Replacement for a knee joint.
A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.
Replacement of the knee joint.
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)
Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).
Replacement for a hip joint.
Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.
Rigid, semi-rigid, or inflatable cylindric hydraulic devices, with either combined or separate reservoir and pumping systems, implanted for the surgical treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.
The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.
The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.
Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.
Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.
Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.
Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.
A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.
A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the anterolateral surface of the medial condyle of the femur, passes posteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the posterior intercondylar area of the tibia.
The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.
Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.
The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.
A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.
A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.
Partial or total replacement of a joint.
A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Surgical insertion of cylindric hydraulic devices for the treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.
Replacement of the hip joint.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Slippage of the FEMUR off the TIBIA.
Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.
Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.
The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.
Holding a PROSTHESIS in place.
Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.
Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.
Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.
The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.
The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.
Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.
Pain in the joint.
The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.
The ligament that travels from the medial epicondyle of the FEMUR to the medial margin and medial surface of the TIBIA. The medial meniscus is attached to its deep surface.
Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.
A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.
Manner or style of walking.
A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
Surgical insertion of an appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face. When only portions of the mandible are replaced, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION.
Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.
Appliances that close a cleft or fissure of the palate.
The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.
The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.

Radiolucent lines and component stability in knee arthroplasty. Standard versus fluoroscopically-assisted radiographs. (1/937)

The radiolucent lines and the stability of the components of 66 knee arthroplasties were assessed by six orthopaedic surgeons on conventional anteroposterior and lateral radiographs and on fluoroscopic views which had been taken on the same day. The examiners were blinded as to the patients and clinical results. The interpretation of the radiographs was repeated after five months. On fluoroscopically-assisted radiographs four of the six examiners identified significantly more radiolucent lines for the femoral component (p < 0.05) and one significantly more for the tibial implant. Five examiners rated more femoral components as radiologically loose on fluoroscopically-assisted radiographs (p = 0.0008 to 0.0154), but none did so for the tibial components. The mean intra- and interobserver kappa values were higher for fluoroscopically-assisted radiographs for both components. We have shown that fluoroscopically-assisted radiographs allow more reproducible, and therefore reliable, detection of radiolucent lines in total knee arthroplasty. Assessment of the stability of the components is significantly influenced by the radiological technique used. Conventional radiographs are not adequate for evaluation of the stability of total knee arthroplasty and should be replaced by fluoroscopically-assisted films.  (+info)

Manipulation of total knee replacements. Is the flexion gained retained? (2/937)

As part of a prospective study of 476 total knee replacements (TKR), we evaluated the use of manipulation under anaesthesia in 47 knees. Manipulation was considered when intensive physiotherapy failed to increase flexion to more than 80 degrees. The mean time from arthroplasty to manipulation was 11.3 weeks (median 9, range 2 to 41). The mean active flexion before manipulation was 62 degrees (35 to 80). One year later the mean gain was 33 degrees (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, range -5 to 70, 95% CI 28.5 to 38.5). Definite sustained gains in flexion were achieved even when manipulation was performed four or more months after arthroplasty (paired t-test, p < 0.01, CI 8.4 to 31.4). A further 21 patients who met our criteria for manipulation declined the procedure. Despite continued physiotherapy, there was no significant increase in flexion in their knees. Six weeks to one year after TKR, the mean change was 3.1 degrees (paired t-test, p = 0.23, CI -8.1 to +2).  (+info)

The tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, randomised study. (3/937)

We assessed the influence of the use of a tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty in a prospective, randomised study. After satisfying exclusion criteria, we divided 77 patients into two groups, one to undergo surgery with a tourniquet and one without. Both groups were well matched. The mean change in knee flexion in the group that had surgery without a tourniquet was significantly better at one week (p = 0.03) than in the other group, but movement was similar at six weeks and at four months. There was no significant difference in the surgical time, postoperative pain, need for analgesia, the volume collected in the drains, postoperative swelling, and the incidence of wound complications or of deep-venous thrombosis. We conclude that the use of a tourniquet is safe and that current practice can be continued.  (+info)

Primary hip and knee replacement surgery: Ontario criteria for case selection and surgical priority. (4/937)

OBJECTIVES: To develop, from simple clinical factors, criteria to identify appropriate patients for referral to a surgeon for consideration for arthroplasty, and to rank them in the queue once surgery is agreed. DESIGN: Delphi process, with a panel including orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, general practitioners, epidemiologists, and physiotherapists, who rated 120 case scenarios for appropriateness and 42 for waiting list priority. Scenarios incorporated combinations of relevant clinical factors. It was assumed that queues should be organised not simply by chronology but by clinical and social impact of delayed surgery. The panel focused on information obtained from clinical histories, to ensure the utility of the guidelines in practice. Relevant high quality research evidence was limited. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. MAIN MEASURES: Appropriateness ratings on a 7-point scale, and urgency rankings on a 4-point scale keyed to specific waiting times. RESULTS: Despite incomplete evidence panellists agreed on ratings in 92.5% of appropriateness and 73.8% of urgency scenarios versus 15% and 18% agreement expected by chance, respectively. Statistically validated algorithms in decision tree form, which should permit rapid estimation of urgency or appropriateness in practice, were compiled by recursive partitioning. Rating patterns and algorithms were also used to make brief written guidelines on how clinical factors affect appropriateness and urgency of surgery. A summary score was provided for each case scenario; scenarios could then be matched to chart audit results, with scoring for quality management. CONCLUSIONS: These algorithms and criteria can be used by managers or practitioners to assess appropriateness of referral for hip or knee replacement and relative rankings of patients in the queue for surgery.  (+info)

Limb salvage surgery in bone tumour with modular endoprosthesis. (5/937)

Thirty-three patients with bone tumours were treated by resection of the growth and reconstruction with a Kotz modular endoprosthesis. The average follow-up was for 50 months, ranging from 14 to 79 months. At the last review, 12 patients (36%) had died due to the tumour and 9 others (27%) had metastases. All 4 patients with proximal tibial reconstruction had poor functional results, due to an extension lag or to knee stiffness. Four of the six tumours of the proximal femur were complicated by local recurrence or dislocation of the hip, and had poor or fair functional results. Of the patients with distal femoral reconstruction, 17 out of 22 had excellent or good functional results. Reconstruction with a modular prosthesis after resection of a tumour gives excellent or good functional results in more than three-fourths of the cases of distal femur reconstruction, but it should be used with caution in the proximal tibia and proximal femur.  (+info)

Soft tissue cover for the exposed knee prosthesis. (6/937)

This study assess the use of muscle flaps to cover exposed knee prostheses and emphasises the need for early plastic surgery consultation. In five of the six patients studied the wound was successfully covered and the knee prosthesis salvaged with a reasonable functional outcome.  (+info)

Survivorship analysis of the "Performance" total knee replacement--7-year follow-up. (7/937)

We present the results of a prospective study in which 32 "Performance" total knee replacements were implanted with a mean follow-up period of 6.5 years. Survival analysis showed 89% survival at 7 years. Of those knees that survived to follow-up 80% were pain free or had mild pain when climbing stairs and only 1 knee was unable to flex beyond 100 degrees. Eighty-six percent of patients were able to walk unlimited distances and all knees had a statistically significant improvement in the knee evaluation scores at follow-up. There was no evidence of loosening or migration in the surviving knees.  (+info)

The results at ten years of the Insall-Burstein II total knee replacement. Clinical, radiological and survivorship studies. (8/937)

We reviewed the outcome of 146 Insall-Burstein II total knee replacements carried out in 121 patients over a period of nearly four years in a general orthopaedic unit. At a mean follow-up of ten years, 94 knees in 78 patients were available for review. Six patients (7 knees) were lost to follow-up and 37 (45 knees) had died. The clinical outcome using the scoring system of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) was excellent or good in 79% of patients, fair in 14% and poor in 7%. The mean preoperative HSS score was 31, improving to 79 at the latest review. Using the newer rating system of the Knee Society, the mean score at ten years was 87 and the mean functional score 56. The arc of flexion improved from a mean preoperative value of 88 degrees to 100 degrees. The 18 patients who had had a previous high tibial osteotomy were analysed separately and were found to have benefited equally from the operation. Nine prostheses were revised, giving a cumulative survival rate of 92.3% at ten years. Radiological evaluation of 104 radiographs showed radiolucent lines around ten tibial components, none of which required revision. Anterior knee pain was a significant problem.  (+info)

It is important to identify and address prosthesis failure early to prevent further complications and restore the functionality of the device. This may involve repairing or replacing the device, modifying the design, or changing the materials used in its construction. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to correct issues related to the implantation of the prosthetic device.

