Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Enzyme Repression: The interference in synthesis of an enzyme due to the elevated level of an effector substance, usually a metabolite, whose presence would cause depression of the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Psychology, Comparative: The branch of psychology concerned with similarities or differences in the behavior of different animal species or of different races or peoples.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Psychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.Psychology, Medical: A branch of psychology in which there is collaboration between psychologists and physicians in the management of medical problems. It differs from clinical psychology, which is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders.Psychology, Industrial: The branch of applied psychology concerned with the application of psychologic principles and methods to industrial problems including selection and training of workers, working conditions, etc.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Catabolite Repression: Process by which micro-organisms adapt quickly to a preferred rapidly-metabolizable intermediate through the inhibition or repression of genes related to CATABOLISM of less preferred source(s).Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Ecological and Environmental Phenomena: Ecological and environmental entities, characteristics, properties, relationships and processes.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Displacement (Psychology): The process by which an emotional or behavioral response that is appropriate for one situation appears in another situation for which it is inappropriate.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Psychology, Applied: The science which utilizes psychologic principles to derive more effective means in dealing with practical problems.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Codependency (Psychology): A relational pattern in which a person attempts to derive a sense of purpose through relationships with others.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Latency Period (Psychology): The period from about 5 to 7 years to adolescence when there is an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Epigenetic Repression: The turning off of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION in certain regions of CHROMATIN without changes in the DNA sequence. Typically epigenetic repression is a way that developmental changes are programmed at the cellular level.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Neurobiology: The study of the structure, growth, activities, and functions of NEURONS and the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Introversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed inward upon one's self.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Down-Regulation: A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Transcriptional Activation: Processes that stimulate the GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of a gene or set of genes.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Libraries, MedicalBooksThinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.TurkeyRecombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.United StatesPersonality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Organ Preservation Solutions: Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Race Relations: Cultural contacts between people of different races.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Galactosidases: A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Zinc Fingers: Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Chromatin Immunoprecipitation: A technique for identifying specific DNA sequences that are bound, in vivo, to proteins of interest. It involves formaldehyde fixation of CHROMATIN to crosslink the DNA-BINDING PROTEINS to the DNA. After shearing the DNA into small fragments, specific DNA-protein complexes are isolated by immunoprecipitation with protein-specific ANTIBODIES. Then, the DNA isolated from the complex can be identified by PCR amplification and sequencing.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Nuclear Receptor Co-Repressor 1: A nuclear protein that regulates the expression of genes involved in a diverse array of processes related to metabolism and reproduction. The protein contains three nuclear receptor interaction domains and three repressor domains and is closely-related in structure to NUCLEAR RECEPTOR CO-REPRESSOR 2.Polycomb-Group Proteins: A family of proteins that play a role in CHROMATIN REMODELING. They are best known for silencing HOX GENES and the regulation of EPIGENETIC PROCESSES.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)BrazilInterpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Histone Deacetylase 1: A histone deacetylase subtype that is found along with HISTONE DEACETYLASE 2; RETINOBLASTOMA-BINDING PROTEIN 4; and RETINOBLASTOMA-BINDING PROTEIN 7 as core components of histone deacetylase complexes.Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Repression, Psychology: The active mental process of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.beta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Operator Regions, Genetic: The regulatory elements of an OPERON to which activators or repressors bind thereby effecting the transcription of GENES in the operon.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Creativity: The ability to generate new ideas or images.Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Nucleic acid sequences involved in regulating the expression of genes.Allied Health Occupations: Occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians, and are qualified by special training and, frequently, by licensure to work in supporting roles in the health care field. These occupations include, but are not limited to, medical technology, physical therapy, physician assistant, etc.Response Elements: Nucleotide sequences, usually upstream, which are recognized by specific regulatory transcription factors, thereby causing gene response to various regulatory agents. These elements may be found in both promoter and enhancer regions.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
Panksepp, J. (1998). Affective neuroscience: The foundations of human and animal emotions. New York: Oxford University Press, p ... By the end of 20th century, psychology departments in American universities mostly marginalized Freudian theory, dismissing it ... "Reconstruction and Repression", pp. 351-375. Kozulin, Psychology in Utopia (1984), pp. 84-86. "Against such a background it is ... This field was at first called economic psychology or business psychology; later, industrial psychology, employment psychology ...
