... is a moth of the family Sphingidae. It is found from Peru to Venezuela. It has also been recorded in Bolivia. Subspecies coronata is found in Colombia. The length of the forewings is 57-63 mm. The species probably broods continuously, with records indicating adults are on wing from March to July and again in October. The larvae of ssp. tigrina probably feed on Ocotea veraguensis, Ocotea atirrensis, Ocotea sarah and Ocotea dendrodaphne. The larvae of ssp. coronata probably feed on Ocotea veraguensis, Ocotea atirrensis and Ocotea dendrodaphne. Adhemarius tigrina tigrina (Peru to Venezuela and Bolivia) Adhemarius tigrina coronata (Colombia) "CATE Creating a Taxonomic eScience - Sphingidae". Cate-sphingidae.org. Archived from the original on 2012-11-13. Retrieved 2011-10-26. ssp. tigrina info ssp. coronata ...
... is a phenylpropene. It is a colorless or slightly yellow oily liquid typically extracted from the root-bark or the fruit of sassafras plants in the form of sassafras oil (although commercially available culinary sassafras oil is usually devoid of safrole due to a rule passed by the FDA in 1960), or is synthesized from catechol or other related methylenedioxy compounds. It is the principal component of brown camphor oil, and is found in small amounts in a wide variety of plants, where it functions as a natural pesticide. Ocotea cymbarum oil made from Ocotea pretiosa, a plant growing in Brazil, and sassafras oil made from Sassafras albidum, a tree growing in eastern North America, are the main natural sources for safrole. It has a characteristic "sweet-shop" aroma. It is a precursor in the synthesis of the insecticide synergist piperonyl butoxide, the fragrance piperonal via isosafrole, and the empathogenic/entactogenic drug MDMA. Safrole (4-allyl-1,2-methylenedioxybenzene or shikimol) is ...
The following is a list of widely known trees and shrubs. Taxonomic families for the following trees and shrubs are listed in alphabetical order, likewise the genera and closely related species. The list currently includes 1351 species. Agathis - kauri conifers Agathis australis - kauri pine; dammar Agathis lanceolata - red kauri Agathis robusta - Dundathu pine; Queensland kauri; smooth bark kauri Araucaria - monkey puzzle trees Araucaria angustifolia - Paraná pine Araucaria araucana - monkey-puzzle tree Araucaria bidwillii - bunya-bunya Araucaria columnaris - Cook pine Araucaria cunninghamii - Moreton Bay pine; hoop pine Araucaria heterophylla - Norfolk Island pine Araucaria hunsteinii - klinki Athrotaxis - Tasmanian cedars Athrotaxis cupressoides - pencil pine Athrotaxis selaginoides - King Billy pine Callitris - cypress-pines Callitris columellaris - white cypress-pine; Murray River cypress-pine; northern cypress-pine Callitris preissii - Rottnest Island pine Callitris verrucosa - mallee ...
... (/ˈkæmfər/) is a waxy, flammable, white or transparent solid with a strong aroma. It is a terpenoid with the chemical formula C10H16O. It is found in the wood of the camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora), a large evergreen tree found in Asia (particularly in Sumatra and Borneo islands, Indonesia) and also of the unrelated kapur tree, a tall timber tree from the same region. It also occurs in some other related trees in the laurel family, notably Ocotea usambarensis. The oil in rosemary leaves (Rosmarinus officinalis), in the mint family, contains 10 to 20% camphor, while camphorweed (Heterotheca) only contains some 5%. Camphor can also be synthetically produced from oil of turpentine. It is used for its scent, as an ingredient in cooking (mainly in India), as an embalming fluid, for medicinal purposes, and in religious ceremonies. A major source of camphor in Asia is camphor basil (the parent of African blue basil). The molecule has two possible enantiomers as shown in the structural ...
The main diversity among Araucaria genus is hosted in New Caledonia, where 14 species, all endemic, are described on a total of 20 extant species. These New Caledonian species are mainly found as dispersed populations in opened area, where competition is less intense. New Caledonia, considered as the smallest of the most significant biodiversity hotspot in the world, host a unique flora which 75.1% is endemic. The different species of Araucaria trees can be found in every habitat that New Caledonia present. However, almost all of them are growing on ultramafic substrate, characterized by a low fertility (low N,P,K levels) and heavy metal richness (nickel, cobalt). The view that the island is a museum for plant relicts is opposed to the one implying more recent radiation consecutively to the island emersion. New Caledonia was part of the supercontinent Gondwana, and separated from Australia 80 Ma. However, geological evidences suggest that New Caledonia was submerged during Paleocene (ca. 65 Ma) ...
The pests and diseases to which cacao is subject, along with climate change, mean that new varieties will be needed to respond to these challenges. Breeders rely on the genetic diversity conserved in field genebanks to create new varieties, because cacao has recalcitrant seeds that cannot be stored in a conventional genebank.[34] In an effort to improve the diversity available to breeders, and ensure the future of the field genebanks, experts have drawn up A Global Strategy for the Conservation and Use of Cacao Genetic Resources, as the Foundation for a Sustainable Cocoa Economy.[35] The strategy has been adopted by the cacao producers and their clients, and seeks to improve the characterization of cacao diversity, the sustainability and diversity of the cacao collections, the usefulness of the collections, and to ease access to better information about the conserved material. Some natural areas of cacao diversity are protected by various forms of conservation, for example national parks. ...