Prosthesis failure can occur in various types of prosthetic devices, including joint replacements, dental implants, and orthotic devices. The causes of prosthesis failure can range from manufacturing defects to user error or improper maintenance. It is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of the factors contributing to prosthesis failure to develop effective solutions and improve patient outcomes.

In conclusion, prosthesis failure is a common issue that can significantly impact the quality of life of individuals who rely on prosthetic devices. Early identification and addressing of prosthesis failure are crucial to prevent further complications and restore functionality. A comprehensive understanding of the causes of prosthesis failure is necessary to develop effective solutions and improve patient outcomes.

The risk of developing osteoarthritis of the knee increases with age, obesity, and previous knee injuries or surgery. Symptoms of knee OA can include:

* Pain and stiffness in the knee, especially after activity or extended periods of standing or sitting
* Swelling and redness in the knee
* Difficulty moving the knee through its full range of motion
* Crunching or grinding sensations when the knee is bent or straightened
* Instability or a feeling that the knee may give way

Treatment for knee OA typically includes a combination of medication, physical therapy, and lifestyle modifications. Medications such as pain relievers, anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids can help manage symptoms, while physical therapy can improve joint mobility and strength. Lifestyle modifications, such as weight loss, regular exercise, and avoiding activities that exacerbate the condition, can also help slow the progression of the disease. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or replace the damaged joint.

There are several types of prosthesis-related infections, including:

1. Bacterial infections: These are the most common type of prosthesis-related infection and can occur around any type of implanted device. They are caused by bacteria that enter the body through a surgical incision or other opening.
2. Fungal infections: These types of infections are less common and typically occur in individuals who have a weakened immune system or who have been taking antibiotics for another infection.
3. Viral infections: These infections can occur around implanted devices, such as pacemakers, and are caused by viruses that enter the body through a surgical incision or other opening.
4. Parasitic infections: These types of infections are rare and occur when parasites, such as tapeworms, infect the implanted device or the surrounding tissue.

Prosthesis-related infections can cause a range of symptoms, including pain, swelling, redness, warmth, and fever. In severe cases, these infections can lead to sepsis, a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when bacteria or other microorganisms enter the bloodstream.

Prosthesis-related infections are typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, imaging tests such as X-rays or CT scans, and laboratory tests to identify the type of microorganism causing the infection. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or other antimicrobial agents to eliminate the infection, and may also involve surgical removal of the infected implant.

Prevention is key in avoiding prosthesis-related infections. This includes proper wound care after surgery, keeping the surgical site clean and dry, and taking antibiotics as directed by your healthcare provider to prevent infection. Additionally, it is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions for caring for your prosthesis, such as regularly cleaning and disinfecting the device and avoiding certain activities that may put excessive stress on the implant.

Overall, while prosthesis-related infections can be serious, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment can help to effectively manage these complications and prevent long-term damage or loss of function. It is important to work closely with your healthcare provider to monitor for signs of infection and take steps to prevent and manage any potential complications associated with your prosthesis.

1. Meniscal tears: The meniscus is a cartilage structure in the knee joint that can tear due to twisting or bending movements.
2. Ligament sprains: The ligaments that connect the bones of the knee joint can become stretched or torn, leading to instability and pain.
3. Torn cartilage: The articular cartilage that covers the ends of the bones in the knee joint can tear due to wear and tear or trauma.
4. Fractures: The bones of the knee joint can fracture as a result of a direct blow or fall.
5. Dislocations: The bones of the knee joint can become dislocated, causing pain and instability.
6. Patellar tendinitis: Inflammation of the tendon that connects the patella (kneecap) to the shinbone.
7. Iliotibial band syndrome: Inflammation of the iliotibial band, a ligament that runs down the outside of the thigh and crosses the knee joint.
8. Osteochondritis dissecans: A condition in which a piece of cartilage and bone becomes detached from the end of a bone in the knee joint.
9. Baker's cyst: A fluid-filled cyst that forms behind the knee, usually as a result of a tear in the meniscus or a knee injury.

Symptoms of knee injuries can include pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited mobility. Treatment for knee injuries depends on the severity of the injury and may range from conservative measures such as physical therapy and medication to surgical intervention.

There are several types of joint instability, including:

1. Ligamentous laxity: A condition where the ligaments surrounding a joint become stretched or torn, leading to instability.
2. Capsular laxity: A condition where the capsule, a thin layer of connective tissue that surrounds a joint, becomes stretched or torn, leading to instability.
3. Muscular imbalance: A condition where the muscles surrounding a joint are either too weak or too strong, leading to instability.
4. Osteochondral defects: A condition where there is damage to the cartilage and bone within a joint, leading to instability.
5. Post-traumatic instability: A condition that develops after a traumatic injury to a joint, such as a dislocation or fracture.

Joint instability can be caused by various factors, including:

1. Trauma: A sudden and forceful injury to a joint, such as a fall or a blow.
2. Overuse: Repeated stress on a joint, such as from repetitive motion or sports activities.
3. Genetics: Some people may be born with joint instability due to inherited genetic factors.
4. Aging: As we age, our joints can become less stable due to wear and tear on the cartilage and other tissues.
5. Disease: Certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, can cause joint instability.

Symptoms of joint instability may include:

1. Pain: A sharp, aching pain in the affected joint, especially with movement.
2. Stiffness: Limited range of motion and stiffness in the affected joint.
3. Swelling: Swelling and inflammation in the affected joint.
4. Instability: A feeling of looseness or instability in the affected joint.
5. Crepitus: Grinding or crunching sensations in the affected joint.

Treatment for joint instability depends on the underlying cause and may include:

1. Rest and ice: Resting the affected joint and applying ice to reduce pain and swelling.
2. Physical therapy: Strengthening the surrounding muscles to support the joint and improve stability.
3. Bracing: Using a brace or splint to provide support and stability to the affected joint.
4. Medications: Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to reduce pain and inflammation.
5. Surgery: In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or reconstruct the damaged tissues and improve joint stability.

1. Infection: Bacterial or viral infections can develop after surgery, potentially leading to sepsis or organ failure.
2. Adhesions: Scar tissue can form during the healing process, which can cause bowel obstruction, chronic pain, or other complications.
3. Wound complications: Incisional hernias, wound dehiscence (separation of the wound edges), and wound infections can occur.
4. Respiratory problems: Pneumonia, respiratory failure, and atelectasis (collapsed lung) can develop after surgery, particularly in older adults or those with pre-existing respiratory conditions.
5. Cardiovascular complications: Myocardial infarction (heart attack), cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiac failure can occur after surgery, especially in high-risk patients.
6. Renal (kidney) problems: Acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease can develop postoperatively, particularly in patients with pre-existing renal impairment.
7. Neurological complications: Stroke, seizures, and neuropraxia (nerve damage) can occur after surgery, especially in patients with pre-existing neurological conditions.
8. Pulmonary embolism: Blood clots can form in the legs or lungs after surgery, potentially causing pulmonary embolism.
9. Anesthesia-related complications: Respiratory and cardiac complications can occur during anesthesia, including respiratory and cardiac arrest.
10. delayed healing: Wound healing may be delayed or impaired after surgery, particularly in patients with pre-existing medical conditions.

It is important for patients to be aware of these potential complications and to discuss any concerns with their surgeon and healthcare team before undergoing surgery.

The exact cause of osteoarthritis is not known, but it is thought to be due to a combination of factors such as genetics, wear and tear on joints over time, and injuries or trauma to the joint. Osteoarthritis can affect any joint in the body, but it most commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine.

The symptoms of osteoarthritis can vary depending on the severity of the condition and which joint is affected. Common symptoms include:

* Pain or tenderness in the joint
* Stiffness, especially after periods of rest or inactivity
* Limited mobility or loss of flexibility
* Grating or crackling sensations when the joint is moved
* Swelling or redness in the affected joint
* Muscle weakness or wasting

There is no cure for osteoarthritis, but there are several treatment options available to manage the symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. These include:

* Pain relief medications such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
* Physical therapy to improve mobility and strength
* Lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, regular exercise, and avoiding activities that exacerbate the condition
* Bracing or orthotics to support the affected joint
* Corticosteroid injections or hyaluronic acid injections to reduce inflammation and improve joint function
* Joint replacement surgery in severe cases where other treatments have failed.

Early diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis can help manage symptoms, slow the progression of the disease, and improve quality of life for individuals with this condition.

There are several symptoms of RA, including:

1. Joint pain and stiffness, especially in the hands and feet
2. Swollen and warm joints
3. Redness and tenderness in the affected areas
4. Fatigue, fever, and loss of appetite
5. Loss of range of motion in the affected joints
6. Firm bumps of tissue under the skin (rheumatoid nodules)

RA can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, blood tests, and imaging studies such as X-rays or ultrasound. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic agents. Lifestyle modifications such as exercise and physical therapy can also be helpful in managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

There is no cure for RA, but early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can help to slow the progression of the disease and reduce symptoms. With proper management, many people with RA are able to lead active and fulfilling lives.

