The condition resulting from the absence or deficiency of LACTASE in the MUCOSA cells of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, and the inability to break down LACTOSE in milk for ABSORPTION. Bacterial fermentation of the unabsorbed lactose leads to symptoms that range from a mild indigestion (DYSPEPSIA) to severe DIARRHEA. Lactose intolerance may be an inborn error or acquired.
A measure of a patient's ability to break down lactose.
An enzyme complex that catalyzes the transfer of GALACTOSE from UDP GALACTOSE to GLUCOSE, forming LACTOSE. The enzyme complex is composed of a B subunit, ALPHA-LACTALBUMIN, which changes the substrate specificity of the A subunit, N-ACETYLLACTOSAMINE SYNTHASE, from N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE to glucose making lactose synthesis the preferred reaction.
Plasmids which determine the ability of a bacterium to ferment lactose.
An enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of LACTOSE to D-GALACTOSE and D-GLUCOSE. Defects in the enzyme cause LACTOSE INTOLERANCE.
Galactosides in which the oxygen atom linking the sugar and aglycone is replaced by a sulfur atom.
Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the same direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.
The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.
Includes ortho-, meta-, and para-nitrophenylgalactosides.
Glycosides formed by the reaction of the hydroxyl group on the anomeric carbon atom of galactose with an alcohol to form an acetal. They include both alpha- and beta-galactosides.
A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.
A large group of membrane transport proteins that shuttle MONOSACCHARIDES across CELL MEMBRANES.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
The first chemical element in the periodic table. It has the atomic symbol H, atomic number 1, and atomic weight [1.00784; 1.00811]. It exists, under normal conditions, as a colorless, odorless, tasteless, diatomic gas. Hydrogen ions are PROTONS. Besides the common H1 isotope, hydrogen exists as the stable isotope DEUTERIUM and the unstable, radioactive isotope TRITIUM.
A slightly acid milk food produced by fermentation due to the combined action of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophilus.
Any tests done on exhaled air.
A disaccharide consisting of one galactose and one glucose moiety in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Raw and processed or manufactured milk and milk-derived products. These are usually from cows (bovine) but are also from goats, sheep, reindeer, and water buffalo.
Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.
Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.
Phosphoric acid esters of galactose.
Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.
A major protein fraction of milk obtained from the WHEY.
The bacterial sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) that catalyzes the transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphoenolpyruvate to its sugar substrates (the PTS sugars) concomitant with the translocation of these sugars across the bacterial membrane. The phosphorylation of a given sugar requires four proteins, two general proteins, Enzyme I and HPr and a pair of sugar-specific proteins designated as the Enzyme II complex. The PTS has also been implicated in the induction of synthesis of some catabolic enzyme systems required for the utilization of sugars that are not substrates of the PTS as well as the regulation of the activity of ADENYLYL CYCLASES. EC 2.7.1.-.
A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)
Bacterial repressor proteins that bind to the LAC OPERON and thereby prevent the synthesis of proteins involved in catabolism of LACTOSE. When lactose levels are high lac repressors undergo an allosteric change that causes their release from the DNA and the resumption of lac operon transcription.
A non-metabolizable galactose analog that induces expression of the LAC OPERON.
The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.
A non-pathogenic species of LACTOCOCCUS found in DAIRY PRODUCTS and responsible for the souring of MILK and the production of LACTIC ACID.
The multifunctional protein that contains two enzyme domains. The first domain (EC 3.2.1.62) hydrolyzes glycosyl-N-acylsphingosine to a sugar and N-acylsphingosine. The second domain (EC 3.2.1.108) hydrolyzes LACTOSE and is found in the intestinal brush border membrane. Loss of activity for this enzyme in humans results in LACTOSE INTOLERANCE.
Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.
General term for a group of MALNUTRITION syndromes caused by failure of normal INTESTINAL ABSORPTION of nutrients.
Agents that affect ION PUMPS; ION CHANNELS; ABC TRANSPORTERS; and other MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS.
The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.
A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.
A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
A genus of fungus in the family Hypocreaceae, order HYPOCREALES. Anamorphs include TRICHODERMA.
Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.
A synthetic disaccharide used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy. It has also been used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p887)
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A class of animal lectins that bind specifically to beta-galactoside in a calcium-independent manner. Members of this class are distiguished from other lectins by the presence of a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain. The majority of proteins in this class bind to sugar molecules in a sulfhydryl-dependent manner and are often referred to as S-type lectins, however this property is not required for membership in this class.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An ascomycetous yeast of the fungal family Saccharomycetaceae, order SACCHAROMYCETALES.
Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.
MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.
A rod-shaped, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacterium that is a genus of the family Bifidobacteriaceae, order Bifidobacteriales, class ACTINOBACTERIA. It inhabits the intestines and feces of humans as well as the human vagina.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)
The major protein constituents of milk are CASEINS and whey proteins such as LACTALBUMIN and LACTOGLOBULINS. IMMUNOGLOBULINS occur in high concentrations in COLOSTRUM and in relatively lower concentrations in milk. (Singleton and Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed, p554)
The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.
Oligosaccharides containing three monosaccharide units linked by glycosidic bonds.
A nucleoside diphosphate sugar which can be epimerized into UDPglucose for entry into the mainstream of carbohydrate metabolism. Serves as a source of galactose in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, cerebrosides, and lactose.
A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in beta (1-4) glycosidic linkage. Obtained from the partial hydrolysis of cellulose.
The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.
A species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of humans and animals, the human mouth, and vagina. This organism produces the fermented product, acidophilus milk.
The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.
An increase in the rate of synthesis of an enzyme due to the presence of an inducer which acts to derepress the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.
Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)
A sulfhydryl reagent that is widely used in experimental biochemical studies.
Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.
Enzymes that catalyze the epimerization of chiral centers within carbohydrates or their derivatives. EC 5.1.3.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Non-digestible food ingredients mostly of a carbohydrate base that improve human health by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of existing BACTERIA in the COLON.
Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A protein phytotoxin from the seeds of Ricinus communis, the castor oil plant. It agglutinates cells, is proteolytic, and causes lethal inflammation and hemorrhage if taken internally.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
A galectin found abundantly in smooth muscle (MUSCLE, SMOOTH) and SKELETAL MUSCLE and many other tissues. It occurs as a homodimer with two 14-kDa subunits.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the formation of galactose 1-phosphate and ADP from ATP and D-galactose. Galactosamine can also act as the acceptor. A deficiency of this enzyme results in GALACTOSEMIA. EC 2.7.1.6.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A syndrome produced by severe protein deficiency, characterized by retarded growth, changes in skin and hair pigment, edema, and pathologic changes in the liver, including fatty infiltration, necrosis, and fibrosis. The word is a local name in Gold Coast, Africa, meaning "displaced child". Although first reported from Africa, kwashiorkor is now known throughout the world, but mainly in the tropics and subtropics. It is considered to be related to marasmus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
A multifunctional galactin initially discovered as a macrophage antigen that binds to IMMUNOGLOBULIN E, and as 29-35-kDa lectin that binds LAMININ. It is involved in a variety of biological events including interactions with galactose-containing glycoconjugates, cell proliferation, CELL DIFFERENTIATION, and APOPTOSIS.
A family of calcium-binding alpha-globulins that are synthesized in the LIVER and play an essential role in maintaining the solubility of CALCIUM in the BLOOD. In addition the fetuins contain aminoterminal cystatin domains and are classified as type 3 cystatins.
The A protein of the lactose synthase complex. In the presence of the B protein (LACTALBUMIN) specificity is changed from N-acetylglucosamine to glucose. EC 2.4.1.90.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of galactose from a nucleoside diphosphate galactose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.
A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of alpha D-glucose 1-phosphate to alpha D-glucose 6-phosphate. EC 5.4.2.2.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Simple sugars, carbohydrates which cannot be decomposed by hydrolysis. They are colorless crystalline substances with a sweet taste and have the same general formula CnH2nOn. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Protein or glycoprotein substances of plant origin that bind to sugar moieties in cell walls or membranes. Some carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) from PLANTS also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. Many plant lectins change the physiology of the membrane of BLOOD CELLS to cause agglutination, mitosis, or other biochemical changes. They may play a role in plant defense mechanisms.
Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.
Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.
A toxic lectin from the seeds of jequirity, Abrus precatorius L. Very active poison. Five different proteins have so far been isolated: Abrus agglutinin, the component responsible for: hemagglutinating activity, & abrins a-d, the toxic principals each consisting of two peptide chains are held together by disulfide bonds.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
A rod-shaped bacterium isolated from milk and cheese, dairy products and dairy environments, sour dough, cow dung, silage, and human mouth, human intestinal contents and stools, and the human vagina.
An endocellulase with specificity for the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-glucosidic linkages in CELLULOSE, lichenin, and cereal beta-glucans.
A galectin found in the small and large intestine and the stomach. It occurs as a homodimer with two 36-kDa subunits and is localized to sites of cell adhesion where it may play role in assembly of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS.
Expulsion of milk from the mammary alveolar lumen, which is surrounded by a layer of milk-secreting EPITHELIAL CELLS and a network of myoepithelial cells. Contraction of the myoepithelial cells is regulated by neuroendocrine signals.
The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose cells occur singly, in pairs or short chains, in V or Y configurations, or in clumps resembling letters of the Chinese alphabet. Its organisms are found in cheese and dairy products as well as on human skin and can occasionally cause soft tissue infections.
Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.
The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.
Parasitic plants that form a bushy growth on branches of host trees which are in the order Santalales. It includes the Christmas mistletoe family (VISCACEAE), the showy mistletoe family (LORANTHACEAE) and the catkin mistletoe family (Eremolepidaceae). The composition of toxins, lectins, tyramine, phenethylamines, and other compounds may be affected by the host.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A naturally occurring product of plants obtained following reduction of GALACTOSE. It appears as a white crystalline powder with a slight sweet taste. It may form in excess in the lens of the eye in GALACTOSEMIAS, a deficiency of GALACTOKINASE.
A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.
A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.
The thin, yellow, serous fluid secreted by the mammary glands during pregnancy and immediately postpartum before lactation begins. It consists of immunologically active substances, white blood cells, water, protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
Former Netherlands overseas territory in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies. It had included the islands of Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, Saba, St. Eustatius, and the southern part of St. Martin. The Netherlands Antilles dissolved on October 10, 2010. Aruba, Curacao and Sint Maarten became autonomous territories of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius are under the direct administration of the Netherlands. (From US Department of State, Background Note)
Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.
A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.
A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in rhinitis, in urinary incontinence, and in the treatment of ulcers. At high doses it has nicotinic effects resulting in neuromuscular blocking.
A genus of leguminous shrubs or trees, mainly tropical, yielding useful compounds such as ALKALOIDS and PLANT LECTINS.
The interference in synthesis of an enzyme due to the elevated level of an effector substance, usually a metabolite, whose presence would cause depression of the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
Relating to the size of solids.
Glycosphingolipids which contain as their polar head group a lactose moiety bound in glycosidic linkage to the hydroxyl group of ceramide. Their accumulation in tissue, due to a defect in lactosylceramide beta-galactosidase, is the cause of lactosylceramidosis.
A device that delivers medication to the lungs in the form of a dry powder.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A mixture of related phosphoproteins occurring in milk and cheese. The group is characterized as one of the most nutritive milk proteins, containing all of the common amino acids and rich in the essential ones.
Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.
Hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives that contain mercury. Some of these are used as sulfhydryl reagents in biochemical studies.
An order of fungi in the phylum Ascomycota that multiply by budding. They include the telomorphic ascomycetous yeasts which are found in a very wide range of habitats.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
Nutritional physiology of animals.
Enzymes which are immobilized on or in a variety of water-soluble or water-insoluble matrices with little or no loss of their catalytic activity. Since they can be reused continuously, immobilized enzymes have found wide application in the industrial, medical and research fields.
Compounds that provide LUBRICATION between surfaces in order to reduce FRICTION.
Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.
Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.
An enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of UDPgalactose from UTP and galactose-1-phosphate. It is present in low levels in fetal and infant liver, but increases with age, thereby enabling galactosemic infants who survive to develop the capacity to metabolize galactose. EC 2.7.7.10.
Glucose in blood.
Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.
An autosomal recessive fructose metabolism disorder due to deficient fructose-1-phosphate aldolase (EC 2.1.2.13) activity, resulting in accumulation of fructose-1-phosphate. The accumulated fructose-1-phosphate inhibits glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, causing severe hypoglycemia following ingestion of fructose. Prolonged fructose ingestion in infants leads ultimately to hepatic failure and death. Patients develop a strong distaste for sweet food, and avoid a chronic course of the disease by remaining on a fructose- and sucrose-free diet.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Allergic reaction to milk (usually cow's milk) or milk products. MILK HYPERSENSITIVITY should be differentiated from LACTOSE INTOLERANCE, an intolerance to milk as a result of congenital deficiency of lactase.
Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.
Method of tissue preparation in which the tissue specimen is frozen and then dehydrated at low temperature in a high vacuum. This method is also used for dehydrating pharmaceutical and food products.
Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.
A hexose or fermentable monosaccharide and isomer of glucose from manna, the ash Fraxinus ornus and related plants. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.
A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Derived proteins or mixtures of cleavage products produced by the partial hydrolysis of a native protein either by an acid or by an enzyme. Peptones are readily soluble in water, and are not precipitable by heat, by alkalis, or by saturation with ammonium sulfate. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is an intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is used as a solvent, emollient, pharmaceutical agent, and sweetening agent.
A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic mechanisms and processes of microorganisms.
A polyhydric alcohol with about half the sweetness of sucrose. Sorbitol occurs naturally and is also produced synthetically from glucose. It was formerly used as a diuretic and may still be used as a laxative and in irrigating solutions for some surgical procedures. It is also used in many manufacturing processes, as a pharmaceutical aid, and in several research applications.
A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria commonly found in the alimentary tract of cows, sheep, and other ruminants. It occasionally is encountered in cases of human endocarditis. This species is nonhemolytic.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-2,3, alpha-2,6-, and alpha-2,8-glycosidic linkages (at a decreasing rate, respectively) of terminal sialic residues in oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycolipids, colominic acid, and synthetic substrate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.
Vertical transmission of hereditary characters by DNA from cytoplasmic organelles such as MITOCHONDRIA; CHLOROPLASTS; and PLASTIDS, or from PLASMIDS or viral episomal DNA.
The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.
The quality or state of being wettable or the degree to which something can be wet. This is also the ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid whose surface tension is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface of the solid.
Lectin purified from peanuts (ARACHIS HYPOGAEA). It binds to poorly differentiated cells and terminally differentiated cells and is used in cell separation techniques.
A necessary enzyme in the metabolism of galactose. It reversibly catalyzes the conversion of UDPglucose to UDPgalactose. NAD+ is an essential component for enzymatic activity. EC 5.1.3.2.
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.
The glyceryl esters of a fatty acid, or of a mixture of fatty acids. They are generally odorless, colorless, and tasteless if pure, but they may be flavored according to origin. Fats are insoluble in water, soluble in most organic solvents. They occur in animal and vegetable tissue and are generally obtained by boiling or by extraction under pressure. They are important in the diet (DIETARY FATS) as a source of energy. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Carbohydrates covalently linked to a nonsugar moiety (lipids or proteins). The major glycoconjugates are glycoproteins, glycopeptides, peptidoglycans, glycolipids, and lipopolysaccharides. (From Biochemical Nomenclature and Related Documents, 2d ed; From Principles of Biochemistry, 2d ed)
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.
A frozen dairy food made from cream or butterfat, milk, sugar, and flavorings. Frozen custard and French-type ice creams also contain eggs.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.

Fecal coliform elevated-temperature test: a physiological basis. (1/1861)

The physiological basis of the Eijkman elevated-temperature test for differentiating fecal from nonfecal coliforms was investigated. Manometric studies indicated that the inhibitory effect upon growth and metabolism in a nonfecal coliform at 44.5 degrees C involved cellular components common to both aerobic and fermentative metabolism of lactose. Radioactive substrate incorporation experiments implicated cell membrane function as a principal focus for temperature sensitivity at 44.5 degrees C. A temperature increase from 35 to 44.5 degrees C drastically reduced the rates of [14C]glucose uptake in nonfecal coliforms, whereas those of fecal coliforms were essentially unchanged. In addition, relatively low levels of nonfecal coliform beta-galactosidase activity coupled with thermal inactivation of this enzyme at a comparatively low temperature may also inhibit growth and metabolism of nonfecal coliforms at the elevated temperature.  (+info)

Calorimetric studies on the stability of the ribosome-inactivating protein abrin II: effects of pH and ligand binding. (2/1861)

The effects of pH and ligand binding on the stability of abrin II, a heterodimeric ribosome-inactivating protein, and its subunits have been studied using high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry. At pH7.2, the calorimetric scan consists of two transitions, which correspond to the B-subunit [transition temperature (Tm) 319.2K] and the A-subunit (Tm 324.6K) of abrin II, as also confirmed by studies on the isolated A-subunit. The calorimetric enthalpy of the isolated A-subunit of abrin II is similar to that of the higher-temperature transition. However, its Tm is 2.4K lower than that of the higher-temperature peak of intact abrin II. This indicates that there is some interaction between the two subunits. Abrin II displays increased stability as the pH is decreased to 4.5. Lactose increases the Tm values as well as the enthalpies of both transitions. This effect is more pronounced at pH7.2 than at pH4.5. This suggests that ligand binding stabilizes the native conformation of abrin II. Analysis of the B-subunit transition temperature as a function of lactose concentration suggests that two lactose molecules bind to one molecule of abrin II at pH7.2. The presence of two binding sites for lactose on the abrin II molecule is also indicated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Plotting DeltaHm (the molar transition enthalpy at Tm) against Tm yielded values for DeltaCp (change in excess heat capacity) of 27+/-2 kJ.mol-1.K-1 for the B-subunit and 20+/-1 kJ.mol-1.K-1 for the A-subunit. These values have been used to calculate the thermal stability of abrin II and to surmise the mechanism of its transmembrane translocation.  (+info)

Structure-function analysis of the UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase. Essential residues lie in a predicted active site cleft resembling a lactose repressor fold. (3/1861)

