The mint plant family. They are characteristically aromatic, and many of them are cultivated for their oils. Most have square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped, open-mouthed, tubular corollas (united petals), with five-lobed, bell-like calyxes (united sepals).
A genus in the mint family (LAMIACEAE).
Mentha is a genus of the mint family (LAMIACEAE). It is known for species having characteristic flavor and aroma.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE. The common names of beebalm or lemonbalm are also used for MONARDA.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE. Members contain teuscordonin. There have been reports of hepatoxicity by this genus.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE used to flavor food.
Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.
A genus of the LAMIACEAE family. It is known for its mild calming effect and for the way cats are attracted to the aroma.
'Ocimum' is a genus of aromatic plants in the family Lamiaceae, which includes various species commonly known as basils, used for culinary, medicinal, and ornamental purposes, characterized by their opposite leaves and two-lipped flowers.
A plant species of the genus OCIMUM, family LAMIACEAE. It is a condiment with carminative properties.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that contains 5-methoxydehydropodophyllotoxin (a PODOPHYLLOTOXIN) and other LIGNANS.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of a familiar food seasoning.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
The above-ground plant without the roots.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE used in TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that contains isoscutellarein-7-O-(allosyl(1-2)glucoside).
The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.
A plant species of the genus SCUTELLARIA, family LAMIACEAE, that contains skullcapflavone and is used in CHINESE HERBAL DRUGS.
Phenolic benzoic acid esters.
A chemical process for separating the components of a liquid mixture by boiling and collecting condensed vapors.
Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Electrophoresis in which a starch gel (a mixture of amylose and amylopectin) is used as the diffusion medium.
Oils derived from plants or plant products.
The reproductive organs of plants.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.

Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel anthocyanin 5-O-glucosyltransferase by mRNA differential display for plant forms regarding anthocyanin. (1/161)

UDP-glucose: anthocyanin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (5-GT) is responsible for the modification of anthocyanins to more stable molecules in complexes for co-pigmentation, supposedly resulting in a purple hue. The cDNA encoding 5-GT was isolated by a differential display applied to two different forms of anthocyanin production in Perilla frutescens var. crispa. Differential display was carried out for mRNA from the leaves of reddish-purple and green forms of P. frutescens, resulting in the isolation of five cDNA clones predominantly expressed in the red form. The cDNA encoded a polypeptide of 460 amino acids, exhibiting a low homology with the sequences of several glucosyltransferases including UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase. By using this cDNA as the probe, we also isolated a homologous cDNA clone from a petal cDNA library of Verbena hybrida. To identify the biochemical function of the encoded proteins, these cDNAs were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The recombinant proteins in the yeast extracts catalyzed the conversion of anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosides into the corresponding anthocyanidin 3,5-di-O-glucosides using UDP-glucose as a cofactor, indicating the identity of the cDNAs encoding 5-GT. Several biochemical properties (optimum pH, Km values, and sensitivity to inhibitors) were similar to those reported previously for 5-GTs. Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of two copies of 5-GT genes in the genome of both red and green forms of P. frutescens. The mRNA accumulation of the 5-GT gene was detected in the leaves of the red form but not in those of the green form and was induced by illumination of light, as observed for other structural genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis in P. frutescens.  (+info)

Beneficial effects of thyme oil on age-related changes in the phospholipid C20 and C22 polyunsaturated fatty acid composition of various rat tissues. (2/161)

The aim of this study was to determine any age-related changes in phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acid composition, in particular C20 and C22 fatty acids in rat liver, brain, kidney and heart, and to assess and compare the effects of dietary supplementation (42.5 mg/kg body weight/day) of the natural antioxidant thyme oil and its major component thymol throughout the rat life span. The fatty acid composition in the various tissues from young (7 months) and aged (28 months) rats was determined and compared. Livers from aged control, thyme oil and thymol treated rats exhibited an increase in 22:6(n-3). In contrast, 22:6(n-3) content of brain, kidney and heart declined in aged rats in all three dietary groups. However, aged rats treated with thyme oil and thymol displayed significantly higher levels of 22:6(n-3) than the respective age-matched controls. Tissue compositions of 20:4(n-6) were found to be significantly lower in the liver and kidney from aged control rats but not those fed either thyme oil or thymol. In aged rats, the composition of 20:4(n-6) in all tissues was highest in rats fed either thyme oil or thymol. These results show that dietary supplementation with thyme oil tended to maintain higher PUFA levels in all tissues studied. The majority of protection provided by thyme oil was by virtue of its thymol component, which comprises 49% of the whole oil. Thymol administered alone did not provide significantly higher protection than the whole oil, suggesting that other components within thyme oil are also contributing antioxidant activity.  (+info)

The cyanogenic glucoside, prunasin (D-mandelonitrile-beta-D-glucoside), is a novel inhibitor of DNA polymerase beta. (3/161)

A DNA polymerase beta (pol. beta) inhibitor has been isolated independently from two organisms; a red perilla, Perilla frutescens, and a mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris. These molecules were determined by spectroscopic analyses to be the cyanogenic glucoside, D-mandelonitrile-beta-D-glucoside, prunasin. The compound inhibited the activity of rat pol. beta at 150 microM, but did not influence the activities of calf DNA polymerase alpha and plant DNA polymerases, human immunodefficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, calf terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, or any prokaryotic DNA polymerases, or DNA and RNA metabolic enzymes examined. The compound dose-dependently inhibited pol. beta activity, the IC(50) value being 98 microM with poly dA/oligo dT(12-18) and dTTP as the DNA template and substrate, respectively. Inhibition of pol. beta by the compound was competitive with the substrate, dTTP. The inhibition was enhanced in the presence of fatty acid, and the IC(50) value decreased to approximately 40 microM. In the presence of C(10)-decanoic acid, the K(i) value for substrate dTTP decreased by 28-fold, suggesting that the fatty acid allowed easier access of the compound to the substrate-binding site.  (+info)