There are several types of knee dislocations, including:

1. Lateral dislocation: This occurs when the lower end of the thigh bone (femur) becomes dislocated from the lateral (outer) aspect of the knee joint.
2. Medial dislocation: This occurs when the lower end of the thigh bone becomes dislocated from the medial (inner) aspect of the knee joint.
3. Posterior dislocation: This occurs when the lower end of the tibia (shin bone) becomes dislocated from the back of the knee joint.
4. Anterior dislocation: This occurs when the lower end of the tibia becomes dislocated from the front of the knee joint.

Knee dislocations are often accompanied by other injuries, such as fractures or tears to the ligaments and tendons that surround the knee joint. Treatment for a knee dislocation usually involves reducing the dislocation back into place, followed by immobilization in a cast or brace to allow the joint to heal. In some cases, surgery may be required to repair any damaged ligaments or tendons.

Staphylococcal infections can be classified into two categories:

1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) - This type of infection is resistant to many antibiotics and can cause severe skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections and surgical site infections.

2. Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA) - This type of infection is not resistant to antibiotics and can cause milder skin infections, respiratory tract infections, sinusitis and food poisoning.

Staphylococcal infections are caused by the Staphylococcus bacteria which can enter the body through various means such as:

1. Skin cuts or open wounds
2. Respiratory tract infections
3. Contaminated food and water
4. Healthcare-associated infections
5. Surgical site infections

Symptoms of Staphylococcal infections may vary depending on the type of infection and severity, but they can include:

1. Skin redness and swelling
2. Increased pain or tenderness
3. Warmth or redness in the affected area
4. Pus or discharge
5. Fever and chills
6. Swollen lymph nodes
7. Shortness of breath

Diagnosis of Staphylococcal infections is based on physical examination, medical history, laboratory tests such as blood cultures, and imaging studies such as X-rays or CT scans.

Treatment of Staphylococcal infections depends on the type of infection and severity, but may include:

1. Antibiotics to fight the infection
2. Drainage of abscesses or pus collection
3. Wound care and debridement
4. Supportive care such as intravenous fluids, oxygen therapy, and pain management
5. Surgical intervention in severe cases.

Preventive measures for Staphylococcal infections include:

1. Good hand hygiene practices
2. Proper cleaning and disinfection of surfaces and equipment
3. Avoiding close contact with people who have Staphylococcal infections
4. Covering wounds and open sores
5. Proper sterilization and disinfection of medical equipment.

It is important to note that MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is a type of Staphylococcal infection that is resistant to many antibiotics, and can be difficult to treat. Therefore, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are crucial to prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Bone malalignment can occur in any bone of the body but is most common in the long bones of the arms and legs. There are several types of bone malalignment, including:

* Angular deformity: A deviation from the normal alignment of two bones meeting at a joint.
* Bowing or bending of a bone: A deviation from the normal straight line of a bone.
* Rotational deformity: A twisting or rotating of a bone around its long axis.
* Growth plate deformity: Abnormal growth or development of the growth plates in children and adolescents, leading to misalignment of the bones.

Bone malalignment can cause symptoms such as pain, stiffness, limited mobility, and difficulty performing daily activities. Treatment options for bone malalignment depend on the type and severity of the condition and may include:

* Bracing or casting to help align the bones
* Physical therapy to improve range of motion and strength
* Medications to manage pain and inflammation
* Surgery to correct the deformity and realign the bones.

The word "arthralgia" comes from the Greek words "arthron," meaning joint, and "algos," meaning pain. It is often used interchangeably with the term "joint pain," but arthralgia specifically refers to a type of pain that is not caused by inflammation or injury.

Arthralgia can manifest in different ways, including:

1. Aching or dull pain in one or more joints
2. Sharp or stabbing pain in one or more joints
3. Pain that worsens with movement or weight-bearing activity
4. Pain that improves with rest
5. Pain that is localized to one joint or multiple joints
6. Pain that is accompanied by stiffness or limited range of motion
7. Pain that is worse in the morning or after periods of rest
8. Pain that is triggered by certain activities or movements

The diagnosis of arthralgia typically involves a comprehensive medical history and physical examination, as well as diagnostic tests such as X-rays, blood tests, or imaging studies. Treatment for arthralgia depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, lifestyle modifications, or other interventions.

1. Osteoarthritis: A degenerative condition that causes the breakdown of cartilage in the joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility.
2. Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in the joints, leading to pain, swelling, and deformity.
3. Gout: A condition caused by the buildup of uric acid in the joints, leading to sudden and severe attacks of pain, inflammation, and swelling.
4. Bursitis: Inflammation of the bursae, small fluid-filled sacs that cushion the joints and reduce friction between tendons and bones.
5. Tendinitis: Inflammation of the tendons, which connect muscles to bones.
6. Synovitis: Inflammation of the synovial membrane, a thin lining that covers the joints and lubricates them with fluid.
7. Periarthritis: Inflammation of the tissues around the joints, such as the synovial membrane, tendons, and ligaments.
8. Spondyloarthritis: A group of conditions that affect the spine and sacroiliac joints, leading to inflammation and pain in these areas.
9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A condition that affects children and causes inflammation and pain in the joints.
10. Systemic lupus erythematosus: An autoimmune disease that can affect many parts of the body, including the joints.

These are just a few examples of the many types of joint diseases that exist. Each type has its own unique symptoms and causes, and they can be caused by a variety of factors such as genetics, injury, infection, or age-related wear and tear. Treatment options for joint diseases can range from medication and physical therapy to surgery, depending on the severity of the condition and its underlying cause.

Femoral neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur in the femur, which is the longest bone in the human body and runs from the hip joint to the knee joint. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and their impact on the affected individual can range from minimal to severe.

Types of Femoral Neoplasms:

There are several types of femoral neoplasms, including:

1. Osteosarcoma: This is a type of primary bone cancer that originates in the femur. It is rare and tends to affect children and young adults.
2. Chondrosarcoma: This is another type of primary bone cancer that arises in the cartilage cells of the femur. It is more common than osteosarcoma and affects mostly older adults.
3. Ewing's Sarcoma: This is a rare type of bone cancer that can occur in any bone, including the femur. It typically affects children and young adults.
4. Giant Cell Tumor: This is a benign tumor that occurs in the bones, including the femur. While it is not cancerous, it can cause significant symptoms and may require surgical treatment.

Symptoms of Femoral Neoplasms:

The symptoms of femoral neoplasms can vary depending on the type and location of the tumor. Common symptoms include:

1. Pain: Patients with femoral neoplasms may experience pain in the affected leg, which can be worse with activity or weight-bearing.
2. Swelling: The affected limb may become swollen due to fluid accumulation or the growth of the tumor.
3. Limited mobility: Patients may experience limited mobility or stiffness in the affected joint due to pain or swelling.
4. Fracture: In some cases, femoral neoplasms can cause a fracture or weakening of the bone, which can lead to further complications.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Femoral Neoplasms:

The diagnosis of femoral neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies and biopsy. Imaging studies, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, can help identify the location and extent of the tumor. A biopsy may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and determine the type of tumor.

Treatment for femoral neoplasms depends on the type and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment options may include:

1. Observation: Small, benign tumors may not require immediate treatment and can be monitored with regular imaging studies to ensure that they do not grow or change over time.
2. Surgery: Many femoral neoplasms can be treated with surgery to remove the tumor and any affected bone tissue. In some cases, this may involve removing a portion of the femur or replacing it with a prosthetic implant.
3. Radiation therapy: This may be used in combination with surgery to treat more aggressive tumors or those that have spread to other areas of the body.
4. Chemotherapy: This may also be used in combination with surgery and radiation therapy to treat more aggressive tumors or those that have spread to other areas of the body.
5. Targeted therapy: This is a type of chemotherapy that targets specific molecules involved in the growth and progression of the tumor. Examples include denintuzumab mafodotin, which targets a protein called B-cell CD19, and olaratumab, which targets a protein called platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFR-alpha).
6. Immunotherapy: This is a type of treatment that uses the body's own immune system to fight cancer. Examples include pembrolizumab and nivolumab, which are checkpoint inhibitors that work by blocking proteins on T cells that prevent them from attacking cancer cells.

The prognosis for patients with femoral neoplasms depends on the type and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. In general, the prognosis is better for patients with benign tumors than those with malignant ones. However, even for patients with malignant tumors, there are many treatment options available, and the prognosis can vary depending on the specifics of the case.