Mucin-type O-glycosylation is initiated by a family of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (ppGaNTases). Based on sequence relationships with divergent proteins, the ppGaNTases can be subdivided into three putative domains: each putative domain contains a characteristic sequence motif. The 112-amino acid glycosyltransferase 1 (GT1) motif represents the first half of the catalytic unit and contains a short aspartate-any residue-histidine (DXH) or aspartate-any residue-aspartate (DXD)-like sequence. Secondary structure predictions and structural threading suggest that the GT1 motif forms a 5-stranded parallel beta-sheet flanked by 4 alpha-helices, which resembles the first domain of the lactose repressor. Four invariant carboxylates and a histidine residue are predicted to lie at the C-terminal end of three beta-strands and line the active site cleft. Site-directed mutagenesis of murine ppGaNTase-T1 reveals that conservative mutations at these 5 positions result in products with no detectable enzyme activity (D156Q, D209N, and H211D) or <1% activity (E127Q and E213Q). The second half of the catalytic unit contains a DXXXXXWGGENXE motif (positions 310-322) which is also found in beta1,4-galactosyltransferases (termed the Gal/GalNAc-T motif). Mutants of carboxylates within this motif express either no detectable activity, 1% or 2% activity (E319Q, E322Q, and D310N, respectively). Mutagenesis of highly conserved (but not invariant) carboxylates produces only modest alterations in enzyme activity. Mutations in the C-terminal 128-amino acid ricin-like lectin motif do not alter the enzyme's catalytic properties.  (+info)

Ontogeny of intestinal safety factors: lactase capacities and lactose loads. (4/1861)

We measured intestinal safety factors (ratio of a physiological capacity to the load on it) for lactose digestion in developing rat pups. Specifically, we assessed the quantitative relationships between lactose load and the series capacities of lactase and the Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1). Both capacities increased significantly with age in suckling pups as a result of increasing intestinal mass and maintenance of mass-specific activities. The youngest pups examined (5 days) had surprisingly high safety factors of 8-13 for both lactase and SGLT-1, possibly because milk contains lactase substrates other than lactose; it also, however, suggests that their intestinal capacities were being prepared to meet future demands rather than just current ones. By day 10 (and also at day 15), increased lactose loads resulted in lower safety factors of 4-6, values more typical of adult intestines. The safety factor of SGLT-1 in day 30 (weanling) and day 100 (adult) rats was only approximately 1.0. This was initially unexpected, because most adult intestines maintain a modest reserve capacity beyond nutrient load values, but postweaning rats appear to use hindgut fermentation, assessed by gut morphology and hydrogen production assays, as a built-in reserve capacity. The series capacities of lactase and SGLT-1 varied in concert with each other over ontogeny and as lactose load was manipulated by experimental variation in litter size.  (+info)

Transcription of the pcbAB, pcbC and penDE genes of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 is repressed by glucose and the repression is not reversed by alkaline pHs. (5/1861)

Glucose repressed transcription of the penicillin biosynthesis genes pcbAB, pcbC and penDE when added at inoculation time to cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 but it had little repressive effect when added at 12 h and no effect when added at 24 or 36 h. A slight increase in the expression of pcbC and penDE (and to a smaller extent of pcbAB) was observed in glucose-grown cultures at pH 6.8, 7.4 and 8.0 as compared with pH 6.2, but alkaline pHs did not override the strong repression exerted by glucose. Transcription of the actin gene used as control was not significantly affected by glucose or alkaline pHs. Repression by glucose of the three penicillin biosynthetic genes was also observed using the lacZ reporter gene coupled to each of the three promoters in monocopy transformants with the constructions integrated at the pyrG locus. Glucose repression of the three genes encoding enzymes of penicillin biosynthesis therefore appears to be exerted by a regulatory mechanism independent from pH regulation.  (+info)

Lectins as membrane components of mitochondria from Ricinus communis. (6/1861)

1. Mitochondria were isolated from developing endosperm of Ricinus communis and were fractionated into outer membrane and inner membrane. The relative purity of the two membrane fractions was determined by marker enzymes. The fractions were also examined by negative-stain electron microscopy. 2. Membrane fractions were sequentially extracted in the following way. (a) Suspension in 0.5M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (b)suspension in 0.1M-EDTA (disodium salt)/0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1; (c) sonication in 0.05M-potassium phosphate, pH7.1;(d)sonication in aq. Triton X-100 (0.1%). The membranes were pelleted by centrifugation at 100 000g for 15 min, between each step. Agglutination activity in the extracts was investigated by using trypsin-treated rabbit erythrocytes. 3. The addition of lactose to inner mitochondrial membrane resulted in the solubilization of part of the lectin activity, indicating that the protein was attached to the membrane via its carbohydrate-binding site. Pretreatment of the membranes with lactose before tha usual extraction procedure showed that lactose could extract lectins that normally required more harsh treatment of the membrane for solubilization. 4. Lectins extracted from inner membranes were purified by affinity chromatography on agarose gel. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of purified samples in sodium dodecyl sulphate indicated that at least part of the lectin present in inner mitochondrial membrane was identical with the R. communis agglutinin of mol.wt. 120 000.  (+info)

Amino acid substitutions in a conserved region in the stalk of the Newcastle disease virus HN glycoprotein spike impair its neuraminidase activity in the globular domain. (7/1861)

The ectodomain of the paramyxovirus haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein spike can be divided into two regions: a membrane-proximal, stalk-like structure and a terminal globular domain. The latter contains all the antibody recognition sites of the protein, as well as its receptor recognition and neuraminidase (NA) active sites. These two activities of the protein can be separated by monoclonal antibody functional inhibition studies and mutations in the globular domain. Herein, we show that mutation of several conserved residues in the stalk of the Newcastle disease virus HN protein markedly decrease its NA activity without a significant effect on receptor recognition. Thus, mutations in the stalk, distant from the NA active site in the globular domain, can also separate attachment and NA. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that the NA activity of this protein is dependent on an intact stalk structure.  (+info)

Effect of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III from Holothuroidea Cucumaria echinata on the ANS fluorescence responses in sensitive MDCK and resistant CHO cells. (8/1861)

The addition of CEL-III to sensitive MDCK cells preincubated with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) caused an increase in the fluorescence intensity of the probe. The increase in the ANS fluorescence caused by CEL-III was Ca2+-dependent and strongly inhibited by 0.1 M lactose, indicating that Ca2+-dependent binding of CEL-III to specific carbohydrate receptors on the plasma membrane is responsible for this phenomenon. In contrast, no significant effect of CEL-III on the ANS fluorescence was observed in CHO cells, which are highly resistant to CEL-III cytotoxicity. In MDCK cells, energy transfer from tryptophan residues to bound ANS molecules was observed in the presence of CEL-III, but not in CHO cells. Furthermore, the amount of ANS bound to MDCK cells increased as the concentration of CEL-III increased. Therefore, a simple interpretation is that the CEL-III-induced increase in ANS fluorescence is attributable to an increase of the hydrophobic region in the plasma membrane where ANS could bind. Immunoblotting analysis of proteins from cells treated with CEL-III indicated that CEL-III oligomers were irreversibly bound to the cells, and the amount of oligomer bound to MDCK cells was much greater than that bound to CHO cells under any conditions tested. The oligomerization may be accompanied by an enhancement of the hydrophobicity of CEL-III molecules, which in turn provides new ANS-binding sites. The difference in susceptibility of MDCK and CHO cells to CEL-III cytotoxicity may be due to a difference in oligomerization of bound CEL-III.  (+info)

