYCOGEN; and related POLYSACCHARIDES and OLIGOSACCHARIDES containing 3 or more 1,4-alpha-linked D-glucose units.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Spiders: Arthropods of the class ARACHNIDA, order Araneae. Except for mites and ticks, spiders constitute the largest order of arachnids, with approximately 37,000 species having been described. The majority of spiders are harmless, although some species can be regarded as moderately harmful since their bites can lead to quite severe local symptoms. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, p508; Smith, Insects and Other Arthropods of Medical Importance, 1973, pp424-430)Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Structural Homology, Protein: The degree of 3-dimensional shape similarity between proteins. It can be an indication of distant AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and used for rational DRUG DESIGN.Heart, Artificial: A pumping mechanism that duplicates the output, rate, and blood pressure of the natural heart. It may replace the function of the entire heart or a portion of it, and may be an intracorporeal, extracorporeal, or paracorporeal heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Lysostaphin: A 25-kDa peptidase produced by Staphylococcus simulans which cleaves a glycine-glcyine bond unique to an inter-peptide cross-bridge of the STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS cell wall. EC 3.4.24.75.Asparagine: A non-essential amino acid that is involved in the metabolic control of cell functions in nerve and brain tissue. It is biosynthesized from ASPARTIC ACID and AMMONIA by asparagine synthetase. (From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed)Cryoelectron Microscopy: Electron microscopy involving rapid freezing of the samples. The imaging of frozen-hydrated molecules and organelles permits the best possible resolution closest to the living state, free of chemical fixatives or stains.Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Reducing Agents: Materials that add an electron to an element or compound, that is, decrease the positiveness of its valence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Mutant Proteins: Proteins produced from GENES that have acquired MUTATIONS.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization: A mass spectrometric technique that is used for the analysis of large biomolecules. Analyte molecules are embedded in an excess matrix of small organic molecules that show a high resonant absorption at the laser wavelength used. The matrix absorbs the laser energy, thus inducing a soft disintegration of the sample-matrix mixture into free (gas phase) matrix and analyte molecules and molecular ions. In general, only molecular ions of the analyte molecules are produced, and almost no fragmentation occurs. This makes the method well suited for molecular weight determinations and mixture analysis.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Muramidase: A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet: Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mutation, Missense: A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Physical Conditioning, Human: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ribosome Subunits, Small, Bacterial: The small subunit of eubacterial RIBOSOMES. It is composed of the 16S RIBOSOMAL RNA and about 23 different RIBOSOMAL PROTEINS.Iodoacetamide: An alkylating sulfhydryl reagent. Its actions are similar to those of iodoacetate.Hydrangeaceae: A plant family of the order ROSALES, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Glycosylation: The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Endopeptidases: A subclass of PEPTIDE HYDROLASES that catalyze the internal cleavage of PEPTIDES or PROTEINS.Dithionitrobenzoic Acid: A standard reagent for the determination of reactive sulfhydryl groups by absorbance measurements. It is used primarily for the determination of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups in proteins. The color produced is due to the formation of a thio anion, 3-carboxyl-4-nitrothiophenolate.Micronucleus Tests: Induction and quantitative measurement of chromosomal damage leading to the formation of micronuclei (MICRONUCLEI, CHROMOSOME-DEFECTIVE) in cells which have been exposed to genotoxic agents or IONIZING RADIATION.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Spectrum Analysis, Raman: Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light.Chromosome Segregation: The orderly segregation of CHROMOSOMES during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Micronuclei, Chromosome-Defective: Defective nuclei produced during the TELOPHASE of MITOSIS or MEIOSIS by lagging CHROMOSOMES or chromosome fragments derived from spontaneous or experimentally induced chromosomal structural changes.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Indole-3-Glycerol-Phosphate Synthase: An enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. EC 4.1.1.48.Iodoacetates: Iodinated derivatives of acetic acid. Iodoacetates are commonly used as alkylating sulfhydryl reagents and enzyme inhibitors in biochemical research.Cell Communication: Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.Malate Dehydrogenase (NADP+)