It's important to note that these are general treatment options and the best course of treatment will depend on the specifics of each individual case. Patients should discuss their diagnosis and treatment options with their healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate course of action for their specific situation.

There are several different types of pain, including:

1. Acute pain: This type of pain is sudden and severe, and it usually lasts for a short period of time. It can be caused by injuries, surgery, or other forms of tissue damage.
2. Chronic pain: This type of pain persists over a long period of time, often lasting more than 3 months. It can be caused by conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, or nerve damage.
3. Neuropathic pain: This type of pain results from damage to the nervous system, and it can be characterized by burning, shooting, or stabbing sensations.
4. Visceral pain: This type of pain originates in the internal organs, and it can be difficult to localize.
5. Psychogenic pain: This type of pain is caused by psychological factors such as stress, anxiety, or depression.

The medical field uses a range of methods to assess and manage pain, including:

1. Pain rating scales: These are numerical scales that patients use to rate the intensity of their pain.
2. Pain diaries: These are records that patients keep to track their pain over time.
3. Clinical interviews: Healthcare providers use these to gather information about the patient's pain experience and other relevant symptoms.
4. Physical examination: This can help healthcare providers identify any underlying causes of pain, such as injuries or inflammation.
5. Imaging studies: These can be used to visualize the body and identify any structural abnormalities that may be contributing to the patient's pain.
6. Medications: There are a wide range of medications available to treat pain, including analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and muscle relaxants.
7. Alternative therapies: These can include acupuncture, massage, and physical therapy.
8. Interventional procedures: These are minimally invasive procedures that can be used to treat pain, such as nerve blocks and spinal cord stimulation.

It is important for healthcare providers to approach pain management with a multi-modal approach, using a combination of these methods to address the physical, emotional, and social aspects of pain. By doing so, they can help improve the patient's quality of life and reduce their suffering.