Lactose monohydrate مناسب بیوشیمی Lactose monohydrate for biochemistry. CAS 10039-26-6, pH 4.0 - 6.5 (100 g/l, H₂O, 20 °C). Sucrose MSDS and product info below ...
Creative-Proteomics offer cas 64044-51-5 [1-13Cgal]lactose monohydrate. We are specialized in manufacturing Stabel Isotope Labeled Analytical Standard products.
ZYRTEC (cetirizine HCI), an over the counter antihistamine for adults and children that helps relieve upper respiratory symptoms caused by allergy triggers such as dust, mold, and pet dander, tree pollen, weeds and grasses, has recently introduced several new over-the-counter products including adult tablets (10mg), ZYRTEK-D tablets and childrens chewables (5mg & 10mg) that contain lactose monohydrate (milk protein). Lactose monohydrate is listed as an inactive ingredient in each of these four products, but the package does not include a warning statement to consumers to indicate the inclusion of a milk protein. Lactose monohydrate is defined as a natural disaccharide, obtained from milk, which consists of one glucose and one galactose moiety ...
According to the 2007 study, Effects of Dietary Lactose on Long-term High-fat-diet-induced Obesity in Rats, the addition of lactose to a high-fat diet decreased body weight, body weight gain, fat accumulation, and the level of serum leptin.. In the study, four groups were observed over 84 days: A control diet group (Cont), a lactose diet group (Lac) in which corn starch in the control diet was replaced by lactose at 10% of the diet weight, a high-fat diet group (Fat) in which lard was added to the control diet to adjust the lipid energy ratio to 40% , and a lactose-added high-fat diet group (Fat+Lac) in which 10% lactose was added to the high-fat diet. The graphs below compares the weight of fats and the amount of serum leptin (a hormone that regulates long-term appetite) between the four groups at the end of the observation.. The graphs show there is no significant difference between the fat accumulation and serum leptin levels between the Cont and Lac group, but the Fat+Lac group does have ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Colorimetric calcium-response of β-lactosylated μ-oxo-bis-[5,15- meso-diphenylporphyrinatoiron(III)]. AU - Hasegawa, Teruaki. AU - Numata, Munenori. AU - Asai, Masayoshi. AU - Takeuchi, Masayuki. AU - Shinkai, Seiji. PY - 2005/8/8. Y1 - 2005/8/8. N2 - β-Lactosylated 5,15-meso-diphenylporphyrinatoiron(III) chloride was prepared by ironization of the corresponding free base porphyrin having acetylated lactoside-units followed by deacetylation with ammonia in a water-methanol mixture. The resultant 5,15-meso-bis(β-lactosylphenyl) porphyrinatoiron(III) chloride showed unique colorimetric response to calcium cation. This colorimetric response is calcium-specific and no other cations, such as sodium, potassium, or magnesium ions induced such colorimetric response. Lines of evidence including UV-vis spectra under different conditions and TEM images strongly indicate that interdigitations of the corresponding μ-oxo-dimers are responsible for this colorimetric change.. AB - ...
Higher intakes of milk and lactose are hypothesized to increase the risk of ovarian cancer. However, in this pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies that prospectively assessed the association between diet and ovarian cancer risk, no statistically significant associations were observed for milk or calcium intake. A weak, marginally significant positive association was observed for lactose and ovarian cancer risk, although lactose was highly correlated with milk and calcium intake within this pooled analysis (median r across studies ,0.83 and 0.90, respectively). For the lactose analysis, we were able to analyze the amount of lactose found in the equivalent of three or more servings of milk (750 g) per day due to the contribution of lactose from other food sources. If lactose is truly a causal factor, the accurate assessment of lactose intake per se would reduce measurement error compared with the use of milk consumption as a surrogate of lactose intake because the latter ignores other dietary ...
InCHi String: isomeric SMILES: C([[email protected]@H]1[[email protected]@H]([[email protected]@H]([[email protected]]([[email protected]@H](O1)O[[email protected]@H]2[[email protected]](O[[email protected]@H]([[email protected]@H]([[email protected]]2O)O)O)CO)O)O)O)O. canonical SMILES: C(C1C(C(C(C(O1)OC2C(OC(C(C2O)O)O)CO)O)O)O)O. IUPAC ...
Professor Miller claims that the careful work of University of Rochester biologist Professor Barry Hall is an experimental demonstration of the ability of Darwinian evolution to produce an irreducibly complex biochemical system. (Barry Hall himself never made such a claim.) I disagree. The fact that the artificial chemical inducer IPTG was added to the lactose-utilizing system effectively mitigated its irreducibility, turning the system into one that could be improved a step at a time. In his recent essay Miller wrote: Does Barry Halls ebg system fit the definition of irreducible complexity? Absolutely. The three parts of the evolved system are: (1) A lactose-sensitive ebg repressor protein that controls expression of the galactosidase enzyme; (2) The ebg galactosidase enzyme; (3) The enzyme reaction that induces the lac permease. Unless all three are in place, the system does not function, which is, of course, the key element of an irreducibly complex system. Millers claim is incorrect ...
Periparturient dairy cows do not exhibit hepatic insulin resistance, yet adipose-specific insulin resistance occurs in cows prone to high weight loss ...
The study results suggest a surface-bulk propagation of the amorphicity during milling in combination with a different amorphous structural conformation to that of the amorphous spray dried lactose.
To do it we exploited one of such genetic systems, existing in the complex of genes that form the Lac Operon shown in Figure 4. Namely, E. coli can survive by metabolizing either glucose or lactose - in the case of lack of glucose. Lactose- or glucose-metabolizing modes are the two stable state of the system. To perform experiments we use IPTG a structural analog of lactose that cannot be metabolized. Thus the input of our system are the external concentrations of Glucose and IPTG (Gluex and IPTGex respectively). Since lactose metabolism is more energy consuming, usually all the apparatus that takes care of the lactose metabolism is repressed. It is the promoter pLac constitutively shut off by the presence of the LacI protein, that inhibits the transcription of the downstream genes in the operon (this is how it works). When IPTG is in the environment, several concurrent processes take place in the cell. IPTG flows across the membrane and after some processing it is able to quench the repressor ...
To do it we exploited one of such genetic systems, existing in the complex of genes that form the Lac Operon shown in Figure 4. Namely, E. coli can survive by metabolizing either glucose or lactose - in the case of lack of glucose. Lactose- or glucose-metabolizing modes are the two stable state of the system. To perform experiments we use IPTG a structural analog of lactose that cannot be metabolized. Thus the input of our system are the external concentrations of Glucose and IPTG (Gluex and IPTGex respectively). Since lactose metabolism is more energy consuming, usually all the apparatus that takes care of the lactose metabolism is repressed. It is the promoter pLac constitutively shut off by the presence of the LacI protein, that inhibits the transcription of the downstream genes in the operon (this is how it works). When IPTG is in the environment, several concurrent processes take place in the cell. IPTG flows across the membrane and after some processing it is able to quench the repressor ...
It was found that Concanavalin A (Con A) accelerates the rates of hydrolysis of E. coli beta-galactosidase and yeast invertase by binding to the product (glucose) formed in the reaction. The effect of Con A can be made ...
For the selective isolation, cultivation and differentiation of coliforms and enteric pathogens based on the ability to ferment lactose. Lactose-fermenting organisms appear as red to pink colonies, others as colourless or transparent colonies.. ...
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SWISS-MODEL Template Library (SMTL) entry for 1hlc.1. X-RAY CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF THE HUMAN DIMERIC S-LAC LECTIN, L-14-II, IN COMPLEX WITH LACTOSE AT 2.9 ANGSTROMS RESOLUTION
OVERVIEW: What every clinician needs to know Pathogen name and classification Shigella is a nonmotile gram-negative bacillus that does not ferment lactose. It grows readily on standard media and can be easily isolated using selective media. It is a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family and is closely related to E. coli. Shigella contains a 220-kb…. ...
Lactose monohydrate, dibasic calcium phosphate (DCP) and microcrystalline cellulose phosphate (MCCP) were studied as diluents in the same quantity for..
How would you describe the regulation of lactose metabolism in the cells described in problem 5 that were able to grow on minimal media with lactose as a nutrient? ...
Preclinical studies report that 6-Sialyllactose (6SL) may have a role in a number of health benefits. This HMO can be added to much more than infant formula. Learn more today.
AS OPPOSED TO NATURAL SUGARS FOUND IN FRUIT (FRUCTOSE) AND MILK (LACTOSE), WHICH DO NOT HAVE THE SAME EFFECT AS THEY CONTAIN OTHER SUBSTANCES IN THEM THAT PREVENT THE GLUCOSE BEING RELEASED TOO QUICKLY INTO THE BLOODSTREAM, SUCROSE IS BROKEN DOWN TOO QUICKLY, WHICH IS BAD FOR THE BODY. OUR BODY DOES NOT REQUIRE SUCH A LARGE AMOUNT OF SUGAR OR ENERGY IN ONE GO AND ONLY A CERTAIN AMOUNT CAN BE CONVERTED INTO GLYCOGEN AND STORED FOR LATER USE, WHICH MEANS THAT THE SURPLUS IS THEN CONVERTED INTO FAT. THIS FAT IS THEN VIRTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO CONVERT BACK INTO SUGAR AND USE AS ENERGY ...
Lactose synthesis rate is an important factor in milk production and quality in mammals. Understanding the lactose synthesis mechanism is crucial for the improvement of milk quantity and quality. However, research on the temporal gene changes regarding lactose synthesis during the whole lactation is still limited. The objective of this study was to determine gene expression profiles related to lactose synthesis in sows during lactation, and further identify the critical steps or key factors in the lactose synthesis pathway. To determine the temporal change of factors related to lactose synthesis in sows, milk from eight multiparous Yorkshire sows (parity 3 to 6) was collected at 0 h, 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, day 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, and 21 after birth of the first piglet. Lactose content, prolactin and progesterone concentration, and gene or protein expression related to lactose synthesis were measured. The lactose yield increased gradually from D2 to D21 and reached a maximum at D14 (3-fold from D2) during
Evaluation of the C. perfringens lactose-inducible promoter system in C. ljungdahlii.In order to determine if the bgaR-PbgaL lactose-inducible system developed for C. perfringens (23) would function in C. ljungdahlii, it was transformed with the plasmid pAH2. This plasmid contains a β-glucuronidase reporter gene fusion downstream of the bgaR-PbgaL sequence, comprised of the ribosomal binding site and 13 codons of the 5′ end of the cpe gene (encoding CPE, a C. perfringens enterotoxin) fused in frame with gusA, an E. coli gene for β-glucuronidase (23).. The addition of lactose to fructose-grown, mid-log-phase cells of C. ljungdahlii containing the pAH2 plasmid increased the expression of β-glucuronidase (Fig. 2). Within 5 h of induction, a substantial increase in gusA expression was observed with the addition of 10 or 20 mM lactose (Fig. 2A, inset). However, even with only 1 mM lactose, expression of gusA was increased 8-fold (Fig. 2A). This pattern of expression of gusA was similar to that ...
When both glucose and lactose are present in the growth medium, the uptake of lactose is strongly inhibited by glucose because of an increase in the nonphosphorylated form of IIAGlc, an inhibitor of lac permease. Mechanism responsible for glucose-lactose diauxie in Escherichia coli - challenge to the cAMP model
I used this recipe as the perfect excuse to finally do something that had been intimidating me for a while: make cheese. Yes, thats right: actually make my own cheese in my own kitchen, using cheesecloth for its original intended purpose. Ironically, I would have never bothered with it had I not been lactose-intolerant, because making cheese had always sounded like so much trouble when its so easy to go to the store. I used a recipe from Smitten Kitchen. It was much easier than I thought, too. And as a bonus, I got to eat lactose-free ricotta, which so far can only be obtained by making it yourself. It tastes better when its rich, so if youre in Canada, I recommend that you use 1 cup of Natrels lactose-free cream and 3 cups of their lactose-free milk. Unfortunately, I dont have lactose-free cream here, so I used 4 cups of lactose-free whole milk. The ricotta was delicious in the tart, though it might be too bland to use as a spread on crackers. Nonetheless, I consider this a complete ...
Lactose-free dairy is a popular choice because of its perceived health benefits. Greater diversity of lactose-free options, added health benefits, liaising with healthcare professionals and more - all will become huge in the years to come. Based on the latest report from DSMs Global Insights Series on Lactose-Free Dairy, along with major global trends in food and drink and insights from experts in the field, we predict that these six trends will impact the lactose-free dairy market and we highlight how dairy producers can capitalize on this. Click here to view the trend report ...
Abstract: Whey is the co-product resulting after the production of cheese (cottage or cheddar), casein from milk. Acid, sweet and casein whey is resulted from precipitating the milk by rennet, microbes or mineral acids, respectively. The protein content is 0.75, 0.30 and 0.50%, the lactose content is 4.80, 4.60 and 4.70%, the ash content is 0.60, 0.80, 0.90% and pH value is 6.1, 4.6 and 4.4 for the sweet, acid and casein whey, respectively. Approximately, each 4 kg of raw milk produce 1 kg cheese and 3 kg whey. Whey can be fed to animals in a variety of forms, such as: Liquid whey, condensed whey, dried whey (partially delactosed whey) or as dried whey products. Liquid whey has been added to straw at ensiling as a rehydration medium. Sweet (cheddar cheese) whey may be more palatable than acid (cottage cheese) whey by ruminants. Many of the bacteria in the rumen apparently have a limited ability to ferment lactose. The most important aspect of whey feeding is gradual adaptation and provision of ...
PURPOSE: To examine by indirect immunofluorescence the distribution of an endogenous 16-kd S-lac lectin (soluble lactose binding lectin) during development of the chicken retina. METHODS: Cryosections of retinal tissue at different developmental stages and cultured retinal cells (either not permeabilized or permeabilized with acetone) were incubated with a rabbit antiserum that specifically reacts with the retinal 16-kd S-lac lectin. After incubation with a fluorescent-labeled secondary antibody, tissue sections and cultured cells were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: Retina was weakly stained with the antiserum on early embryonic day 7, whereas on embryonic days 13 and 18 it showed a restricted granular staining in the outer retina. At embryonic day 18, in addition, there was widespread staining in all retinal layers. This pattern was maintained by postnatal day 5 and in the adult retina, although the intensity of the staining of the outer retina was weaker. In retinal cell ...
Lactose-free marble cheese gives these nachos all the melty, cheesy goodness anyone could want. Dip into lactose-free sour cream for even more creamy goodness. Normally served as a bar snack, nachos actually have enough protein and calories to count as a main course. __Ensure that all ingredients are lactose-free.__
: Lactose-free mascarpone by Mila: the lactose-free cream cheese by Mila offers enjoyment without regrets. It is easily recognizable by its orange packaging.
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André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial
Wanted* (cross-posted) *Needed* An E.coli that has a high expression of the lac operon specifically high expression of the lac-permease and b-galactosidase proteins), and hence has unrestricted growth on lactose. However (and heres the cruncher) the strain must also have mutations in its pts carbohydrate system (specifically HPro and enz1) so it cannot utilise pts carbohydrates to any great extent compared to lactose and must also have mutations in its galactose permease system so it cannot readily use galactose as a carbohydrate source. That is does a strain exist that can preferentially use lactose over other common carbohydrates as a primary energy source? Where is this strain? (Sorry for the cross-post; a (polite) recommendation about appropriate groups would be appreciated.) Please reply by *mail* to jeffric at kea.lincoln.ac.nz THANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKYOUTHANKHELLOYOUTHANKYOUTHSNKYOU ...
RESULTS: The results showed that peanut pod concentration, incubation time and lactose (as inducer) were found to be the most effective factor for promoting enzyme production, followed by the C/N ratio. Peanut pod 70%w/w, C/N ratio 20, incubation time 72h, wheat straw as solid substrate and lactose concentration 1%w/w the best conditions determined by the Taguchi method ...
A system for drying a wet lactose product stream includes a disperser configured to disperse agglomerated lactose particulates in a wet lactose stream into a dispersed wet lactose stream. A back-mixed partial drying zone is configured to at least partially dry the dispersed wet lactose stream by recirculating a partially dried lactose stream with the dispersed wet lactose stream. A plug-flow secondary drying zone is configured to dry the partially dried lactose stream to generate a substantially dried lactose stream.
Notes: Sample opacity or turbidity presents no problem since the sensor system is electrochemical rather than spectrophotometric. Endogenous glucose, if present, should be determined as a sample blank, i.e. extract diluted pro-rata in water instead of ß-galactosidase. Incomplete hydrolysis may take place for lactose concentrations greater than 10 %W/V. For greater accuracy at these levels repeat hydrolysis using a 5µl sample and scale results as detailed in kit instructions.. ...
Chr. Hansen says its new lactose biosensor test kit can determine lactose concentration in all dairy products, including those with added flavours.
Explanation of A & R The function of (3-galactosidase enzyme in lactose metabolism is to form glucose by cleaving lactose. Thus if both glucose and lactose are present in the growth medium, activity of lac operon is not needed, and indeed, no p-galactosidase is formed until virtually all of the glucose in the culture medium is consumed. The lack of synthesis of p-galactosidase is a result of lack of synthesis of lac mRNA. No lac mRNA is made in the presence of glucose, because in addition to an inducer for inactivating the lac i repressor, another element (cAMP-CAP) is needed for initiating lac mRNA synthesis. The activity of this element is regulated by the concentration of glucose ...
Less than 70 percent of the adult human population is capable of digesting the milk sugar lactose. Not content to stop consuming dairy, humankind has...
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Meal-replacement diets using shakes can help make losing those unwanted pounds a little easier. If you have a difficult time tolerating milk, you may think these types of shakes and diets are out of the question. But there are lactose-free options that can help you lose, too.
Those of you whove seen the movie Spanglish might remember the sandwich Adam Sandler makes for Paz Vega; its presented as the best sandwich in the world. It turns out that The Kitchn posted the recipe very early on. Since I had bacon left over from a salad recipe, I figured this was a good way to use it. A sandwich is pretty easy to make in any kitchen, and this one was absolutely delicious. It was very filling and made for a great dinner - so great, in fact, that the Engineer bought more bacon so that I could make this again. I used pre-sliced lactose-free Gouda cheese, which was wonderful. I didnt toast the bread, but either way works. All we had was lemonaise, a mayonnaise flavoured with lemon and herbs; personally, I recommend plain mayonnaise, especially homemade (otherwise, use Hellmans). Im definitely hanging on to this recipe! Im giving you proportions for two sandwiches here, but feel free to make just one ...
Fructose-free and lactose-free cooking is a matter of habit - Thats why we want to help you find top recipes to suit your taste | frusano.com.
The Coliform Vials are a screening vial specific for coliform or-ganisms. The vial has broad inclusiv-ity and an assay time of 14-24 hours for most applications. The vial contains a peptone yeast extract base with lac-tose as a carbon source. The selec-tive agents include bile salts, sodium lauryl sulfate and other gram-positive inhibitors. Acidification of the medium due to the lactose utilization changes the pH indicator from a purple to a yel-low color. The color change is read by optical sensors in the instrument ...
The Coliform Vials are a screening vial specific for coliform or-ganisms. The vial has broad inclusiv-ity and an assay time of 14-24 hours for most applications. The vial contains a peptone yeast extract base with lac-tose as a carbon source. The selec-tive agents include bile salts, sodium lauryl sulfate and other gram-positive inhibitors. Acidification of the medium due to the lactose utilization changes the pH indicator from a purple to a yel-low color. The color change is read by optical sensors in the instrument ...
IN a recent letter, McKenzie et al. (1998) reported that the late-arising adaptive Lac+ revertants of our Escherichia coli strain, FC40, are not slow to grow on lactose medium and concluded that the mutants must therefore have arisen after plating on lactose. We had reached the same conclusion on different grounds, namely, that in FC40: (i) very few Lac+ revertant colonies appear within 2 days of plating on lactose; (ii) despite the absence of any measurable increase in cell numbers, revertant colonies accumulate from day 2 onward, at a constant rate for at least the next 5 days; (iii) the distribution of these colonies is Poisson, not Luria-Delbrück; and, (iv) their cells produce the same amount of β-galactosidase as early arising revertants (Cairns and Foster 1991; Foster 1994; Foster and Trimarchi 1994). In addition, our finding that adaptive, but not growth-dependent, reversion of FC40 requires functions of RecA, E. colis recombinase, led us to conclude that in this strain adaptive ...
lacZ. No transcription. Structural genes lacZ. lacY. lac A. No transcription. Presence of lactose. Transcription and translation. Active regulator protein. Inactive regulator protein (repressor). Allolactose. 12 When lactose is present, some of it is converted into allolactose,.... RNA polymerase lacO operator. Transcription and translation. Active regulator protein. Inactive regulator protein (repressor) ...
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Lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is a condition in which people have symptoms due to the decreased ability to digest ... Live yogurt cultures in yogurt improve digestion of lactose in yogurt in individuals with lactose maldigestion. ... Yogurt with live cultures[62][63][64] is more beneficial than pasteurized yogurt for people with lactose malabsorption.[65] ... These yogurts may be suitable for people with lactose intolerance or those who prefer plant-based foods such as vegetarians or ...
Lactose intolerance[edit]. Ingestion of certain active strains may help lactose-intolerant individuals tolerate more lactose ... lactic-acid bacteria inhibits the growth of proteolytic bacteria because of the low pH produced by the fermentation of lactose ...
People who experience lactose intolerance usually avoid milk and other lactose-containing dairy products, which may cause mild ... "Lactose intolerance". Genetics Home Reference. 8 February 2016. Archived from the original on 25 January 2016. Retrieved 12 ... "Is Butter a Dairy Product, and Does it Contain Lactose?". Authority Nutrition. 1 July 2016. Archived from the original on 28 ... "Lactose Intolerance". National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, US National Institutes of Health. 2021 ...
It is a component of lactose synthase[citation needed] This enzyme modifies the connection between two molecule UDP-galactose ... Hill RL, Brew K (1975). "Lactose synthetase". Advances in Enzymology and Related Areas of Molecular Biology. Advances in ...