  • VDOT had imposed a 15-ton weight limit for three weeks from late October to mid-November of 2017 after an annual inspection identified potential abnormalities in two of the bridge's pins, which help support the bridge beams and were installed in 2007. (wtvr.com)
  • Motorists should watch for periodic lane closures on U.S. 11 from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. between Oranda Road and Shenandoah County and Water Plant Road in Warren County through March and April. (nvdaily.com)
  • One traffic lane has been removed for this project, and the SFMTA says it is not expected to affect parking and will present "no significant delay to motorists on Folsom Street or in the area due to the pilot project. (sfgate.com)
  • He agreed with Mr Bridges about the "Gull effect", and said motorists would benefit if the company expanded. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Known as Kalayaan Lanes, these routes are open to private motorists in preparation for the upcoming holiday season. (yahoo.com)
  • The bridge carried about 25 vehicles a day on Route 713 over the creek, Coy said. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • One eastbound lane of the Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge on Route 40 between Harford and Cecil counties will be closed starting next week, along with additional closures planned in the coming weeks. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Additionally, one westbound lane will be closed continuously from Oct. 26 to Nov. 9, and westbound Route 40 will be temporarily closed at Route 222 for three consecutive weekends starting Oct. 30. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The closures are part of the MDTA's project to reconstruct the existing pavement from the E Street Bridge approach to Route 222 in Cecil County, to remove the existing toll plaza and to construct a new toll gantry and Information Technology System equipment to support all-electronic tolling operations west of the Hatem Bridge. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Save on your prescriptions at the CVS Pharmacy 2988 Route 516 and Red Oak Lane in Old Bridge using discounts from GoodRx. (goodrx.com)
  • Folsom is a major bike route from the Mission to downtown SF, and it has featured a heavily-used bicycle lane for years now, but this re-configuration creates a wider, buffered lane along the right-hand side . (sfgate.com)
  • CHICO - Caltrans joined officials from the city of Chico and the Butte County Association of Governments today to celebrate the completion of a much-needed project to construct new auxiliary lanes and sound walls on State Route 99 near Bidwell Park in central Chico. (ca.gov)
  • The auxiliary lanes provide an important connector over Bidwell Park for local residents traveling between State Route 32 and East 1st Street. (ca.gov)
  • As a result, VDOT officials warned drivers on Route 3 to expect delays Thursday since only one lane of the bridge is open and traffic is being led by a "pilot vehicle. (wtvr.com)
  • Medical help is already en route to the marina. (nh.us)
  • (Trenton) - New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) officials today announced the start of a major rehabilitation of the Route 495 Bridge over Route 1&9 and Paterson Plank Road in North Bergen which leads to the Lincoln Tunnel. (nj.gov)
  • The work to be performed in this first phase will be under the bridge and along the Paterson Plank Road - Union Turnpike corridor and will not affect peak period traffic on mainline Route 495. (nj.gov)
  • At that time one lane of Route 495 in each direction will be closed, limiting the roadway capacity and causing severe congestion. (nj.gov)
  • The Route 495 Viaduct is a nine span bridge that carries traffic over the NYS&W and Conrail rail lines, as well as Route 1&9, Paterson Plank Road and Liberty Avenue in North Bergen, Hudson County. (nj.gov)
  • The Route 495, Route 1&9/Paterson Plank Road bridge deck is in poor condition and the structural framing and supporting piers have areas of severe corrosion and section loss. (nj.gov)
  • The exclusive bus lane (XBL) is a contra-flow transit lane along Route 495 from the NJ Turnpike to the Lincoln Tunnel and is considered the busiest and most productive bus lane in the nation. (nj.gov)
  • A safety project to construct passing lanes in both directions on State Route 246 near Lompoc from Cebada Canyon Road to Hapgood Road (East) will result in a traffic switch beginning Thursday, June 29 at 10 pm. (edhat.com)
  • The bridges along the route to Colombia 's National Archeological Park of Tierradentro are a good example. (travelandleisure.com)
  • LANCASTER COUNTY, Va. -- VDOT has imposed a three-ton vehicle weight limit as inspectors work to make sure the Robert O. Norris Bridge is safe after a strange sound was reported by a construction crew Wednesday night. (wtvr.com)
