Iguanas: Large herbivorous tropical American lizards.EcuadorLizardsAlligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Cheek: The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Embryology: The study of the development of an organism during the embryonic and fetal stages of life.Nobel PrizePubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Mycoplasma Infections: Infections with species of the genus MYCOPLASMA.Animals, ZooHypodermyiasis: Infestation with larvae of the genus Hypoderma, the warble fly.New YorkOrganothiophosphates: Carbon-containing thiophosphoric acid derivatives. Included under this heading are compounds that have carbon bound to either SULFUR atom, or the OXYGEN atom of the SPO3 core structure.Serratia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the natural environment (soil, water, and plant surfaces) or as an opportunistic human pathogen.Falconiformes: An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Literature, ModernHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Famous PersonsDrama: A composition in prose or verse presenting in dialogue or pantomime a story involving various characters, usually intended to be acted on a stage and to be regarded as a form of entertainment. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).FloridaReptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Alien Hand Syndrome: An apraxia characterized by the affected limb having involuntary, autonomous, and purposeful behaviors that are perceived as being controlled by an external force. Often the affected limb interferes with the actions of the normal limb. Symptoms develop from lesions in the CORPUS CALLOSUM or medial frontal cortex, stroke, infarction, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME, corticobasal degeneration).Clutch Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by an oviparous or ovoviviparous animal.TurtlesFiji: A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Viscum album: A plant species of the family VISCACEAE, order Santalales, subclass Rosidae. This is the traditional mistletoe of literature and Christmas. Members contain viscotoxin (5 kDa basic polypeptides related to thionins), beta-galactoside- and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectin II (60 kDa), and polysaccharides. Mistletoe lectin I is a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein. Commercial extracts include Plenosol, Eurixor, Helixor Isorel, Iscador, and NSC 635089 (ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS, PHYTOGENIC).Chenopodium album: A plant species in the CHENOPODIUM genus known for edible greens.Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)United StatesRestaurantsMeat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.
  • Las Iguanas won Best restaurant drinks offer at the Restaurant Magazine R200 Awards in October 2014 Las Iguanas won the overall award at the National Burger Awards 2017 with the Buenos Aires Burger Las Iguanas hit the headlines in August 2015 after their controversial tips policy was revealed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Description The rare Blue Iguana is found only in the Cayman Islands where they are a protected species and the subject of an ongoing conservation program. (imagekind.com)
  • Iguanas are often hard to spot, as they tend to blend into their surroundings and their coloration enables them to hide from larger predators. (wikipedia.org)
  • Male iguanas can raise their dewlap to appear bigger than they really are, either to intimidate predators, or to impressive females. (factbites.com)
  • If they survive the first difficult years of life, when food is often scarce and predators are a danger, land iguanas can live for more than 50 years. (galapagos.org)
  • The reason this iguana is perched over the water is to allow it to drop into the ocean so it can swim to safety if it is threatened by predators. (msn.com)
  • Although a large iguana bobbing its head, dewlap expanded, can look quite menacing to predators and to humans, it is used by males during courtship. (vinow.com)
  • This activity puts iguanas at risk of getting hit by cars, being open to predators and to humans. (vinow.com)
  • You may have been feeding your iguana animal protein for several years and it may be looking and acting just great. (anapsid.org)
  • Rediscovered in 1990, the Jamaican iguana has been the subject ofan intensive recovery program supported largely through the efforts of the AZA Limd TAG and participating U.S. zoos. (kingsnake.com)
  • This discovery inspired the formation of the IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group, which has worked with local conservation partners over the past 20 years to increase the wild population of Jamaican Iguana. (iucn.org)
  • These iguanas face similar threats, although the Jamaican Iguana also has to contend with the Indian Mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) which was introduced to Jamaica in the late 1800s. (iucn.org)