Primary lactose intolerance is when the amount of lactase declines as people age. Secondary lactose intolerance is due to ... Lactose intolerance List of allergens (food and non-food) Plant milk Nwaru BI, Hickstein L, Panesar SS, Roberts G, Muraro A, ... Congenital lactose intolerance is an extremely rare genetic disorder in which little or no lactase is made from birth. Research ... The unabsorbed lactose reaches the large intestine, where resident bacteria use it for fuel, releasing hydrogen, carbon dioxide ...
... lactose tolerant!" The animal studies scholar Vasile Stănescu suggested that this notion drew upon the 19th-century ...
"Lactose intolerance". Genetics Home Reference. Retrieved 2020-08-03. "Glucose-galactose malabsorption , Genetic and Rare ... Congenital lactase deficiency, a condition caused by a genetic mutation in which the body cannot digest lactose properly. ... Breath hydrogen tests are utilized to determine lactose, fructose, and/or sucrose intolerance. Small intestinal bacterial ... lactose, fructose, and sucrose). Dietary fiber and fat can be increased and fluid intake, especially fruit juice intake, ...
Gränzle, M.G. (2011). "Lactose and Oligosaccharides , Lactose: Derivatives". Encyclopedia of Dairy Sciences (2nd ed.). Elsevier ...
This product is: purely vegetable , cholesterol-free , egg-free , lactose-free , free of milk protein , free of genetic ...
"I'm Lactose". Couples Therapy: Ep. 6: "Playing By The Rules" Bonus Clips". VH1. Retrieved September 13, 2013. "Courtney Stodden ... They later clarified in 2014 that they were in fact not lactose intolerant, and that their empathy for animals was their sole ... Stodden is a vegetarian, having chosen the diet because they "never felt right eating animals before", and because of lactose ...
This gene is unique among the beta4GalT genes because it encodes an enzyme that participates both in glycoconjugate and lactose ... The shorter transcript encodes a protein which is cleaved to form the soluble lactose synthase. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... lactose. The two enzymatic forms result from alternate transcription initiation sites and post-translational processing. Two ...
Lactose is derived from cow's milk and is a frequently used filler or binder in tablets and capsules. Magnesium stearate is the ... "Lactose and Derivatives". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Wiley-VCH. pp. 1-9. doi:10.1002/14356007.a15_107.pub2 ...
"Lactose Against Intolerance!" How milkshake became a tool of protest". www.newstatesman.com. "Celebrating milkshake in the ... The milkshakes also have added fiber and other nutrients, and they have much less lactose, which makes the shakes appropriate ... for some lactose-intolerant people. The U.S. sales of milkshakes, malts, and floats rose 11% in 2006, according to the industry ...
The Lactose Operon. 1970. ISBN 978-0-317-11809-4. Collins, J. F. (1962). "Estimation of penicillinase in single bacterial cells ...
Chakelian, Anoosh (20 May 2019). ""Lactose Against Intolerance!" How milkshake became a tool of protest". New Statesman. ...
Chakelian, Anoosh (16 May 2019). ""Lactose Against Intolerance!" How milkshake became a tool of protest". New Statesman. ...
Widya, Clarissa (26 November 2015). "Lactose Intolerant - Invite". Papergang.co.uk.. ...
Vincent is lactose intolerant. Throughout the series, Vince talks about how he and his entourage are "living the life" after ...
The protein is part of a system whose main function is to catalyze the accumulation and transport of lactose and other beta- ... Lactose permease Crandall, M; Koch, A.L. (February 1971). "Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Escherichia Coli Affecting Beta- ...
Carbohydrates are mainly lactose; several lactose-based oligosaccharides have been identified as minor components. The fat ...
Lactose intolerance occurs when an individual is deficient in the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in the ... Due to genetic differences, intolerance of lactose is more common globally than tolerance. Rates of lactose intolerance vary ... A lactose-free food, such as non-dairy ice cream, may require a different process during manufacturing. For example, ... In Asia and Africa, where rates of lactose intolerance are much higher than in the West and dairy production has been less ...
He loves salami and likes plain (no butter, sour cream, etc.) baked potatoes; he is lactose intolerant. Mark also collects ...
He is lactose intolerant. Thayer, Suzi (March 6, 2018). "Boothbay's Matthew Forgues, Olympic hopeful in racewalking". Boothbay ...
The etymology is comparable to that of the word lactose in that both contain roots meaning "milk sugar". Lactose is a ... However, most lactose in breast milk is synthesized from galactose taken up from the blood, and only 35±6% is made from ... Relationship to lactoseEdit. Galactose is a monosaccharide. When combined with glucose (monosaccharide), through a condensation ... The hydrolysis of lactose to glucose and galactose is catalyzed by the enzymes lactase and β-galactosidase. The latter is ...
He is also lactose intolerant. Dennis Lee (voiced by Alexander Polinsky) - Dennis Lee is Juniper's grumpy, cynical older ...
Bowen, R. (25 April 2009). "Lactose Intolerance (Lactase Non-Persistence)". Colorado State University. Jablecki, Donna Mae. " ...
However, not all genetically lactase nonpersistent individuals are noticeably lactose intolerant, and not all lactose ... The frequency of lactose malabsorbers was 18.4% in members of Beja tribes over the age of 30, and 73.3% in members of Nilotic ... Lactose solution is then given to the subjects to drink, and blood glucose levels are checked at 20 minute intervals for an ... Lactose favors the intestinal absorption of calcium: it helps maintaining it in a soluble form. This can be advantageous in ...
Bowen, R. (25 April 2009). "Lactose Intolerance (Lactase Non-Persistence)". Colorado State University. Jablecki, Donna Mae. " ...
... they are unsuitable for consumption by people who are lactose intolerant. Brocciu is lower in lactose. Whey cheese is produced ... This type has a relatively low lactose content and a white to yellowish color. It is possible to ripen whey cheeses made with ... After the production of most cheeses, about 50% of milk solids remain in the whey, including most of the lactose and ... Cheeses produced with this method possess a relatively high lactose content. Typically, they have a yellowish to brown color ...
Lactose intolerance is a result of the body not producing sufficient lactase to digest the lactose in milk; dairy foods which ... Subgroups include enzymatic (e.g. lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency), pharmacological (e.g. reactions against ... Srinivasan R, Minocha A (September 1998). "When to suspect lactose intolerance. Symptomatic, ethnic, and laboratory clues". ... Diagnosis of food intolerance can include hydrogen breath testing for lactose intolerance and fructose malabsorption, ...
Low-lactose and lactose-free versions of foods are often available to replace dairy-based foods for those with lactose ... Pediatric Lactose Intolerance at eMedicine *^ Swagerty DL, Walling AD, Klein RM (May 2002). "Lactose intolerance". American ... Typical lactose levels in dairy products[49] Dairy product. Serving size. Lactose content. Percentage ... Lactose intolerance is a common condition caused by a decreased ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products.[1] ...
Check out these tips on dealing with lactose intolerance. ... If you have lactose intolerance, youre not alone. Millions of ... What Is Lactose Intolerance?. Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest a sugar called lactose that is found in milk and ... People with lactose intolerance do not produce enough of the lactase enzyme to break down lactose. Instead, undigested lactose ... Who Gets Lactose Intolerance?. A person may be or may become lactose intolerant for different reasons:. *Ethnic background. ...
... is a problem digesting foods that contain lactose. Many people are able to have these foods and beverages ... Lactose intolerance is a problem digesting foods that contain lactose. Lactose is a naturally occurring sugar found in dairy ... Lactose-Controlled Diet. If you are lactose intolerant, you will need to limit foods containing this milk sugar. ... Most people with lactose intolerance can consume small amounts of lactose without experiencing symptoms. Research suggests that ...
Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. Read more. ... Lactose intolerance means that you cannot digest foods with lactose in them. ... Lactose intolerance means that you cannot digest foods with lactose in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made ... Lactose intolerance is not serious. Eating less food with lactose, or using pills or drops to help you digest lactose usually ...
Lactose intolerance is a common digestive problem where the body is unable to digest lactose, a type of sugar mainly found in ... What causes lactose intolerance?. The body digests lactose using a substance called lactase. This breaks down lactose into 2 ... Treating lactose intolerance. Theres no cure for lactose intolerance, but cutting down on food and drink containing lactose ... Lactose intolerance is a common digestive problem where the body is unable to digest lactose, a type of sugar mainly found in ...
... lactose (CHEBI:17716). α-lactose (CHEBI:36219) is a lactose (CHEBI:17716). β-lactose (CHEBI:36218) is a lactose (CHEBI:17716). ... lactose 6-phosphate (CHEBI:28339) has functional parent lactose (CHEBI:17716). lactose phosphate (CHEBI:25004) has functional ... lactose (CHEBI:17716) has role human metabolite (CHEBI:77746) lactose (CHEBI:17716) is a glycosylglucose (CHEBI:24405) ... CHEBI:17716 - lactose. Main. ChEBI Ontology. Automatic Xrefs. Reactions. Pathways. Models. .gridLayoutCellStructure { min-width ...
Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Explore symptoms ... Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. Lactose is ... This form of lactose intolerance results in severe diarrhea. If affected infants are not given a lactose-free infant formula, ... Approximately 65 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose after infancy. Lactose intolerance in ...
... trouble digesting lactose, the main sugar in milk and milk products - which can cause cramps, diarrhea, and gas. ... What Is Lactose Intolerance?. Lactose intolerance is when someone has trouble digesting lactose, a type of sugar found in milk ... In lactose intolerance, the body doesnt make enough lactase to break down lactose. Instead, undigested lactose sits in the gut ... Lactose is added to some boxed, canned, frozen, and prepared foods. Some words are clues that the food has lactose in it: ...
Kids with lactose intolerance have trouble digesting a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy foods. But by making smart ... People who have lactose intolerance (say: LAK-tose in-TAHL-er-ents) have trouble digesting (say: dye-JES-ting) lactose, a type ... Living With Lactose Intolerance. Some people with lactose intolerance must avoid all foods containing lactose, but others can ... What Happens in Lactose Intolerance?. As with everything else you eat, your body needs to digest lactose to be able to use it ...
Are your stomach cramps and diarrhea caused by lactose intolerance? WebMD explains how to control symptoms --and which nondairy ... Even things lactose-intolerant people may take for relief, such as tablets to reduce stomach acid and gas, can contain lactose. ... Where Lactose May Be Hiding. Although milk is most associated with lactose intolerance, any dairy product may cause diarrhea ... National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Lactose Intolerance.". WebMD Medical Reference: "Lactose Intolerance - ...
Lactose intolerance, inability to digest lactose, the predominant sugar in dairy products. It affects people by causing ... Lactose intolerance is caused a by deficiency in the amount of lactase, the enzyme that ... dairy product: Lactose. …metabolize lactose, a condition called lactose intolerance. The unmetabolized lactose cannot be ... 3) Lactose tolerance test: Normally, blood glucose levels should rise after digestion of lactose, thus in a lactose-intolerant ...
An enzyme called lactase is needed by the body to digest lactose. ... Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy ... Lactose intolerance. www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/lactose-intolerance/definition-facts. Updated ... There is no known way to prevent lactose intolerance. You can prevent symptoms by avoiding foods with lactose. ... Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. An enzyme called lactase is needed by the body to digest ...
Lactose intollerance What is the most accurate test for analyzing the effectiveness of treatment in patients with Lactose ... So patients either cut out all or some lactose from their diets, or they can use lactose enzyme preparations to help them ... treatment for lactose intolerance because it is caused by the lack of the enzyme required to digest lactose. ... Also contact the Allergy Association by visiting their Website at: www.allallergy.net to find out more about lactose ...
Lactose intolerance is a worldwide phenomenon that has been widely studied over the years in order to understand the influences ... Lactose intolerance is a worldwide phenomenon that has been widely studied over the years in order to understand the influences ... Even today, lactose intolerance is seldom seen in British, German and Scandinavian populations but is commonly seen among ... Similarly, in Mongolia, horse milk was consumed on a regular basis and cases of lactose intolerance are fewer compared to China ...
Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. During ... digestion, lactose is broken down into two sim ... Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a ... Who Gets Lactose Intolerance?. Many Americans who believe they are lactose intolerant are mistaken: The prevalence of lactose ... The degree of lactose intolerance varies from person to person. In most cases, the ability to digest lactose was present at ...
Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest lactose, the sugar in milk and dairy products. Learn more about this common ... What Is Lactose Intolerance?. Articles OnLactose Intolerance. Lactose Intolerance Lactose Intolerance - What Is Lactose ... What Is Lactose?. Lactose is the sugar thats in milk.. Our bodies use an enzyme called lactase to break down that sugar so we ... Lactose Intolerance Treatments Millions of Americans cant digest a certain sugar in milk and milk products called lactose. If ...
Lactose Free direct from Safeway. Browse our selection and order groceries for flexible Delivery or convenient Drive Up and Go ... Horizon Organic Milk Lactose Free 2% Reduced Fat Half Gallon - 64 Fl. Oz. ... Horizon Organic Milk Lactose Free Vitamin D Half Gallon - 64 Fl. Oz. ... O Organics Organic Milk Ultra Pasteurized Vitamin D Lactose Free Half Gallon - 1.89 Liter ...
Lactose intolerance describes a condition where a person is incapable of digesting lactose - a type of sugar present in milk ... Causes of lactose intolerance. Normally, lactose present in milk and dairy products is broken down by an enzyme called lactase ... Lactose intolerance describes a condition where a person is incapable of digesting lactose - a type of sugar present in milk ... However, people with lactose intolerance have deficient levels of lactase meaning that much of this lactose sugar remains in ...
Lactose intolerance is a common disorder and is due to the inability to digest lactose into its constituents, glucose and ... encoded search term (Lactose%20Intolerance) and Lactose Intolerance What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape Consult. ... Tolerance of symptomatic lactose malabsorbers to lactose in milk chocolate. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 May. 57(5):701-5. [Medline]. ... The relationship between lactose tolerance test results and symptoms of lactose intolerance. Am J Gastroenterol. 1997 Jun. 92(6 ...
Lactose is a sugar that is found in milk and milk-based products, and the intolerance of lactose is literally an inability to ... There is no one way to deal with lactose intolerance. However, there are many lactose free products on the market which can ... This Lactose Intolerance page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle navigation ... Breaking down lactose into simpler forms of sugar called glucose and galactose is the job of lactase and without it, suffering ...
Lactose definition is - a disaccharide sugar C12H22O11 that is present in milk and yields glucose and galactose upon hydrolysis ... Comments on lactose. What made you want to look up lactose? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if ... Examples of lactose in a Sentence. Recent Examples on the Web. In general, fresher cheeses contain more lactose than aged ... Post the Definition of lactose to Facebook Share the Definition of lactose on Twitter ...
Learn the signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance and the medications used in treatment. Common symptoms and signs include ... Main Article on Lactose Intolerance Symptoms and Signs. * Lactose Intolerance. Lactose intolerance is a common problem where a ... Lactose intolerance is a condition in which the body is unable to fully digest lactose, a form of natural sugar found in milk. ... Lactose Intolerance: Symptoms & Signs. *Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD. Melissa Conrad ...
Lactose intolerant?. Everytime I have a hot chocolate/mocha I have to run to the toilet within 20 minutes. Yet I have no ... If you can drink milk then you are not lactose intolerant. your body is not able to digest the chocolate or cocoa most probably ... If you can drink milk then you are not lactose intolerant. your body is not able to digest the chocolate or cocoa most probably ... Does anyone have any suggestions for being able to control or get rid of my symptoms from Lactose Intolerance? My Main problem ...
... were tested for lactose maldigestion by breath hydrogen analysis after consuming milk containing... ... Bayless TM: Lactose malabsorption, milk intolerance, and symptom awareness in adults.In Lactose Digestion: Clinical and ... hydrolyzed-lactose milk and a commercial lactase tablet in alleviating lactose maldigestion. Am J Clin Nutr 49:1233-1237, 1989 ... were tested for lactose maldigestion by breath hydrogen analysis after consuming milk containing 16.5 g lactose (360 ml milk). ...
... www.glutenfreescallywag.com/2012/04/banana-cake-lactose-f...,/a, ... The Gluten Free Scallywag Lactose Free Banana Cake A delicious ... a href=http://www.glutenfreescallywag.com/2012/04/banana-cake-lactose-free-cream-to-serve.html rel=nofollow, ...
Im still starting to wonder if i actually have IBS or im just lactose intolerant. Because the more I read about IBS,unl... ... I have crohns, suspected IBS and am lactose intolerant...they can test you for lactose intolernace, they tested me and sure ... I have IBS with D and am lactose intolerant. I have to same problems as you. For some strange reason there are days when I can ... Im still starting to wonder if i actually have IBS or im just lactose intolerant. Because the more I read about IBS,unless I ...
What is lactose? Lactose is a sugar particular to milk and milk products. When milk is metabolized normally in the human body, ... Living with lactose intolerance. Many dairy products, including yogurt, milk, ice cream, and spreads, are available in lactose- ... There are plenty of alternatives for the lactose intolerant in the markets these days, so living lactose-free doesnt need to ... A person who is lactose intolerant produces little or no lactase. Thus the intact lactose molecule passes through the ...
... measure the ability of your intestines to break down a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy ... Lactose tolerance tests measure the ability of your intestines to break down a type of sugar called lactose. This sugar is ... The lactose tolerance blood test looks for glucose in your blood. Your body creates glucose when lactose breaks down. ... Abnormal results may be a sign of lactose intolerance.. A breath test result that shows a rise in hydrogen content of 20 ppm ...
Letter: Lactose intolerance in San populations. Br Med J 1974; 2 :728 ... Letter: Lactose intolerance in San populations.. Br Med J 1974; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5921.728-a (Published 29 ...
  • Most adults (around 65-70% of the world's population) are lactose intolerant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Individuals may be lactose intolerant to varying degrees, depending on the severity of these symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Little kids are less likely to have it, but many people eventually become lactose intolerant in adulthood - some while they are still teens. (kidshealth.org)
  • As people get older, their bodies usually stop producing the lactase enzyme, and most people will naturally become lactose intolerant over time. (kidshealth.org)
  • Because many people may think they're lactose intolerant when they really aren't, it helps to see a doctor who can diagnose the condition correctly and advise you on ways to manage it. (kidshealth.org)
  • If your doctor thinks you might be lactose intolerant, he or she will take your medical history by asking about any concerns and symptoms you have, your past health, your family's health, any medications you're taking, any allergies you may have, and other issues. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you are lactose intolerant, you will need to limit foods containing this milk sugar. (eatright.org)
  • Research suggests that the equivalent of one glass of milk per day may be tolerable for many individuals who are lactose intolerant. (eatright.org)
  • If you're lactose intolerant, getting the right amount of important vitamins and minerals can prove difficult. (www.nhs.uk)
  • For example, only about 5 percent of people of Northern European descent are lactose intolerant. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If your symptoms improve on a dairy-free diet, but happen again when you try dairy again, there's a good chance you are lactose intolerant. (kidshealth.org)
  • Milk may do a body good, but not if you're one of the millions of people who are lactose intolerant. (webmd.com)
  • If you're lactose intolerant, you can have symptoms from between 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating or drinking dairy products. (webmd.com)
  • If you are lactose intolerant, the best way to avoid symptoms is to read food labels. (webmd.com)
  • Even things lactose-intolerant people may take for relief, such as tablets to reduce stomach acid and gas, can contain lactose. (webmd.com)
  • If you're lactose intolerant, a number of non-dairy foods can help you get enough calcium. (webmd.com)
  • If you avoid milk, you also need to make sure you get enough vitamin D. It works with calcium to keep bones strong, and milk is a major source of vitamin D. If you are lactose intolerant, ask your doctor if you should take a calcium and vitamin D supplement. (webmd.com)
  • 3) Lactose tolerance test: Normally, blood glucose levels should rise after digestion of lactose, thus in a lactose-intolerant individual who cannot digest lactose, there would be no obvious rise in blood glucose. (britannica.com)
  • On the other hand, populations in sub-Saharan African, southern Europe and people native to America and the Pacific Islands do not continue to possess lactase into adulthood and are lactose intolerant. (news-medical.net)
  • indeed, it is estimated that over 70 percent of the world's adult population cannot digest lactose, with the exception of people of northern European descent, of whom less than 20 percent are lactose-intolerant. (healthcentral.com)
  • But if you are truly lactose intolerant, symptoms can occur whenever you consume milk and other dairy products high in lactose. (healthcentral.com)
  • Being lactose intolerant is not the same as being allergic to milk. (webmd.com)
  • For people who are lactose intolerant, their low lactase levels gives them symptoms after they eat dairy. (webmd.com)
  • What Happens In My Body If I'm Lactose Intolerant? (webmd.com)
  • But people who are lactose intolerant don't have it so easy. (webmd.com)
  • In the United States, it's estimated that about 30 million people are lactose intolerant. (webmd.com)
  • How Do I Know If I'm Lactose Intolerant? (webmd.com)
  • If you do, you might be lactose intolerant. (webmd.com)
  • Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica , "Early cheese making may have helped lactose-intolerant farmers spread," 14 Sep. (merriam-webster.com)
  • Am I lactose intolerant? (medhelp.org)
  • Hi, If you can drink milk then you are not lactose intolerant. (medhelp.org)
  • Paige DM, Bayless TM, Dellinger WS: Relationship of milk consumption to blood glucose rise in lactose intolerant individuals. (springer.com)
  • Im still starting to wonder if i actually have IBS or im just lactose intolerant. (healingwell.com)
  • Does it sound like IBS-D or could it just be lactose intolerant. (healingwell.com)
  • My GI doc said I could be slightly lactose intolerant, (because I can eat things like cheese and yogurt, which have very small concentrations of lactose), or I could be allergic to the protein casein in milk. (healingwell.com)