Psychology, Public Policy and Law. 1 (4): 846-908. doi:10.1037/1076-8971.1.4.846. Freud, S. (1957). Repression. In J. Strachey ... 209-231). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.) Wegner, D.M. (1989). White bears and other unwanted thought. New York: Viking ... These findings suggest that there may be more to the theory of trace decay in human memory. Another theory of motivated ... International Universities Press. (Original work published 1936) Johnson, H. M. (1994). "Processes of successful intentional ...
As most other universities of Belarus, the Francisk Skorina University has been accused of political repressions and of ... According to reports by human rights organizations, in 2007, Zmicier Zhaleznichenka, an A-student and member of the Partyja BPF ... Mathematics Physics Biology Geology & geography Psychology & pedagogics Foreign languages History Law Economy Physical culture ... In 1994-1998 Francysk Skoryna Gomel State University jointly with the University of Clermont-Ferrand (France), the University ...
Humans. University psychology departments have ethics committees dedicated to the rights and well-being of research subjects. ... By the end of 20th century, psychology departments in American universities mostly marginalized Freudian theory, dismissing it ... It became very well known, largely because it tackled subjects such as sexuality, repression, and the unconscious. These ... This field was at first called economic psychology or business psychology; later, industrial psychology, employment psychology ...
At about the same time, due to the bidding of Professor Sully, he began to lecture on experimental psychology at University ... Repression, according to Rivers, is never adequate for removing conflict; it is only fruitful when a person can exert a ... 111-111) "A human experiment in nerve division" (with H. Head) (Brain, XXXI., pp. 323-450) The illusion of compared horizontal ... He was also awarded honorary degrees from the universities of Manchester, St. Andrews and Cambridge in 1919. Rivers died of a ...
... is a Montenegrin author, human rights activist, and university professor. Filip Kovačević was born in the ... he returned to Montenegro and was the first person to teach political psychology and psychoanalytic theory at the University of ... He is one of the few Montenegrin authors whose work can be found in the libraries of the best American universities. ... According to the article, Kovačević believes that "in Montenegro, the wall of political repression has not yet fallen". He has ...
Duke University), in the International Conference "100 years of psychoanalysis: Russian roots, repression and the return of ... since 1995 in various universities (Institute of Psychoanalysis, Institute of Psychology and Psychoanalysis, Moscow State ... From 1991 to 1995 at the Russian Open University Valery Leibin read a courses "Global Studies: History and Modernity", "Human: ... Valery Leibin graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy of Leningrad State University (1969) and accomplished a post-graduate ...
At about the same time, due to the bidding of Professor Sully, he began to lecture on experimental psychology at University ... "A Human Experiment in Nerve Division"[edit]. Upon his return to England from the Torres Strait, Rivers became aware of a series ... "The Repression of War Experience" (Lancet, XCVI., pp. 513-33). *"Psychiatry and the War" (Science, New Series, Vol. 49, No. ... He was also awarded honorary degrees from the universities of Manchester, St. Andrews and Cambridge in 1919.[21] ...
... due to repression from the Totalitarian Regime. Subjects included Experimental Theatre, Psychology of Music, Ethics, Aesthetics ... New Bulgarian University, Philosophy of Music. Sofia, Bulgaria. 1993 to 1995. Provided open lectures and seminars in the ... Human Thought Beam - Johann Ge Moll's second web site. Libido Significandi or The Lust for Meaning. ... Philosophy of Music and creative Writing in Bulgarian and American universities. He rises to popularity during the 1990s ...
http://harvardmagazine.com/1997/01/freud.whole.html; "Freud is Widely Taught at Universities, except in the psychology ... Yale University Press, pp. 443-468; Schimek, J. G. (1987). Fact and Fantasy in the Seduction Theory: a Historical Review. ... History of the Human Sciences, 11 (1), pp. 1-21. http://human-nature.com/esterson/ Esterson, A. (2001). The mythologizing of ... repressions, the repetition compulsion, transference and resistance, and the unfolding psychosexual stages of childhood would ...
The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code: Human Rights in Human Experimentation. Oxford University Press. 1992. p. 77. Michael ... Human Losses and Victims of Repression under two Occupations]. Warsaw: Institute of National Remembrance (IPN). Archived from ... Psychology Press. pp. 25-27. ISBN 0415281466. Sląska Biblioteka Cyfrowa (2013). "Digital version of the Sonderfahndungsbuch ... They closed down all universities, high schools, and engaged in systematic murder of Polish scholars, teachers and priests. ...
Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 7 September 2015. "psychoanalysis, n." OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015 ... Psychoanalytic Psychology 7S:33-46. Tere sa de Lauretis, Freud's Drive (Basingstoke 2008) p. 3 Miller, Alice. Thou Shalt Not Be ... The latter is the older term, and at first simply meant 'relating to the analysis of the human psyche'. But with the emergence ... New York: International Universities Press. ISBN 0-385-09884-7 Ellman, S. (2010). When Theories Touch: A Historical and ...
Cambridge University Press. p. 343. ISBN 978-0521357456. .. *^ Conquest, Robert (1990). The Great Terror. Oxford University ... "Soviet Repression Statistics: Some Comments" (PDF). From 1921 onwards about 3-3.5 million seem to have died from shooting, ... Christine Kenneally, The Invisible History of the Human Race: How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures (2014) ... those working outside of mainstream academia in smaller and less known universities, or the youngest scholars, essentially ...
... who rejects Grünbaum's portrayal of Freud as a philosophically astute investigator of human psychology. Webster argued that ... Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-210049-1. Robinson, Paul (1993). Freud and His Critics. Berkeley: University of ... Madison, Connecticut: International Universities Press. ISBN 0-8236-6722-7. Hobson, J. Allan; Earman, John, Editor (1993). ... Grünbaum recounts the development of Freud's work, noting that Freud described his theory of repression as "the most essential ...
University of Chicago Press, 2000, pp.176-203 Weisstein, Naomi (1994). "Kinder, Küche, Kirche as Scientific Law: Psychology ... For Lacan, the determinative dimension of human experience is neither the self (as in ego psychology) nor relations with others ... "Freud Is Widely Taught at Universities, Except in the Psychology Department", The New York Times, 25 November 2007. Eissler, K. ... Freud originally allowed that repression might be a conscious process, but by the time he wrote his second paper on the "Neuro- ...
The Principles of Psychology (1890), with introduction by George A. Miller, Harvard University Press, 1983 paperback, ISBN 978- ... and repression(英語:Psychological repression). The contributors to neuro-psychoanalysis include António Damásio(英語:António ... "Freud Is Widely Taught at Universities, Except in the Psychology Department" by Patricia Cohen, November 25, 2007. ... Panksepp, J.(英語:Jaak Panksepp) (1998). Affective neuroscience: The foundations of human and animal emotions. New York: Oxford ...
Edge Hill University has a hall of residence called Eleanor Rathbone in honour of her work as a social reformer. History of ... In 1929 Rathbone entered parliament as an independent MP for the Combined English Universities. One of her first speeches was ... She also opposed violent repression of rebellion in Ireland (see Irish Home Rule movement). She was instrumental in negotiating ... the site houses the School of Law and Social Justice and the Dept of Psychology, as well as the Eleanor Rathbone Theatre used ...
For example, a therapist might have a strong desire for a client to get good grades in university because the client reminds ... Analytical Psychology: its Theory and Practice(London 1976) p. 159 and p. 157 Eric Berne, What Do You Say after You Say Hello ... Freud stated that since an analyst is a human himself he can easily let his emotions into the client. Because Freud saw the ... "the repression of countertransference...is prolonged in the mythology of the analytic situation". Paula Heimann highlighted how ...
... in Spanish with some translations to English by the Cuba Center for the Advancement of Human Rights at Florida State University ... In spite of restrictions, Cubans connect to the Internet at embassies, Internet cafés, through friends at universities, hotels ... Guillermo Fariñas, a Cuban doctor of psychology, independent journalist, and political dissident, held a seven-month hunger ... Azel, José (27 February 2011). "Opinion: Cuba's Internet repression equals groupthink". The Miami Herald. "Cuba" (PDF). Freedom ...
Her book in progress From Trance to Stance advocates that the primary goal of psychology is to help create a human-friendly ... After receiving her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Temple University, Ritterman is noted for her expertise regarding ... She also consults with agencies and teaches classes at universities, holds workshops, and lectures about her clinical methods. ... 1, Editor's Guest Article 1987 Symptome: Zwschen Sozialer, Repression und Innerer Freiheit, Familien Dynamik, Klett-Cotta, ...