Responses of Mentha suspension-cultured cells to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and accumulation of esterified phenolic acids in their cell walls. (4/161)

Two distinct types of cell growth of suspension-cultured Mentha were formed when the cells maintained in the medium containing 1000 micrograms l-1 2,4-D were subcultured into different 2,4-D concentrations. Few cell elongation of Mentha (average cell length: 34-40 microns) was observed after division in the medium containing 1-200 micrograms l-1 2,4-D; and significant cell elongation (average cell length: 95-130 microns) was observed after cell division in the medium containing 500-2000 micrograms l-1 2,4-D. A close correlation between culture medium and water content in the cells indicated that 2,4-D promoted cell elongation by water uptake. Amounts of phenolic acid in cell walls were much higher in unelongated cell walls than in elongated ones during the cultivation, and there was a close correlation between the amounts and the level of PAL activity in elongated and unelongated cells. However, there was no significant difference in cell wall components and its neutral sugar composition between elongated and unelongated cells.  (+info)

Geranyl diphosphate synthase: cloning, expression, and characterization of this prenyltransferase as a heterodimer. (5/161)

Geranyl diphosphate synthase, which catalyzes the condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate to geranyl diphosphate, the key precursor of monoterpene biosynthesis, was purified from isolated oil glands of spearmint. Peptide fragments generated from the pure proteins of 28 and 37 kDa revealed amino acid sequences that matched two cDNA clones obtained by random screening of a peppermint-oil gland cDNA library. The deduced sequences of both proteins showed some similarity to existing prenyltransferases, and both contained a plastid-targeting sequence. Expression of each cDNA individually yielded no detectable prenyltransferase activity; however, coexpression of the two together produced functional geranyl diphosphate synthase. Antibodies raised against each protein were used to demonstrate that both subunits were required to produce catalytically active native and recombinant enzymes, thus confirming that geranyl diphosphate synthase is a heterodimer.  (+info)

Allergic alveolitis due to herb dust exposure. (6/161)

We report an episode of allergic alveolitis in a female farmer due to massive exposure to organic dust contaminated with microorganisms during threshing of herbs (thyme). The patient's medical history, the results of exposure test, inhalation challenge, and bronchoalveolar lavage suggested the diagnosis of allergic alveolitis  (+info)

Tanshinone IIA, an ingredient of Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines through the activation of caspase-3. (7/161)

Tanshinone II-A is a derivative of phenanthrene-quinone isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, a traditional herbal medicine that is known to induce antiinflammatory, anti-oxidative and cytotoxic activity. We have examined cellular effects of Tanshione II-A on HL60 human promyelocytic leukemic cells and K562 human erythroleukemic cells. Tanshione II-A induced a dose- and time-dependent DNA fragmentation into the multiples of 180 bp and specific proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in both cell lines. PI-staining and flow cytometry analysis of K562 cells following Tanshione II-A treatment showed an increase of the cells possessing hypodiploid DNA indicative of apoptotic state of cells. Caspase-3 activity was significantly increased during Tanshinone II-A treatment of both HL60 and K562 cells, whereas caspase-1 activity was not changed. These results suggest that Tanshione II-A induced HL60 and K562 cellular apoptosis that may be associated with the selective members of caspase family.  (+info)

Regulation of monoterpene accumulation in leaves of peppermint. (8/161)

Plants synthesize numerous classes of natural products that accumulate during development and are thought to function as constitutive defenses against herbivores and pathogens. However, little information is available about how the levels of such defenses are regulated. We measured the accumulation of monoterpenes, a model group of constitutive defenses, in peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) leaves and investigated several physiological processes that could regulate their accumulation: the rate of biosynthesis, the rate of metabolic loss, and the rate of volatilization. Monoterpene accumulation was found to be restricted to leaves of 12 to 20 d of age, the period of maximal leaf expansion. The rate of monoterpene biosynthesis determined by (14)CO(2) incorporation was closely correlated with monoterpene accumulation, as determined by gas chromatographic analysis, and appeared to be the principal factor controlling the monoterpene level of peppermint leaves. No significant catabolic losses of monoterpenes were detected throughout leaf development, and monoterpene volatilization was found to occur at a very low rate, which, on a monthly basis, represented less than 1% of the total pool of stored monoterpenes. The composition of volatilized monoterpenes differed significantly from that of the total plant monoterpene pool, suggesting that these volatilized products may arise from a separate secretory system. With the demonstration that the rate of biosynthesis is the chief process that determines monoterpene accumulation in peppermint, efforts to improve production in this species can now focus on the genes, enzymes, and cell differentiation processes that regulate monoterpene biosynthesis.  (+info)

I apologize for the confusion, but "Lamiaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically it is a family of flowering plants that includes many familiar herbs such as mint, rosemary, sage, basil, and lavender. These plants are often used in medicine, cooking, and for ornamental purposes. The Lamiaceae family is characterized by their square stems, opposite leaves, and two-lipped flowers.

"Salvia" is a genus of plants that includes over 900 species, with some commonly known as sage. However, in a medical context, the term "Salvia" often refers to Salvia divinorum, a specific species of this plant. Salvia divinorum, also known as sage of the diviners, is a psychoactive herb that can produce hallucinations and other altered mental states when ingested, usually by smoking or chewing the leaves. It contains a chemical called salvinorin A, which is believed to be responsible for its psychoactive effects.

It's important to note that while Salvia divinorum has been used in traditional healing practices in some cultures, it can also have dangerous side effects and its use is regulated in many parts of the world. It should only be used under medical supervision and with a clear understanding of its potential risks.