  • I have crohns, suspected IBS and am lactose intolerant. (healingwell.com)
  • According to estimates, somewhere between 30 and 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant. (supermarketguru.com)
  • A person who is lactose intolerant produces little or no lactase. (supermarketguru.com)
  • Unfortunately, many people who are not lactose intolerant believe that they are, and vice versa. (supermarketguru.com)
  • Soy and nut products are popular substitutes, and some who are lactose-intolerant can still consume goat's milk products. (supermarketguru.com)
  • There are plenty of alternatives for the lactose intolerant in the markets these days, so living lactose-free doesn't need to be stressful. (supermarketguru.com)
  • home / diarrhea abdominal pain and lactose intolerant? (medicinenet.com)
  • Anyone that is lactose intolerant should make it point to carefully check the ingredients of all packaged or pre-processed foods as they may contain unsuspected lactose. (medicinenet.com)
  • Improvement of lactose digestion in a previously intolerant child or adult is caused by growth of lactose-digesting bacteria rather than an induction in activity of the lactase enzyme because lactase is a noninducible enzyme. (medscape.com)
  • A person becomes lactose intolerant when his or her small intestine stops making. (healthline.com)
  • A person becomes lactose intolerant when his or her small intestine stops making enough of the enzyme lactase to digest and break down the lactose. (healthline.com)
  • According to Mayo Clinic , nearly 30 million American people over the age of 20 are lactose intolerant. (healthline.com)
  • People who are lactose intolerant may need to avoid eating these products or take medicines containing the lactase enzyme before doing so. (healthline.com)
  • a trans-dermal patch for french people who are lactose intolerant or otherwise eat too much cheese. (halfbakery.com)
  • People who are lactose intolerant typically begin to experience symptoms 30 minutes to two hours after ingesting dairy products. (healthday.com)
  • Today, many lactose-free dairy alternatives are available, including soy-based and rice-based dairy products, allowing those who are lactose intolerant to enjoy dairy without symptoms. (healthday.com)
  • Creamy and satisfying, Clemmy's is a godsend to the lactose intolerant. (thenibble.com)
  • Ice cream lovers can unhappily discover they are becoming lactose intolerant. (thenibble.com)
  • While not all persons deficient in lactase have symptoms, those who do are considered to be lactose intolerant. (healingwell.com)
  • As many as 75 percent of all African-Americans and Native Americans and 90 percent of Asian-Americans are lactose intolerant. (healingwell.com)
  • People who are lactose intolerant have unpleasant symptoms after eating or drinking milk or milk products. (uhhospitals.org)
  • If your blood sugar levels don't rise, you may be lactose intolerant. (uhhospitals.org)
  • High levels of hydrogen in your breath may mean you are lactose intolerant. (uhhospitals.org)
  • In the past, people who were lactose intolerant were told to stop taking dairy products. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Basically Europeans have the lowest percentage of lactose intolerant people. (wutang-corp.com)
  • However a large percentage of the world's population is defined as 'lactose intolerant' to standards. (wutang-corp.com)
  • Humans are the only creatures that can digest milk from a different species, we are all lactose intolerant but we have a gene that helps to suppress this and it's only over time that this effect begins to wear off. (wutang-corp.com)
  • Avoiding milk and dairy products may mean that people who are lactose-intolerant require calcium and vitamin D supplementation. (uspharmacist.com)
  • People who have had major bowel or stomach surgery, or suffer from coeliac disease are often lactose intolerant. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Many people become lactose intolerant for a few days after they have had diarrhoea. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • If you get a stomach ache or diarrhoea within half an hour, you may be lactose intolerant. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • If sugar levels rise the patient is not lactose intolerant. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Millions of Americans are lactose intolerant. (savannahnow.com)
  • If levels are very high, the patient is probably lactose intolerant. (savannahnow.com)
  • An article in Cycling Plus states that being lactose intolerant can inhibit the exchange of oxygen between the lungs and the blood and therefore affect stamina in an adverse way. (runnersworld.com)
  • If you are lactose intolerant, make sure you get enough calcium and vitamin D each day. (nih.gov)
  • But if your levels are too low you become lactose intolerant, leading to symptoms after you eat or drink dairy. (drugs.com)
  • Approximately 70 percent of African Americans, 90 percent of Asian Americans, 53 percent of Mexican Americans, and 74 percent of Native Americans were lactose intolerant. (pcrm.org)
  • 7 The recognition of this fact has resulted in an important change in terminology: Those who could not digest milk were once called "lactose intolerant" or "lactase deficient. (pcrm.org)
  • You can be intolerant of lactose only, or both. (celiac.com)
  • I was lactose intolerant for 15 yrs before all my other intolerances kicked in. (celiac.com)
  • People who have chronic medical conditions affecting the digestive tract, such as Crohn's disease or cystic fibrosis, also could become either temporarily or permanently lactose intolerant. (livestrong.com)
  • There is a very good chance that you or someone that you know is lactose intolerant. (healthcastle.com)
  • A sizable number of adults believe they are lactose intolerant but do not actually have impaired lactose digestion, and some persons with lactase deficiency can tolerate moderate amounts of ingested lactose. (aafp.org)
  • Lactose-intolerant patients must ensure adequate calcium intake. (aafp.org)
  • Most lactose-intolerant people don't have to avoid lactose entirely, they just need to be sensible and not overdo it. (mydr.com.au)
  • Lactose is a form of sugar that milk contains, and because these hard cheeses have very little lactose, they are suitable for lactose-intolerant people. (reference.com)
  • These symptoms have a tendency to begin around half an hour to two hours after the lactose intolerant individual has consumed a meal containing lactose. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Symptoms and severity vary from person to person, as each lactose intolerant individual will vary in their level of tolerance. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Hard cheeses are also often easier to digest for those people who are lactose intolerant, so they are also a great choice. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Eating dairy products with other food can also help people who are lactose intolerant in their quest for a special diet to minimise the repercussions of eating dairy products. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Individuals who are lactose intolerant can still partake in a healthy diet involving milk products if they are careful enough and make the right choices. (selfgrowth.com)
  • I'm severely lactose intolerant - they're thinking full blown allergy. (netmums.com)
  • I am lactose intolerant and haven't come across any despite asking doctors umpteen times. (netmums.com)
  • Approximately 65% of the world's population is lactose intolerant , which makes questions about managing lactose intolerance naturally while expecting a common question. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • If you believe you may be lactose intolerant, it is important to speak with your doctor. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • If you've discovered you're lactose intolerant, you may be wondering how you'll survive without milk, cheese and perhaps most importantly, ice cream. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Being lactose intolerant means that you cannot digest the milk sugar (lactose) in dairy products. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Being lactose intolerant means that you cannot digest the milk sugar (lactose) in dairy products and while the problem is not serious, the symptoms can be uncomfortable. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Such was the position that [The Thought Emporium] found himself in at age 16, suddenly violently lactose intolerant and in need of a complete diet overhaul. (hackaday.com)
  • Technically all mammals are supposed to be lactose intolerant after they have passed the age of nursing from their mothers. (hackaday.com)
  • If you're actually lactose intolerant, though, your lactase deficiency leads to symptoms after you eat dairy foods. (thirdage.com)
  • As many as 75 percent of all adults worldwide are lactose intolerant, and between 30 million and 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant. (faqs.org)
  • Between 30 and 50 million Americans are lactose intolerant, meaning they are deficient in the enzyme lactase. (faqs.org)
  • The majority of lactose-intolerant people can consume small amounts of lactose, or lactose in certain foods, but may experience symptoms of intestinal upset if they consume too much. (faqs.org)
  • Lactose-intolerant individuals should also be able to tolerate cheese, as most of the lactose is removed, along with the whey, when the cheese is made. (faqs.org)
  • Does this mean I'm lactose intolerant? (medhelp.org)
  • An estimated 70% [1] of adult humans are considered lactose intolerant and therefore, from a world view, lactose intolerance can be regarded as "normal" for adult humans whereas lactose tolerance may be considered a form of neoteny . (bionity.com)
  • Certain people who report problems with consuming lactose are not actually lactose intolerant. (bionity.com)
  • 1998) found only 4% were both lactose intolerant and lactose maldigesters, while 32.2% were lactose maldigesters but did not test as lactose intolerant. (bionity.com)
  • When I was pregnant with Chase I remember a lot of mommies complaining about being lactose intolerant during pregnancy. (empowher.com)
  • A person who is lactose intolerant is someone who cannot fully digest lactose, the sugar in milk. (lifescript.com)
  • Many people think they are lactose intolerant but are not and people who have low levels of lactase do not always exhibit the signs of lactose intolerance. (lifescript.com)
  • It is only when you have both the symptoms and the low levels that you can truly say you are lactose intolerant. (lifescript.com)
  • If you are lactose intolerant, you will not be able to increase the lactase in your body, but you can take steps that will help you live a more comfortable life. (lifescript.com)
  • If gastrointestinal symptoms are present, you're said to be lactose intolerant. (health24.com)
  • Being lactose intolerant isn't the same as having a milk allergy. (health24.com)
  • Approximately 70% of the world's peoples are lactose intolerant. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Up until several thousand years ago, that enzyme turned off once a person grew into adulthood - meaning most adults were lactose intolerant (or "lactase nonpersistent," as scientists call it). (npr.org)
  • Even lactose-intolerant adults could have benefited from milk. (npr.org)
  • A healthy lactose-intolerant person who drank that still-fresh milk would get a bad case of diarrhea. (npr.org)
  • So, with milk's deadly effects for the lactose intolerant, individuals with the lactase mutation would have been more likely to survive and pass on that gene. (npr.org)
  • 2. ...but it doesn't contain any lactose, so if you're lactose-intolerant you should be fine to eat it (as always, use your best judgment and check with your doctor if you're unsure if you should try it). (glamour.com)
  • In people who are lactose intolerant, lactose is not broken down and provides food for gas-producing gut flora, which can lead to diarrhea, bloating, flatulence, and other gastrointestinal symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • most lactose-intolerant people can tolerate a certain level of lactose in their diets without ill effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] Those affected vary in the amount of lactose they can tolerate before symptoms develop. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis may be confirmed if symptoms resolve following eliminating lactose from the diet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose intolerance primarily refers to a syndrome having one or more symptoms upon the consumption of food substances containing lactose. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with lactose intolerance may have a variety of symptoms. (kidshealth.org)
  • Most people with lactose intolerance can consume small amounts of lactose without experiencing symptoms. (eatright.org)
  • Many people with lactose intolerance are also able to enjoy yogurt and hard cheeses, such as cheddar or Swiss, without experiencing symptoms. (eatright.org)
  • Symptoms of lactose intolerance usually develop within a few hours of consuming food or drink that contains lactose. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The severity of your symptoms and when they appear depends on the amount of lactose you have consumed. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The symptoms of lactose intolerance can be similar to several other conditions, so it's important to see your GP for a diagnosis before removing milk and dairy products from your diet. (www.nhs.uk)
  • If your GP thinks you have lactose intolerance, they may suggest avoiding foods and drinks containing lactose for 2 weeks to see if your symptoms improve. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This leads to the production of various gases, which cause the symptoms associated with lactose intolerance. (www.nhs.uk)
  • There's no cure for lactose intolerance, but cutting down on food and drink containing lactose usually helps to control the symptoms. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Most people with lactase nonpersistence retain some lactase activity and can include varying amounts of lactose in their diets without experiencing symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • People without these changes have a reduced ability to digest lactose as they get older, resulting in the signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • What Are the Signs & Symptoms of Lactose Intolerance? (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose intolerance can cause a variety of symptoms. (kidshealth.org)
  • To diagnose lactose intolerance, doctors ask about a child's symptoms and diet. (kidshealth.org)
  • Although milk is most associated with lactose intolerance, any dairy product may cause diarrhea and other symptoms. (webmd.com)
  • The amount of lactose consumed is not necessarily related to the severity of the symptoms. (britannica.com)
  • 5) A patient may consume lactose-free dairy products to determine if the symptoms are truly lactose intolerance or a possible allergy to dairy products. (britannica.com)
  • Treatment of these illnesses may improve the symptoms of lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Other intestinal problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome , may cause the same symptoms as lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cutting down your intake of milk products that contain lactose from your diet most often eases symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Symptoms most often go away when you remove milk, other dairy products, and other sources of lactose from your diet. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You have an infant younger than 2 or 3 years old who has symptoms of lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You or your child has symptoms of lactose intolerance and you need information about food substitutes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You can prevent symptoms by avoiding foods with lactose. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance is not a health risk, and symptoms may be controlled by following dietary measures. (healthcentral.com)
  • Many times, the diagnosis rests on a patient's description of symptoms and response to elimination of lactose in the diet, and does not always require another test. (healthcentral.com)
  • Many people have a certain low level of lactose that they tolerate and that will not cause symptoms. (healthcentral.com)
  • If you have symptoms of lactose intolerance, see your doctor. (webmd.com)
  • Not all people deficient in lactase have the symptoms commonly associated with lactose intolerance, but those who do are said to have lactose intolerance. (news-medical.net)
  • People sometimes confuse lactose intolerance with cow's milk intolerance because the symptoms are often the same. (news-medical.net)
  • Visceral hypersensitivity and intolerance symptoms in lactose malabsorption. (medscape.com)
  • Correlation between symptoms developed after the oral ingestion of 50 g lactose and results of hydrogen breath testing for lactose intolerance. (medscape.com)
  • The relationship between lactose tolerance test results and symptoms of lactose intolerance. (medscape.com)
  • Suarez FL, Savaiano DA, Levitt MD. A comparison of symptoms after the consumption of milk or lactose-hydrolyzed milk by people with self-reported severe lactose intolerance. (medscape.com)
  • Does anyone have any suggestions for being able to control or get rid of my symptoms from Lactose Intolerance? (medhelp.org)
  • Thus the intact lactose molecule passes through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract resulting in various GI symptoms, including bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and flatulence. (supermarketguru.com)
  • These symptoms can occur anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours after consuming milk products and will usually subside once the body has passed the lactose containing foods. (supermarketguru.com)
  • Lactose intolerance symptoms are very similar to those of other GI disorders, making it difficult to spot. (supermarketguru.com)
  • 1 Lactose ingestion in certain susceptible individuals can cause abdominal symptoms that are variable and can be treated with dietary restriction or enzyme replacement, depending on the amount of lactose consumed and the degree of lactase deficiency. (aappublications.org)
  • The amount of lactose that will cause symptoms varies from individual to individual, depending on the amount of lactose consumed, the degree of lactase deficiency, and the form of food substance in which the lactose is ingested. (aappublications.org)
  • The symptoms of lactase deficiency (therefore lactose intolerance) include gas , abdominal cramping and/or diarrhea when a person takes in more dairy products than his/her lactase can handle. (medicinenet.com)
  • However, symptoms of lactose intolerance rarely develop in people younger than 6 years. (medscape.com)
  • however, self-reported symptoms of lactose intolerance correlate with low calcium intake. (medscape.com)
  • Spider, the lactose intolerance may definitely be to blame for your symptoms. (news24.com)
  • If you have lactose intolerance, you may have symptoms within a few hours after you have milk or milk products, or other foods that contain lactose . (nih.gov)
  • Your symptoms may be mild or severe, depending on how much lactose you have. (nih.gov)
  • In some people, this extra fluid and gas causes lactose intolerance symptoms. (nih.gov)
  • Symptoms of lactose intolerance may not begin until later childhood, the teen years, or early adulthood. (nih.gov)
  • 3,4 Lactose intolerance can cause uncomfortable symptoms, while a serious allergic reaction to milk can be life threatening. (nih.gov)
  • The bacteria that are normally present in the large intestine interact with the undigested lactose and cause symptoms such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea. (healthline.com)
  • Lactose intolerance usually causes gastrointestinal symptoms, such as gas, bloating, and diarrhea, about 30 minutes to two hours after ingesting milk or other dairy products containing lactose. (healthline.com)
  • Symptoms range from mild to severe, based on the amount of lactose consumed and the amount a person can tolerate. (thenibble.com)
  • Common symptoms include nausea, cramps, bloating, gas, and diarrhea, which begin about 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating or drinking foods containing lactose. (healingwell.com)
  • The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of lactose each individual can tolerate. (healingwell.com)
  • If a baby or young child is experiencing symptoms of lactose intolerance, many pediatricians simply recommend changing from cow's milk to soy formula and waiting for symptoms to abate. (healingwell.com)
  • Symptoms often start about 30 minutes to 2 hours after you have food or drinks that have lactose. (uhhospitals.org)
  • How severe your symptoms are will depend on how much lactose you have had. (uhhospitals.org)
  • The symptoms of lactose intolerance may look like other health problems. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Lactose intolerance symptoms can be unpleasant, but they won't hurt you. (uhhospitals.org)
  • For some kids, these symptoms are very severe and their systems can't tolerate any lactose. (rchsd.org)
  • Although lactase levels may be low, the symptoms of lactose intolerance may not appear until adolescence or adulthood. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Symptoms of lactose intolerance can range from nonexistent or mild to serious discomfort. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Lactose intolerance can mimic many other conditions that cause similar symptoms. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Treatment is aimed at reducing symptoms by lowering or eliminating the amount of lactose in the diet. (uspharmacist.com)
  • If foods that contain lactose are eliminated and symptoms continue, a doctor could recommend supplementing the diet with nonprescription lactase enzyme tablets or drops. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Unlike people with true milk allergy, who must avoid milk or dairy products altogether, those with lactose intolerance can often ingest small amounts without experiencing serious symptoms. (uspharmacist.com)
  • In fact, after the diagnosis of lactose intolerance is confirmed, the doctor may recommend eliminating the offending products from the diet for a period of time, then slowly reintroducing small amounts of food with lactose to see which foods cause symptoms. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Some people with lactose intolerance are able to eat certain dairy products without symptoms, especially milk products with lower lactose levels, such as certain cheeses and yogurt. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Symptoms are often absent until early adulthood, when the levels of lactase enzyme become so low that symptoms begin to appear after ingestion of lactose-containing foods. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The most common symptoms usually appear within an hour or two after ingestion of lactose-containing foods. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The key to treatment in patients with lactose intolerance is to identify the foods that cause symptoms. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The inability to digest lactose, resulting from deficiency of the enzyme lactase and sometimes causing diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. (dictionary.com)
  • Sometimes GPs advise patients to avoid food and drinks containing lactose for 2 weeks to see if symptoms improve. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • In persons with low levels of lactase, the lactose is not broken down properly, and does not absorb into the bloodstream, but moves into the large intestine, connecting with bacteria in the colon, triggering symptoms. (savannahnow.com)
  • Even though lactase levels may drop at an early age, it may be years before symptoms of lactose intolerance surface. (savannahnow.com)
  • Children born at full term generally do not show symptoms of lactose before the age 3. (savannahnow.com)
  • The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. (nih.gov)
  • More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. (nih.gov)
  • Talk with your doctor or a dietitian about changing your diet to manage lactose intolerance symptoms while making sure you get enough nutrients. (nih.gov)
  • To manage your symptoms, you may need to reduce the amount of lactose you eat or drink. (nih.gov)
  • Most people with lactose intolerance can have some lactose without getting symptoms. (nih.gov)
  • Research suggests that many people could have 12 grams of lactose-the amount in about 1 cup of milk-without symptoms or with only mild symptoms. (nih.gov)
  • Signs and symptoms usually depend on the amount of lactose you eat. (drugs.com)
  • The condition, which is also called lactose malabsorption, is usually harmless, but its symptoms can be uncomfortable. (drugs.com)