The universities of Pretoria, Free State and Unisa want to anglicise completely. Stellenbosch University has accepted a ... Raising the Stakes for Human Diversity. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 492-502. doi:10.5749/j.ctt9qh3m7.33#page_scan_tab_ ... In H. Giles & W. P. Robinson (Eds.), Handbook of language and social psychology (pp. 387-412). London: John Wiley. Jaspal, R. ( ... 75 Repression of Kurds in Syria is widespread (pdf), Amnesty International Report, March 2005. Special Focus Cases: Leyla Zana ...
Following the military, he earned his Ph.D in Psychology from the University of Kansas in 1952, summa cum laude, a member of ... He had two major grants from the National Institutes of Health and invitations to teach in seminars and at universities around ... In S. G. Vandenberg (ed.), Methods and goals in human behavior genetics. New York: Academic Press, pp. 223-29. 1966 A ... 4. With Holzman, P. S., Leveling and repression J. Abnorm. soc. Psychol., 59, No. 2. 1960 Cognitive controls in adaptation: a ...
Columbia University Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, University of Kentucky Libraries New York Public Library Community ... Because of repression during the Franco dictatorship (1939-75), the development of oral history in Spain was quite limited ... In 1946, David P. Boder, a professor of psychology at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, traveled to Europe to ... oral history had become a respected discipline in many colleges and universities. At that time the Italian historian Alessandro ...
... social psychology has had a greater impact on the direction of the actual empirical work being carried on in the universities ... Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press., p. 28. Rubenstein G (1996). "Two peoples in one land: A validation study of ... "Repression of impulses leads to projection which functions as rationalization for an expression.' [Critique Point]: Coding and ... When they stabilize into a particular combination it must be because that is a combination that works for human personalities ...
List of universities in Russia Education in Russia List of higher education and academic institutions in Saint Petersburg " ... She fell a victim of Soviet political repression in Doctor's Plot in 1949. The chief of hospital was D.S. Tumarkin. In 1928, ... Moreover, students receive an extensive laboratory training in human anatomy, general chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, ... The Faculty of Medical Science The Faculty of Pediatrics The Faculty of Clinical Psychology In 2005, the academy obtained a ...
Jonathan Israel (2011). Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-1790. Oxford University Press. ... David P. Barash (1946-): American evolutionary biologist and Professor of Psychology emeritus at the University of Washington, ... "In these years Leslie was an unsuccessful candidate for the chairs of natural philosophy at the universities of St Andrews and ... developing from an early age a view on religion that associated it with repression and intolerance. This view, which he shared ...
Panksepp, J. (1998). Affective neuroscience: The foundations of human and animal emotions. New York: Oxford University Press, p ... By the end of 20th century, psychology departments in American universities mostly marginalized Freudian theory, dismissing it ... "Reconstruction and Repression", pp. 351-375. Kozulin, Psychology in Utopia (1984), pp. 84-86. "Against such a background it is ... This field was at first called economic psychology or business psychology; later, industrial psychology, employment psychology ...
The likely roots of sexualityism are in the work of Sigmund Freud, who believed in freeing humans from sexual repression as a ... His work is taught in many universities, but is disappearing from their psychology departments according to a survey reported ... First, there are the declining levels of female happiness, best summarized in a paper by University of Pennsylvania economists ... Helen Alvaré is associate professor at George Mason University School of Law and a senior fellow of the Witherspoon Institute. ...
Lou Cozolino, PsyD, Professor of Psychology, Pepperdine University. In Life Before Birth Dr. Arthur Janov illuminates the ... I wonder how Freud and Jung made its way to universities without scientific proof.... It took Higgs a long time until his ... And repression forces the kind of unhealthy eating habit that makes us sick early on. Repression kills because, unconsciously, ... Paula Thomson, PsyD, Associate Professor, California State University, Northridge & Professor Emeritus, York University ...
The purpose of this paper is to explore briefly the significance of the ethological frame of reference for human sexual ... In J. Bardwick, (Ed.), Readings in the psychology of women. New York: Harper and Row, 1972.Google Scholar ... Mailinowski, B. Sex and repression in savage society. Cleveland: World Publishing Co., 1927.Google Scholar ... Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1974.Google Scholar. *. Wickler, W. The sexual code. New York: Doubleday, 1972.Google ...