  • Still a highly conservation-dependent species, the Jamaican Iguana has benefited from the Jamaican government's commitment to the Convention on Biological Diversity, as well as the resources provided by numerous international zoos and donors. (iucn.org)
  • However, the Jamaican Iguana recovery program is now at a major cross-roads. (iucn.org)
  • The potential for large-scale development in the Portland Bight Protected Area, which includes the only existing wild population of Jamaican Iguana, would prevent a key objective in the long-term survival of the species - establishing a safe second population of iguanas on the Goat Islands. (iucn.org)
  • This reintroduction is outlined as a priority action in the Jamaican Iguana Species Recovery Plan, which has now been published by the IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group. (iucn.org)
  • Together with our Jamaican partners, we described action steps for nine objectives in the Species Recovery Plan that will ensure the recovery of the Jamaican Iguana. (iucn.org)
  • The IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group will share the Jamaican Iguana Species Recovery Plan at their annual meeting, due to take place on 14-15 November, in Kingston, Jamaica. (iucn.org)
  • Prolonged cold snaps in 2009 and 2010 killed off many of them - news stations showed frigid iguanas stiffly falling from trees - but the population rebounded. (necn.com)
  • The damage, cleanup and health concerns associated with iguanas, as well as their dramatic population growth, has prompted state officials to start thinking about management strategies. (necn.com)
  • The Hellshire Hills ecosystem supports the remnant population ofthis critically endangered iguana and provides the only two nesting areas known to exist. (kingsnake.com)
  • The field project, which also entails protection of nesting sites, predator control and monitoring of released iguanas and the wild population, is currently being funded, in par, by two AZA Conservation Endowment Fund (CEF) gmnts. (kingsnake.com)
  • It may look tough, however, due to its limited distribution, the marine iguana population is at risk the marine iguana can be affected by anything or anyone tampering with their limited ecosystem such as extreme weather, people, and pollution. (whaletimes.org)
  • The original version of this story said that the iguanas on the U.S. Virgin Islands feed on mosquitoes and that Hurricane Irma decimated the iguana population, which would most likely result in a proliferation of mosquitoes. (wlrn.org)
  • In fact, iguanas do not feed on mosquitoes and there is no correlation between their reduced number and the mosquito population. (wlrn.org)
  • There are small subpopulations of this iguana on multiple small cays around Roatn, however, the names of these cays are often inconsistent, further hindering systematic surveying (S. Pasachnik pers. (eol.org)
  • Iguana hatchlings hatch after between 10 to 15 weeks of incubation and look similar in shape and coloring to adult iguanas. (reference.com)
  • He wants to breed the iguanas he catches to sell hatchlings as pets in northern states with cold winters. (necn.com)
  • an additional six will be released in June 1998, The iguanas are collected as hatchlings and then headstarted for five to six years at the Hope Zoo in Kingston until large enough to avoid predation by the introduced mongoose. (kingsnake.com)
  • Before the reintroduction of sub-adult iguanas and the implementation of a mongoose trapping program, juveniles and hatchlings were never seen. (iucn.org)
  • A baby iguana is called a hatchling. (reference.com)
  • 15 minutes later, I was a screaming ball of fear as I watched a to-the-death confrontation between a baby iguana and a racer snake. (medium.com)
  • Founded in 1991, Las Iguanas operates 54 outlets in the United Kingdom as at 1 January 2018. (wikipedia.org)
  • An iguana that froze lies near a pool after falling from a tree in Boca Raton, Fla., Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. (yahoo.com)
  • The first Las Iguanas opened on St Nicholas Street, in Bristol in April 1991, offering a diverse Latin American-themed menu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iguanas come from exotic tropical lands, and as such they require very specific housing, food, light, and other care requirements to thrive in captivity. (factbites.com)
  • Iguanas in captivity are prone to this in a large part because people keep feeding them animal protein and do not give them enough access to water or humidity. (anapsid.org)
  • Iguanas tend to push and rub their noses against the walls of their enclosures as they repeatedly pace back and forth. (factbites.com)
  • The iguanas on Venecia continue to breed today and many of the resulting juveniles are repatriated to Santa Cruz, approximately every three years. (galapagos.org)
  • Ron Magill, a spokesman for Zoo Miami, tells The New York Times that iguanas climb up trees to roost for the night and then, "the temperature goes down, they literally shut down, and they can no longer hold on to the trees," he said. (kuow.org)