Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Port-Wine Stain: A vascular malformation of developmental origin characterized pathologically by ectasia of superficial dermal capillaries, and clinically by persistent macular erythema. In the past, port wine stains have frequently been termed capillary hemangiomas, which they are not; unfortunately this confusing practice persists: HEMANGIOMA, CAPILLARY is neoplastic, a port-wine stain is non-neoplastic. Port-wine stains vary in color from fairly pale pink to deep red or purple and in size from a few millimeters to many centimeters in diameter. The face is the most frequently affected site and they are most often unilateral. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 5th ed, p483)Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Blood Stains: Antigenic characteristics and DNA fingerprint patterns identified from blood stains. Their primary value is in criminal cases.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Laboratories, Hospital: Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Clinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Animals, LaboratoryPhenazinesMedical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Eosine Yellowish-(YS): A versatile red dye used in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, textiles, etc., and as tissue stain, vital stain, and counterstain with HEMATOXYLIN. It is also used in special culture media.Clinical Laboratory Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative and clinical activities associated with the provision and utilization of clinical laboratory services.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Hematoxylin: A dye obtained from the heartwood of logwood (Haematoxylon campechianum Linn., Leguminosae) used as a stain in microscopy and in the manufacture of ink.Methyl Green: A tri-benzene-ammonium usually compounded with zinc chloride. It is used as a biological stain and for the dyeing and printing of textiles.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Laboratory Personnel: Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Laboratory Proficiency Testing: Assessments aimed at determining agreement in diagnostic test results among laboratories. Identical survey samples are distributed to participating laboratories, with results stratified according to testing methodologies.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Periodic Acid-Schiff Reaction: A histochemical technique for staining carbohydrates. It is based on PERIODIC ACID oxidation of a substance containing adjacent hydroxyl groups. The resulting aldehydes react with Schiff reagent to form a colored product.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Silver Staining: The use of silver, usually silver nitrate, as a reagent for producing contrast or coloration in tissue specimens.Chemistry, Clinical: The specialty of ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY applied to assays of physiologically important substances found in blood, urine, tissues, and other biological fluids for the purpose of aiding the physician in making a diagnosis or following therapy.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Lasers, Dye: Tunable liquid lasers with organic compounds (i.e., dye) which have a strong absorption band, used as the active medium. During emission, the dye has to be optically excited by another light source (e.g., another laser or flash lamp). The range of the emission wavelength may be anywhere from the ultraviolet to the near infrared (i.e., from 180 to 1100nm). These lasers are operated in continuous wave and pulsed modes. (UMDNS, 2005)Medical Laboratory Science: The specialty related to the performance of techniques in clinical pathology such as those in hematology, microbiology, and other general clinical laboratory applications.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Clinical Laboratory Services: Organized services provided by MEDICAL LABORATORY PERSONNEL for the purpose of carrying out CLINICAL LABORATORY TECHNIQUES used for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Alcian Blue: A copper-containing dye used as a gelling agent for lubricants, for staining of bacteria and for the dyeing of histiocytes and fibroblasts in vivo.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Vaginosis, Bacterial: Polymicrobial, nonspecific vaginitis associated with positive cultures of Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobic organisms and a decrease in lactobacilli. It remains unclear whether the initial pathogenic event is caused by the growth of anaerobes or a primary decrease in lactobacilli.Microbiological Techniques: Techniques used in microbiology.Gardnerella vaginalis: A species in the genus GARDNERELLA previously classified as Haemophilus vaginalis. This bacterium, also isolated from the female genital tract of healthy women, is implicated in the cause of bacterial vaginosis (VAGINOSIS, BACTERIAL).Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Tolonium Chloride: A phenothiazine that has been used as a hemostatic, a biological stain, and a dye for wool and silk. Tolonium chloride has also been used as a diagnostic aid for oral and gastric neoplasms and in the identification of the parathyroid gland in thyroid surgery.Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Pathology, Clinical: A subspecialty of pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Rosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects.Histocytological Preparation Techniques: Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.Tissue Fixation: The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Negative Staining: The technique of washing tissue specimens with a concentrated solution of a heavy metal salt and letting it dry. The specimen will be covered with a very thin layer of the metal salt, being excluded in areas where an adsorbed macromolecule is present. The macromolecules allow electrons from the beam of an electron microscope to pass much more readily than the heavy metal; thus, a reversed or negative image of the molecule is created.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Fixatives: Agents employed in the preparation of histologic or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all of the constituent elements. Great numbers of different agents are used; some are also decalcifying and hardening agents. They must quickly kill and coagulate living tissue.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Pathology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers and provides pathology services.Benzophenoneidum: An aniline dye used as a disinfectant and an antiseptic agent. It is weakly fluorescing and binds specifically to certain proteins.Organic Chemicals: A broad class of substances containing carbon and its derivatives. Many of these chemicals will frequently contain hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and other elements. They exist in either carbon chain or carbon ring form.