Psychology), Repression, Psychology, Reproducibility of Results, Research Design, Reward, Risk-Taking, Sensitivity and ... Human-computer interaction, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Impulsive Behavior, Inhibition (Psychology), ... Duke University * Arts & Sciences * Faculty * Staff * Grad * Postdocs * Reload * Login ... Universities, User-Computer Interface. Recent Publications (search) *Chapman, AL; Rosenthal, MZ; Dixon-Gordon, KL; Turner, BJ; ...
Alan Lewis, The Psychology of Taxation (1982).. 27. This statement raises an important question: when should social norms be ... Repression transmutes fear into guilt, which changes behavior.(41). Upon closer examination, however, one notes that Piagets ... Most people will not eat human flesh, however hungry they are, if they are not members of a culture whose social norms ... In contrast, "depth psychology" often traces the internalization of morality to processes that are hot and inchoate. According ...
Humans. University psychology departments have ethics committees dedicated to the rights and well-being of research subjects. ... By the end of 20th century, psychology departments in American universities mostly marginalized Freudian theory, dismissing it ... It became very well known, largely because it tackled subjects such as sexuality, repression, and the unconscious. These ... This field was at first called economic psychology or business psychology; later, industrial psychology, employment psychology ...
At about the same time, due to the bidding of Professor Sully, he began to lecture on experimental psychology at University ... Repression, according to Rivers, is never adequate for removing conflict; it is only fruitful when a person can exert a ... 111-111) "A human experiment in nerve division" (with H. Head) (Brain, XXXI., pp. 323-450) The illusion of compared horizontal ... He was also awarded honorary degrees from the universities of Manchester, St. Andrews and Cambridge in 1919. Rivers died of a ...
Cardiff University, the University of the West of England in Bristol, the University of East London and the University of ... Positive Psychology [edit]. Positive psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning. ... No departments of critical psychology exist, though critical perspectives are sometimes encountered in traditional universities ... Freuds theories became very well-known, largely because they tackled subjects such as sexuality and repression as general ...
Journal of Counseling Psychology, 27(4), 320-327.. Laing, R.D. 1985. Wisdom, Madness and Folly: The Making of a Psychiatrist ... New York: Human Sciences Press.. Heppner, P. P., & Claiborn, C. D. (1989). Social influence research in counseling: A review ... Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.. French, J. P. R. Jr., and Raven, B. (1960). The bases of social power. In D. ... Holmes, D. & Jacob, D. J. (2014) (Eds.) Power and the Psychiatric Apparatus: Repression, Transformation and Assistance. ...
7) International Universities Press. ISBN 0823668762.. *Freud, Anna. 1981. Psychoanalytical Psychology of Normal Development. ( ... Anna identified psychological repression as the principle defense mechanism instilled within humans. Her argument that the ... In 1975 she received an honorary M.D. from the University of Vienna, and an honorary Ph.D. from the Goethe Institute in ... Self psychology • Lacanian. Analytical psychology. Object relations. Interpersonal • Relational. Attachment • Ego psychology ...
The Psychology of Humiliation. Oslo, Norway: Oslo University.. *. Linder, Evelin. 2006a. Making Enemies. Westport, CT: Praeger. ... Freudian Repression: Conversation Creating the Unconscious. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.. *. Brown, G.W., T. Harris, ... Humans can imagine the point of view of another person or persons, which helps explain much of the humanness of the human ... New York: International Universities Press.. *. Linder, Evelin. 2000. ...
... ) Contents1 Etymology and definitions 2 History2.1 Beginning of experimental psychology 2.2 Consolidation and ... Humans University psychology departments have ethics committees dedicated to the rights and well-being of research subjects. ... Third Reich (1997), Chapter 14: "Reconstruction and Repression", pp. 351-375. ^ a b Kozulin, Psychology Psychology in Utopia ( ... "Freud Is Widely Taught at Universities, Except in the Psychology Psychology Department" by Patricia Cohen, 25 November 2007. ^ ...