  • During a milling and paving operation on the bridge [Wednesday], a VDOT construction inspector reported an abnormal sound that could potentially indicate a safety concern with a bridge element," officials said. (wtvr.com)
  • Earlier in the day, officials posted a photo of a safety rescue boat leaving shore before a VDOT bridge inspection team rappelled down the structure. (wtvr.com)
  • NORRIS BRIDGE: VDOT bridge inspection team with climbers and safety rescue boat have launched to start work to check the structure for safety after a report of an abnormal sound. (wtvr.com)
  • The pins will remain on the bridge," Annette Adams, P.E., VDOT Fredericksburg District Structure and Bridge Engineer, said at the time. (wtvr.com)
  • MoDOT has once again closed one westbound lane of I-255 at the bridge while crews are repairing an expansion joint to prevent further damage. (kmov.com)
  • One less lane should not produce much noticeable congestion along Folsom between 11th and 4th streets. (sfgate.com)
  • The new auxiliary lanes will reduce congestion through the heart of Chico and enhance safety for thousands of commuters and local residents who travel on this stretch of highway daily,' said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. (ca.gov)
  • But the authors note, "previous analysis established that the carpool lane did not contribute to the bottleneck formation and capacity drop. (howwedrive.com)
  • But even as the capacity of the carpool lane began to drop, the researchers observed an interesting pattern: The "discharge" of vehicles from the bottleneck in other lanes actually began to increase. (howwedrive.com)
  • In lane 2, as pictured above (the one next to the HOV), drivers made fewer changes in and out of it when the carpool lane was activated (some of those drivers may have previously been jumping back and forth between lane 1, the 'fast lane,' and 2). (howwedrive.com)
  • When the carpool lane wasn't activated, lanes saw anywhere from 9% to 13% worse performance in VPH (vehicles per hour). (howwedrive.com)
  • The authors note that if this "smoothing effect" is not observed and quantified, long highway delays might be incorrectly attributed to the carpool lane. (howwedrive.com)
  • As Highway 286 will eventually be widened, the bridge needs to be wider to fit the freeway underneath it. (kiiitv.com)
  • Also note that PBOT is proposing a shared bike/walk lane because this section of the highway has no sidewalk. (bikeportland.org)
  • Brackett said there were still several lanes of the highway closed and there was a heavy state police presence on the scene. (unionleader.com)
  • The bridge is on the Asian Highway and the Trans-Asian Railway which, when fully developed, will provide uninterrupted international road and railway links from southeast Asia through Central Asia to northwest Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • maybe someday we'll have "variable lane assignment" to smooth it out across the highway. (howwedrive.com)
  • Vital repairs to bridges over the A10 at Rush Green near Hertford (between the A414 and the A10) start in January with road and lane closures planned in the early stages of the project. (whtimes.co.uk)
  • Portland Transportation Director Leah Treat's decision last year to make physical separation the default design for bike lane projects is starting to pay off. (bikeportland.org)
  • Portland Bicycle Planning Coordinator Roger Geller on Tuesday shared no less than nine projects, all approved and to some extent funded, that will scatter new, modern protected bike lanes into every quadrant of the city within two years. (bikeportland.org)
  • The Morrison Bridge has a great bike facility that is almost impossible to reach, let alone find for the first time. (bikeportland.org)
  • With public bike share arriving in July, this proposal for a contraflow lane on SE Morrison Street would help people find their way to and from the bridge landing on Water Street. (bikeportland.org)
  • Both create a parking-protected westbound bike lane on this awkward stretch of road, a definite improvement for people looking to jump quickly between the Central Eastside and downtown. (bikeportland.org)
  • This is just a four-block stretch of a very important road, but Geller said upgrading it from a buffered bike lane to a post-protected one will demonstrate "the design that we want to continue with" as more parts of the roadway are repaved or reworked. (bikeportland.org)
  • Geller said the two-way bike lane on the east side of the bridge (the one that heads north today) will have some sort of vertical separation, possibly hard plastic posts. (bikeportland.org)
  • We reported yesterday that the upgraded parking-and-curb-protected bike lanes in this commercial district, the only sidewalk-facing commercial strip in East Portland, will be among the best in the city. (bikeportland.org)