"Mentha" is a genus name in botanical taxonomy, which includes various species of mint plants. While it's not a medical term per se, some mentha species have been used in traditional medicine and may be referenced in medical literature or natural health practices. The essential oils derived from these plants, such as peppermint (Mentha piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata), are often used in aromatherapy, topical applications, and as flavorings in oral care products and medications. They have been studied for potential benefits related to digestion, pain relief, and mental clarity, although more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish appropriate dosages and safety guidelines.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Melissa" is not a medical term. It is a proper name, which is commonly used as a female given name in the English-speaking world. In botany, "Melissa" refers to a genus of aromatic herbs in the mint family, also known as lemon balm. The essential oil from this plant has been used in traditional medicine for its calming and soothing properties. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try to help if I can provide reliable and accurate information.

Teucrium is a genus of plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It includes several species commonly known as germander, which have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes. However, it's important to note that the use of some Teucrium species as herbal remedies has been associated with serious side effects, including liver toxicity. Therefore, their medical use is not recommended without proper medical supervision and scientific evidence supporting their safety and efficacy.

"Satureja" is a genus of plants, also known as savory, that belongs to the family Lamiaceae. There are two main species, Winter Savory (Satureja montana) and Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis), which are native to the Mediterranean region. These plants have been used traditionally in cooking for their aromatic leaves and in traditional medicine for their potential health benefits. However, it's important to note that the use of "Satureja" as a medical treatment should be under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as there is limited scientific evidence to support its effectiveness in treating specific medical conditions.

Volatile oils, also known as essential oils, are a type of organic compound that are naturally produced in plants. They are called "volatile" because they evaporate quickly at room temperature due to their high vapor pressure. These oils are composed of complex mixtures of various compounds, including terpenes, terpenoids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and alcohols. They are responsible for the characteristic aroma and flavor of many plants and are often used in perfumes, flavors, and aromatherapy. In a medical context, volatile oils may have therapeutic properties and be used in certain medications or treatments, but it's important to note that they can also cause adverse reactions if not used properly.

"Nepeta" is a genus name in botanical taxonomy, which includes approximately 250 species of plants commonly known as catnips or catmints. The most well-known species is Nepeta cataria, which is native to Europe and Asia but has been naturalized in many parts of the world.

Nepeta plants are perennial herbs that belong to the Lamiaceae family, which also includes mint, sage, and basil. They have a square stem, opposite leaves, and small, two-lipped flowers that can be white, pink, or purple. The leaves and flowers of Nepeta plants contain volatile oils, including nepetalactone, which is responsible for their characteristic smell and is known to attract cats.

While "Nepeta" itself does not have a medical definition, some Nepeta species are used in herbal medicine for their sedative, calming, and anti-spasmodic properties. For example, Nepeta cataria has been traditionally used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and digestive disorders. However, it's important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these uses is limited, and more research is needed to confirm their safety and efficacy.

"Ocimum" is the scientific name for a genus of plants that includes sweet basil, holy basil, and other varieties of basil. These herbs are part of the mint family (Lamiaceae) and are native to tropical regions of Africa and Asia. They are widely used in cooking for their aromatic leaves, which have a strong, pungent flavor. Holy basil, also known as tulsi, is considered sacred in Hinduism and has been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine for its potential health benefits. However, it's important to note that while some herbs and plants can have medicinal properties, they should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment.

'Ocimum basilicum' is the scientific name for the herb commonly known as sweet basil. While it is not a medical term itself, basil has been used in various traditional medicinal practices for its supposed benefits. However, there is limited scientific evidence to support many of these claims. It is more widely recognized as a culinary herb and essential oil source.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Hyptis" is not a medical term. It is a genus of plants in the mint family, also known as "Brazilian mint" or " bushmint." Some Hyptis species have been used in traditional medicine, but there is limited scientific evidence supporting their effectiveness. If you have any questions about specific medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help if I can!

'Origanum' is not a medical term itself, but it is the genus name for a group of plants that includes oregano and marjoram. These plants are part of the Lamiaceae family, also known as the mint family.

Oregano, specifically Origanum vulgare, has been used in traditional medicine for its antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. The essential oil of oregano is rich in carvacrol and thymol, which are believed to contribute to its medicinal effects. However, it's important to note that the scientific evidence supporting these uses is limited, and more research is needed before any definitive medical claims can be made.

Marjoram, Origanum majorana, has also been used in traditional medicine for various purposes, including as a digestive aid, an antispasmodic, and a sedative. Its essential oil contains compounds such as terpinen-4-ol and γ-terpinene, which may have medicinal properties. However, similarly to oregano, more research is needed before any firm medical conclusions can be drawn about the use of marjoram in treatment.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Aerial parts of plants refer to the above-ground portions of a plant, including leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits. These parts are often used in medicine, either in their entirety or as isolated extracts, to take advantage of their medicinal properties. The specific components of aerial parts that are used in medicine can vary depending on the plant species and the desired therapeutic effects. For example, the leaves of some plants may contain active compounds that have anti-inflammatory or analgesic properties, while the flowers of others may be rich in antioxidants or compounds with sedative effects. In general, aerial parts of plants are used in herbal medicine to treat a wide range of conditions, including respiratory, digestive, and nervous system disorders, as well as skin conditions and infections.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Isodon" is not a medical term. It is actually a genus of plants, also known as "Dragon's Claw", which belongs to the mint family (Lamiaceae). Some species of Isodon have been used in traditional medicine in various parts of the world. If you have any questions about a specific medical term or concept, I would be happy to help if I can!

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

"Sideritis" is a genus of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It includes around 150 species, many of which are native to the Mediterranean region and central Asia. Several species of Sideritis are used in traditional medicine, particularly in southern Europe. The name "Sideritis" comes from the Greek word for "iron," as some species were believed to have properties that helped heal wounds caused by iron weapons.

In a medical context, however, "Sideritis" is not a widely recognized term and does not have a specific medical definition. If someone is referring to "Sideritis" in a medical context, they are likely talking about the use of these plants in traditional medicine or as dietary supplements. Some proponents of herbal medicine claim that Sideritis has various health benefits, such as reducing anxiety and improving digestion, although there is limited scientific evidence to support these claims.

Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the traditional knowledge, practices, and beliefs about plants held by a particular group of people or culture. It involves the documentation and analysis of the ways in which people use plants for medicinal, food, shelter, clothing, dye, ritual, and other purposes. The field of ethnobotany draws on anthropology, botany, ecology, chemistry, and geography to understand the complex relationships between human cultures and their plant resources.

Ethnobotanists may conduct fieldwork with communities to learn about their traditional plant use, documenting this knowledge through interviews, observations, and collections of plant specimens. They may also study the ecological and cultural factors that shape plant use and management, as well as the impacts of globalization, environmental change, and other forces on traditional plant knowledge and practices.

The information gathered through ethnobotanical research can have important implications for conservation, human health, and sustainable development. For example, traditional plant remedies may provide leads for the development of new drugs or therapies, while understanding the cultural significance of plants can help inform efforts to protect biodiversity and support the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

Scutellaria baicalensis, also known as Chinese skullcap or Baikal skullcap, is a plant native to China and other parts of East Asia. In traditional Chinese medicine, it has been used for various purposes such as treating respiratory infections, inflammation, and liver diseases. The root of the plant contains flavonoids, including baicalein, baicalin, and wogonin, which have been studied for their potential medicinal properties. These compounds have been found to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral effects in laboratory studies. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings and determine the safety and effectiveness of Scutellaria baicalensis as a treatment for various medical conditions in humans.

Depsides are a type of chemical compound that are formed by the condensation of two molecules of phenolic acids. They are a subclass of polyphenols, which are compounds found in plants that have various biological activities. Depsides are characterized by the presence of a central core structure consisting of a benzene ring linked to a carboxylic acid group through a carbon-carbon bond.

Depsides can be further classified into different subgroups based on the specific phenolic acids that make up their structure. Some common examples of depsides include chlorogenic acid, which is formed from caffeic acid and quinic acid, and rosmarinic acid, which is formed from caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid.

Depsides have been studied for their potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. They are found in a variety of plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, herbs, and spices, and may contribute to the overall health-promoting properties of these foods.

Distillation is a laboratory technique or industrial process in which a mixture is heated to produce a vapor, which is then condensed and collected as a purified liquid. In the medical context, distillation may refer to the process of extracting or purifying certain substances, such as essential oils from plants or alcohol for use in medicinal preparations. It is also used in the production of pharmaceuticals and chemical compounds. The process works by taking advantage of differences in volatility between components in a mixture: those with lower boiling points vaporize first and are condensed separately, allowing for their isolation.

Insect repellents are substances that are applied to the skin, clothing, or other surfaces to deter insects from landing or crawling on that surface. They work by masking the scents that attract insects or by repelling them with unpleasant odors. Insect repellents can be chemical-based, such as those containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), picaridin, or IR3535, or they can be natural, such as those containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or citronella. These substances work by interfering with the insect's ability to detect human scent, making it less likely that they will come into contact with the person using the repellent. Insect repellents are an important tool in preventing insect-borne diseases such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, and Zika virus.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

Electrophoresis, starch gel is a type of electrophoretic technique used in laboratory settings for the separation and analysis of large biomolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins. In this method, a gel made from cooked starch is used as the supporting matrix for the molecules being separated.

The sample containing the mixture of biomolecules is loaded onto the gel and an electric field is applied, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode. The starch gel acts as a molecular sieve, with smaller molecules moving more quickly through the gel than larger ones. This results in the separation of the mixture into individual components based on their size and charge.

Once the separation is complete, the gel can be stained to visualize the separated bands. Different staining techniques are used depending on the type of biomolecule being analyzed. For example, proteins can be stained with dyes such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue or silver nitrate, while nucleic acids can be stained with dyes such as ethidium bromide.

Starch gel electrophoresis is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique that has been widely used in molecular biology research and diagnostic applications. However, it has largely been replaced by other electrophoretic techniques, such as polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), which offer higher resolution and can be automated for high-throughput analysis.

Medical definitions generally do not include plant oils as a specific term. However, in a biological or biochemical context, plant oils, also known as vegetable oils, are defined as lipid extracts derived from various parts of plants such as seeds, fruits, and leaves. They mainly consist of triglycerides, which are esters of glycerol and three fatty acids. The composition of fatty acids can vary between different plant sources, leading to a range of physical and chemical properties that make plant oils useful for various applications in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. Some common examples of plant oils include olive oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, and jojoba oil.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "flowers" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "flowers" is commonly used to refer to the reproductive structures of flowering plants (angiosperms), which are characterized by having both male and female reproductive organs or separate male and female flowers.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

Angiosperms, also known as flowering plants, are a group of plants that produce seeds enclosed within an ovary. The term "angiosperm" comes from the Greek words "angeion," meaning "case" or "capsule," and "sperma," meaning "seed." This group includes the majority of plant species, with over 300,000 known species.

Angiosperms are characterized by their reproductive structures, which consist of flowers. The flower contains male and female reproductive organs, including stamens (which produce pollen) and carpels (which contain the ovules). After fertilization, the ovule develops into a seed, while the ovary matures into a fruit, which provides protection and nutrition for the developing embryo.

Angiosperms are further divided into two main groups: monocots and eudicots. Monocots have one cotyledon or embryonic leaf, while eudicots have two. Examples of monocots include grasses, lilies, and orchids, while examples of eudicots include roses, sunflowers, and legumes.