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Mobiluncus: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are found in the human vagina, particularly in association with Gardnerella vaginalis in cases of bacterial vaginosis.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Pneumocystis: A genus of ascomycetous FUNGI, family Pneumocystidaceae, order Pneumocystidales. It includes various host-specific species causing PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA in humans and other MAMMALS.Silver: Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.Methenamine: An anti-infective agent most commonly used in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Its anti-infective action derives from the slow release of formaldehyde by hydrolysis at acidic pH. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p173)False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Microsporidiosis: Infections with FUNGI of the phylum MICROSPORIDIA.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Microsporida: An order of parasitic FUNGI found mostly in ARTHROPODS; FISHES; and in some VERTEBRATES including humans. It comprises two suborders: Pansporoblastina and APANSPOROBLASTINA.Phosphotungstic Acid: Tungsten hydroxide oxide phosphate. A white or slightly yellowish-green, slightly efflorescent crystal or crystalline powder. It is used as a reagent for alkaloids and many other nitrogen bases, for phenols, albumin, peptone, amino acids, uric acid, urea, blood, and carbohydrates. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Clinical Chemistry Tests: Laboratory tests demonstrating the presence of physiologically significant substances in the blood, urine, tissue, and body fluids with application to the diagnosis or therapy of disease.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Methylene Blue: A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.Bacteriology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.Pathology: A specialty concerned with the nature and cause of disease as expressed by changes in cellular or tissue structure and function caused by the disease process.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Sputum: Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.Silver Nitrate: A silver salt with powerful germicidal activity. It has been used topically to prevent OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Parasitology: The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.Propidium: Quaternary ammonium analog of ethidium; an intercalating dye with a specific affinity to certain forms of DNA and, used as diiodide, to separate them in density gradients; also forms fluorescent complexes with cholinesterase which it inhibits.Laboratory Chemicals: Chemicals necessary to perform experimental and/or investigative procedures and for the preparation of drugs and other chemicals.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Immunoassay: A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hyalin: A clear, homogenous, structureless, eosinophilic substance occurring in pathological degeneration of tissues.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Automation, Laboratory: Controlled operations of analytic or diagnostic processes, or systems by mechanical or electronic devices.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Azo CompoundsKeratin-7: A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.Blood Chemical Analysis: An examination of chemicals in the blood.Microsporidia: A phylum of fungi comprising minute intracellular PARASITES with FUNGAL SPORES of unicellular origin. It has two classes: Rudimicrosporea and MICROSPOREA.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Animal Technicians: Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Cryptosporidium: A genus of coccidian parasites of the family CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE, found in the intestinal epithelium of many vertebrates including humans.Cytological Techniques: Methods used to study CELLS.Coccidia: A subclass of protozoans commonly parasitic in the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract but also found in the liver and other organs. Its organisms are found in both vertebrates and higher invertebrates and comprise two orders: EIMERIIDA and EUCOCCIDIIDA.Laundry Service, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all activities pertaining to the hospital laundry service.Paraffin Embedding: The infiltrating of tissue specimens with paraffin, as a supporting substance, to prepare for sectioning with a microtome.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Reagent Strips: Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Tissue Embedding: The technique of placing cells or tissue in a supporting medium so that thin sections can be cut using a microtome. The medium can be paraffin wax (PARAFFIN EMBEDDING) or plastics (PLASTIC EMBEDDING) such as epoxy resins.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.Vagina: The genital canal in the female, extending from the UTERUS to the VULVA. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pyronine: Xanthene dye used as a bacterial and biological stain. Synonyms: Pyronin; Pyronine G; Pyronine Y. Use also for Pyronine B. which is diethyl-rather than dimethylamino-.Laser Therapy, Low-Level: Treatment using irradiation with LASER light of low power intensity so that the effects are not due to heat, as they are in LASER THERAPY.Cryoultramicrotomy: The technique of using a cryostat or freezing microtome, in which the temperature is regulated to -20 degrees Celsius, to cut ultrathin frozen sections for microscopic (usually, electron microscopic) examination.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Congo Red: An acid dye used in testing for hydrochloric acid in gastric contents. It is also used histologically to test for AMYLOIDOSIS.Cytodiagnosis: Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)Diagnostic Tests, Routine: Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.Pyuria: The presence of white blood cells (LEUKOCYTES) in the urine. It is often associated with bacterial infections of the urinary tract. Pyuria without BACTERIURIA can be caused by TUBERCULOSIS, stones, or cancer.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Molecular Diagnostic Techniques: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).United StatesAgar: A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.Cryptosporidiosis: Intestinal infection with organisms of the genus CRYPTOSPORIDIUM. It occurs in both animals and humans. Symptoms include severe DIARRHEA.Microtomy: The technique of using a microtome to cut thin or ultrathin sections of tissues embedded in a supporting substance. The microtome is an instrument that hold a steel, glass or diamond knife in clamps at an angle to the blocks of prepared tissues, which it cuts in sections of equal thickness.