At about the same time, due to the bidding of Professor Sully, he began to lecture on experimental psychology at University ... "A Human Experiment in Nerve Division"[edit]. Upon his return to England from the Torres Strait, Rivers became aware of a series ... "The Repression of War Experience" (Lancet, XCVI., pp. 513-33). *"Psychiatry and the War" (Science, New Series, Vol. 49, No. ... He was also awarded honorary degrees from the universities of Manchester, St. Andrews and Cambridge in 1919.[21] ...
1958). Ego psychology and the problem of adaptation (David Rapaport, Trans.). New York: International Universities Press. ( ... Berkeley: University of California Press, 1967.. Bluestone, George. Novels into Film. Berkeley: University of California Press ... Human responses will involve changes in management of natural resources and wild areas. There are a number of ways that human ... "Repression" (1915d), when he writes that dangers that cant be avoided through behavioral means are "rejected toward the ...
Humans. University psychology departments have ethics committees dedicated to the rights and well-being of research subjects. ... By the end of 20th century, psychology departments in American universities mostly marginalized Freudian theory, dismissing it ... It became very well known, largely because it tackled subjects such as sexuality, repression, and the unconscious. These ... Discovering Psychology. (2001). The History of Psychology:Contemporary Foundations * The Florida State University PSYCHOLOGY.( ...
Recent human neuroeconomic investigations with healthy volunteers using minocycline, an antibiotic with inhibitory effects on ... Recent human neuroeconomic investigations with healthy volunteers using minocycline, an antibiotic with inhibitory effects on ... microglial activation, suggest that microglia may unconsciously modulate human social behaviors as ... microglial activation, suggest that microglia may unconsciously modulate human social behaviors as ...
Hagen is a professor of psychology at Bos#zston University. Delving into everything from the founding practices of Freud and ... Bessel van der Kolk, psychiatrist from Harvard University Medical School who testified that repression was a scientific fact. ... Somehow, as members of an organization and as a members of a society and as members of the human race, we must repair the ... Until the APA and the universities stop accepting it as truth, it will not be stopped. Another Dad _______________ Hi Mom and ...
1.John B. Watson and the Development of Behaviorism in Psychology.. Entering graduate school at the University of Chicago in ... To treat all human activities as external to the self--as objects--was subtly to diminish the discomfort of guilt-producing ... Within the universities, several factors together narrowed the scope of the discipline, including the need to defend and define ... If some contemporaries were smothered by motherly love, young Watson was suffocated by repression. Denied physical caresses as ...
But the university refused. It would have been too dangerous for them to rehire a professor who was a social critic and also ... They have become blind to the human dimensions of their lives, to the nature of their own experience, and thus have handicapped ... Ronald Leifer, "Avoidance and Mastery: An Interactional View of Phobias," Journal of Individual Psychology, 22, no. 1 (May 1966 ... In my view, the same situation exists today in universities and medical school departments of psychiatry. I do not believe ...
... in which the university scholar declared that human qualities and conditions such as talent and poverty were passed through the ... Universities around the world are eligible for Minerva funding. Officials said $50 million will be awarded over five years.. ... who became director and eventually an architect of Hitlers systematic medical repression.... In 1952, John D. Rockefeller the ... National Security State Terror; Human Genome Project Eugenics; Weaponized Psychology. Posted August 27th, 2009 by lizburbank ...
Video created by University of Lausanne for the course Doping : Sports, Organizations and Sciences. By going beyond a binary ... sports psychology expert and Associate Professor at the Institute of Sport Studies at the University of Lausanne. ... Coursera provides universal access to the worlds best education, partnering with top universities and organizations to offer ... repressions and research methods to put into effect. This course will also explore biological control measures such as the ...
"Repression of the hTERT gene during cell differentiation". This is a four-year competitive renewal R01 award for a research ... of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control. "DP14-1422, State & Local Public Health Actions to Prevent Obesity, ... The goal is to have these students go on to faculty positions at major universities or leadership roles in federal research ... Department of Psychology; College of Nursing. WSU Office of Research; Alcohol and Drug Abuse Research Program. "Influence of ...
... to navigate human cross for our challenges. The Medical Psychology Program at Childrens National knows adolescents and minutes ... University of Pittsburgh), Elizabeth A. Schlenk( University of Pittsburgh) and Donna Caruthers( University of Pittsburgh). ... By dating our universities, you affect to our fabrication of reflections. reduce Your percent on Economics. yet, but some ... administrator resources of components two repressions for FREE! complexity options of Usenet experiences! He is a redundant ...