Angiosperms are ecologically and economically important, providing food, shelter, and other resources for many organisms, including humans. They have evolved a wide range of adaptations to different environments, from the desert to the ocean floor, making them one of the most diverse and successful groups of plants on Earth.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

Media related to Lamiaceae at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Lamiaceae at Wikispecies Lamiaceae in L. Watson and M.J. ... Cork University Press ISBN 978-185918-4783 "List of genera in Lamiaceae". In: "Lamiaceae". In: "List of families". In: " ... The Lamiaceae (/ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiːˌiː, -iˌaɪ/ LAY-mee-AY-see-ee, -⁠eye) or Labiatae are a family of flowering plants commonly known ... The enlarged Lamiaceae contain about 236 genera and have been stated to contain 6,900 to 7,200 species, but the World Checklist ...
Lamiaceae (/ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiaɪ, -iː/ LAY-mee-AY-see-eye, -⁠ee or Labiatae are a family of flowering plants in the order Lamiales ... The enlarged Lamiaceae contain about 236 genera and have been stated to contain 6,900 to 7,200 species, but the World Checklist ... Y.W.Yuan, indigenous "Pronunciation of lamiaceae". Retrieved 25 November 2014. Heywood, Vernon H.; Brummitt, Richard K.; Seberg ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western Australia and the Northern ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
Lamiaceae, Flora of Asia, Monotypic Lamiaceae genera, All stub articles, Lamiaceae stubs). ... Colebrookea is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae, first described in 1806. It contains only one known species, ... Khanam, M. & Hassan, M.A. (2008). Lamiaceae. Flora of Bangladesh 58: 1-161. Bangladesh National Herbarium, Dhaka. v t e ( ...
... , commonly known as saltbush foxglove, is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
Lamiaceae). Hyssopus tianschanicus Boriss. (Lamiaceae) Mentha alaica Boriss. (Lamiaceae) Mentha darvasica Boriss. (Lamiaceae) ... Lamiaceae) Astragalus inopinatus Boriss. (Fabaceae) These species of succulent are named in her honour: Sedum borissovae Balk. ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a shrub with its ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Francis Aubie Sharr (2019). Western Australian Plant ...
Lamiaceae)" (PDF). Austrobaileya. 9 (3): 321-381. Ng, L.K.; Ling, S.K. (2001). Bunyapraphatsara, N.; van Valkenburg, J.L.C.H. ( ... Anisomeles malabarica, more commonly known as the Malabar catmint, is a species of herbaceous shrub in the family Lamiaceae. It ... Aluri, Raju J. S. (1992). "The Mint Genus Anisomeles (Lamiaceae)". Proceedings of the Indian National Science Academy. 58 (6): ... Khanam, M. & Hassan, M.A. (2008). Lamiaceae. Flora of Bangladesh 58: 1-161. Bangladesh National Herbarium, Dhaka. Aluri, Raju J ...
... , commonly known as Oldfield's foxglove, is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Paczkowska, Grazyna; Chapman, Alex R. (2000). The ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a low, spreading ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ... Dasymalla axillaris, commonly known as native foxglove or woolly foxglove, is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae ...
... is a genus of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae and is endemic to Australia, most species occurring in ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. "Pityrodia". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 25 ... Shepherd, Kelly A. (2007). "Pityrodia iphthima (Lamiaceae), a new species endemic to banded ironstone in Western Australia, ... The name Chloanthaceae has not been widely adopted and Pityrodia is now included in the Lamiaceae. In his 1979 paper, Munir ...
Lamiaceae, Monotypic Lamiaceae genera, Flora of Africa, Flora of Asia, Flora of Australia, Flora of New Guinea, All stub ... Basilicum is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae, first described in 1802. It contains only one known species, Basilicum ... Suddee, S., Paton, A.J. & Parnell, J.A.N. (2005). Taxonomic Revision of the tribe Ocimeae Dumort (Lamiaceae) in continental ... Khanam, M. & Hassan, M.A. (2008). Lamiaceae. Flora of Bangladesh 58: 1-161. Bangladesh National Herbarium, Dhaka. Paton, A.J., ...
Lamiaceae)". Kew Bulletin 58(3):597-645. Robert Brown. 1810. Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae et Insulae Van Diemen:504. (see ... Leonotis is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae. One species, Leonotis nepetifolia, is native to tropical ... "Molecular Phylogenetics of the Leucas Group (Lamioideae; Lamiaceae)". Systematic Botany 34(1):173-181. Wikimedia Commons has ...
... is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae and is endemic to the Northern Territory. It is ... Lamiaceae)". Telopea. 14: 1-3. doi:10.7751/telopea2012001. "Approved Conservation Advice for Wrixonia schultzii" (PDF). ... Carrick, John (1976). "Studies in Australian Lamiaceae 1. The Genus Wrixonia F.Muell. (Prostantheroideae)" (PDF). Journal of ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a small, openly ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 6. doi:10.1071/SB10039. "Dasymalla teckiana". FloraBase. Western Australian ...
Quoya is a genus of flowering plants in family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. Plants in this genus are shrubs ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. "Quoya". APNI. Retrieved 24 November 2016. ... Lamiaceae genera, Lamiales of Australia, Taxa named by Charles Gaudichaud-Beaupré). ...
... is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae and is endemic to tropical north Queensland. ... Lamiaceae)". Austrobaileya. 5 (4): 733-734. Queensland Agricultural Journal. volume 15. page 493. 1904. (Articles with short ... Conn, Barry J.; Wilson, Trevor C. (12 January 2015). "Prostanthera (Lamiaceae) from far-north Queensland, Australia". Telopea. ...
Lamiaceae). Kew Bulletin 64: 235-257. Flora of China Vol. 17 Page 268, 排香草属 pai cao xiang shu, Anisochilus Wallich ex Bentham, ... Anisochilus is a genus in the family Lamiaceae, commonly called as Kapuri first described in 1830. It is native to China, the ...