  • The signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance usually begin from 30 minutes to two hours after eating or drinking foods that contain lactose. (drugs.com)
  • Make an appointment with your doctor if you frequently have symptoms of lactose intolerance after eating dairy foods, particularly if you're worried about getting enough calcium. (drugs.com)
  • In the colon, normal bacteria interact with undigested lactose, causing the signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance. (drugs.com)
  • Your doctor might suspect lactose intolerance based on your symptoms and your response to reducing the amount of dairy foods in your diet. (drugs.com)
  • Cow's milk allergies, conversely, are less common conditions that may manifest with equivalent symptoms and are able to simulate and/or aggravate lactose intolerance. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Forty-six adult patients with lactose intolerance and persistent symptoms despite a lactose-free diet underwent skin-prick test to investigate cow's milk, goat's milk, and soy protein‐specific-IgE. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest the milk sugar lactose, causing gastrointestinal symptoms of flatulence, bloating, cramps, and diarrhea in some individuals. (pcrm.org)
  • These products are enzymatically modified to cleave lactose into glucose and galactose, preventing stomach upset and other symptoms of lactose maldigestion. (pcrm.org)
  • Keeping a food diary to determine which foods cause the most symptoms can help you determine which foods to reduce from your diet, and might help you recognize when your lactose intolerance has resolved itself. (livestrong.com)
  • Common symptoms include abdominal pain and bloating, excessive flatus, and watery stool following the ingestion of foods containing lactose. (aafp.org)
  • The degree of lactose malabsorption varies greatly among patients with lactose intolerance, but most of them can ingest up to 12 oz of milk daily without symptoms. (aafp.org)
  • Malabsorption of dietary lactose in the small intestine results in gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, passage of loose, watery stools, and excessive flatus. (aafp.org)
  • The main symptoms of lactose intolerance are abdominal discomfort or pain, a bloated feeling, wind and watery diarrhoea . (mydr.com.au)
  • The symptoms usually develop 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating or drinking products containing lactose. (mydr.com.au)
  • If lactose intolerance is suspected, you doctor may suggest you avoid foods that contain lactose for a few weeks to see if your symptoms improve. (mydr.com.au)
  • If the symptoms return when you re-introduce lactose to your diet, you most likely have lactose intolerance. (mydr.com.au)
  • Hard cheeses such as cheddar cheese have only very small amounts of lactose (less than 0.1 grams per serve) and generally cause no symptoms. (mydr.com.au)
  • Usually, lactose in medicines only causes symptoms in people with severe lactose intolerance. (mydr.com.au)
  • If the body is deficient in lactase and can not break lactose down into glucose, the sufferer may begin to feel some very uncomfortable symptoms such as stomach cramps, flatulence, bloating, nausea, and diarrhoea. (selfgrowth.com)
  • This pilot study aimed to determine whether raw milk reduces lactose malabsorption and/or lactose intolerance symptoms relative to pasteurized milk.We performed a crossover trial involving 16 adults with self-reported lactose intolerance and lactose malabsorption confirmed by hydrogen (H2) breath testing . (tripdatabase.com)
  • Symptoms of lactose intolerance and an allergic reaction to milk are different. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Studies have shown that many true lactose intolerants can consume moderate amounts of milk and dairy products without symptoms, particularly if milk is part of a meal. (faqs.org)
  • This slows the digestive process and may lessen symptoms of lactose intolerance. (gosanangelo.com)
  • For example, hard cheeses, such as Swiss or cheddar, have small amounts of lactose and generally cause no symptoms. (gosanangelo.com)
  • I am wondering if anyone else has had the symptoms of lactose-intolerance occur to them during pregnancy? (empowher.com)
  • I wouldn't think much of these symptoms since being pregnant wreaks havoc on the digestive system, but there is such a strong pattern to the days I do or do not eat dairy that I began to wonder if it's lactose intolerance, induced by pregnancy? (empowher.com)
  • These symptoms usually develop within a few hours of consuming foods or drinks that contain lactose. (health24.com)
  • However, if an individual doesn't absorb lactose properly, it doesn't necessarily mean that they'll experience symptoms. (health24.com)
  • Symptoms usually begin in late adolescence or early adulthood, when there's no longer enough lactase available in the small intestine to digest lactose from dairy foods. (health24.com)
  • In both primary and secondary lactose intolerance, ingesting dairy products will worsen the symptoms. (health24.com)
  • The trick is to eat dairy products in combination with other foods that don't contain lactose and not to eat too much dairy at once. (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is a problem digesting foods that contain lactose. (eatright.org)
  • The severity of the condition varies by individual, meaning different people may have different tolerances for foods and beverages that contain lactose. (eatright.org)
  • As someone recovers, they may be able to go back to consuming foods and drinks that contain lactose. (eatright.org)
  • People with lactose intolerance experience a range of digestive complaints after eating foods or consuming drinks that contain lactose. (eatright.org)
  • Ask if any of these products contain lactose and if the amount might be bothersome to you. (eatright.org)
  • But they need to eat it with other foods that don't contain lactose and not eat too much dairy at once. (kidshealth.org)
  • Birth control pills may contain lactose. (webmd.com)
  • This process can cause cramps, abdominal pain, gas, and diarrhea about 30 minutes to 2 hours after consuming any foods or drinks that contain lactose. (rchsd.org)
  • Many kids can have small amounts of dairy products - which should be consumed in combination with other foods that don't contain lactose - and some can have one to two glasses of milk each day without any problems, especially if consumed with non-dairy foods. (rchsd.org)
  • Even OTC and prescription medications may contain lactose as inactive ingredients. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The domestic method' - avoid eating foods that contain lactose for a couple of days and then drink two to three glasses of milk. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • You may not need to completely avoid foods and beverages that contain lactose -such as milk or milk products. (nih.gov)
  • Many foods that do not contain lactose are also sources of calcium. (nih.gov)
  • What foods and drinks contain lactose? (nih.gov)
  • Ask your dietitian for more information about how to avoid or limit foods that contain lactose. (drugs.com)
  • But you might want to check your medicines to find out if they contain lactose because there may be lactose-free alternatives available. (mydr.com.au)
  • Few people have such severe lactose intolerance that they have to cut out all milk products and be wary of nondairy foods or medications that contain lactose. (thirdage.com)
  • s teething strips which don't contain lactose. (mothering.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a common condition caused by a decreased ability to digest lactose , a sugar found in dairy products . (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest a sugar called lactose that is found in milk and dairy products. (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose is a naturally occurring sugar found in dairy products such as milk, yogurt and cheese. (eatright.org)
  • Lactose-free versions of dairy products are available in most supermarkets. (eatright.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is a common digestive problem where the body is unable to digest lactose, a type of sugar mainly found in milk and dairy products. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and other dairy products. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If individuals with lactose intolerance consume lactose-containing dairy products, they may experience abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, nausea, and diarrhea beginning 30 minutes to 2 hours later. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If people with lactose intolerance eat dairy products, the lactose passes into their intestines, leading to gas, cramps, a bloated feeling, and diarrhea. (kidshealth.org)
  • Kids and teens can manage lactose intolerance by not drinking less milk and eating fewer dairy products. (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose intolerance can start suddenly - even if you've never had trouble with dairy products or other foods containing lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • The doctor also might suggest a kind of medicine you can take when you eat dairy products and other foods containing lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • When you do eat dairy products, stick with foods that have smaller amounts of lactose in them, such as aged cheeses, including cheddar. (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose intolerance , inability to digest lactose , the predominant sugar in dairy products. (britannica.com)
  • Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There are also many lactose-free dairy products available. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance is suspected when stomach upset occurs shortly after consuming milk or other dairy products. (healthcentral.com)
  • The lactase in these over-the-counter supplements will break down most lactose in dairy products. (healthcentral.com)
  • Also, there are lots of lactose-free dairy products at the supermarket. (webmd.com)
  • Treatment consists of use of lactase-treated dairy products or oral lactase supplementation, limitation of lactose-containing foods, or dairy elimination. (aappublications.org)
  • For many, dairy products that are lower in lactose, such as yogurt and hard cheeses, are better tolerated than high-lactose foods like milk. (healthday.com)
  • Eat dairy products with naturally lower levels of lactose. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Kids who have this kind of discomfort after consuming dairy products might have lactose intolerance, which is caused by problems digesting lactose, the main sugar in milk and milk products. (rchsd.org)
  • Also, kids with lactose intolerance may find that other dairy products, such as yogurt and cheeses, are easier to digest than milk. (rchsd.org)
  • As a result the body struggles to digest lactose, the main carbohydrate in dairy products. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • When people talk about all dairy, they generally refer to the protein, casein, in dairy products, while lactose is the sugar in dairy products. (celiac.com)
  • Lactose gets digested by enzymes in cultured dairy products, and some people can eat some cheeses, yogurt, sour cream, etc., which have all been cultured. (celiac.com)
  • Some people have difficulty consuming milk and other dairy products because they cannot produce lactase, the enzyme responsible for digesting lactose. (livestrong.com)
  • Stomach pain, cramps, gas, bloating and diarrhea that occurs after you have eaten dairy products might indicate that you have lactose intolerance. (livestrong.com)
  • People who have a permanent form of lactose intolerance do not make lactase, an enzyme that breaks down dairy products during digestion. (livestrong.com)
  • If you are breastfeeding, you may have to avoid dairy products for the sake of your baby's comfort, and if you are bottle feeding you may need to use a lactose-free formula. (livestrong.com)
  • A special diet to avoid lactose in dairy products may also benefit from special milk that has been processed in order to be free from the sugar that causes the problems. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The most common symptom of lactose intolerance is digestional upset-usually characterized by gas , bloating, or diarrhea -after eating dairy products. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • In addition, a number of dairy products are also provided in lactose-free or lactose-reduced varieties. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • Lactose intolerance means you have trouble digesting the milk sugar found in dairy products like milk, cheese, and ice cream. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Most likely, the cramping, bloating, and abdominal pain you felt were caused by your body's inability to break down lactose, which is found in most dairy products. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Stiff competition from dairy alternatives such as cereals and nuts, however, hinders this market, which is ascribed to a proliferation of consumers who prefer to avoid dairy products altogether as they are sensitive to not just milk sugar lactose, but also to dairy proteins. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Lactose is mainly used as a fermentation substrate for lactic acid bacteria in dairy products such as yogurt and cheese. (sci-toys.com)
  • Lactose intolerance (or hypolactasia ) is the term used to describe a decline in the level of lactase , an enzyme needed for proper metabolization of lactose (a sugar that is a constituent of milk and other dairy products), in human beings. (bionity.com)
  • Without lactase, the lactose disaccharide in many dairy products remains uncleaved and cannot be absorbed through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, so remains in the intestines. (bionity.com)
  • Not all dairy products have the same amount of lactose. (gosanangelo.com)
  • Dairy products were high on the list of things not to eat and before long, we all learned how to make lactose free foods that were almost as good as the real thing. (lifescript.com)
  • Lactose Broth is frequently used as a pre-enrichment medium when testing foods and dairy products for Salmonella spp. (neogen.com)
  • Lactose Broth is widely used and is included in many procedures for testing foods, dairy products and other materials. (neogen.com)
  • Lactose Broth is also used for the detection of coliform organisms in water, dairy products, and other materials. (neogen.com)
  • And the very people who shouldn't have been consuming high-lactose dairy products - the hungry and malnourished - would be the ones more likely to drink fresh milk. (npr.org)
  • Both can be easily used in school experiments to visualise the different lactose content of different dairy products such as whole milk, lactose free milk, yoghurt, buttermilk, coffee creamer, sour cream, kefir etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dairy products such as milk yogurt and cheese contain very little lactose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose, a disaccharide molecule found in milk and dairy products, cannot be directly absorbed through the wall of the small intestine into the bloodstream, so, in the absence of lactase, passes intact into the colon[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with suspected lactose intolerance can be assessed clinically by dietary lactose elimination or by tests including noninvasive hydrogen breath testing or invasive intestinal biopsy determination of lactase (and other disaccharidase) concentrations. (aappublications.org)
  • [1] Management is typically by decreasing the amount of lactose in the diet, taking lactase supplements , or treating the underlying disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose malabsorption" refers to the physiological concomitant of lactase deficiency (i.e., the body does not have sufficient lactase capacity to digest the amount of lactose ingested). (wikipedia.org)
  • People of different ages and races will have varying severities of illness when consuming the same amount of lactose. (britannica.com)
  • As a result we can tolerate smaller amounts of milk or milk products (low-fat milk or non-fat milk contain the same amount of lactose as regular milk). (medicinenet.com)
  • When there is not enough lactase to digest the amount of lactose consumed, the results, although not usually dangerous, may be very distressing. (healingwell.com)
  • Using lactose-free and lactose-reduced milk and milk products may help you lower the amount of lactose in your diet. (nih.gov)
  • A small amount of lactose may be found in some prescription and over-the-counter medicines. (nih.gov)
  • Talk with your doctor about the amount of lactose in medicines you take, especially if you typically cannot tolerate even small amounts of lactose. (nih.gov)
  • There is a moderate amount of lactose (0.1 to 4 grams per serve) in ice cream, cream and soft cheeses (such as cream cheese, cottage cheese and ricotta cheese). (mydr.com.au)
  • People with lactose intolerance do not produce enough of the lactase enzyme to break down lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • Congenital lactase deficiency, also called congenital alactasia, is a disorder in which infants are unable to break down lactose in breast milk or formula. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In lactose intolerance, the body doesn't make enough lactase to break down lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • The disease is different from lactose intolerance, in which a lack of the enzyme lactase results in the inability to properly break down lactose, a sugar found in milk products. (news-medical.net)
  • That's the enzyme needed to break down lactose into the simple sugars glucose and galactose, which are absorbed into the bloodstream. (thenibble.com)
  • Lactose intolerance happens when the body makes too little of the enzyme lactase, which is needed to break down lactose into two smaller sugars, called glucose and galactose. (rchsd.org)
  • Lactase, found in the lining of the small intestine, is needed to break down lactose sugar into two simple sugars--glucose and galactose--for easy absorption. (uspharmacist.com)
  • they lack lactase, the required digestive enzyme needed to break down lactose. (savannahnow.com)
  • The human body uses the enzyme lactase to break down lactose into galactose and glucose - which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. (savannahnow.com)
  • This results from a shortage of the lactase enzymes which break down lactose into its simpler forms, glucose and galactose. (pcrm.org)
  • These bacteria break down lactose into lactic acid, which solidifies the milk, and creates an acid environment that favors the benign lactic acid bacteria over those that are more harmful. (sci-toys.com)
  • Our bodies use an enzyme called lactase, which is produced in the epithelial cells on the villi in the small intestines, to break down lactose into glucose and galactose so that we can absorb it into our bodies and use it for energy. (health24.com)
  • When you don't have enough lactase to break down lactose, you're lactose malabsorbant. (health24.com)
  • If the lactose tolerance test results indicate the presence of a severe lactase deficiency, there may be a variety of culprits, including inflammatory bowel disease and malabsorption syndromes. (healthcentral.com)
  • Lactose malabsorption and intolerance and peak bone mass. (medscape.com)
  • Mishkin S. Dairy sensitivity, lactose malabsorption, and elimination diets in inflammatory bowel disease. (medscape.com)
  • Arola H. Diagnosis of hypolactasia and lactose malabsorption. (medscape.com)
  • Saavedra M, Perman JA: Current concepts in lactose malabsorption and intolerance. (springer.com)
  • Bayless TM: Lactose malabsorption, milk intolerance, and symptom awareness in adults. (springer.com)
  • Caskey DA, Payne-Bose D, Welsh JD, et al: Effects of age on lactose malabsorption in Oklahoma native Americans as determined by breath H 2 analysis. (springer.com)
  • almost 4 billion people worldwide have lactose malabsorption. (medscape.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is caused by lactose malabsorption. (nih.gov)
  • If you have lactose malabsorption, your small intestine makes low levels of lactase-the enzyme that breaks down lactose-and can't digest all the lactose you eat or drink. (nih.gov)
  • The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • Evaluate lactose intolerance, malabsorption syndromes. (labcorp.com)
  • Lactose malabsorption is a normal physiologic pattern. (aafp.org)
  • Lactase non-persistence (LNP), or primary hypolactasia, is a genetic condition that mediates lactose malabsorption and can cause lactose intolerance. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Here we report the prevalence of lactose intolerance in a double-blind placebo study.The LCT C>T-13910 variant was genotyped by RT-PCR in 121 volunteers and lactose malabsorption was assessed using the hydrogen breath test (HBT) after consuming 25 g of lactose . (tripdatabase.com)
  • Lactose malabsorption refers to the inability to digest and absorb lactose. (health24.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is often used interchangeably with lactose malabsorption. (health24.com)
  • Lactose malabsorption is therefore described as the physiological problem that manifests as lactose intolerance. (health24.com)
  • Lactose, a disaccharide that comprises the monosaccharides glucose and galactose, is the primary carbohydrate found exclusively in mammalian milk. (aappublications.org)
  • Lactose, a disaccharide unique to mammalian milk, is hydrolyzed into the monosaccharides glucose and galactose at the brush border of enterocytes on the villous tip by the enzyme lactase (a beta-D-galactosidase known as lactase phlorizin hydrolase). (medscape.com)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide, which means that it is composed of two other sugars bound together (glucose and galactose). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide (sugar) derived from galactose and glucose, found in milk. (savannahnow.com)
  • When you ingest milk sugar, you have to digest the lactose into its two simple sugar units, also called disaccharide units, glucose and galactose. (livestrong.com)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide digested by lactase. (labcorp.com)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide carbohydrate , composed of the two monosaccharides, glucose and galactose. (faqs.org)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide , two simple sugars in one molecule. (sci-toys.com)
  • Lactose , a disaccharide of β-D-galactose & β-D-glucose, that is normally split by lactase . (bionity.com)
  • Lactose is a unique disaccharide found exclusively in the milk of mammals. (intechopen.com)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose is a disaccharide derived from the condensation of galactose and glucose, which form a β-1→4 glycosidic linkage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is due to the lack of the enzyme lactase in the small intestines to break lactose down into glucose and galactose . (wikipedia.org)
  • Normally when a person eats something containing lactose, an enzyme in the small intestine called lactase breaks it down into simpler sugar forms called glucose and galactose . (kidshealth.org)
  • This breaks down lactose into 2 sugars called glucose and galactose, which can be easily absorbed into the bloodstream. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The small intestine normally makes a special substance called lactase (say: LAK-tase), an enzyme that breaks lactose down into simpler sugars called glucose (say: GLOO-kose) and galactose (say: guh-LAK-tose). (kidshealth.org)
  • Lactose is normally broken down in the small intestine by the enzyme lactase into glucose and galactose . (britannica.com)
  • Breaking down lactose into simpler forms of sugar called glucose and galactose is the job of lactase and without it, suffering is bound to occur. (empowher.com)
  • When milk is metabolized normally in the human body, the enzyme lactase breaks down lactose into the simple sugars glucose and galactose. (supermarketguru.com)
  • Normally, when lactose reaches the digestive system, the lactase enzyme breaks down lactase into glucose and galactose. (healingwell.com)
  • Lactase is part of a group of enzymes found in the small intestine, liver and kidney of mammals that breaks down lactose milk sugar into its simple sugars, glucose and galactose, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream. (savannahnow.com)
  • Lactose is sugar composed of two simple sugars - glucose and galactose. (runnersworld.com)
  • Virtually all infants and young children have the lactase enzymes that split lactose into glucose and galactose, which can then be absorbed into the bloodstream. (pcrm.org)
  • The enzyme splits and hydrolyzes dietary lactose into glucose and galactose for transport across the cell membrane. (aafp.org)
  • During digestion, lactose is broken down into two simpler sugars, glucose and galactose. (mydr.com.au)