... may refer to: A prosthesis of the lower limb, starting at the knee Knee replacement without replacing the rest ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Knee prosthesis. If an internal link led you here, you may ...
Main components of a knee prosthesis. KS zones, anteroposterior (AP) view. Specific KS zones are as follows, with * meaning ... MC knee replacements attempt to mimic a more natural knee motion by decreasing motion on the medial aspect of the knee and ... Knee replacement, also known as knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace the weight-bearing surfaces of the knee ... "Association between knee alignment and knee pain in patients surgically treated for medial knee osteoarthritis by high tibial ...
This allows the patient to be fit with a below knee prosthesis vs a traditional above knee prosthesis.[citation needed] In less ... extension prosthesis, or custom shoe lifts. Amputation usually requires the use of prosthesis. Another alternative is a ... lower part near the knee) will not connect with the femoral head. Type C - The entire top half of the femur bone is absent, ... the end of the femur bone at the knee) is present. In the pelvis, no acetabulum (hip socket) is present; instead the pelvic ...
Stein, J. L.; Flowers, W. C. (1988). "Stance phase control of above-knee prostheses: knee control versus SACH foot design". ... Robotic prosthesis control is a method for controlling a prosthesis in such a way that the controlled robotic prosthesis ... Grimes, D. L.; Flowers, W. C.; Donath, M. (1977). "Feasibility of an active control scheme for above knee prostheses". Journal ... Grimes, D. L. (1979). An active multi-mode above knee prosthesis controller. PhD Thesis, Cambridge, MA, MIT, Department of ...
Goodfellow, John; O'Connor, John (1978). "The mechanics of the knee and prosthesis design". Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. ... Ankle replacements have a 30-day readmission rate of 2.2%, which is similar to that of knee replacement but lower than that of ... Banks SA, Hodge WA (June 1996). "Accurate measurement of three-dimensional knee replacement kinematics using single-plane ... previous arthrodesis of the ipsilateral hip or knee or severe deformities of these joints. Other potential contraindications ...
Larkin, J. A.; Lit, L.; Sinnott, J.; Wills, T.; Szentivanyi, A. (1999). "Infection of a knee prosthesis with Tsukamurella ... Infection of a knee prosthesis with Tsukamurella species. A case report. South Med J 1999; 92:831-2 Larkin JA, Minerva K, ...
Fite, Kevin; Mitchell, J.; Sup, F.; Goldfarb, M. (2007). "Design and control of an electrically powered knee prosthesis". ...
He started using a new knee prosthesis in 2012. It was exhausting. By 2018, things had changed. Papară had participated in a ...
TRI 2 - Severe leg impairment, including above knee amputees. Must ride bicycle and run with above knee prosthesis or run using ... May use prosthesis, brace or sling on the bike and/or run. TRI 5 - Moderate leg impairment: Includes below-knee amputees. Must ... Lower Extremity - This includes single below-the-knee amputees, in which a standard bicycle is used, and run with prosthesis or ... Wheelchair Two - This division consists of athletes who have double below-the-knee or a double above-the-knee amputation. These ...
Use a conventional bicycle and run with above-knee prosthesis or using crutches. TRI-3 - Les Autres, including athletes with ... Use a conventional bicycle and may run with brace or prosthesis. TRI-6a - Visual impairment, total blindness or may be able to ... Use a conventional bicycle and may use braces, prosthesis or slings on the cycling and/or running stage. TRI-5 - Moderate leg ... Use a conventional bicycle or a tricycle and run with leg braces or prosthesis. TRI-4 - Arm impairments, including paralysis, ...
Hannah, RE; Morrison, JB; Chapman, AE (Apr 1984). "Prosthesis alignment: effect on gait of persons with below-knee amputations ... Even with the advanced computerized knee joint of Otto Bock's C-Leg transfemoral prosthesis, the subjects experienced increased ... knock-knee, pigeon toe, and club foot. Misaligned sockets can simulate excessive hip and knee flexion and extension. As ... Weight of prosthesis Distribution of weight Alignment of components Overall fit of prosthesis A common trend in modern ...
Osseointegrated total knee replacement connected to a lower limb prosthesis: 4 cases. 2.45 Impact Factor. This paper presents ... "Osseointegrated total knee replacement connected to a lower limb prosthesis: 4 cases". Acta Orthop. 86 (6): 740-4. doi:10.3109/ ... The Knee. 23 (2): 261-266. doi:10.1016/j.knee.2015.07.002. PMID 26275579. Khemka, A; Frossard, L; Lord, SJ; Bosley, B; Al ... ACT News - Osseointegration helps above-the-knee amputees. The titanium rod is inserted in the bone and connected through an ...
The typical disability profile of the class is double above-knee amputation." While skiing, they may use a prosthesis. In the ... Double below the knee amputees also have a competitive advantage when compared to double above the knee amputees. From the 2004 ... It has four parts: a socket, a knee, a shank and a foot. Above the knee amputees have difficulty using standard able-bodied ... This class is for people who have both legs amputated above the knee. This classification is sometimes abbreviated as A/K. In ...
Al Muderis also published the first series of combining osseointegration prosthesis with Joint replacement enabling below knee ... orbital prosthesis), or nose (nose prosthesis) Bone anchored limb prostheses Bone anchored hearing conduction amplification ( ... This "osseoperception" means that the prosthesis user regains a more accurate sense of how the prosthesis is interacting with ... One of the peculiarities of osseointegrated prostheses is that mechanical events at the prosthesis (e.g. touch) are transferred ...
Rehm's right leg was amputated below the knee after a wakeboarding accident. He uses a carbon-fibre bladed prosthesis, from ... A rules change at the IAAF meant that he needed to qualify his prosthesis with the IAAF to prove that it did not provide an ... In 2005, at age 14, after a wakeboarding accident, Rehm had his right leg amputated below the knee. Rehm won a gold medal at ... Rehm is nicknamed "The Blade Jumper", as he is a long jumper with a blade-type leg prosthesis. ...
"Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis as a predictor of mechanical loosening of knee prostheses". The Journal of Bone and ... Two synchronised x-ray foci are used to obtain a stereo image of the bone and the prosthesis. The positions of the foci are ... The coordinates of the bone and prosthesis markers are accurately measured and the three-dimensional position of the markers is ... The change in the position (translation and rotation) of the prosthesis markers relative to the bone markers is then determined ...
The Berkeley team developed the PTB Below knee prosthesis for amputations below the knee. Using completely new technologies, ... His modular 'tinker toy' system would then be used to put the prosthesis together. The computer system would later be known as ... In addition, inspired by complaints from fishermen, he replaced the raw hide used to protect the prosthesis with a plastic ... In addition to developing the quadrilateral socket, the team at Berkeley systematized the prosthesis developed by Colin ...
US 5030237 Elbow prosthesis "Pyrocarbon Finger Joint Implant" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-21. Retrieved ... For example, in analysing the knee,ankle, or shoulder joints. Such knowledge assists in developing artificial joints and ... 2013 - 422 pages) "Muscle Physiology - Joint Moment Arm". Knee joint motion description and measurement[permanent dead link] ... "Gender differences in surface rolling and gliding kinematics of the knee". Clin Orthop Relat Res. 413 (413): 208-21. doi: ...
As a result of gangrene he lost one of his legs (a below-knee amputation). He wore a prosthesis, yet never mentioned it and led ...
In 2003, the leg was amputated below the knee, which Aarebrot himself called "a relief". He later used a prosthesis and ...
He carried out biomaterial work in artificial knees, hips, and dental prostheses. He served as president of Rose-Hulman ...
Austin-Moore prosthesis for fracture of the neck of femur Baksi's prosthesis for elbow replacement Charnley prosthesis for ... Borus T, Thornhill T (January 2008). "Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty". J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 16 (1): 9-18. doi:10.5435/ ... Kocmond, JH; Delp, SL; Stern, SH (1995). "Stability and range of motion of Insall-Burstein condylar prostheses. A computer ... Neumann, Lars; Freund, Knud Gade; Sørensen, K. Harry (1996). "Total Hip Arthroplasty with the Charnley Prosthesis in Patients ...
Prostheses are technically the complete finished item. For instance, a C-Leg knee alone is not a prosthesis, but only a ... Prostheses are specifically not orthoses, although given certain circumstances a prosthesis might end up performing some or all ... A prosthesis, prosthetic, or prosthetic limb is a device that replaces a missing body part. It is part of the field of ... Prostheses are typically used to replace parts lost by injury (traumatic) or missing from birth (congenital) or to supplement ...
... instrument maker and prostheses designer. She was the first woman in Prussia to receive a patent (for her leg prosthesis) and ... Her design allowed the knee joint to work without a locking device. It moved using a combination of gut strings and pressure- ... so the prosthesis lacked strength or could not adequately close. In addition, this prosthesis was made of heavy sheet iron and ... Then the prosthesis was pulled over the bandages and hung over the shoulder by a strap that was attached to the front and back ...
Dissatisfied with both the fit and the function of his above-knee prosthesis, Hanger designed a new prosthesis constructed of ... The Virginia state government commissioned Hanger to manufacture the above-knee prosthesis for other wounded soldiers. ... At that moment, a Union cannonball ricocheted inside the stable, striking his left leg below the knee. This was the beginning ... His design used rubber bumpers rather than standard catgut tendons and featured hinges at both the knee and ankle. Hanger ...
... was designed to assist surgeons in minimally-invasive placement of knee prostheses. In 2006, the entire patent portfolio ... the company began to work on minimally-invasive knee surgery and developed its very first robot which they named BRIGIT™. ...
His dissatisfaction with the fit and function of the limb replacement led Hanger to design and construct a new prosthesis from ... The injury required amputation of Hanger's leg above the knee; he underwent the first battlefield amputation of the war, at the ... Hanger returned to his parents' home to recuperate wearing a prosthesis that was essentially a wooden peg. ... whittled barrel staves, rubber and wood, with hinges at the knee and foot. The device worked well, and the state legislature ...
In some cases, prolonged heel contact or knees remaining fulling extended is a problem with training prosthesis use. Foot drag ... For jerky knee motions, the cause could be a loose socket in the knee or inadequate suspension. In that case, the socket might ... the mark is taken where the prosthesis landed. If prosthesis lands outside the landing zone nearer the board than where athlete ... often caused by an ill-fitting prosthesis - can be corrected by shortening the length of the prosthesis. Uneven length strides ...
In some cases, prolong heel contact or knees remaining fulling extended is a problem with training in how to use the prosthesis ... For jerky knee motions, the cause could be a loose socket in the knee or inadequate suspension. In that case, the socket might ... Double below the knee amputees also have a competitive advantage when compared to double above the knee amputees. From the 2004 ... This can be caused by an ill fitting prosthesis that can be fixed by shortening the length of the prosthesis. Some people in ...