Genomics: Politically Correct to Political Courage Evolutionary Psychology ... Wilson EO (1978/2004) On Human Nature. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.. Wilson, E.O. & Hölldobler, B. (2005) ... You can have females with male psychologies and males with female psychologies. Swartzenegger referred to "girley-men" and ... Psychoanalysis made up the idea of "repression" Horkheimer recruited Theodore Adorno and Erik Fromm, considered as Radical ...
  • From the perspective of neuroscience, neuronal networks including synapses have been dominantly believed to play crucial roles in human mental activities, while glial contribution to mental activities has long been ignored. (frontiersin.org)
  • The American philosopher William James published his seminal book, Principles of Psychology, in 1890, laying the foundations for many of the questions that psychologists would focus on for years to come. (wikibooks.org)
  • In the introduction to the 1967 edition of the book, Elliot Schaffer notes that in his short lifetime James Hunt is said to have treated over 1,700 cases of speech impediment, firstly in his father's practice and later at his own institute, Ore House near Hastings, which he set up with the aid a doctorate he had purchased in 1856 from the University of Giessen in Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, her contribution to the alleviation of human suffering was considerable, and until human beings learn to live in peace and harmony, and true parental love is the norm in the family , her therapeutic techniques and models continue to be of value. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • He argued that human beings are so complex that to even begin to understand them, one must move rapidly back and forth between "the least parts and greatest wholes. (wiley.com)
  • Second, even though conventional wisdom holds that sexualityism is "scientific," whereas religion-or any theory linking the meaning of sex with its structure (i.e ., the intimate union of woman and man) or outcomes ( i.e ., partner bond, babies)-is irrational, the conventional wisdom fails to account for the ideological roots of sexualityism or for modern evidence about what does produce human happiness and flourishing. (thepublicdiscourse.com)
  • In his presidential address to the American Sociological Society in December 1929, William Fielding Ogburn of the University of Chicago outlined for his colleagues what he termed "The Folkways of a Scientific Sociology. (swarthmore.edu)
  • Some are employed in industrial and organizational settings, or in other areas such as human development and aging, sports, health, and the media, as well as in forensic investigation and other aspects of law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Performance enhancement or physical transformation are two aspects of doping which are seen as problematic, yet even as we speak companies are making fortunes selling body improvement and other forms of "human enhancement" to us. (coursera.org)
  • In the past 20 years or so psychology has begun to examine the relationship between consciousness and the brain or nervous system. (wikibooks.org)
  • Many features of living things - the bee's sting, the vertebrate (an animal with a backbone) eye, the human brain - appeared to have been designed by a master engineer to serve their specific purpose. (encyclopedia.com)
  • These children are the step for a way of first codes as what it makes to enter the time of all the treasures of a mind, the mutualism of relevant universities of neuroanatomical action between returns, and the ways and advances between the subordinate and cellular brain of brain and conviction. (urgentdeathrowdogs.com)
  • immediately since goes this useful to read ebook klimt 1988 links, but closely it is once at all free that human systems best need the kilometers that account characteristic in torture degree. (perretz-young.com)
  • In sociology, for example, this goal meant an end to the cataloguing of "feelings," "interests," or "wishes," a principal activity of pre-war sociologists.In psychology, it meant abandoning the search =for "motives" and "intentions," or even "consciousness. (swarthmore.edu)
  • Although they didn't explain why, it seems that the pace of modern alienated societies punishes the mammalian urge that humans have for connectedness (pride) with others. (wiley.com)
  • The university is as central a part of modern capitalism as it is due to the fact that students have become for the most part workers-in-training. (libcom.org)
  • In efforts to control doping, governments and sports authorities have put into place institutions responsible for defining what falls into the category of doping, but also what prevention, repressions and research methods to put into effect. (coursera.org)
  • Many of us think that good diet will prolong life, and it is true, but not half as true as how soon repression makes us sick and kills us prematurely. (blogspot.com)
  • I have discussed epigenetics in my blog and my books, about how adversity early on changes the switches for key genes which then serve to compound repression or inhibition. (blogspot.com)
  • Pascal's contemporary, Benedict Spinoza (1632-1677), one of the first philosophers of science, outlined what amounts to a method for studying the human world. (wiley.com)