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Indicators and Reagents: Substances used for the detection, identification, analysis, etc. of chemical, biological, or pathologic processes or conditions. Indicators are substances that change in physical appearance, e.g., color, at or approaching the endpoint of a chemical titration, e.g., on the passage between acidity and alkalinity. Reagents are substances used for the detection or determination of another substance by chemical or microscopical means, especially analysis. Types of reagents are precipitants, solvents, oxidizers, reducers, fluxes, and colorimetric reagents. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p301, p499)Neutral Red: A vital dye used as an indicator and biological stain. Various adverse effects have been observed in biological systems.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Oxazines: Six-membered heterocycles containing an oxygen and a nitrogen.Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Dermatomycoses: Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)MycosesCell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.HemosiderinKlippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome: A congenital disorder that is characterized by a triad of capillary malformations (HEMANGIOMA), venous malformations (ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA), and soft tissue or bony hypertrophy of the limb. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the VG5Q gene which encodes a strong angiogenesis stimulator.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Vaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Fluoresceins: A family of spiro(isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-(9H)xanthen)-3-one derivatives. These are used as dyes, as indicators for various metals, and as fluorescent labels in immunoassays.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Potassium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain potassium as an integral part of the molecule.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Pneumonia, Pneumocystis: A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by DYSPNEA, tachypnea, and HYPOXEMIA. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a frequently seen opportunistic infection in AIDS. It is caused by the fungus PNEUMOCYSTIS JIROVECII. The disease is also found in other MAMMALS where it is caused by related species of Pneumocystis.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Osmium: Osmium. A very hard, gray, toxic, and nearly infusible metal element, atomic number 76, atomic weight 190.2, symbol Os. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Colorimetry: Any technique by which an unknown color is evaluated in terms of standard colors. The technique may be visual, photoelectric, or indirect by means of spectrophotometry. It is used in chemistry and physics. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Rhodamines: A family of 3,6-di(substituted-amino)-9-benzoate derivatives of xanthene that are used as dyes and as indicators for various metals; also used as fluorescent tracers in histochemistry.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Protozoan Infections: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Gonorrhea: Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Laboratory tests. Antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing and anti-extractable nuclear antigen (anti-ENA) form the mainstay of ... and porphyrin brownish-red stained teeth in severe recessive forms of porphyria (or combinations of the disorder, known as dual ... Millard LG (1979). "Abnormal Laboratory Test Results and Their Relationship to Prognosis in Discoid Lupus Erythematosus. A Long ... Diagnosis can be difficult and is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory tests.[1] There are a number of other kinds ...
Ziehl-Neelsen stain)及金氏(Kinyoun)染色(英语:Kinyoun stain),兩染色法在顯微鏡下所見的背景為藍色,而結核桿菌則是呈現紅色[29][30]。另外也可使用金胺-若丹明(Auramine-rhodamine )染色法 ... Medical Laboratory Science: Theory and Practice. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill. 2000: 473. ISBN 0-07-463223-X.. ... Acid-Fast Stain Protocols. 21 August 2013 [26 March 2016].. *^ Kommareddi
The de Galantha technique and the de Galantha stain bear her name for this work. The methods, techniques and stain she ... She had moved to Minnesota and achieved the position as head of the Histology Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in the pathology ... She is considered a pioneer in the field of modern histology and known for the de Galantha technique and the de Galantha stain ... 1932). "Modified silver stain for Treponema pallidum". American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2, 63. de Galantha, E. (1935). " ...
When virions are coated with stain (positive staining), fine detail is obscured. Negative staining overcomes this problem by ... In: Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science. Second Edition. Volume II: Animal Models, edited by Jann Hau & Gerald L. Van Hoosier ... Negative staining of proteins. Electron Microscopy Reviews. 1990;3(1):43-72. doi:10.1016/0892-0354(90)90013-I. PMID 1715774. ... Laboratory maintenance of Rickettsia rickettsii. Current Protocols in Microbiology. 2008;Chapter 3:Unit 3A.5. doi:10.1002/ ...
The AGT cytogenetics laboratory manual. 3rd ed. Barch, Margaret J., Knutsen, Turid., Spurbeck, Jack L., eds. 1997. Lippincott- ... "Flow Cytometry Intracellular Staining Guide". eBioscience, Inc. Retrieved 2011-09-25. Cohen, Adina; Brodie, Chaya; Sarid, Ronit ... and is used in protocols for intracellular staining of these cytokines. TPA induces KSHV reactivation in PEL cell cultures via ...
"Histology Laboratory Manual". www.columbia.edu. Archived from the original on 6 May 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2018.. .mw-parser- ... In 1968, a report indicated that beta-carotene was synthesized in laboratory conditions in slices of corpus luteum from cows. ... H&E stain. Pathology[edit]. *Corpus Luteum cyst: hemorrhage into persistent corpus luteum. Commonly regresses spontaneously. ...
Giemsa staining will uniquely stain B. malayi sheath pink. However, finding the microfilariae on blood films can be difficult ... B. malayi microfilariae resemble W. bancrofti and Loa loa microfilariae with minor differences that can aid in laboratory ... The microfilariae are sheathed, which stains heavily with Giemsa. The sheath is actually the egg shell, a thin layer that ... With appropriate laboratory equipment, microscopic examination of differential morphological features of microfilariae in ...
Some suggest the Wayson stain is useful for this purpose, but this has been shown not to be the case. Laboratory identification ... On Gram staining, the organism is a Gram-negative rod with a characteristic "safety pin" appearance (bipolar staining). On ... Sheridan EA, Ramsay AR, Short JM, Stepniewska K, Wuthiekanun V, Simpson AJ (May 2007). "Evaluation of the Wayson stain for the ... Kanamycin is used to kill B. pseudomallei in the laboratory, but the concentrations used are much higher than those achievable ...