His leg was amputated below the knee, and he used a prosthesis the rest of his life. Higgins died on December 15, 1873. He is ...
Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors About the Knee. The Adult Knee. Editors: J.J. Callaghan, A.G. Rosenberg, H.E. Rubash, P.T. Simion, ... Abdeen A, Healey JH (September 2010). "Allograft-prosthesis composite reconstruction of the proximal part of the humerus: ...
Like Ahab, he has replaced the missing limb with a prosthesis made of sperm whale bone, in his case a mallet. Ahab immediately ... A very old, half-deaf African-American with bad knees, is presented in the chapter "Stubb's Supper" at some length in a ...
... commercially available as the Rheo Knee an active ankle-foot orthosis, and the world's first powered ankle-foot prosthesis. ... He used these prostheses to alter his height to avoid awkward body positions and to grab hand and foot holds previously out of ... Both of Herr's legs had to be amputated below the knees; Batzer lost his lower left leg, the toes on his right foot, and the ... Using specialized prostheses that he designed, he created prosthetic feet with high toe stiffness that made it possible to ...
Robotic unicompartmental knee arthroplasty". In Scott, W. Norman (ed.). Insall & Scott Surgery of the Knee (Sixth ed.). ... "Pseudotumors in Association with Well-Functioning Metal-on-Metal Hip Prostheses: A Case-Control Study Using Three-Dimensional ... Where only 40% of traditionally operated knees were in the desired orientation, all of the robotic assisted knees were found to ... Acrobot was originally designed to be used in total knee replacement surgery with application for use in unicompartmental knee ...
Oliveira is a double-below-the-knee amputee, classifying him in the Paralympic T43 class; athletes in this class run in T44 ... Oliveira began running with wooden prostheses, and started competing in races in Brazil at age 13. He began running on carbon- ...
... may be useful in applications such as body armor, packing material, knee and elbow pads, robust shock absorbing ... "Empirical Validation of an Auxetic Structured Foot With the Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis". IEEE Robotics and Automation ...
Unlike all previous prostheses,[citation needed] it stored kinetic energy from the wearer's steps as potential energy, like a ... An amputee himself, having lost a leg below the knee at age 21, Phillips was motivated by the limitations of then-existing ... In 1999 he established Second Wind, a non-profit organization to provide inexpensive and resistant prostheses to amputees ...
... double below the knee amputee prostheses give the runner a competitive advantage over single below the knee amputees. Grouping ... Blades for above the knee amputees have four parts: a socket, a knee, a shank and a foot, while blades for below the knee ... People who are missing both legs below the knee are sometimes referred to as BK while people missing both arms below the elbow ... The sport takes into account the length of the amputation beyond just above or below the knee when assigning a player to a ...
Immunosuppressive medication Intravenous drug abuse Recent joint surgery Hip or knee prosthesis and skin infection HIV ... A replacement prosthesis is usually not inserted at the time of removal to allow antibiotics to clear infection of the region. ... For those with artificial joint implants, there is a chance of 0.86 to 1.1% of getting infected in a knee joint and 0.3 to 1.7 ... In adults the most common joint affected is the knee. Hip, shoulder, wrist and elbow joints are less commonly affected. Spine, ...
The leg was so badly mangled that it later had to be amputated eight inches (20 cm) above the knee. As a result, Pool would not ... After 22 months of rehabilitation and being fitted with a prosthesis, Pool opened a filling station and garage at his home in ...
... below knee amputation). For biopsies, "extraction" is used when force is required (as with endometrial biopsy), and "excision" ... hip prosthesis adjustment) involve cutting and separation only: division (osteotomy), release (peritoneal adhesiolysis) ...
This is especially present when utilized before and after spine, hip, or knee surgery. Telehealth (or telerehabilitation) is a ... prostheses, orthoses, and other interventions. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it ... and knee conditions". Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research. 24 (1): e12159. doi:10.1111/jabr.12159. ISSN 1751-9861. S2CID ... "Effectiveness of manual physical therapy and exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee. A randomized, controlled trial". Annals of ...
His doctors believed that the surgery went well enough to allow him the future use of a prosthesis. Nike Tour playoff record (0 ... it would be an above-the-knee deal, and it's pretty risky for my situation anyway. It's something that I've recognized could ... recognizing that a prosthesis would enable him to walk without pain, but noted, "If I lose my leg, ...
Neppel, blown 10 yards from his gun, had 1 leg severed below the knee and suffered other wounds. Despite his injuries and the ... During his recovery and rehabilitation at McCloskey General Hospital in Temple, Texas, Neppel was fitted with prostheses and ...
Components for partial and total knee joint prostheses ISO 7207-1:2007 Part 1: Classification, definitions and designation of ... Cardiac valve prostheses ISO 5840-1:2015 Part 1: General requirements ISO 5840-2:2015 Part 2: Surgically implanted heart valve ... Vascular prostheses - Tubular vascular grafts and vascular patches ISO 7199:2016 Cardiovascular implants and artificial organs ... Partial and total hip joint prostheses ISO 7206-1:2008 Part 1: Classification and designation of dimensions ISO 7206-2:2011 ...
Such identification through Registry data can lead to prostheses being withdrawn from the market. When investigations by the ... "Utilisation of primary total knee joint replacements across socioeconomic status in the Barwon Statistical Division, Australia ...
SB-LL1 Athletes competing in the class SB-LL1 have significant impairment to one leg, such as amputation above the knee, or "a ... Athletes with annotations will use prostheses during racing. SB-LL2 Athletes competing in the class SB-LL2 have impairment to ... one or both legs "with less activity limitation", such as below-knee amputation. SB-UL Athletes competing in the class SB-UL ...
Untener wore a prosthesis for the rest of his life. Untener had this view of the amputation "A deformed leg was socially ... Due to complications from a genetic deformity to his ankle, doctors were forced to amputate his leg below the knee. ...
Kyle Maynard was born missing both legs above the knee, and both arms above the elbow. Nick Newell is a mixed martial artist ... The most popular method of treatment for congenital amputation is having the child be fit for a prosthesis which can lead to ...
... and eventually had to have his leg amputated above the knee in July. He was fitted with a prosthesis, from which he derived his ...
Charnley was convinced that the best way to fix the prosthesis into the femur was to use bone cement that acted as a grout ... in particular the knee, ankle and shoulder. Charnley also influenced generations of orthopaedic surgeons through his textbook ... As time went by, the number of operations increased, and Charnley designed a machine which mechanically built prostheses and ...
... endoskeletal below Knee and above-knee prosthesis with a soft cosmetic cover Immediate post-operative prosthesis (removable and ... internal knee joints used in the knee joint replacement surgery, etc.) or external (artificial limbs, aesthetic fingers, etc ... Apart from prosthesis and orthosis, a prosthetist and orthotist is the only licensed professional in India to prescribe ... The following aids and appliances are fabricated by the Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics: Endoskeletal prosthesis: ...
It can be used to produce specialized splints, prostheses, parts for medical devices and inert implants. The end goal of 3D ... Many scientists began working on creating a next-generation robot system to assist the surgeon in performing knee and other ... It is having a rapid growth in the prosthesis, medical implants, novel drug formulations and the bioprinting of human tissues ...
Foot Paw Hoof Biomimetics Prosthesis Orthosis Locomotor effects of shoes Lockley, M; Jackson, P (2008). "Morphodynamic ... excessive loading to the knees, hips, lumbo-pelvic joints or lumbar vertebrae). Foot disorders are common in captive elephants ... or who use a prosthesis following the diabetes-related amputation of a leg. Such knowledge can be incorporated in technology ...
The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and ... A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. ... A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal ... prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging. ...
Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae knee prosthesis infection P Gazeau 1 , S Rezig 2 , L Quaesaet 2 , T Williams 3 , D Tande 4 , S ... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae knee prosthesis infection P Gazeau et al. Med Mal Infect. 2018 Aug. ... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection of a total knee arthroplasty an occupational hazard. Traer EA, Williams MR, Keenan JN. ... Septic arthritis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in a prosthetic knee joint. Hocqueloux L, Poisson DM, Sunder S, ...
Hip or knee replacement surgery requires careful planning, but it is also something that can give you back your vitality and ... How to choose a hip or knee replacement surgeon and prosthesis. 21 Shares Share 1 Tweet 1 Share 1 Email 18 ... Filed Under: Joint ReplacementHip ImplantsPreparing for Hip ReplacementKnee ImplantsPreparing for Knee Replacement ... People with knee and hip problems will cut back on 40% or more of the things that make their lives worthwhile. ...
Finally, dr Janssen recommended surgery of the knee: a knee prosthesis. The operation was 100, no 1000% less troublesome than I ... Experiences of a 55 year old patient after total knee prosthesis. She was operated by RPA Janssen, MD at Máxima Medical Center ... Surprisingly, replacement of my knee has really improved my walking; my other osteoarthritic knee feels less painful. I feel ... I could no longer walk without pain, sometimes not even bend my knee. I needed help to get in and out of my car. A short walk ( ...
A novel method for in vivo knee prosthesis wear measurement. Short, A; Gill, H S; Marks, B; Waite, J C; Kellett, C F; Price, A ... A novel method for in vivo knee prosthesis wear measurement. ... Wear remains an important cause of failure in knee replacement ... This method was used to measure in vivo prosthesis wear to an accuracy of 0.11 mm. ...
Start Over You searched for: Subjects Knee Prosthesis ✖Remove constraint Subjects: Knee Prosthesis ... 1. Total knee replacement Publication: [Washington] : GWU, c1978 Subject(s): Knee Joint -- surgery. Knee Prosthesis ...
Knee osteoarthritis may occur locally in the individual compartments of the knee joint. Either the inner knee, the outer knee ... of the knee prior to the actual knee replacement ultimately decides whether a partial knee replacement or full knee replacement ... What is the success rate of a Repicci prosthesis for osteoarthritis of the knee?. The success rate of the Repicci prosthesis ... What is the procedure for a Repicci prosthesis?. The partial knee prosthesis only covers the arthrosis of the medial (inner) ...
Dr Ryan Siwiec treats knee instability and sports injuries by using knee prosthesis in Auburn Hills, Oakland County, MI. ... An unstable knee causes pain, swelling, stiffness and a tendency of the joint to buckle or give way. ... the patella or knee cap can move out of its groove in the knee joint and lead to instability. An unstable knee causes pain, ... Unstable Knee. The knee joint is one of the largest joints in the body. This highly complex joint has several tissues ...