Lamiaceae)". Field Crops Research. 98 (1): 76-81. doi:10.1016/j.fcr.2005.12.011. Kyesmu, P.M. (1994). "Plectranthus Esculentus ... is a species of plant in the dicot family Lamiaceae. It is indigenous to Africa, where it is grown for its edible tubers. It is ... Lamiaceae): a tale of more than two genera". PhytoKeys (129): 1-158. doi:10.3897/phytokeys.129.34988. PMC 6717120. PMID ...
... , commonly known as red velvet, is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to the south- ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Quattrocchi, Umberto (2014). CRC world dictionary ...
Lamiaceae)". Turkish Journal of Botany. 33: 61-63. v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from ...
... is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 1-9. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
Lamiaceae)". Kew Bulletin 64(4):587-625. Ray Harley, "In search of Labiatae in Eastern Brazil", Vitex: A Newsletter for ... It is the largest genus in the subfamily Viticoideae of Lamiaceae. Taxon sampling in molecular phylogenetic studies has never ... "Troublesome tropical mints: re-examining generic limits of Vitex and relations (Lamiaceae) in South East Asia". Taxon 58(2):500 ... ISBN 978-0-8493-2673-8 (set). (see External links below). Systematics of Lamiaceae Subfamily Viticoideae. At: Website of Kew ...
Lamiaceae, Lamiaceae genera, Taxa named by Sijfert Hendrik Koorders). ... Lamiaceae). Kew Bulletin 64: 587-625. (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles ... Teijsmanniodendron is a genus of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae, first described in 1904. It is native to ...
Lamiaceae, Lamiaceae genera, Taxa named by Daniel Oliver). ... of the mint family Lamiaceae (formerly placed within ... F.A.Zich; B.P.M.Hyland; T.Whiffen; R.A.Kerrigan (2020). "Lamiaceae". Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants Edition 8 (RFK8). ...
... , commonly known as golden bush, is a flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae and is endemic to Western ... Lamiaceae)". Australian Systematic Botany. 24 (1): 8. doi:10.1071/SB10039. Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of ...
513-. "Lamiaceae". (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, All articles with unsourced statements ... a genus in the catnip subfamily Nepetoideae of the mint family Lamiaceae. None have been reported to be especially harmful to ...
Media related to Lamiaceae at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Lamiaceae at Wikispecies Lamiaceae in L. Watson and M.J. ... Cork University Press ISBN 978-185918-4783 "List of genera in Lamiaceae". In: "Lamiaceae". In: "List of families". In: " ... The Lamiaceae (/ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiːˌiː, -iˌaɪ/ LAY-mee-AY-see-ee, -⁠eye) or Labiatae are a family of flowering plants commonly known ... The enlarged Lamiaceae contain about 236 genera and have been stated to contain 6,900 to 7,200 species, but the World Checklist ...
Lamiaceae Lindley 唇形科 chun xing ke Authors: Xi-wen Li & Ian C. Hedge Lamiophlomis rotata. Credit: Harvard University Herbaria ... 1991) suggests that Cardioteucris cordifolia C. Y. Wu, originally placed in the Lamiaceae, is identical with Caryopteris ... he believes that the generic placement of Cardioteucris is in the Lamiaceae because of its 2-lipped calyx and deeply 4-divided ...
... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamiaceae, CC BY-SA 3.0 . Photo: (c) Chad Arment, all rights reserved, uploaded by Chad Arment) ... Lamiaceae (/ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiˌaɪ/ or /ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiiː/) or Labiatae is a family of flowering plants commonly known as the mint or ...
Pictures of lamiaceae wildflowers of West USA. Toothed, veined stem leaves of agastache urticifolia - Timpooneke Trail, Mt ... Keywords: Lamiaceae, Agastache Urticifolia, Utah, horsemint giant hyssop, pink flowers, lamiaceae, wildflowers. License/ ... Plants , Wildflowers , Lamiaceae , Agastache Urticifolia. Previous Photo. Toothed, veined stem leaves of agastache urticifolia ...
Family: Lamiaceae Lindl.. *Country of Origin: Mediterranean, southern Europe to western Asia *Description: Hardy evergreen ... Family: Lamiaceae *SubFamily: Nepetoideae *Tribe: Mentheae *SubTribe: Salviinae Flowering Data:. This accession has been ... Current Accessions in the Lamiaceae. Subfamily Ajugoideae *Clerodendrum nutans. *Clerodendrum speciosissimum. *Clerodendrum ...
The taxon you have searched for is non-marine. Please turn off the relevant filter (at the top right of this page) to view the taxon ...
Lamiaceae Lippenblütler Mint family (24). Gesamteindruck/Habitus , Blüten und Blütenstände. Krautige Pflanzen. *. Ajuga reptans ... Lamiaceae , Liliaceae , Lythraceae , Magnoliaceae , Malvaceae , Moraceae , Moringaceae , Musaceae , Myrtaceae , Nyctaginaceae ...
Habitat: Dune mat (DM), Dune scrub (DS), Dune swale (SW), Coniferous dune forest (CDF), Riparian forest (RF), Freshwater marsh (FM), Freshwater swamp (FS), Freshwater marsh (FM), Open water (OW), Brackish marsh (BM), Salt marsh (SM), Mudflat (MF) Agricultural wetland (AW). ...
Images of Stenogyne microphylla (Lamiaceae) (native mint) Links to high-resolution free images of Stenogyne microphylla ( ... Lamiaceae) (native mint) by Forest & Kim Starr (USGS) are available here. Stenogyne microphylla images by Jupiter Nielsen ... Lamiaceae) HEAR home > species info > plants > Stenogyne microphylla (Lamiaceae) (hints) Taxonomy & nomenclature Images ...
Lamiaceae (Mint Family). Flowers: Pink-Purple-Blue tiny 5 petaled flowers; Developing from small green bud ball into dense pin ... On Montara Mountain, Lamiaceae Family members include:. Pitcher Sage - Lepechinia calycina. Coyote Mint - Monardella villosa ... Lamiaceae (Mint Family). Flowers: 5 petals, white tinged with lavender, tubular with large mouths, one inch long, single ... Lamiaceae are distinctive, in a complex sort of way: The stems are square with opposite leaves, with each pair of leaves at ...