  • Lactase is needed in order to break lactose down into simple sugars such as glucose and galactose. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of lactase-an enzyme produced by the cells lining your small intestine, which breaks down the lactase molecules in the foods you eat into two sugars, glucose and galactose. (qualityhealth.com)
  • Lactose in milk is a rich nutrient for infants, who develop the ability to break it down into glucose and galactose by producing lactase in the brush border membrane of the small intestine. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The glucose can be in either the α-pyranose form or the β-pyranose form, whereas the galactose can only have the β-pyranose form: hence α-lactose and β-lactose refer to the anomeric form of the glucopyranose ring alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose is hydrolysed to glucose and galactose, isomerised in alkaline solution to lactulose, and catalytically hydrogenated to the corresponding polyhydric alcohol, lactitol. (wikipedia.org)
  • This enzyme cleaves the lactose molecule into its two subunits, the simple sugars glucose and galactose, which can be absorbed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors can test for lactose intolerance by using the hydrogen breath test. (kidshealth.org)
  • However, undigested lactose in the colon ferments (breaks down) and produces various gases, including hydrogen. (kidshealth.org)
  • Your physician might order a hydrogen breath test to help diagnose lactose intolerance. (eatright.org)
  • They might test the breath for hydrogen levels before and after the child drinks lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • When lactose isn't digested, the bacteria that normally live in the large intestine use it and make hydrogen gas. (kidshealth.org)
  • To test the amount of hydrogen, the doctor will have you drink something with lactose in it. (kidshealth.org)
  • 2) Lactose breath hydrogen test: Undigested lactose leads to the production of hydrogen in the gut. (britannica.com)
  • Ability to absorb lactose can be determined by administering lactose orally and measuring the resulting rise in blood glucose (lactose tolerance test), or by measuring the amount of hydrogen subsequently exhaled in the breath (hydrogen breath test). (healthcentral.com)
  • That's because hydrogen is given off when lactose is broken down in the colon. (webmd.com)
  • 48 males, 50 females) were tested for lactose maldigestion by breath hydrogen analysis after consuming milk containing 16.5 g lactose (360 ml milk). (springer.com)
  • But if your body has trouble breaking down and absorbing lactose, breath hydrogen levels increase. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • I continued to have some stomach troubles, and was given the Hydrogen Breath Test since Lactose Intolerance is fairly common with Gluten problems, but it came up negative. (medhelp.org)
  • I know the Hydrogen Breath Test is extremely accurate in most cases for Lactose Intolerance. (medhelp.org)
  • This test measures the amount of hydrogen in your breath after consuming a drink high in lactose. (healthline.com)
  • If you aren't fully digesting lactose, the hydrogen breath test will show a higher than normal amount of hydrogen in your breath. (healthline.com)
  • The most common tests used to measure the absorption of lactose in the digestive system are the lactose tolerance test, the hydrogen breath test, and the stool acidity test. (healingwell.com)
  • Raised levels of hydrogen in the breath indicate improper digestion of lactose. (healingwell.com)
  • The lactose tolerance and hydrogen breath tests are not given to infants and very young children who are suspected of having lactose intolerance. (healingwell.com)
  • Doctors usually diagnose lactose intolerance through a simple hydrogen breath test. (rchsd.org)
  • If someone has a lactose intolerance, the test will show that there is a higher than average level of hydrogen and methane in the breath. (rchsd.org)
  • In adults, a confirmation test for lactose intolerance known as the hydrogen breath test can be used. (uspharmacist.com)
  • During this test, the amount of hydrogen in the breath is measured after the patient drinks a lactose-containing drink. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Since lactose not broken down by digestion gives off hydrogen gas, this test can help confirm the relative lack of lactose digestion by lactase. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The most common test for lactose intolerance is the lactose hydrogen breath test. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • This involves taking a lactose solution by mouth and measuring the hydrogen produced in the breath over the next two hours or so. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • If excess hydrogen is produced then lactose has not been absorbed but fermented in the colon. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • The hydrogen breath test: The patient fasts overnight then has a lactose solution the following morning. (savannahnow.com)
  • High levels of hydrogen are usually present in your breath if your body is not digesting lactose properly. (drugs.com)
  • After you drink a liquid that contains high levels of lactose, your doctor measures the amount of hydrogen in your breath at regular intervals. (drugs.com)
  • If necessary, diagnosis can be confirmed by using a breath hydrogen or lactose tolerance test. (aafp.org)
  • Within the large intestine, free lactose is fermented by colonic bacteria to yield short-chain fatty acids and hydrogen gas. (tripdatabase.com)
  • As with the previous test, a lactose-loaded beverage is consumed, and the individual then breathes into a machine that measures the amount of hydrogen in the breath. (faqs.org)
  • When they reach the large intestine, resident bacteria ferment the lactose, causing excessive production of hydrogen, short-chain fatty acids, methane, and carbon dioxide. (uspharmacist.com)
  • 8,9 A hydrogen breath test measures intestinal absorption of hydrogen after lactose inges- tion. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Elevated levels imply colonic maldigestion of lactose with resultant hydrogen production. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The lactose tolerance test begins with the individual fasting (not eating) before the test and then drinking a liquid that contains lactose. (healingwell.com)
  • Lactose tolerance test - measuring blood sugar levels after drinking lactose. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • The lactose tolerance test: The patient drinks a lactose solution, then a blood sample is taken to measure glucose levels. (savannahnow.com)
  • Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. (nih.gov)
  • Since 25% of normal individuals have flat glucose tolerance tests, it has been suggested that patients with flat lactose tolerance tests should also have a glucose tolerance test. (labcorp.com)
  • Special tests, including a formal lactose tolerance test and measuring the lactase concentration in the small bowel are available. (mydr.com.au)
  • The lactose tolerance test involves an individual drinking a liquid that contains lactose. (faqs.org)
  • In the lactose tolerance test, blood glucose is examined at several points after lactose ingestion to determine whether it was digested. (uspharmacist.com)
  • People with lactose intolerance do not produce enough lactase, so lactose stays in the digestive system, where it's fermented by bacteria. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Yogurt contains less lactose than milk, and the bacteria predigest much of what remains. (healthcentral.com)
  • Bob Gathany, AL.com , "Up in the air at the Huntsville Community Kite Festival," 4 Mar. 2018 To make it, dairy producers have long employed the help of Streptococcus thermophilus, a bacteria that gobbles up the lactose in milk and poops out lactic acid. (merriam-webster.com)
  • Bacteria in your colon break down the lactose and create fluid and gas. (nih.gov)
  • If your body is unable to digest the lactose, the bacteria in your intestine will break it down instead. (healthline.com)
  • The process by which bacteria break down sugars like lactose is called fermentation. (healthline.com)
  • Lactic acid accumulates when bacteria in the intestine ferment the undigested lactose. (healthline.com)
  • Undigested lactose fermented by bacteria in the colon creates lactic acid and other short-chain fatty acids that can be detected in a stool sample. (healingwell.com)
  • When there's not enough lactase in the body, lactose doesn't get broken down in the small intestine, and it passes into the large intestine where bacteria ferment it into gases and acids. (rchsd.org)
  • The lactose reaches the colon and is fermented by bacteria in the large intestine and this can produce excess gas and stomach rumbling and leads to diarrhoea. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • In addition to increasing the volume and fluidity of the gastrointestinal contents, unabsorbed lactose entering the colon is affected by bacteria. (aafp.org)
  • In lactase-deficient patients, some of the carbohydrates reaching the colon can be metabolized by bacteria into short-chain fatty acids and absorbed, but the net result of ingestion of lactose is a substantial rise in fluid and gas in the bowel. (aafp.org)
  • Enteral bacteria adapt to the relative abundance of this undigested sugar and their operons quickly switch over to lactose metabolism , which produces copious amounts of gas by fermentation . (bionity.com)
  • You may be able to tolerate cultured milk products, such as yogurt, because the bacteria used in the culturing process naturally produce the enzyme that breaks down lactose. (gosanangelo.com)
  • The lactose reaching the lower bowel draws extra water into the bowel and is fermented by the bacteria there, producing gas and acid stools. (breastfeeding.asn.au)
  • Lactose Broth is used for the cultivation of Salmonella and coliform bacteria from food, dairy, and water products in a laboratory setting. (neogen.com)
  • Pre-enrichment in a non-selective medium such as Lactose Broth allows for repair of cell damage, dilutes toxic or inhibitory substances, and provides a nutritional advantage to Salmonella over other bacteria. (neogen.com)
  • The lactose moves into the colon (or large intestine), where bacteria ferment it. (health24.com)
  • What Are Examples of Non-Lactose Fermenting Bacteria? (reference.com)
  • Examples of non-lactose fermenting bacteria include salmonella, shigella, proteus and pseudomonas aeruginosa. (reference.com)
  • These microorganisms can be differentiated from lactose-fermenting bacteria by using differential bacteriological media, such as MacConkey agar and eosin-methylene blue agar, or EMB. (reference.com)
  • Some bacteria are unable to process lactose and instead ferment peptone. (reference.com)
  • Lactase is used as the bacteria used to make them consume lactose during the manufacturing process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bell RR, Draper HH, Bergan JD: Sucrose, lactose and glucose tolerance in northern Alaskan Eskimos. (springer.com)
  • Rozen P, Shafrir E: Behavior of serum free fatty acids and glucose during lactose tolerance tests. (springer.com)
  • The lactose tolerance blood test looks for glucose in your blood. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Your body creates glucose when lactose breaks down. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • The blood test is considered normal if your glucose level rises more than 30 mg/dL (1.6 mmol/L) within 2 hours of drinking the lactose solution. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • The blood test is considered abnormal if your glucose level rises less than 20 mg/dL (1.1 mmol/L) within 2 hours of drinking the lactose solution. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Several blood samples are taken over a 2-hour period to measure the person's blood glucose (blood sugar) level, which indicates how well the body is able to digest lactose. (healingwell.com)
  • If lactose is incompletely broken down the blood glucose level does not rise, and a diagnosis of lactose intolerance is confirmed. (healingwell.com)
  • In addition, glucose may be present in the sample as a result of unabsorbed lactose in the colon. (healingwell.com)
  • If someone is not digesting lactose, their stool will have lactic acid, glucose, and other fatty acids. (uhhospitals.org)
  • If glucose levels remain low, it means the lactose was not acted upon by the lactase and has not been received in the bloodstream. (savannahnow.com)
  • The individual must fast before this test, in which several blood samples are taken over a two-hour period to measure the blood glucose level, which indicates how well the body is able to digest lactose. (faqs.org)
  • If lactose is incompletely absorbed, then the blood glucose level will not rise, confirming a diagnosis of lactose intolerance. (faqs.org)
  • Taking this before eating foods that contain dairy helps the body digest the lactose sugar in dairy. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you take it right before eating foods that cause you trouble, it usually helps your body digest the lactose. (kidshealth.org)
  • Some studies have found the active cultures in yogurt produce those important lactase enzymes, which can help you digest the lactose in the yogurt. (webmd.com)
  • Lactaid milk has had the lactase enzyme added to it to digest the lactose, and some people can tolerate lactose in any form by taking the Lactaid type tablets with it. (celiac.com)
  • This contains lactase and temporarily allows you to digest the lactose in milk. (livestrong.com)
  • If you're allergic to something, even a tiny particle can be enough to trigger a reaction, while most people with lactose intolerance can still consume small amounts of lactose without experiencing any problems, although this varies from person to person. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Even nondairy products such as creamers or whipped toppings can contain "milk derivatives" or "caseinate" ingredients that contain small amounts of lactose. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Small amounts of lactose (e.g. 10 grams a day) can usually be tolerated. (mydr.com.au)
  • It is generally not necessary to avoid taking medicines that contain small amounts of lactose. (mydr.com.au)
  • Reading the ingredient list can help you identify if a food contains lactose. (eatright.org)
  • You can check the ingredient list on packaged foods to see if the product contains lactose. (nih.gov)
  • As such, skim milk still contains lactose, which makes it inappropriate for people with lactose intolerance. (livestrong.com)
  • Skim milk is low in calories but contains lactose. (livestrong.com)
  • Many foods, drinks, and digestive aids are available to help manage lactose intolerance. (kidshealth.org)
  • National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: "Lactose Intolerance. (webmd.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a problem caused by the digestive system. (news-medical.net)
  • Lactose intolerance is a common problem where a person's digestive system cannot digest lactose. (medicinenet.com)
  • For you, I would suggest taking the Digestive Advantage for Lactose Intolerance, or even the Irritable Bowel Syndrome kind. (healingwell.com)
  • Please consult your doctor to make sure that you are not suffering from other digestive disease that can mimic lactose intolerance. (medicinenet.com)
  • Lactose intolerance happens when your small intestine does not make enough of a digestive enzyme called lactase. (uhhospitals.org)
  • This test checks how your digestive system absorbs lactose. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Many foods, drinks, and digestive aids are available for those with a lactose intolerance (like milk specifically made for people with this condition, which most supermarkets carry). (rchsd.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is the inability to absorb lactose into the digestive system. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Lactose intolerance is a digestive disorder where your body does not produce enough of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down lactose in your gut. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Lactase breaks down lactose into simpler forms that can then be absorbed into the bloodstream during the digestive process. (faqs.org)
  • The research I've done on this topic basically says that lactose intolerance in pregnancy is very uncommon, and is more likely the result of normal digestive problems. (empowher.com)
  • I first started learning about lactose free living when my brother was diagnosed with Crohn's Disease, a form of inflammatory bowl disease (IBD) that inflames the lining of the digestive tract. (lifescript.com)
  • An RDN can help you determine how much lactose you may be able to tolerate on a regular basis and ensure you're getting an adequate amount of nutrients that are needed for good health. (eatright.org)
  • Glutard, then, is a disparaging term for a person who doesn't eat gluten, lactard for someone who can't tolerate lactose , and libtard for a liberal. (merriam-webster.com)
  • If the cause of the injury is treated, you may be able to tolerate lactose again. (nih.gov)
  • Many people with lactose intolerance may be able to tolerate yogurt with active cultures, which is very high in calcium, even though it is fairly high in lactose. (faqs.org)
  • Yogurt is another good source of a low lactose dairy product, as long as the container indicates it has live culture. (medicinenet.com)
  • Also take a look at Green Valley Organics' lactose-free yogurt, sour cream, kefir and frozen kefir . (thenibble.com)
  • Does Greek Yogurt Cause Lactose Intolerance? (livestrong.com)
  • Some cheeses and yogurt have less lactose than others. (lifescript.com)
  • Chemical evidence from ancient pots shows that these long-ago farmers learned to process the milk into cheese or yogurt, which removes some of the lactose. (npr.org)
  • [1] The onset of primary lactose intolerance, the most common type, is typically in late childhood or early adulthood, [1] but prevalence increases with age. (wikipedia.org)
  • [10] [11] Today the prevalence of lactose tolerance varies widely between regions and ethnic groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • The prevalence of lactose intolerance is lowest in populations with a long history of dependence on unfermented milk products as an important food source. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Xiong L, Wang Y, Gong X, Chen M. Prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: data from a tertiary center in southern China. (medscape.com)
  • Prevalence, cause and diagnosis of lactose intolerance in children aged 1-5 years: a systematic review of 1995-2015 literature. (medscape.com)
  • Scrimshaw NS, Murray EB: The acceptability of milk and milk products in populations with a high prevalence of lactose intolerance. (springer.com)
  • On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake, while true lactose intolerance prevalence is not known in these populations. (medscape.com)
  • While people of European descent have a lactose intolerance prevalence of only about 2%, as they grow older, their bodies can cease the production of lactase. (thenibble.com)
  • Prevalence of Lactose Intolerance in Chile: A Double-Blind Placebo Study. (tripdatabase.com)
  • However, cultures such as that of Japan, where dairy consumption has been on the increase, demonstrate a lower prevalence of lactose intolerance in spite of a genetic predisposition [7] . (bionity.com)
  • The frequency of primary lactose intolerance varies, with the highest prevalence among people of African, Asian, Hispanic, Mediterranean and southern European descent. (health24.com)
  • Other types of lactose-free foods include almond and coconut milk products. (healthcentral.com)
  • There are three types of lactose intolerance. (drugs.com)
  • Unlike other types of lactose intolerance, this type requires complete avoidance of lactose. (faqs.org)
  • But before we get into the types of lactose free foods out there, let's discuss what lactose intolerance is. (lifescript.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is caused a by deficiency in the amount of lactase , the enzyme that breaks down lactose in the small intestine . (britannica.com)
  • The condition results from a deficiency of lactase, an enzyme made in the small intestine that breaks down lactose. (medicinenet.com)
  • Diagnosis of lactose intolerance can be done through multiple routes. (britannica.com)
  • Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil. (medscape.com)
  • Delacour H, Leduc A, Loucano-Perdriat A, Plantamura J, Ceppa F. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis. (medscape.com)
  • Sasaki Y, Lio M, Kameda H, et al: Measurement of 14 C-lactose absorption in the diagnosis of lactase deficiency. (springer.com)
  • A diagnosis of lactose intolerance can usually be made with a careful history supported by dietary manipulation. (aafp.org)
  • Accurate diagnosis of lactose intolerance can significantly relieve patient anxiety and avoid inappropriate investigation and treatment. (aafp.org)
  • Lactose Broth is not intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or other conditions in humans. (neogen.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is caused by a shortage of the enzyme lactase, which is produced by the cells that line the small intestine. (news-medical.net)
  • Treatment options include taking the enzyme lactase pills or drops (Lactaid, Lactrase, etc.) before and during a meal rich in lactose. (medicinenet.com)
  • Lactose intolerance in adulthood is very common and is the result of a genetically programmed progressive loss of the activity of the small intestinal enzyme lactase. (medscape.com)
  • People with this condition have trouble digesting milk sugar (lactose) due to a relative lack of the enzyme lactase . (uspharmacist.com)
  • Someone with lactose intolerance has a deficiency of the enzyme lactase, which breaks the lactose into simple sugars. (runnersworld.com)
  • Lactose intolerance occurs when your small intestine doesn't produce enough of an enzyme (lactase) to digest milk sugar (lactose). (drugs.com)
  • Persons with lactose intolerance are unable to digest significant amounts of lactose because of a genetically inadequate amount of the enzyme lactase. (aafp.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme lactase, which the body needs in order to digest and absorb lactose, with is a sugar found in milk. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Certain antibiotics can trigger temporary lactose intolerance by interfering with the intestine's ability to produce the lactase enzyme. (kidshealth.org)
  • In primary lactose intolerance, the amount of lactase enzyme normally declines gradually after weaning from breastfeeding. (britannica.com)
  • The reason for a specific lactose intolerance in celiacs is that the villi in the small intestine which are damaged by the gluten produce the lactase enzyme needed for its digestion, and often once the celiac person heals he can resume consuming lactose. (celiac.com)
  • As a macromolecule -- large molecule -- lactose requires the lactase enzyme to break it up during digestion. (livestrong.com)
  • Congenital lactose intolerance is an extremely rare condition in which the lactase enzyme is completely absent at birth. (faqs.org)
  • Only when both gene expressions are affected is lactase enzyme synthesis reduced, which in turn reduces lactose digestion. (bionity.com)
  • In the 20th century "lactose intolerance" was assumed to be a pathology, but it turns out that most human populations can not digest milk sugar as adults due to the lack of production of the lactase enzyme. (discovermagazine.com)
  • After a bout of infectious diarrhea, some kids can develop a temporary lactose intolerance that usually improves after a few days or weeks. (kidshealth.org)
  • Some antibiotics can trigger temporary lactose intolerance by affecting how the intestine makes lactase. (kidshealth.org)
  • After having diarrhea, some people have a temporary lactose intolerance that usually gets better after a few days or weeks. (kidshealth.org)
  • In infants, an intestinal infection such as gastroenteritis may cause temporary lactose intolerance. (healthcentral.com)
  • Temporary lactose intolerance may result from medication (such as antibiotics or NSAIDs like ibuprofen) that affect the intestinal lining and stop lactase production for a few weeks. (healthcentral.com)
  • Temporary lactose intolerance can be the result of several gastrointestinal disruptions that might occur at certain times during your life. (livestrong.com)
  • Babies born significantly earlier than their due dates also might have temporary lactose intolerance, because their intestines are not yet making lactase. (livestrong.com)
  • The solution to temporary lactose intolerance is to adopt the lifestyle you would follow if you were permanently affected by the condition. (livestrong.com)
  • A very common cause of temporary lactose intolerance is gastroenteritis , particularly when the gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus . (bionity.com)
  • 1) Stool acidity test: Stools will have low pH because undigested lactose ferments into lactic acid . (britannica.com)
  • Lactic acid comes from the fermintation of lactose. (celiac.com)