Belowkneeprosthesis leg isaprostheticlimbforamputationofthelowerleg.Applicabletopatientswithamputationwithin8cmofthekneejointto7cmabovethemedialmalleolus.TheBKprosthesisconsistsofareceivingcavity,ahan
Knee prosthesis. 3055-1. Known or suspected Munchausen syndrome by proxy during current admission. ...
This preliminary study compared the antagonistic active knee prosthesis with subjects prescribed knee prostheses. The subjects ... This thesis presents the design and evaluation of a novel biomimetic active knee prosthesis capable of emulating intact knee ... Agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis: A preliminary study in level-ground walking. E. C. Martinez-Villalpando, and H. M. ... Use of the novel biomimetic active knee prosthesis resulted in a metabolic cost reduction for all four subjects by an average ...
FDA approves Hi-Flex mobile bearing knee prostheses Mitchell Sheinkop, M.D., will be the first in the U.S. to surgically ... Women wait longer to pursue knee-replacement surgery than men do Is getting new knees on your list of New Years resolutions? ... Unconscious prejudices among doctors may explain why women complaining of knee pain are less likely than men to be recommended ... Research at the University of Delaware indicates that women wait longer to pursue knee-replacement surgery than men do. ...
Characteristics of 9 nontuberculous mycobacterial knee and hip prosthetic joint SSIs at multiple hospitals, Oregon, 2010-2014* ... Prosthesis type. Procedure year. SSI type. Mycobacterium species. Time to SSI, d†. SSI to culture, d‡. Time to culture, d§. ... Outbreak of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Joint Prosthesis Infections, Oregon, USA, 2010-2016 Genevieve L. Buser12. , Matthew R. ... Outbreak of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Joint Prosthesis Infections, Oregon, USA, 2010-2016. ...
We propose an active prosthesis to improve performance. The motor in our prosthetic knee allows the patient to move his hip ... We are currently optimizing the prosthesis design to achieve accurate tracking of the knee angle. Future optimization criteria ... To improve the efficiency of the prosthesis, we use the braking phase of the prosthesis to regenerate energy. By storing energy ... We are considering two knee motor designs-a gear drive and a ball screw drive. Both designs appear to have the potential for ...
For the basics of meniscal pathology we advise you first to read the article Knee Meniscus - Part... ... Breast Prosthesis *Breast Implants. Mammography *Test. Male Breast *Pathology of the Male Breast ...
Contraindications include bacteremia, inaccessible joints, joint prosthesis, and overlying infection in the soft tissue. Large ... The knee joint is the most common and the easiest joint for the physician to aspirate. One approach involves insertion of a ... Local corticosteroid injections can provide significant relief and often ameliorate acute exacerbations of knee osteoarthritis ... Knee joint aspiration and injection are performed to aid in diagnosis and treatment of knee joint diseases. ...
... total knee replacement) is relief of significant, disabling pain caused by severe arthritis. See the image below. ... The primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (ie, ... Total knee arthroplasty. Total knee replacement prosthesis ... Knee Position during Surgical Wound Closure in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Review. J Knee Surg. 2018 Jan. 31 (1):6-12. [QxMD ... Two knees or not two knees? Patient costs and outcomes following bilateral and unilateral total knee joint replacement surgery ...
PRI Femoral Impactor Block for knee prosthesis surgery. Orthopedic Manual Surgical Instrument. ...
High Performance Robotic Below-Knee Prostheses. In human locomotion, the ankle plays an important energetic role, and supplies ... However, in the majority of existing below-knee prostheses, the prosthetic ankle joints are energy-passive, only storing and ... below-knee) amputees in the United States. Xiangrong Shen, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. ... of human legs in a variety of gaits and to transfer these principles to the design and control of powered leg prostheses and ...
MEASURING SAGITTAL KNEE ANGLE AND MOMENT USING SENSORS EMBEDDED IN A PROSTHESIS. Manz, S., Schmalz, T., Schopper, V., Dosen, S. ... Towards the usage of embedded prosthesis sensors for real-life gait analysis of amputee subjects. Manz, S., Seifert, D., ...
Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship of press-fit condylar sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses ... Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship of press-fit condylar sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses ... Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship of press-fit condylar sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses ... Long-term clinical outcomes and survivorship of press-fit condylar sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses ...
Determination of endurance properties of knee tibial trays ... Implants for surgery - Total knee-joint prostheses - Part 1: ... of tibial trays used in knee-joint prostheses to support and secure the plastic articulating surface. It applies to tibial ...
Knee replacement is surgery to remove a damaged knee joint and replace it with an artificial joint. Learn about the purpose, ... Knee replacement surgery, or knee arthroplasty, is surgery to replace parts of the knee with a prosthesis or artificial parts. ... The goal of knee replacement is to restore pain-free range of motion and full knee function.. A doctor may recommend knee ... You may need knee replacement surgery if you have knee joint damage and severe knee pain that makes daily activities, such as ...
NIH Consensus Development Conference on Total Knee Replacement (Day 1) ... Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee. Knee Prosthesis. Reoperation Publication Types: Congress. Consensus Development Conference, ... Total knee replacement (TKR) has shown increasing success in relieving knee pain and improving joint function for patients ... NIH Consensus Development Conference on Total Knee Replacement / OMAR ... [et al.]. Author: National Institutes of Health ...
ReMotion Knee. Polycentric knee prosthesis on a polymer basis. Designed for conditions in developing countries, the prosthesis ... It is suitable for mass production, and its price of 80 USD is 10% of that of comparable prostheses. ...
... cemented posterior stabilized knee prosthesis after a mean 25-month follow-up: analysis of 110 prostheses.. Thelu CE; Pasquier ... 3. [Uncemented knee prosthesis. Results apropos of 58 cases with a minimum of 5-year follow-up].. Gacon G; Coillard JY; Barba L ... Total knee arthroplasty with a mobile-bearing prosthesis: comparison of retention and sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ... 8. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with the oxford prosthesis in patients with medial compartment arthritis.. Emerson RH; ...
... principles and current concepts in the treatment of patients with a need for primary arthroplasty in the hip and knee. This ... Case 3: Cemented fixation: with and without impaction grafting: tumor prostheses: cement within cement ... Overview of failure mechanisms and indications for revision knee arthroplasty. *Preoperative planning for revision knee ... Revision knee arthroplasty: *Case 1: Loosening with malalignment. *o Case 2: Severe bone loss requiring bone or metal ...
Orthotics may include prostheses; a brace for your ankle, knee, or foot; or custom-fitted shoes or inserts for individuals with ...
Blood Vessel Prosthesis* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... In vivo deformation of the human abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries with hip and knee flexion: implications for the ... In vivo deformation of the human abdominal aorta and common iliac arteries with hip and knee flexion: implications for the ... The effect of aging on deformations of the superficial femoral artery resulting from hip and knee flexion: potential clinical ...
... skin-implant interface both after implantation into the dorsum and after implantation into the residuum after below-knee ... skin-implant interface both after implantation into dorsum and after implantation into the residuum after below-knee amputation ... and vastus medialis of the pigs in order to increase adherence of the below-knee prosthesis (see Table 1). ... Bone-anchored limb prostheses offer a number of advantages over socket-based prostheses (1). The technology of osseointegration ...
  • Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection of a total knee arthroplasty an occupational hazard. (nih.gov)
  • Total knee arthroplasty. (medscape.com)
  • Methods: The study consisted of a consecutive series of 444 patients (mean age [and standard deviation], 66.5 ± 7.4 years) who underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty, with one side treated immediately after the other. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Knee replacement surgery , or knee arthroplasty , is surgery to replace parts of the knee with a prosthesis or artificial parts. (healthgrades.com)
  • This course teaches current concepts in the treatment of patients with a need for revision or complex primary arthroplasty in the hip and knee. (aofoundation.org)
  • 2. Cemented all polyethylene tibial insert unicompartimental knee arthroplasty: a long term follow-up study. (nih.gov)
  • 5. [Medin modular implant for total knee arthroplasty--mid-term results]. (nih.gov)
  • 6. The outcome of rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty with cement at a minimum of ten years of follow-up. (nih.gov)
  • 8. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty with the oxford prosthesis in patients with medial compartment arthritis. (nih.gov)
  • 9. [Total knee arthroplasty with the Beznoska S.V.L. implant: short-term results]. (nih.gov)
  • 10. Mobile bearing vs fixed bearing prostheses for posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty for postoperative functional status in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. (nih.gov)
  • 11. Mobile and fixed-bearing (all-polyethylene tibial component) total knee arthroplasty designs: surgical technique. (nih.gov)
  • 12. [Fixed-bearing versus mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized clinical and radiological study]. (nih.gov)
  • 13. [Total knee arthroplasty with bicruciate preservation: Comparison versus the same posterostabilized design at eight years follow-up]. (nih.gov)
  • 15. [Mid-term results of Wallaby I posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of the first 425 cases]. (nih.gov)
  • 17. Mobile-bearing insert translational and rotational kinematics in a PCL-retaining total knee arthroplasty. (nih.gov)
  • 18. Poor short-term outcomes after computer-assisted rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty with a deep-trochlear-groove femoral component: analysis of 19 patients. (nih.gov)
  • 19. Survival analysis of total knee arthroplasty at a minimum 10 years' follow-up: a multicenter French nationwide study including 846 cases. (nih.gov)
  • 20. Total knee arthroplasty with a mobile-bearing prosthesis: comparison of retention and sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament in cementless implants. (nih.gov)
  • unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. (nih.gov)
  • The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The knee design is motivated by a mono-articular prosthetic knee model comprised of a variable damper and two series- elastic clutch units spanning the knee joint. (mit.edu)
  • The subjects' prescribed prostheses encompass four of the leading prosthetic knee technologies commercially available, including passive and electronically controlled variable-damping prosthetic systems. (mit.edu)