Discover the impact of Lamiaceae herb companion planting on tomato growth and secondary metabolites. Explore the changes in ... Herbs of Lamiaceae family like peppermint and hyssop seemed to have the similar growth promoting influence on tomato as evident ... The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of Lamiaceae herbs companion planting on growth and secondary ... As such, the present experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of some Lamiaceae herbs companion planting on tomato ...
In Lamiaceae, flowers are pollinated by insects of the Apidae group (Xylocopa violaceae) and Apis sp. have been seen ... Extracellular Localization of the Diterpene Sclareol in Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea L., Lamiaceae). *Jean-Claude Caissard, ... 7. Werker E (1993) Function of essential oil-secreting glandular hairs in aromatic plants of the Lamiaceae. Flav Frag J 8: 249- ... Even if the biosynthesis of sclareol in S. sclarea is presumably similar to the biosynthesis of terpenes in other Lamiaceae ...
a-h. Lamiaceae exóticas ocorrentes no Rio Grande do Norte - a. Clerodendrum thomasoniae; b. Leonotis nepetifolia; c. Leonurus ... a-h. Exotic Lamiaceae species in Rio Grande do Norte - a. Clerodendrum thomasoniae; b. Leonotis nepetifolia; c. Leonurus ... Lamiaceae no Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil1 1 Parte da dissertação de Mestrado em Sistemática e Evolução do primeiro autor pela ... Espécies de Lamiaceae no Rio Grande do Norte: Distribuição, endemismo e origem.*: Baseado no BFG (2018)BFG - The Brazil Flora ...
nuda (Lamiaceae) from Romania. Domenii publicaţii > Biologie + Tipuri publicaţii > Articol în revistã ştiinţificã ...
... // Novitates Syst. Pl. Vasc. Vol. 53. P. 83-88. https ... The synopsis of the genus Thymus (Lamiaceae) in the Northern Siberia // Bot. Zhurn. Vol. 101, № 10. P. 1240-1253. [In Russian ... A new species of the genus Thymus (Lamiaceae) from the north of Yakutia. *Index page ... Characteristics of Thymus reverdattoanus (Lamiaceae) population in the south of its range (Nadym district, Yamal-Nenets ...
Resinous Skullcap, Scutellaria resinosa, growing on the bank of a small arroyo. Garden of the Gods, elevation 6,500 Feet, May 30, 2003. Growing about a foot below the bottom of a small wash. Leaves are likely basal and stem. Stem leaves are opposite. Stems have a square cross section. Flowers in pairs from leaf axils. Leaf length 27 mm, width 11 mm, flower width 13 mm, length 26 mm. Some characteristics of the genera: flowers blue, 4 stamens with anthers, calyx teeth 5 or less, upper calyx with distinct crest. ...
Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution CC BY Licence.. ...
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PLANT: Annual, biennial and perennial herbs or shrubs (rarely small trees), often variously pubescent, mostly aromatic; stems mostly 4 angled. LEAVES: opposite (rarely alternate or whorled), simple (rarely pinnately compound), mostly toothed to lobed, exstipulate. INFLORESCENCE: cymose, or less often racemose to paniculate, the cymes often congested as axillary verticils, these sometimes forming spikes or interrupted spikes, the internodes then clearly visible. FLOWERS: mostly perfect; sepals 5, connate, the calyx appearing 2 5 lobed or toothed, actinomorphic to zygomorphic, mostly persistent; petals 5, connate, the corolla (4 )5 lobed, mostly strongly zygomorphic, often bilabiate; stamens epipetalous, 2 (2 staminodes sometimes also present) or 4 (then of two lengths); pistil 1; carpels 2; ovary superior, sessile to stalked, deeply 4 lobed, each lobe with 1 ovule; style 1, the stigma usually 2 lobed. FRUIT: of 4 1 seeded nutlets. NOTES: Ca. 200 genera, ca. 3500 spp., cosmopolitan; frequented by ...
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Resumen Se describe e ilustra una nueva especie de Scutelleria del noreste de Cuba. Scutelleria holguinensis se ubica en Scutelleria subg. Scutellaria, sect. Scutellaria y está estrechamente relacionada con S. havanensis, de la cual difiere por ser plantas poco robustas, con follaje ralo; hojas orbiculares y flores magentas. Su distribución se encuentra limitada a la provincia de Holguín y de acuerdo con los parámetros establecidos por la IUCN, se encuentra en peligro crítico de extinción (CR).
6 Lamiaceae raceme & thryse. 7 Lamiaceae calyx. 8 Bilabiate corollas in Lamiaceae. 9 Flower shapes in Lamiaceae. 10 Lamiaceae ... 1 Lamiaceae plants. 2 Lamiaceae leaves. 3 More Lamiaceae leaf types. 4 Stellate hairs in Lamiaceae. 5 Lamiaceae inflorescences ... Lamiaceae. Lauraceae. Liliaceae. Liverworts. Lycopodiaceae. Lygodiaceae. Lythraceae. Magnoliaceae. Malpighiaceae. Malvaceae. ... Lamiaceae (Labiatae).. The Mint family has been undergoing reorganisation for many years particularly in. relation to the ...
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The Lamiaceae Family, Anti-HIV, and Antioxidant Responses. Economic Importance of Lamiaceae: 1. They are common in the Maltese ... Lamiaceae, with ca. Fabaceae are also used as ornamental plants. Bharathidasan University. While the Lamiaceae has been ... Lamiaceae, https: //www.britannica.com/topic/list-of-economically-important-members-of-the-family-Lamiaceae-2035852 of 25 ... Lamiaceae ) rich in proteins some of the mint family ( Lamiaceae ) one! Is of much importance because there are a number of ...
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Lamiaceae (Q7967) From JSTOR Labs Wikibase. Revision as of 13:06, 11 September 2019 by Admin. (talk , contribs) (‎Cleared an ...
... Posted on January 30, 2023. January 30, 2023. By Rajesh Ramnarayan ...
  • in the 1990s, phylogenetic studies suggested that many genera classified in the Verbenaceae should be classified in the Lamiaceae or to other families in the order Lamiales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lamiaceae (/ˌleɪmiˈeɪsiːˌiː, -iˌaɪ/ LAY-mee-AY-see-ee, -⁠eye) or Labiatae are a family of flowering plants commonly known as the mint, deadnettle or sage family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coriandrum sativum:It is chiefly grown in Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Bihar and Uttar Pra… LAMIACEAE (Labiatae) - Mint Family Herbs with square stems and aromatic oils Leaves opposite or whorled, simple Flowers bisexual, zygomorphic. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • The enlarged Lamiaceae contain about 236 genera and have been stated to contain 6,900 to 7,200 species, but the World Checklist lists 7,534. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exotic Lamiaceae species in Rio Grande do Norte - a. (scielo.br)