  • Explore how far you can travel by car, bus, bike and foot from 325 Winter Park Lane. (walkscore.com)
  • That scant 60 yards yards of bike lanes turned into more than 92 miles in 2014. (forthepeople.com)
  • I'd like to leave a bunch on the bike lane on Congress Street, which drivers think is a special little douchebag lane just for them to use! (universalhub.com)
  • NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - If you ask drivers, many will tell you it's become chaos in New York City because of miles and miles of bike lanes popping up in recent years. (cbslocal.com)
  • A lot of street real estate has been given up on the promise that bike lanes would be heavily used. (cbslocal.com)
  • bike lanes aren't empty. (cbslocal.com)
  • Ahh yes, let's trot out that tired old canard that "bike lanes are empty most of the time so they are a waste. (cbslocal.com)
  • Many have bike lanes. (vrbo.com)
  • After Bangladesh attained independence in 1971, the new government publicly stated its intention in 1972 to construct a bridge over the Jamuna and budgetary provisions were kept for the purpose in the 1972-73 budget. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Virginia Department of Transportation recently began work to build a new bridge over the creek at the Shenandoah-Warren county line between Strasburg and Middletown. (nvdaily.com)
  • Work was under way to replace the 158-ft. (48 m), one-lane bridge over Walker Creek in Giles County, which had been deemed structurally deficient under federal guidelines, said Virginia Department of Transportation spokeswoman Heidi Coy. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • Theatre Arts of Lane is a gateway program to theatre, film, and television work throughout the region. (lanecc.edu)
  • Work continues to replace the Butte Creek Bridge on SR-99. (ca.gov)
  • Work on a $5.9 million project to improve safety by widening the shoulders of the Rock Creek Bridge is scheduled to begin in spring 2015. (ca.gov)
  • In seconds, Jim has secured the fisherman to a place of safety, while Sal has begun to work the mechanisms to raise the bridge. (nh.us)
  • The bassist has produced some of his best work in tandem with guitarist Shawn Lane, and here the two of them work some of their magic, accompanied by a band of virtuoso musicians. (oldies.com)
  • Also interesting was that, although we've seen desktop processors work in other vendors' workstation motherboards, the S1200BTL wouldn't recognize our Sandy or Ivy Bridge-based chips, limiting testing to the LGA 1155 Xeons in our lab. (tomshardware.com)
  • Preparation work, at the interchange near McDonalds and the BP garage, will start on Friday, January 8, on part of the bridge. (whtimes.co.uk)
  • The Jamuna Multipurpose Bridge Authority (JMBA) was set up by an ordinance promulgated by the then President Hussain Muhammad Ershad on July 3, 1985 to implement the project. (wikipedia.org)
  • So the Mackinac Bridge Authority will drive your car for you…for free. (travelandleisure.com)
  • The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA), together with the Quezon City Government, has signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to add four more routes to the existing 17 Mabuhay Lanes / Christmas Lanes that were opened in 2010. (yahoo.com)
  • Design-build of a 30-mile corridor project that includes 39 bridges, more than 800 utility relocations, and design and construction of tolled managed lanes, general-purpose lanes, collector-distributor roads and bridges. (walshgroup.com)
  • If they want to be compared to the people who were successful in stopping highways from going though neighborhoods and making more livable, walkable communities, they should be advocating for tearing down the overpass and replacing it with surface roads, but with fewer lanes than the current plans call for. (universalhub.com)
  • Crews will continue removing debris the bridge from 9 p.m. Sunday until 6 a.m. on Monday. (kiiitv.com)
  • Savor contemporary British fare at our Park Lane hotel's inviting restaurant. (marriott.com)
  • Lock in a great price for Park Lane Guest House - rated 9 by recent guests! (booking.com)
  • The elegantly appointed Park Lane Guest House is furnished with hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings and stained glass. (booking.com)
  • The French doors in the Park Lane Guest House open up to a private patio, which overlooks the garden. (booking.com)
  • The Park Lane Guest House is a 5 minutes' drive from the Texas Capitol. (booking.com)
  • 325 Winter Park Lane has a Walk Score of 5 out of 100. (walkscore.com)
  • Drivers were less tempted to change lanes, because there were fewer options available, and the "discharge flows" actually increased. (howwedrive.com)
  • City transportation officials have decided to close the dangerous outer-lane of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, starting Monday night, following the death of an off-duty cop. (queenstribune.com)
  • City transportation officials have decided to close the outer-lane of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. (queenstribune.com)