A Gram stain is made using a primary stain of crystal violet and a counterstain of safranin. Bacteria that turn purple when ... ISBN 1-55581-142-6. A translation is also at Brock, T.D. "Pioneers in Medical Laboratory Science: Christian Gram 1884". Hoslink ... The stain later played a major role in classifying bacteria. Gram was a modest man, and in his initial publication he remarked ... The work that gained Gram an international reputation was his development of a method of staining bacteria, to make them more ...
... is a manufacturer of wood stain and other wood finishes. It was founded by Samuel Cabot IV in 1877 ... He set up a laboratory in Chelsea, Massachusetts and his brother Godfrey joined him in 1882. They produced household ... Its best-known brand is Cabot Stain. Its headquarters are in Newburyport, Massachusetts. Samuel Cabot IV studied chemistry at M ... disinfectant, sheep dip, wood preservatives, and shingle stain using coal tar that was a by-product of the gas works in Boston ...
Pfyffer,G. E. (2007). Mycobacterium: General Characteristics, Laboratory Detection, and Staining Procedures. In P. R. Murray ( ... Brown-Elliot, B. A., & Wallace, R. J. (2007). Mycobacterium:Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Rapidly Growing ...
... the sections are stained with one or more pigments. The aim of staining is to reveal cellular components; counterstains are ... Clinical pathology is a medical specialty that is concerned with the diagnosis of disease based on the laboratory analysis of ... "Special stains and tests - DermNet New Zealand". 2008. Archived from the original on 2011-05-20.. ... Paris: European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. p. 5. Retrieved 23 March 2020.. ...
Coomassie Blue staining can also be used as a loading control staining method in western blot analysis. It is applied as an ... anionic pre-antibody stain. In 2009, Brilliant Blue G was used in scientific experiments to treat spinal injuries in laboratory ... It was subsequently discovered that the protein bands could be stained without staining the polyacrylamide by using a colloid ... As the dye stained the polyacrylamide gel as well as the protein, in order to visualise the protein bands they needed to ...
Coxx, H. J. (1925). Biological Stains - A Handbook on the Nature and Uses of the Dyes Employed in the Biological Laboratory. ... The primary constriction cannot take up most stains, so during cell division this region is a gap in staining. Within the ... These cells are then stained, photographed, and arranged into a karyogram, with the set of chromosomes arranged, autosomes in ... Commission on Standardization of Biological Stains. Waldeyer-Hartz (1888). "Über Karyokinese und ihre Beziehungen zu den ...
For common stains, an automatic process is normally used; but rarely used stains are often done by hand. The second method of ... These procedures above are also carried out in the laboratory under scrutiny and precision by a trained specialist Medical ... The aim of staining is to reveal cellular components; counterstains are used to provide contrast. The most commonly used stain ... and stained using the similar staining techniques as traditional wax embedded sections. The advantages of this method is rapid ...
Diagnosis is by a swab of the affected area for laboratory testing. A Gram stain is performed to show Gram-positive cocci in ...
It is used to stain neural RNA blue in the Nissl stain.[citation needed] The largest application of aniline is for the ... Being a standard reagent in laboratories, aniline is used for many niche reactions. Its acetate is used in the Aniline acetate ... http://www.nuclear-weapons.info/cde.htm#Corporal SSM Muir, GD (ed.) 1971, Hazards in the Chemical Laboratory, The Royal ...
To see the tissue under a microscope, the sections are stained with one or more pigments. The aim of staining is to reveal ... "Laboratory medicine specialist in EFcC newsletter may 2011 (page 5)" (PDF). "Bulletin officiel du n°32 du 4 septembre 2003 - ... Clinical pathology is a medical specialty that is concerned with the diagnosis of disease based on the laboratory analysis of ... Sometimes the general term "laboratory medicine specialist" is used to refer to those working in clinical pathology, including ...
Chromosome stains. In The ACT Cytogenetics Laboratory Manual 2nd ed, ed. M.J. Barch. The Association of Cytogenetic ... StainingEdit. The study of karyotypes is made possible by staining. Usually, a suitable dye, such as Giemsa,[19] is applied ... The staining technique using giemsa staining is called G banding and therefore produces the typical "G-Bands".[22] ... Silver staining: Silver nitrate stains the nucleolar organization region-associated protein. This yields a dark region where ...
See also Shroud of Turin#Blood stains for laboratory researches. The Catholic Church teaches that the bread and wine, through ...
This allowed for reproducible staining of cells for microscopy purposes. This method is still used in laboratories today. In ... Fleischer B. Editorial: 100 years ago: Giemsa's solution for staining of plasmodia. Trop Med Int Health. 2004 Jul;9(7):755-6.[1 ... In 1904 Giemsa published an essay on the staining procedure for flagellates, blood cells, and bacteria. Giemsa improved the ... "Giemsa stain". This dye is used for the histopathological diagnosis of malaria and parasites such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, ...
Laboratory hazards[edit]. Drops of 98% sulfuric acid char a piece of tissue paper instantly. Carbon is left after the ... dehydration reaction staining the paper black.. Superficial chemical burn caused by two 98% sulfuric acid splashes (forearm ... In the laboratory, this is often demonstrated by mixing table sugar (sucrose) into sulfuric acid. The sugar changes from white ... On a laboratory scale, sulfuric acid can be diluted by pouring concentrated acid onto crushed ice made from de-ionized water. ...