  • The mint family (Lamiaceae), with approximately 236 genera and 7200 species, is the sixth largest family of flowering plants, and has major economic and cultural importance worldwide. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • The Lamiaceae are mostly herbs or shrubs comprising about 200 genera and 3,200 species. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • Lamiaceae is distributed nearly worldwide, and many species are cultivated for their fragrant leaves and attractive flowers. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • In this project, we will document part of the Lamiaceae (mint family), a species-rich plant family represented all around the world (except Antarctica) with approximately 7000 species. (doedat.be)
  • Lamiaceae is divided into 7 sub-families - Ajugoideae, Lamioideae, Nepetoideae, Prostantheroideae, Scutellarioideae, Symphorematoideae and Viticoideae- plus a few genera still that are still unplaced. (botanybrisbane.com)
  • Links to high-resolution free images of Stenogyne microphylla (Lamiaceae) (native mint) by Forest & Kim Starr (USGS) are available here. (hear.org)
  • Horehound, Self Heal and Motherwort are known Lamiaceae members with medicinal qualities, and any feline can attest to the rejuvenating properties of Nepeta cataria, or Catnip. (montara.com)
  • Lamiaceae Nepeta cataria L. (bas-net.by)
  • The greater part of the Acanthaceae family are herbs or shrubs, but vines and Lamiaceae Lamiaceae See list of 35 genera in this family Choose this genus Scutellaria. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • El orégano puede causar reacciones en personas alérgicas a las plantas de la familia Lamiaceae, como albahaca, hisopo, lavanda, mejorana, menta y salvia. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In 2004, the Lamiaceae were divided into seven subfamilies, plus 10 genera not placed in any of the subfamilies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the genera of Lamiaceae have never been sampled for DNA for molecular phylogenetic studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sclareol can be extracted from inflorescences of Salvia sclarea L., a pluriannual herb from the Lamiaceae family, which is more commonly cultivated for its essential oil. (plos.org)
  • Although this is still considered an acceptable alternative name, most botanists now use the name Lamiaceae in referring to this family. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lamiaceae belong to a large family and are found growing over the entire planet. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • 1. The Lamiaceae family is characterised by square stems, aromatic leaves (gland-dotted) and zygomorphic (irregular) flowers with the corolla usually 2-lipped. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • The Lamiaceae Family, Anti-HIV, and Antioxidant Responses. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • Ring in the new year with a Britannica Membership, List of economically important members of the family Lamiaceae, https://www.britannica.com/topic/list-of-economically-important-members-of-the-family-Lamiaceae-2035852. (newdimensionsipm.com)
  • The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of Lamiaceae herbs companion planting on growth and secondary metabolites changes in tomato plants. (scirp.org)
  • Ahmad, H. , Kobayashi, M. and Matsubara, Y. (2020) Changes in Secondary Metabolites and Free Amino Acid Content in Tomato with Lamiaceae Herbs Companion Planting. (scirp.org)
  • Furthermore, whether this phenomenon is exclusive to tomato-basil companionship or other Lamiaceae herbs shows the same effect is still unclear. (scirp.org)
  • 1991) suggests that Cardioteucris cordifolia C. Y. Wu, originally placed in the Lamiaceae, is identical with Caryopteris siccanea W. Smith (Verbenaceae, q.v.). Although the original author agrees with the identity of Cardioteucris cordifolia and Cardiopteris siccaneae , he believes that the generic placement of Cardioteucris is in the Lamiaceae because of its 2-lipped calyx and deeply 4-divided ovary. (efloras.org)
  • Characteristics of Thymus reverdattoanus ( Lamiaceae ) population in the south of its range (Nadym district, Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Area) // Bot. (binran.ru)
  • Lamiaceae are distinctive, in a complex sort of way: The stems are square with opposite leaves, with each pair of leaves at right angles to the ones above and below it. (montara.com)
  • Many members of Lamiaceae make attractive garden additions, particulary the showy sages and mints. (montara.com)
  • The enlarged Lamiaceae contain about 236 genera and have been stated to contain 6,900 to 7,200 species, but the World Checklist lists 7,534. (wikipedia.org)
  • This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Prathapan, K. D., Faizal, M. H., Anith, And K. N. (2005): A new species of Longitarsus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding on Chinese potato, Plectranthus rotundifolius (Lamiaceae) in southern India. (gbif.org)
  • Family: Lamiaceae 81 species. (syzygium.xyz)
  • species (Lamiaceae) in India are carried out. (ijpsr.com)
  • The genus Callicarpa L. (Lamiaceae) comprises 154 species and 12 varieties (The Plant List 2013) of shrubs or small trees, rarely woody climbers, distributed in temperate and tropical regions. (botanyvn.com)
  • Volatile compounds of Lamiaceae exhibit a synergistic antibacterial activity with streptomycin. (fiocruz.br)
  • Studies on developing new, effective and safe natural products from Lamiaceae (rich source of flavonoids and other active compounds) are promising and may offer prevention and treatment for patients with coronary disease and other related diseases. (imrpress.com)
  • and on Lamium amplexicaule (Lamiaceae) are given. (qld.gov.au)
  • In 2004, the Lamiaceae were divided into seven subfamilies, plus 10 genera not placed in any of the subfamilies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the genera of Lamiaceae have never been sampled for DNA for molecular phylogenetic studies. (wikipedia.org)