... is the name gien tae sindry species o eatable fresh- an saut-watter algae that conteins a heich amoont o meeneral sauts, in parteecular iodine an airn. It is smuith an fine, aften clappit tae rocks. Slake is common aboot the wast coast o Breetain an the east coast o Ireland alang the Erse Sea. Whan bylt it forms a jeely an can be etten o breid insteid o butter. It can be ceukit in soup cried slake-kail. Species o slake fund aboot Scotland is Enteromorpha prolifera, Gloeocapsa magma, Monostroma grevillei, sindy species o Gracilaria kent as Reid-slake, Enteromorpha intestinalis kent as watter puddins, Ulva lactuca kent as green slake, an Porphyra laciniata an Porphyra umbilicalis baith kent as slake-kail. ...
People living on the coast often eat seaweed, especially those in East Asia, such as Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. It is also used in Belize, Peru, the Canadian Maritimes, Scandinavia, Ireland, Wales, Philippines, and Scotland. Tiwi, Albay residents discovered a new pancit or noodles made from seaweed. These have health benefits. Seaweed is rich in calcium and magnesium and seaweed noodles can be cooked into pancit canton, pancit luglug, spaghetti or carbonara.[4] In Asia, Zicai (紫菜) (in China), gim (in Korea) and nori (in Japan) are sheets of dried Porphyra used in soups or to wrap sushi. Chondrus crispus (commonly known as Irish moss or carrageenan moss) is another red alga used in producing various food additives, along with Kappaphycus and various gigartinoid seaweeds. Porphyra is a red alga used in Wales to make laver. Laverbread, made from oats and the laver, is a popular dish there. Affectionately called "Dulce" in northern Belize, seaweeds are mixed with milk, ...
Originally, the term nori was generic and referred to seaweeds, including hijiki.[3] One of the oldest descriptions of nori is dated to around the 8th century. In the Taihō Code enacted in 701, nori was already included in the form of taxation.[4] Local people have been described as drying nori in Hitachi Province Fudoki (721-721), and nori was harvested in Izumo Province Fudoki (713-733), showing that nori was used as food from ancient times.[5] In Utsubo Monogatari, written around 987, nori was recognized as a common food. Nori had been consumed as paste form until the sheet form was invented in Asakusa, Edo (contemporary Tokyo), around 1750 in the Edo period through the method of Japanese paper-making.[6][7][8][9]. The word "nori" first appeared in an English-language publication in C.P. Thunberg's Trav., published in 1796.[10] It was used in conjugation as "Awa nori", probably referring to what is now called aonori.[10]. The Japanese nori industry was in decline after WWII, when Japan was ...
Sodium/potassium-transporting ATPase subunit alpha-1 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ATP1A1 gene. The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the family of P-type cation transport ATPases, and to the subfamily of Na+/K+-ATPases. Na+/K+-ATPase is an integral membrane protein responsible for establishing and maintaining the electrochemical gradients of Na and K ions across the plasma membrane. These gradients are essential for osmoregulation, for sodium-coupled transport of a variety of organic and inorganic molecules, and for electrical excitability of nerve and muscle. This enzyme is composed of two subunits, a large catalytic subunit (alpha) and a smaller glycoprotein subunit (beta). The catalytic subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase is encoded by multiple genes. This gene encodes an alpha 1 subunit. Alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been identified. In melanocytic cells ATP1A1 gene expression may be regulated by MITF. Mutations in this gene have been ...
... is Korea's traditional mask drama which is the second most Important Intangible Cultural Properties of Korea after Jongmyo jerye. It is performed primarily in April (chopail), May (danoh), July (Basin) and August (Thanksgiving) and also sometimes in a ceremony which prays for rain. The name originates from the place where mask-playing started, Yangju province in Korea. It was the first mask play to be designated as an "Important Intangible Cultural Property". According to the Korean official culture information service, Yangju byeolsandae nori was started by government officials working in Yangju province. In Yangju, a group of entertainers called Ttakttakyipae from Hanyang came to perform every April and May but they frequently broke their promise and failed to put on a show. As a result, the officials in Yangju started to make their own mask drama and hold performances. Lee Eul-chuk was the main organiser of the show and the first to produce mask dramas in Yangju. At ...
Infobox vein , Name = Umbilical vein , Latin = vena umbilicalis , GraySubject = 135 , GrayPage = 519 , Image = Gray502.png , Caption = Fetal circulation; the umbilical vein is the large red vessel at the far left. , Image2 = Gray977.png , Caption2 = Human embryo about 15 days old. [[Human brain,Brain]]& [[Human heart,heart]] represented from right side. [[Digestive tube]] & [[yolk sac]] in median section (Umbilical vein labeled at bottom right). , DrainsFrom = , DrainsTo = , Artery = [[umbilical artery]] , MeshName = , MeshNumber = , Dorlands = nine/16928421 , DorlandsID = Umbilical veins ...
Huisman, J.M., Sherwood, A.R. & Abbott, I.A. (2003) Morphology, reproduction, and the 18S rRNA gene sequence of Pihiella liagoraciphila gen. et sp. nov. (Rhodophyta), the so-called 'monosporangial discs' associated with members of the Liagoraceae (Rhodophyta), and proposal of the Pihiellales ord. nov. J. Phycol. 39: 978-987 ...

No data available that match "known tenera"


  • Young girl from Delhi recently offered to review our hair conditioner Tenera crafted with certified organic ingredients, a conditioner that brings along goodness of Organic Rosemary, Olive, Avocado & Coconut Milk for hair. (organicaffaire.com)
  • Tenera by Rouge Bunny Rouge is part of their Fragrant Confections Collection , an oriental/ vanilla / woody perfume perfect for the chilly autumn weather. (greekgoddess.london)
  • b ) Open tenera fruits showing fleshy mesocarp from which palm oil is extracted and kernel that contains an oil with shorter fatty acids. (nature.com)
  • In contrast, the cold-aridiphilous mollusk (Vallonia tenera and Pupilla aeoli) variability displays a different pattern. (columbia.edu)