A 1991 paper from the NIH described the laboratory development of one such stain. However, no company currently offers this ... Immuno-fluorescence (IFA) stain: An IFA stain causes Blastocystis cells to glow when viewed under a microscope, making the ... IFA stains are in use for Giardia and Cryptosporidium for both diagnostic purposes and water quality testing. ... However one laboratory director noted that pathologists using conventional microscopes failed to identify many Blastocystis ...
Masson developed at three-stain protocol used in histology known as "Masson's trichrome stain". In 1927, he left Strasbourg to ... Masson reworked the pathology curriculum at the university and reorganized the pathology laboratories there. He retired from ... Al Aboud, Khalid; Al Aboud, Ahmad (May 20, 2013). "Eponyms in the Dermatology literature linked to stains used in skin biopsies ...
... staining is used in clinical diagnostics and in laboratory research. In clinical diagnostics, immunostaining ... After developing the stain by adding the chemical substrate, the distribution of the stain can be examined by microscopy. ... Optimal staining depends on a number of factors including the antibody dilution, the staining chemicals, the preparation and/or ... These stains use antibodies to bind to specific antigens, usually of protein or glycoprotein origin. Since antibodies are ...
An objective of the CLIA is to ensure the accuracy, reliability and timeliness of test results regardless of where the test was performed. Most Laboratory Developed Tests have been regulated under this program.[3] In 2014 the FDA started a public discussion about regulating some LDTs.[4] Per CLIA, each specific laboratory system, assay, examination is graded for level of complexity by assigning scores of 1, 2, or 3 for each of the following seven criteria. A score 1 is the lowest level of complexity and a score of 3 indicates the highest level. Score 2 is assigned when the characteristics for a particular test are intermediate between the descriptions listed for scores of 1 and 3.[5] Criteria for categorization: ...
The Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine or JCTLM is collaboration between the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM), the International Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), and the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC). The goal of the JCTLM is to provide a worldwide platform to promote and give guidance on internationally recognized and accepted equivalence of measurements in laboratory medicine and traceability to appropriate measurement standards. ...
At least since 1875 there have been reports of automated devices for scientific investigation.[1] These first devices were mostly built by scientists themselves in order to solve problems in the laboratory. After the second world war, companies started to provide automated equipment which had become more and more complex. Automation was spreading in laboratories steadily through the 20th century, but then a revolution took place: in the early 1980s, the first fully automated laboratory was opened by Dr. Masahide Sasaki.[2][3] In 1993, Dr. Rod Markin at the University of Nebraska Medical Center created one of the world's first clinical automated laboratory management systems.[4] In the mid-1990s, he chaired a standards group called the Clinical Testing Automation Standards Steering Committee (CTASSC) of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry,[5][6] which later evolved into an area committee of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards ...
... (ORNL), beliggende i Oak Ridge i Tennessee i USA, er et amerikansk forsknings- og teknologisenter, som samarbeider med Tennessee University og Battelle Memorial Institute (UT-Battelle). Senteret blir administrert av det amerikanske energidepartementet. Sentret ble opprettet i 1943, i forbindelse med Manhattanprosjektet, og beskjeftiger vitenskapsmenn og ingeniører som utfører basale og videregående studier i forbindelse med utvikling av nasjonens behov for ren vedvarende energi, oppretting og beskyttelse av naturen og bidrar til den nasjonale sikkerhet. Laboratoriet ble ved opprettelse en utvikler og produsent av isotoper. ...
In order to take a scientific measurement with a microphone, its precise sensitivity must be known (in volts per pascal). Since this may change over the lifetime of the device, it is necessary to regularly calibrate measurement microphones. This service is offered by some microphone manufacturers and by independent testing laboratories. Microphone calibration by certified laboratories should ultimately be traceable to primary standards a (National) Measurement Institute that is a signatory to International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. These could include the National Physical Laboratory in the UK, PTB in Germany, NIST in the USA and the National Measurement Institute, Australia, where the reciprocity calibration (see below) is the internationally recognised means of realising the primary standard. Laboratory standard microphones calibrated using this method are used in-turn to calibrate other microphones using comparison calibration techniques ...
Ceph was initially created by Sage Weil (developer of the Webring concept and co-founder of DreamHost) for his doctoral dissertation,[16] which was advised by Professor Scott A. Brandt in the Jack Baskin School of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz and sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Intel Corporation, Microsoft Corporation, SAP Laboratories and others.[17]. After his graduation in fall 2007, Weil continued to work on Ceph full-time, and the core development team expanded to include Yehuda Sadeh Weinraub and Gregory Farnum. In 2012, Weil created Inktank Storage for professional services and support for Ceph.[18][19]. In April 2014, Red Hat purchased Inktank, bringing the majority of Ceph development in-house.[20]. In October 2015, the Ceph Community Advisory Board was formed to assist ...
... (born 5 September 1950) is an American chemical engineer. In 2011 he became the Founding Pritzker Director and Dean of the Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME) at the University of Chicago, in addition to serving as the Deputy Laboratory Director for Science at Argonne National Laboratory. Tirrell's research specializes in the manipulation and measurement of polymer surface properties. Tirrell was born in Phillipsburg, New Jersey on September 5, 1950. He received a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering (B.S. Ch.E.) in 1973 Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. in 1977 from University of Massachusetts Amherst in Polymer Science and Engineering under Stanley Middleman. In 1977, Tirrell became an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, serving as the head of the department from 1995 to 1999. In 1999, he moved to the University of California, Santa Barbara, where was Richard A. Auhll ...