  • Close your eyes and imagine the dawn birdsong in the images of deserted country lanes, meet the wonderful wildlife on Villager Jim's doorstep, and let him introduce you to the garden birds he calls his friends - Deidre the blue tit, Jenny the wren and more. (cordee.co.uk)
  • The designation, which applies to 10 percent of the state's 20,000 bridges, means a bridge must be monitored, inspected and maintained but does not imply that it is unsafe or likely to collapse. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • Coy said the contract to replace the bridge was awarded last year, months before a similar bridge collapse in Minnesota killed 13 people. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • As if Florida doesn't have enough problems, this morning the U.S. Coast Guard warned that the Roosevelt Bridge in Stuart is "at risk of imminent collapse. (forthepeople.com)
  • After the collapse that killed 13 and injured 145, the weight limit on the Norris Bridge was reduced to three tons, two pins were replaced, and an additional protective system was installed. (wtvr.com)
  • It does not disappoint, for Dixie O'Day in the Fast Lane is a gorgeous little book. (penguin.co.uk)
  • This feast of beautifully nostalgic merriment will definitely be a winner with adults, but Dixie O'Day in the Fast Lane is first and foremost a cleverly written chapter book for newly independent readers. (penguin.co.uk)
  • Dixie O'Day in the Fast Lane is a little book to truly treasure, which has all the ingredients to become a firm favourite with little readers. (penguin.co.uk)
  • This reference design demonstrates the implementation of two x8 Lanes JESD204B (Duplex) IP cores synchronization in Intel ® Arria ® 10 device through FMC loopback card. (intel.co.jp)
  • The DOT's website states that studies show a double digit increase in volume of 59 percent after implementation of the lanes, but that was information from 2014 before many more miles of cycling lanes were added. (cbslocal.com)
  • We're on Buxton Road in High Lane, less than a 20-minute drive outside of Stockport. (bupa.co.uk)
  • Whitechapel runs from the edge of the City of London at Bishopsgate in the West to Cavell Street in the East, and from Commercial Road in the south moving to the Brick Lane area in the north. (wikitravel.org)
  • Brick Lane is a small but diverse neighbourhood, named after a long road starting in Whitechapel and running north into Shoreditch. (wikitravel.org)
  • They recommended a rail-cum-road bridge near Sirajganj with an estimated cost of $175 million. (wikipedia.org)
  • On being invited by the Bangladesh government, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) funded a feasibility study through Nippon Koei Co. Ltd. in 1973 on the construction of a road-cum-rail bridge over the Jamuna. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the consultants made an assessment of the engineering feasibility and cost of a combined road-cum-gas transmission bridge, which introduced the concept of a multipurpose bridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was estimated that a 12-kilometre-long (7.5 mi) bridge with three road lanes would cost $420 million. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between 1987 and 1989, the phase-II feasibility study was carried out when a road-cum-rail-cum-power bridge was found both economically and technically viable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Terry Douris, Cabinet Member for Highways, said: "There is never a good time to do works of this nature, but the bridges will soon be coming to a point where safety might be compromised and we have a duty to make sure that all road users are safe. (whtimes.co.uk)
  • Construction on the new bridge is expected to be completed in the fall. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • Additionally, officials said all construction equipment had been removed from the bridge. (wtvr.com)
  • The exclusive bus lane (XBL) will remain operational during construction. (nj.gov)
  • This construction is expected to last for about two and a half years while the entire bridge deck, parapets, light fixtures, guiderail, and drainage are replaced. (nj.gov)
  • The XBL lane will be maintained during all stages of construction. (nj.gov)
  • The parking spaces that are located below the bridge will be lost temporarily during construction. (nj.gov)
  • Popular leader Maulana Abdul Hamid Khan Bhashani first raised the demand for construction of the Bangabandhu Bridge at a political level in 1949. (wikipedia.org)
  • On January 6, 1964, Mohammad Saifur Rahman, a member from Rangpur in the Provincial Assembly inquired about government's intentions with regard to the construction of a bridge over the Jamuna. (wikipedia.org)