  • I read somewhere that when you don't produce the lactase to digest lactose that the lactose turns into lactic acid in the intestines and can cause cramps, discomfort, and all that jazz. (celiac.com)
  • Certain health conditions and treatments also may lead to lactose intolerance as the result of intestinal damage. (eatright.org)
  • It can be present at birth (congenital lactose intolerance) or develop on its own over time (primary lactose intolerance) or due to afflictions that injure the intestinal lining (secondary lactose intolerance). (britannica.com)
  • Kern F Jr, Struthers JE Jr. Intestinal lactase deficiency and lactose intolerance in adults. (medscape.com)
  • Absorption of lactose requires lactase activity in the small intestinal brush border to split the bond linking the 2 monosaccharides. (aappublications.org)
  • Lactose intolerance is a distinct entity from cow milk-protein sensitivity, which involves the immune system and causes varying degrees of injury to the intestinal mucosal surface. (aappublications.org)
  • Although transient lactose intolerance may occur during acute gastroenteritis and as part of any process that leads to reduction of the small intestinal absorptive surface (such as untreated celiac disease ), it is rarely clinically significant and, when present, can be easily treated with a short course of a lactose-free diet. (medscape.com)
  • Although premature infants have partial lactase deficiency because of intestinal immaturity, enzyme expression can be induced by lactose ingestion. (medscape.com)
  • Intestinal diseases such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease or a surgery or injury to your small intestine can also cause lactose intolerance. (healthline.com)
  • Diseases associated with secondary lactose intolerance include intestinal infection, celiac disease, bacterial overgrowth and Crohn's disease. (drugs.com)
  • If you've had radiation therapy for cancer in your stomach or you have intestinal complications from chemotherapy, your risk of developing lactose intolerance increases. (drugs.com)
  • of intestinal lactase prevents hydrolysis of ingested lactose . (tripdatabase.com)
  • The doctor also can test your breath to see if you show signs of lactose intolerance. (kidshealth.org)
  • Your health care provider may order these tests if you have signs of lactose intolerance. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance is when someone has trouble digesting lactose , a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy foods. (kidshealth.org)
  • People who have lactose intolerance (say: LAK-tose in-TAHL-er-ents) have trouble digesting (say: dye-JES-ting) lactose, a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy foods. (kidshealth.org)
  • If you are, you can't digest the natural sugar (called lactose) found in milk and milk products. (webmd.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, the major sugar found in milk. (news-medical.net)
  • Lactose is a sugar that is found in milk and milk-based products, and the intolerance of lactose is literally an inability to properly digest this particular sugar. (empowher.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a condition in which the body is unable to fully digest lactose, a form of natural sugar found in milk. (medicinenet.com)
  • Lactose, a natural sugar found in milk and products made from milk, is digested in the body by an enzyme known as lactase. (uspharmacist.com)
  • We remove 16g of the stubborn lactose sugars naturally found in milk before adding our own field-grown, digestible sugars. (safeway.com)
  • Normally, when we eat something with lactose, an enzyme in the small intestine called lactase breaks it down into simple sugars. (kidshealth.org)
  • During digestion, lactose is broken down into two simple sugars by lactase, an enzyme found in the small intestine. (healthcentral.com)
  • [5] [8] Other mammals normally lose the ability to digest lactose after weaning and this was the ancestral state of all humans before the recent evolution of lactase persistence , which extends lactose tolerance into adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • [5] The ability to digest lactose is most common in people of European descent, and to a lesser extent in parts of the Middle East and Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approximately 65 percent of the human population has a reduced ability to digest lactose after infancy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mutations that cause congenital lactase deficiency are believed to interfere with the function of lactase, causing affected infants to have a severely impaired ability to digest lactose in breast milk or formula. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some individuals have inherited changes in this element that lead to sustained lactase production in the small intestine and the ability to digest lactose throughout life. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The ability to digest lactose into adulthood depends on which variations in the regulatory element within the MCM6 gene individuals have inherited from their parents. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In most cases, the ability to digest lactose was present at birth but was lost, either suddenly or gradually, between the ages of three and 20. (healthcentral.com)
  • However, many people have a reduced ability to digest lactose after infancy. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • When researchers tested various ethnic groups for their ability to digest lactose, however, their findings proved otherwise. (pcrm.org)
  • However, like the ability to digest lactose, susceptibility to osteoporosis differs dramatically between ethnic groups, and neither milk consumption nor calcium intake in general are decisive factors with regard to bone health. (pcrm.org)
  • Some patients with lactase persistence lose the ability to digest lactose as a result of environmental triggers, a condition known as secondary LI . (uspharmacist.com)
  • Lactose intolerance in adulthood is caused by reduced production of lactase after infancy (lactase nonpersistence). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance in adulthood is most prevalent in people of East Asian descent, with 70 to 100 percent of people affected in these communities. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance in adulthood is caused by gradually decreasing activity (expression) of the LCT gene after infancy, which occurs in most humans. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In primary lactose intolerance, lactase production falls off sharply by adulthood, making milk products difficult to digest. (drugs.com)
  • Lactose intolerance usually appears in adulthood. (drugs.com)
  • Today, however, 35 percent of the global population - mostly people with European ancestry - can digest lactose in adulthood without a hitch. (npr.org)
  • Most people with lactose intolerance can handle small amounts of dairy, so a common early approach is to consume a small portion of dairy along with other foods in a meal to determine what the body can and can't handle. (healthday.com)
  • Most older children and adults need not avoid lactose completely, but individuals differ in the amounts of lactose they can handle. (healingwell.com)
  • If a person does not produce sufficient amounts of lactase, lactose can be difficult to digest. (uspharmacist.com)
  • People with lactose intolerance can handle different amounts of lactose. (nih.gov)
  • Often, a special diet to minimise a person's exposure to lactose will simply involve measures like drinking smaller amounts of milk at more frequent intervals. (selfgrowth.com)
  • These dairy foods contain lesser amounts of lactose. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Lactose overload is often seen in babies consuming large amounts of breastmilk, that is when their mothers have an oversupply . (breastfeeding.asn.au)
  • Depending on the underlying reason why the body's not producing enough lactase, lactose intolerance may be temporary or permanent. (www.nhs.uk)
  • People with lactose intolerance do not make enough lactase in their small intestine. (kidshealth.org)
  • But people with lactose intolerance don��t have enough lactase. (webmd.com)
  • People who develop primary lactose intolerance - the most common type - start life producing enough lactase. (drugs.com)
  • [1] Congenital lactose intolerance is an extremely rare genetic disorder in which little or no lactase is made from birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose intolerance in infancy resulting from congenital lactase deficiency is a rare disorder. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Lactose intolerance in infants (congenital lactase deficiency) is caused by mutations in the LCT gene. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Differences between primary, secondary, congenital, and developmental lactase deficiency that may result in lactose intolerance are discussed. (aappublications.org)
  • This is referred to as congenital lactose intolerance. (healthline.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a consequence of lactase deficiency, which may be genetic (primary hypolactasia and primary congenital alactasia) or environmentally induced (secondary or acquired hypoalactasia). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are various laboratory tests, as well as evaluating symptomatic response to ingestion of lactose-containing products. (britannica.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a clinical syndrome of 1 or more of the following: abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, flatulence, and/or bloating after the ingestion of lactose or lactose-containing food substances. (aappublications.org)
  • Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. (nih.gov)
  • In general, fresher cheeses contain more lactose than aged cheeses, which means cheeses like feta and ricotta, my old favorites, are higher in lactose , and now my enemy. (merriam-webster.com)
  • What Are Some Lactose-Free Cheeses? (reference.com)
  • All hard cheeses are free of lactose, such as cheddar, Asiago, Edam and cotija. (reference.com)
  • Some cheeses that contain less than 5 grams of lactose per serving include mozzarella, cream cheese and ricotta, which are sometimes suitable for people with lactose intolerance. (reference.com)
  • Usually within 30 minutes to 2 hours after eating, someone with lactose intolerance will experience nausea, stomach cramps, bloating, gas, and diarrhea. (kidshealth.org)
  • This form of lactose intolerance results in severe diarrhea. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This means that if you eat dairy foods, the lactose from these foods will pass into your intestine, which can lead to gas, cramps, a bloated feeling, and diarrhea (say: dye-uh-REE-uh), which is loose, watery poop. (kidshealth.org)
  • Does Lactose Intolerance Cause Diarrhea? (webmd.com)
  • Secondary lactose intolerance can occur at any age, and about 50 percent of infants with diarrhea will be found to have it. (britannica.com)
  • They will have diarrhea as soon as human milk or a formula containing lactose is introduced. (healthline.com)
  • If you're experiencing cramps, bloating, and diarrhea after drinking milk or eating and drinking milk products, your doctor may want to test you for lactose intolerance. (healthline.com)
  • A large lactose load may be dangerous for very young individuals because they are more prone to dehydration that can result from diarrhea caused by the lactose. (healingwell.com)
  • The principal manifestation of lactose intolerance is an adverse reaction to products containing lactose (primarily milk), including abdominal bloating and cramps, flatulence, diarrhea, nausea, borborygmi, and vomiting (particularly in adolescents). (wikipedia.org)
  • Some chronic gastrointestinal disorders, such as Crohn's disease may cause lactose intolerance. (healthcentral.com)
  • Small intestine problems that can cause lactose intolerance include bacterial overgrowth, celiac disease and Crohn's disease. (drugs.com)
  • Usually the harder the cheese, the less lactose it contains. (lifescript.com)
  • [1] Primary lactose intolerance occurs as the amount of lactase declines as people age. (wikipedia.org)
  • In primary lactose intolerance, the body begins to produce less lactase after about the age of two, depending on an individual's racial or ethnic background. (faqs.org)
  • Primary lactose intolerance refers to a genetically programmed loss of lactase. (health24.com)
  • Occasionally, a type of lactose intolerance called developmental lactose intolerance occurs when a baby is born prematurely. (healthline.com)
  • Lactose intolerance occurs when a person has a shortage of an enzyme known as lactase, which is produced in the small intestine and is responsible for breaking down lactose. (healthday.com)
  • This form of lactose intolerance occurs when your small intestine decreases lactase production after an illness, injury or surgery involving your small intestine. (drugs.com)
  • Secondary lactose intolerance occurs because of an injury to the small intestine. (health24.com)
  • Developmental lactose intolerance occurs in babies who are born prematurely. (health24.com)
  • Secondary lactose intolerance occurs as a result of another illness. (health24.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is very common in adults. (medlineplus.gov)
  • About 30 million American adults have some degree of lactose intolerance by age 20. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Deng Y, Misselwitz B, Dai N, Fox M. Lactose intolerance in adults: biological mechanism and dietary management. (medscape.com)
  • Both children and adults can get lactose intolerance. (uhhospitals.org)
  • Most adults of Caucasian (white) origin can absorb lactose into adult life. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Adults: 50 g in 250 mL water Collect specimens at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes following lactose administration. (labcorp.com)
  • however, some adults have difficulties in fully metabolizing lactose. (intechopen.com)
  • Thousands of years ago, a mutation in the human genome allowed many adults to digest lactose and drink milk. (npr.org)
  • By descent, more than 70% of western Europeans can digest lactose as adults, compared with less than 30% of people from areas of Africa, eastern and south-eastern Asia and Oceania. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, lactose intolerance and cow's milk intolerance are not related. (news-medical.net)
  • Polar bear milk has almost ten times as much fat and protein as cow's milk, almost no lactose . (merriam-webster.com)
  • Irritable bowel syndrome can present similarly and milk protein intolerance (adverse reaction to the protein in cow's milk - not the same as an allergy or lactose intolerance). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • This study was designed to evaluate the contribution of IgE-mediated cow's milk sensitization to the symptomatology of adult patients with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • IgE-mediated sensitization to cow's milk is a frequent comorbidity in subjects with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance and is worth consideration in patients with this condition. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Though lactose-free soy milk does not taste exactly like cow's milk, it works in baked goods just as milk does. (livestrong.com)
  • If you do not have this enzyme, or do no have enough of it, you cannot digest lactose. (livestrong.com)
  • But there are ways to manage lactose intolerance while still getting the nutrition of dairy foods. (webmd.com)
  • The good news is that you can manage lactose intolerance dietary challenges during pregnancy. (americanpregnancy.org)
  • Similarly, in Mongolia, horse milk was consumed on a regular basis and cases of lactose intolerance are fewer compared to China where ancient civilizations did not consume milk. (news-medical.net)
  • The mutation has led to the populations of Northern Europe and India developing lactose tolerance so that they can safely consume milk and milk products. (news-medical.net)
  • If you struggle with lactose intolerance and want to consume skim milk or something similar, you have several options. (livestrong.com)
  • While there's no cure for lactose intolerance, it can be managed by keeping an eye on the amount of milk and milk products you consume and/or by introducing lactase into the milk products you enjoy. (health24.com)
  • Millions of Americans can't digest a certain sugar in milk and milk products called lactose. (webmd.com)
  • Lactose is a sugar particular to milk and milk products. (supermarketguru.com)
  • The sugar present in milk and milk products is called lactose. (medicinenet.com)
  • Lactose is in all milk and milk products and may be found in other foods and drinks. (nih.gov)
  • Milk and milk products should generally still be included in the diet because they are valuable sources of calcium, but don't eat or drink large quantities of lactose-containing products at one time - spread it out over the course of the day. (mydr.com.au)
  • And finally, lactose-free milk and milk products or calcium-fortified foods are other good choices for meeting your calcium needs. (emaxhealth.com)
  • In order for lactose to be absorbed, it must be split into those two smaller sugars. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • As with other unabsorbed sugars ( mannitol ), the lactose raises the osmotic pressure of the colon contents, preventing the colon from reabsorbing water and hence causing a laxative effect to add to the excessive gas production. (bionity.com)
  • Lactose has relatively low cariogenicity among sugars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lactose is not added directly to many foods, because its solubility is less than that of other sugars commonly used in food. (wikipedia.org)
  • Who is at risk of developing lactose intolerance? (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Persons who have had radiotherapy to the abdomen have a higher risk of developing lactose intolerance. (savannahnow.com)
  • Your doctor may do a blood, breath or stool test to find out if your problems are due to lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In the test, the patient drinks a lactose-loaded beverage, and the breath is analyzed at regular intervals. (healingwell.com)
  • A person blows into a tube to give a sample of the breath, then gives another sample after drinking a lactose solution or eating a lactose-containing food. (rchsd.org)
  • That's because undigested lactose leads to higher levels of these gases in the system, which can be detected in the breath. (rchsd.org)
  • Lactose also helps your body absorb a number of other minerals, such as magnesium and zinc. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Lactase breaks down the lactose in food so your body can absorb it. (uhhospitals.org)
  • All humans can absorb lactose as babies. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • You simply do not have the means to absorb lactose properly. (lifescript.com)
  • [1] Lactose intolerance does not cause damage to the gastrointestinal tract . (wikipedia.org)
  • Problems digesting lactose can also occur in people with other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as celiac disease , a condition in which the intestine becomes damaged due to the person's abnormal sensitivity to gluten (a protein found in wheat and certain other grains). (rchsd.org)
  • People of Asian, African, Native American, and Hispanic backgrounds are more likely to develop lactose intolerance at a young age. (kidshealth.org)
  • Everyone's different, but most people with lactose intolerance can eat a small amount of dairy. (kidshealth.org)
  • Often people with lactose intolerance are aware that specific foods and drinks appear to cause GI distress. (eatright.org)
  • In the UK, lactose intolerance is more common in people of Asian or African-Caribbean descent. (www.nhs.uk)
  • People who have not inherited these variations from either parent will have some degree of lactose intolerance. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A lot of people have lactose intolerance, but no one has to put up with feeling awful. (kidshealth.org)
  • Not everyone reacts in the same way - or within the same amount of time - because some people can handle more lactose than others can. (kidshealth.org)
  • Some people with lactose intolerance must avoid all foods containing lactose, but others can eat some dairy foods. (kidshealth.org)
  • Many people can drink lactose-free milk that has added calcium. (kidshealth.org)
  • In white people, lactose intolerance often develops in children older than age 5. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Even today, lactose intolerance is seldom seen in British, German and Scandinavian populations but is commonly seen among people from southern European, especially Italians. (news-medical.net)
  • This type of lactose intolerance is more common in people with Asian, African, Native American, or Mediterranean ancestry. (healthline.com)
  • Finally, people with lactose intolerance can enjoy ice cream as often as they like. (thenibble.com)
  • It's Clemmy's Ice Cream, the all natural, universal treat for people who need sugar-free, gluten-free and/or lactose-free products. (thenibble.com)
  • People with lactose intolerance may feel discomfort 30 minutes to 2 hours after consuming milk or milk products. (thenibble.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is more common among people of Asian, African, Native American, and Hispanic descent. (rchsd.org)
  • For most people with lactose intolerance, it remains a lifelong problem. (rchsd.org)
  • In some people, this problem results in a condition known as lactose intolerance. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a relatively common condition estimated to affect between 30 and 50 million people in the United States. (uspharmacist.com)
  • People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest the sugar (lactose) in milk. (drugs.com)
  • Most people with lactose intolerance can manage the condition without having to give up all dairy foods. (drugs.com)
  • There is no reason for people with lactose intolerance to push themselves to drink milk. (pcrm.org)
  • Not many people would, but then again, if you've experienced the violent reaction to lactose that some people have, you just might consider it. (hackaday.com)
  • Lactose-free food products are meant for people with lactose intolerance. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Lactose-free milk formula is also rapidly emerging owing to a growing number of people seeking the nutritional value of milk in their daily diet. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Don't get me wrong - there are many people who suffer from lactose intolerance and are forced to live a lactose free lifestyle. (lifescript.com)
  • There are many products on the market today to help people live lactose free. (lifescript.com)
  • People who are at risk for lactose intolerance are usually teenagers, but the condition can begin as early as infancy. (lifescript.com)
  • Goat's milk is also known to be agreeable to people with lactose intolerance. (lifescript.com)
  • Major propellants of the global lactose-free food market include a surge in the incidence of lactose intolerance caused by the inability to digest milk sugar lactose among consumers. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Lactose intolerance is a condition caused by the body's inability to digest one of the carbohydrate components of milk, lactase. (health24.com)
  • [1] Secondary lactose intolerance is due to injury to the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diseases causing secondary lactose intolerance include rotavirus, giardia and other parasitic infections, inflammatory bowel disease , celiac disease , cystic fibrosis , and AIDS. (britannica.com)
  • The length of time secondary lactose intolerance persists depends on the causative factor. (britannica.com)
  • Treatment of secondary lactose intolerance should also include treatment of the underlying causes. (britannica.com)
  • You also can suffer from a temporary form of the condition, also referred to as secondary lactose intolerance. (livestrong.com)
  • Medications also might cause secondary lactose intolerance. (livestrong.com)
  • Secondary lactose intolerance, on the other hand, is temporary and results from a disease or medications that damage the lining of the small intestine where lactase is normally active. (faqs.org)
  • Secondary lactose intolerance gradually disappears when the illness passes. (faqs.org)
  • Is secondary lactose intolerance adding to the overload situation? (breastfeeding.asn.au)
  • Patients who experience secondary LI from an infection may be advised to slowly reintroduce lactose-containing products to ascertain whether lactase is again present. (uspharmacist.com)
  • You may be advised to take lactase substitutes, which are drops or tablets you can take with your meals or drinks to improve your digestion of lactose. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Lactose intolerance is due to incomplete digestion of lactose, or milk sugar. (emaxhealth.com)