Edward M. "Eddy" Rubin is an internationally known geneticist and medical researcher at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California and has served as the director of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) since 2002. After serving as DOE JGI Director for 14 years, Rubin stepped down in March 2016 to become the Chief Scientific Officer at Metabiota, a big data analytics start-up focused on infectious diseases and epidemic risk. Life: Dr. Rubin received his B.A. degree in physics from the University of California, San Diego, and both his Ph.D. in biophysics and his M.D. from the University of Rochester. Following a genetics fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, he became a research associate at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Rubin joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in 1989 and led the Laboratory's Genome Sciences Department from 1998 to 2002, before taking over the helm of ...
... (NPU: Nomenclature for Properties and Units) is a patient centered clinical laboratory terminology for use in the clinical laboratory sciences. Its function is to enable results of clinical laboratory examinations to be used safely across technology, time and geography. To achieve this, the NPU terminology supplies: Unique identifiers for types of examined properties of the patient, supporting structured communication and storage of laboratory data in e.g. clinical laboratory reports or electronic health records Stable and unambiguous definitions of the types of examined properties, expressed using international nomenclatures, and in accordance with international standards Specification of measurement units where relevant A structure allowing for secure translation of the definitions into other languages The purpose of the NPU terminology is to enable patient examination data to be safely transmitted between ...
The term reproducible research refers to the idea that the ultimate product of academic research is the paper along with the laboratory notebooks [10] and full computational environment used to produce the results in the paper such as the code, data, etc. that can be used to reproduce the results and create new work based on the research.[11][12][13][14][15] Typical examples of reproducible research comprise compendia of data, code and text files, often organised around an R Markdown source document[16] or a Jupyter notebook.[17]. Psychology has seen a renewal of internal concerns about irreproducible results. Researchers showed in a 2006 study that, of 141 authors of a publication from the American Psychology Association (APA) empirical articles, 103 (73%) did not respond with their data over a 6-month period.[18] In a follow up study published in 2015, it was found that 246 out of 394 contacted authors of papers in APA journals did not share their data upon request (62%).[19] In a 2012 ...
A laboratory (lab for short) is a work place where scientific research, experiments, or measurement are done. The word laboratory is also used for other places where the work done or equipment used are like those in scientific laboratories. These include: ...
Established in 1993, Laboratory for Electro-Optics Systems was established at the same place where the first Indian satellite Aryabhatta was fabricated in 1975, namely Banglore. The laboratory has developed sensors for tracking Earth and Stars for the satellites which were launched when the space research was ushering in India. Satellites like Aryabata, Bhaskara, Apple, IRS, SROSS and INSAT-2 have been equipped with the sensors developed by this laboratory.[1] The lab has also participated in the India's first moon mission Chandrayaan-1.[2][3]. ...
டாக்டர் ரெட்டீசு லாபரேட்டரி வரையறுக்கப்பட்டது, (Dr. Reddy's Laboratories Ltd) ஒருங்கிணைந்த முறையில் மருந்துத் தயாரிக்கும் ஓர் நிறுவனம் ஆகும். இது தனது தயாரிப்பை மூன்று வணிகப் பிரிவுகளால் குவியப்படுத்துகிறது: இவை உலகளாவிய பண்புசார் பிரிவு, மருந்துச் சேவை மற்றும் இயக்கத்திலுள்ள உட்பொருட்கள் (PSAI) பிரிவு, உரிமையுடை பொருட்கள் பிரிவு ஆகும். முன்னதாக ஐதராபாத்தில் அமைந்திருந்த பொதுத்துறை ...
It is used as fuel additive; food additive; histological stain (silver) in laboratories; reagents in chemlcal synthesis of ...
Owned by the University of Utah, ARUP Laboratories clients include more than half of the nations university teaching ... ARUP Laboratories is a national reference laboratory and a worldwide leader in innovative laboratory research and development. ... hospitals and childrens hospitals, major commercial laboratories, military and government facilities, and major clinics. ... The ARUP Immunohistochemistry Laboratory is an NSABP-approved laboratory for the testing of breast markers. *Stain and ...
Routine and special stains are usually selected to demonstrate a special structure, chemical or molecular characteristic of the ... Routine, Special, and Advanced Staining for the IHC Laboratory. Routine and special stains are usually selected to demonstrate ... Routine, Special, and Advanced Staining for the IHC Laboratory Recorded: May 22 2019 57 mins Debra Freeman ... Routine, Special, and Advanced Staining for the IHC Laboratory Debra Freeman [[ webcastStartDate * 1000 , amDateFormat: MMM D ...
... grow your own onion root tips and follow a specific staining procedure that will make visible the DNA In the root tip cells. ... In the DNA Staining and Microscopy Laboratory Kit for biology and life science, ... In the DNA Staining and Microscopy Laboratory Kit for biology and life science, grow your own onion root tips and follow a ... Students grow their own onion root tips and then follow a specific staining procedure that will allow them to see the DNA in ...