  • On July 11, 1966, Shamsul Haque, another member from Rangpur in the same Assembly, moved a resolution for the construction of the bridge and the house adopted it unanimously. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the other hand, in his address to the nation over radio and television on the eve of general election in Pakistan in 1970, the Awami League leader Sheikh Mujibur Rahman mentioned the construction of Bangabandhu Bridge as an election pledge of his party. (wikipedia.org)
  • RICHMOND, Va. (AP) A steel deck-truss bridge collapsed June 4, injuring a man who was driving an overweight concrete truck over it, transportation officials said. (constructionequipmentguide.com)
  • Most emergency vehicles, including ambulances, are permitted to continue crossing the bridge," officials said. (wtvr.com)
  • As of 11:30 a.m., officials said that light-duty pickup trucks, ambulances and passenger vehicles were now able to cross the bridge. (wtvr.com)
  • Drivers can expect lane closures on U.S. 11 at the Cedar Creek Bridge north of Strasburg beginning Monday. (nvdaily.com)
  • This upgrade to the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge is just the latest step we've taken to keep the more than 180,000 daily drivers crossing safely on one of the City's most iconic bridges," said DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. (queenstribune.com)
  • Reporter Laura French, in a CBS 6 Problem Solvers Investigation, talked to drivers and residents who were concerned about the bridge. (wtvr.com)
  • The same phenomenon was observed a few minutes earlier in lane 3, as drivers started anticipating the impending carpool restriction. (howwedrive.com)
  • What's interesting about this is that for many of those individual drivers, they were presumably changing lanes to try and improve their own position. (howwedrive.com)
  • Monday morning commuters will soon see a a big change while going over the Gold Star Memorial Bridge heading south. (wtnh.com)
  • The post Four New Routes Added to Kalayaan Lanes Now Open for Private Vehicles appeared first on Carmudi Philippines . (yahoo.com)
  • The bridge consisted of four 185.5-foot (56.5 m) long fixed spans, one 274-foot (84 m) long draw span, seven 73-foot (22 m) long spans over the Albany Basin, one 110-foot (34 m) long span over Quay Street, and one 63-foot (19 m) long span over Maiden Lane. (wikipedia.org)
  • HAMPTON -- The Neil R. Underwood Memorial Bridge spans the Hampton River between Hampton Beach and Seabrook. (nh.us)
  • Although now largely a Bengali neighbourhood, within living memory, Brick Lane was a Jewish district. (wikitravel.org)
  • Bangabandhu Bridge, commonly called the Jamuna Multi-purpose Bridge (Bengali: যমুনা বহুমুখী সেতু Jomuna Bohumukhi Setu) is a bridge opened in Bangladesh in June 1998. (wikipedia.org)
  • We have to constantly check for storm damage and any and all repairs that might need to be made to the piers that support the bridge. (nh.us)
  • From Monday, January 18, for approximately 14 weeks, there will be 24-hour lane closures on the A10 in both north and south bound directions allowing essential repairs to the bridges to be carried out safely. (whtimes.co.uk)
  • Jim Tice drives over the 61-year-old bridge daily, and said the state needs to invest in a new bridge ASAP. (wtvr.com)
  • Dr. Michael R. Liebowitz, founder of the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, told the New York Times that the fear of crossing bridges is very common (if not as well known as, say, the fear of flying). (travelandleisure.com)
  • This has caused quite the headache for area residents this weekend because lanes stretching from 1-37 to Laredo had to be closed. (kiiitv.com)
  • It is still a largely working-class area but has attracted a large Bangaledeshi community which has made Brick Lane what it is today. (wikitravel.org)
  • Located at the western end of Lake Ontario, the bridge is a crucial link between the Greater Toronto Area and the Niagara Peninsula, which borders upstate New York. (cbc.ca)
  • This HIA compared the health effects of various strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from cars and small trucks by 21% by 2035 in the Lane County Eugene/Springfield metropolitan area. (cdc.gov)
  • The Central Lane Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), serving the Eugene-Springfield area, worked with the Lane Council of Governments (LCG) and local partners to develop a plan to reduce emissions and submit a report to the Oregon Legislature by 2015. (cdc.gov)
  • For the report, Lane County Public Health and LCG conducted an HIA to show how the proposed GHG-reduction policies and investments might affect current health conditions in the Eugene/Springfield metro area. (cdc.gov)
  • As the authors note, it's worth investigating how signage and striping might reduce "disruptive" lane changing. (howwedrive.com)
  • In 1953, the bridge was dedicated to Lt. Underwood, and in 1964, a small ceremony was held as a tribute to the last toll to be paid. (nh.us)
  • The dump truck (left) that struck the Burlington Skyway bridge had its bucket raised as it slammed into the bridge's overhead steel trusses and girders. (cbc.ca)