Brain Research Laboratories 2016. Div. of Cambridge Intelligent Systems, Inc.. Phone: 617-965-5544. Toll-free: 888-BRL-5544. ...
2019 Brain Research Laboratories. Div. of Cambridge Intelligent Systems, Inc.. Phone: 617-965-5544. Toll-free: 888-BRL-5544. ...
Methylene Blue Staining Solution, 0.2% in 25% Ethanol, Laboratory Grade, 100 mL. Item # 875913 Methylene Blue Staining Solution ... Rated 5 out of 5 by Gfracassa from Slide stain Methylene blue worked very well to stain some buccal squamous epithelial cells ... Laboratory Grade - Intermediate purity. Suitable for educational laboratories. Use for qualitative analysis, not quantitative ... This product is specially made for use in science education laboratories; no certificate of analysis is available. ...
Stains and dyes are frequently used in biology and medicine to highlight structures in biological tissues for viewing. ... Staining is an auxiliary technique used in microscopy to enhance contrast in the microscopic image. ... Home/Laboratory Supplies/Pipettes & Stains Pipettes & Stains. Pipettes are perhaps the most used tool in the lab. Staining is ... Stains and dyes are frequently used in biology and medicine to highlight structures in biological tissues for viewing, often ...
Search our extensive database of medical/laboratory tests and review in-depth information about each test. ... Information about Parasitology Stain by Modified Acid-Fast, Stool. ... Parasitology Stain, Isospora Stain, Cyclospora Stain, Cryptosporidium/Cyclospora Stain. Test information includes:. *LOINC ... Parasitology Stain by Modified Acid-Fast, Stool. a.k.a. Cystoisospora, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium , Stool by Acid ...
Summary of Gram Stain Reading and Reporting Procedure. *View control smears under oil immersion. If the control smears stained ... The page below is a sample from the LabCE course Reading and Reporting Gram Stained Direct Smears. Access the complete course ... Learn more about Reading and Reporting Gram Stained Direct Smears (online CE course) » How to Subscribe ... Look at the direct smear macroscopically to locate the stained area. *Examine the direct smear under oil immersion and find an ...
The term "special stains" refers to staining methods other than H&E. Special stains provide a means of staining elements, ... Dyes used to stain tissue samples in the histology laboratory for microscopic evaluation are called biological dyes or ... "Routine" staining in the histology laboratory is done with the use of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) in which the nuclei of cells ... Tissue Staining in the Histology Laboratory. Due to their transparent nature, the cellular and intracellular structure of ...
Microwave Easy Dip Slide Staining Kit. Staining kit contains one of each color jar plus one staining rack for 12 slides. Jars ... This is a basic laboratory microwave for staining microscope tissue samples, waste solids testing, moisture testing, chemical ... Buy Laboratory Microwave Ovens Online. Browse from a large selection of lab microwave ovens for sale online at Ladd Research. ... The LBP310 laboratory microwave oven is a time and power level based microwave that incorporates the exclusive True-To-PowerTM ...
Changes to laboratory staining techniques offer opportunity to reduce contamination eventsTissue contamination in the anatomic ... While laboratories strive to reduce contamination as much as possible, it has been viewed more as an inconvenience than as a ... Also, this paper illuminates a source of significant contamination that has largely been overlooked-staining baths. ... Some ways to avoid contamination during the staining process.. *For more about changes to laboratory staining techniques, ...
Gram stain. Gram stains of usually sterile body fluids (CSF, synovial fluid, pleural fluid) showing gram-positive diplococci ... Results of CSF Gram stains in younger children with meningitis are positive 90-100% of the time, but the CSF Gram stain ... Sputum Gram stain from a patient with a pneumococcal pneumonia. Note the numerous polymorphonuclear neutrophils and gram- ... CSF should be sent for cell count, protein levels, glucose levels, Gram stain, and culture. Antigen tests are needed only if ...
Gram stain. Obtain Gram stain and culture of cerebrospinal fluid if meningitis is suspected. ... Laboratory Studies. CBC count. A CBC count may reveal leukocytosis with a left shift and bandemia. In patients with hematologic ... Pulmonary Physiology Laboratory; Director of Research in Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary ...
Stool sample submitted for Gram stain will be screened for the presence of PMNs only. ... Transport to laboratory as soon as possible. Stool Container Type. Container Size. Specimen Volume. ...
Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science Art and Science of Laboratory Medicine. Clinical laboratory and biomedical science ... Others that are not stained by crystal violet are referred to as Gram negative, and appear red.. Read more: GRAM STAIN. ... Laboratory (85) Labquality Days (1) microbiology (538) mycology (24) Nordic Congress on Quality in Laboratory Medicine (1) ... Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory ...
automated sample preparation system / laboratory / staining / sputum. AT-3003 Dual(G/F) Add to MyMedicalExpo favorites ... automated sample preparation system / laboratory / for hematology / staining AT-3004 Dual(G/H) ... automated sample preparation system / laboratory / staining / sputum AT-3002 DUAL (G/Z) ... The GRAM / AFB Dual Stainer provides fast, easy and stable staining process for staining clinical spedmens(according to GRAM ...
CSF sample was taken and sent to a laboratory for gram stain. Gram stain findings are in the image below.. What are the ... Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science Art and Science of Laboratory Medicine. Clinical laboratory and biomedical science ... Laboratory (85) Labquality Days (1) microbiology (538) mycology (24) Nordic Congress on Quality in Laboratory Medicine (1) ... Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory ...
Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science Art and Science of Laboratory Medicine. Clinical laboratory and biomedical science ... Laboratory (85) Labquality Days (1) microbiology (538) mycology (24) Nordic Congress on Quality in Laboratory Medicine (1) ... Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory ... What are the findings of this CSF gram stain?. Correct answer is below the image.. (Click image to enlarge). .. Correct answer ...
How can I get my samples stained and analyzed?. For staining and analysis, you must place an order with the BHCL via iLab. ... Sectioning & Staining What does FFPE mean?. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded. What is the standard thickness of a slide ... Can I request an IHC stain on a bone histomorphometry sample?. No. The sample must undergo a series of processes and harsh ... If IHC stains are needed on bone, you must request routine processing with decalcification and paraffin embedding. ...
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General Laboratory Techniques. An Introduction to Working in the Hood. * General Laboratory Techniques. ... The presentation also provides a step-by-step procedure for immunohistological staining followed by a Nissl stain, in addition ... An overview of common brain stains is provided, including those that specifically mark neuronal cell bodies, like Nissl stains ... multiple stains are available. The dyes used in Nissl stains attach to nucleic acids, coloring the somata purple and revealing ...
Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science Art and Science of Laboratory Medicine. Clinical laboratory and biomedical science ... Laboratory (85) Labquality Days (1) microbiology (538) mycology (24) Nordic Congress on Quality in Laboratory Medicine (1) ... Clinical laboratory professional specialized to external quality assessment (proficiency testing) schemes for Laboratory ... Candida albicans yeast and pseudo hyphae in gram stain preparation under 100x microscopy in a female patient aged 48 who is ...
Home /Slide Staining. Slide Staining. Slide Staining Services Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E), and ... 1) Manual HE Staining. 2) Manual IHC and IF staining. 3) Automated IHC and IF staining on the Ventana Discovery XT. ... 5. After antibody has been validated and optimal conditions determined for staining, preliminary staining runs are done on ... There is a charge per slide stained during the antibody work-up (~$35 per slide). In all cases the investigator must supply the ...
  • Disclosed is an automated staining apparatus including an arm moveable in three dimensions, and a hollow tip head located on the arm including integral reagent tip head, wash tip and blow tip for selectively dispensing gas and liquid onto microscope slides. (google.com)
  • Sections #1-3 and 8-10 (7 microns thick) will be stained with the von Kossa reagent and counterstained by the van Gieson method for initial analysis of the basic parameters (3). (mdanderson.org)
  • The cells that are previously stained with crystal violet and iodine are then treat with a decolorizing reagent like, Ethanol 95% or Acetone alcohol . (medicallabscientist.org)
  • The staining reagent diluted in buffer or acetic acid solution can be stored in very clean and detergent-free glass or plastic bottles, protected from light at 4 °C for at least three months. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Stains and dyes are frequently used in biology and medicine to highlight structures in biological tissues for viewing, often with the aid of different microscopes. (shopmedvet.com)
  • Since supravital and intravital nature of the staining depends on the dye, a combination of supravital and vital dyes can also be used in a sophisticated way to better classify cells into distinct subsets (e.g. viable, dead, dying etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vital stains include dyes like trypan blue and propidium iodide, which are either too bulky or too charged to cross the cell membrane, or which are actively rapidly pumped out by live cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this work one needs specific dyes that stain exclusively the tissues of acupuncture meridians. (springer.com)
  • Liquid silver stain remover (Silvosol) is available in some countries and can work very well on sinks, tubs, benchtops and even clothing. (westlab.com)
  • The term vital stain is used by some authors to refer to an intravital stain, and by others interchangeably with a supravital stain, the core concept being that the cell being examined is still alive. (wikipedia.org)
  • A significant difference in fluorescein-stained cell count may indicate a physiological response to the contact lens and/or care regimen over time. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Special histochemical and immunohistochemical stains also are discussed. (entokey.com)
  • an image-capture 2-D optical sensor configured to two dimensionally image at least one element in said automatic staining apparatus. (google.com.au)
  • 3 . An apparatus according to claim 1 , wherein the optical sensor is adapted to record an image of the finalised sample after said sample has been subjected to a staining protocol. (google.com.au)
  • Only very recently we found a staining dye, Alcian blue that stains the acupuncture meridian and were able to trace the governing vessel (GV) of a rat using this dye. (springer.com)
  • The latter will prove useful if a problem oc- curs during the staining process and/or if you wish later to send the smears to a reference laboratory. (cdc.gov)
  • The invention relates to the staining of poly(amino acids), including peptides, polypeptides and proteins in gels and on solid supports, using neutral or anionic complexes of transition metals. (google.com)
  • stain protein gels? (bio.net)
  • Proteins from silver-stained gels can be digested enzymatically and the resulting peptide analyzed and sequenced by mass spectrometry. (nih.gov)
  • Standard proteins yield the same peptide maps when extracted from Coomassie- and silver-stained gels, as judged by electrospray and MALDI mass spectrometry. (nih.gov)
  • It is not suitable for staining proteins on blots or in IEF gels and shows reduced sensitivity when staining proteins on 2-D gels. (sigmaaldrich.com)