  • The results of this investigation report for the first time a metabolic cost reduction when walking with a prosthetic system comprised of an electrically powered active knee and passive foot-ankle prostheses, as compared to walking with a conventional transfemoral prosthesis. (mit.edu)
  • Above-knee amputees who use a prosthetic leg typically have to compensate for its shortcomings with unnatural hip motions. (csuohio.edu)
  • The motor in our prosthetic knee allows the patient to move his hip normally, thus reducing the possibility of ancillary health issues. (csuohio.edu)
  • However, in the majority of existing below-knee prostheses, the prosthetic ankle joints are energy-passive, only storing and dissipating energy in use. (nih.gov)
  • User-adaptive control of a magnetorheological prosthetic knee A magnetorheological knee prosthesis is presented. (mit.edu)
  • User-adaptive control of a magnetorheological prosthetic knee A magnetorheological. (mit.edu)
  • and for higher levels of amputation, the prosthetic knee. (essentialevidenceplus.com)
  • But it's the way they recreate these phases of gait that separates one type of prosthetic knee from another. (ottobock.com)
  • Even the most advanced prosthetic knee joint or foot component does not compensate for a poorly designed socket. (nih.gov)
  • The knee joint is one of the largest joints in the body. (drsiwiec.com)
  • Damage to any of these supportive structures causes the instability of the knee joint. (drsiwiec.com)
  • When these tissues get injured, the patella or knee cap can move out of its groove in the knee joint and lead to instability. (drsiwiec.com)
  • Considering the type and severity of injury, your surgeon decides on the surgical repair or reconstruction of the joint by replacing the damaged parts with a prosthesis. (drsiwiec.com)
  • Knee joint aspiration and injection are performed to aid in diagnosis and treatment of knee joint diseases. (aafp.org)
  • The knee joint is the most common and the easiest joint for the physician to aspirate. (aafp.org)
  • Contraindications include bacteremia, inaccessible joints, joint prosthesis, and overlying infection in the soft tissue. (aafp.org)
  • Knee joint aspiration and injection are performed to establish a diagnosis, relieve discomfort, drain off infected fluid, or instill medication. (aafp.org)
  • Knee replacement surgery is a procedure to remove a damaged surface of the knee joint and resurface worn-out cartilage with new gliding surfaces. (healthgrades.com)
  • A doctor may recommend knee replacement for severe knee joint damage from a knee injury or arthritis. (healthgrades.com)
  • A knee joint is made up of the upper shinbone (tibia), the kneecap (patella), and the lower thighbone (femur). (healthgrades.com)
  • Total knee replacement (TKR) has shown increasing success in relieving knee pain and improving joint function for patients suffering from knee problems due to injury, degenerative disease, and inflammation. (nih.gov)
  • Each year, approximately 300,000 TKR surgeries are performed in the United States for end-stage arthritis of the knee joint. (nih.gov)
  • Any joint in the body may be affected by the disease, but it is particularly common in the knee. (aaos.org)
  • The knee is the largest and strongest joint in your body. (aaos.org)
  • The ends of the three bones that form the knee joint are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth, slippery substance that protects and cushions the bones as you bend and straighten your knee. (aaos.org)
  • The knee joint is surrounded by a thin lining called the synovial membrane. (aaos.org)
  • In osteoarthritis, the cartilage in the knee joint gradually wears away. (aaos.org)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that attacks multiple joints throughout the body, including the knee joint. (aaos.org)
  • In rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial membrane that covers the knee joint begins to swell. (aaos.org)
  • Meniscal tears and ligament injuries can cause instability and additional wear on the knee joint which, over time, can result in arthritis. (aaos.org)
  • A knee joint affected by arthritis may be painful and inflamed. (aaos.org)
  • The joint may become stiff and swollen, making it difficult to bend and straighten the knee. (aaos.org)
  • A prosthesis for replacement of a damaged joint or load-bearing structure in an animal or human body comprises a shaped structural member, a relatively thick or cushioning coating of a physiologically inert elastomer over the surfaces of the structural member in load-bearing relationship with the skeletal structure of the body, and an open-pore, tissue-ingrowth-receptive fabric coating the elastomer, all elements being firmly bonded to each other. (justia.com)
  • Replacement for a knee joint. (nih.gov)
  • Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology International Conference, Lyon, France, pp. 4687-4692, 2007. (mit.edu)
  • S. K. Au, J. Weber, H. M. Herr and E.C. Martinez-Villapando, Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology International Conference, Lyon, France, pp. 3020-3026, 2007. (mit.edu)
  • Powered ankle-foot prosthesis improves walking metabolic economy At moderate to fast walking speeds, the human ankle provides net positive. (mit.edu)
  • Unconscious prejudices among doctors may explain why women complaining of knee pain are less likely than men to be recommended for total knee replacement surgery, a study in the current issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests. (news-medical.net)
  • Research at the University of Delaware indicates that women wait longer to pursue knee-replacement surgery than men do. (news-medical.net)
  • also referred to as total knee replacement [TKR]) is relief of significant, disabling pain caused by severe arthritis. (medscape.com)
  • The goal of knee replacement is to restore pain-free range of motion and full knee function. (healthgrades.com)
  • Osteoarthritis , which is an age-related condition, is a common reason for knee replacement surgery. (healthgrades.com)
  • With knee replacement surgery, people can live more active lives free of chronic knee pain . (healthgrades.com)
  • It can take 4-12 months to completely recover from knee replacement surgery. (healthgrades.com)
  • Since the first knee replacement surgery in 1968, there have been significant advances in surgical techniques and material components. (healthgrades.com)
  • In a 2019 study, using data from 2000-2014, researchers estimated that roughly 1.2 million knee replacement surgeries will take place in 2025. (healthgrades.com)
  • This article looks at knee replacement surgery, including the different types of knee replacement, what makes a person a candidate for knee replacement, and what is involved before, during, and after knee replacement surgery. (healthgrades.com)
  • What is knee replacement surgery? (healthgrades.com)
  • Doctors recommend knee replacement surgery for severe knee pain , typically only after Trusted Source PubMed Central Highly respected database from the National Institutes of Health Go to source nonsurgical treatments have stopped helping relieve pain or aid everyday activities. (healthgrades.com)
  • Knee replacement is common, but orthopedic knee surgery comes with risks and potential complications. (healthgrades.com)
  • Consider getting a second opinion about your treatment choices, including nonsurgical options, before deciding on knee replacement. (healthgrades.com)
  • What are the different types of knee replacement surgery? (healthgrades.com)
  • Knee replacement involves resurfacing and replacing any or all parts of a knee. (healthgrades.com)
  • The type of injury or damage to the knee you have sustained, as well as your lifestyle and overall health status, help inform what type of knee replacement your surgeon recommends. (healthgrades.com)
  • 1. LCS mobile-bearing total knee replacement. (nih.gov)
  • Surgical procedures included total hip replacement, total knee replacement, vertebral fusion, and hip reconstruction. (cdc.gov)
  • I have struggled with knee osteoarthritis for years. (rpajanssen.nl)
  • This can be caused by sudden twisting of the knee, tears of the meniscus, ligament or capsule, osteoarthritis of the knee (wear and tear of the cushioning cartilage tissue between bones) and sports injuries. (drsiwiec.com)
  • Local corticosteroid injections can provide significant relief and often ameliorate acute exacerbations of knee osteoarthritis associated with significant effusions. (aafp.org)
  • Results: Postoperative total knee scores (95 and 94 points), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (19 and 18 points), University of California, Los Angeles activity score (both prostheses, 5 points), range of motion (129° ± 6.3° and 127° ± 6.8°), and radiographic findings did not differ significantly between the press-fit condylar Sigma mobile and fixed-bearing designs at the final follow-up. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • The major types of arthritis that affect the knee are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and posttraumatic arthritis. (aaos.org)
  • Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the knee. (aaos.org)
  • Although lower extremity prostheses are currently better able to give assistance than their upper-extremity counterparts, important locomotion problems still remain for leg amputees. (mit.edu)
  • These challenges point to the need for highly versatile, fully integrated lower-extremity powered prostheses that can replicate the biological behavior of the intact human leg. (mit.edu)
  • Such prostheses can restore an important component of biological ankle function for lower-extremity amputees. (mit.edu)
  • This investigation hypothesizes that the biomimetic active-knee prosthesis, with a variable impedance control, can improve unilateral transfemoral amputee locomotion in level-ground walking, reducing the metabolic cost of walking at self- selected speeds. (mit.edu)
  • Powered transfemoral prostheses have the ability to ameliorate the substantial energetic cost difference between amputees and non-amputees during walking. (mit.edu)
  • The quasipassive transfemoral prostheses developed in this lab have onboard computation and control, but require minimal electrical power to operate. (mit.edu)
  • To evaluate this hypothesis, a preliminary study investigated the clinical impact of the active knee prosthesis on the metabolic cost of walking of four unilateral above-knee amputees. (mit.edu)
  • The proposed project aims to develop a novel robotic actuator that can generate more power and store a larger amount of energy in a compact and light-weight robotic prosthesis, with the objective of significantly enhancing the health and life quality of the 400,000 trans-tibial (below-knee) amputees in the United States. (nih.gov)
  • Interfacing bionic prostheses with the peripheral nervous system will allow amputees to receive tactile feedback from their prosthesis and volitionally control it akin to their biological limbs. (mit.edu)
  • Neural control of bionic prostheses will allow users to dynamically adapt their gait to changing terrains. (mit.edu)
  • Microprocessor knees use sensors, software, and a built-in computer to adjust fluid-based resistance to your unique gait. (ottobock.com)
  • Bone-anchored limb prostheses offer a number of advantages over socket-based prostheses ( 1 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • A method to determine the optimal features for control of a powered lower-limb prostheses Lower-limb prostheses are rapidly. (mit.edu)
  • Sockets-the cup-shaped devices that attach an amputated limb to a lower-limb prosthesis-are made through unscientific, artisanal methods that do not have repeatable. (mit.edu)
  • Nineteen patients (53%) had lower limb ignorance about diabetic foot care among primary care amputation, the commonest of which was below knee. (who.int)
  • Introduction to below knee prosthesis leg (1)_Shijiazhuang Aosuo International Trade Co., Ltd. (as-health.cn)
  • The deeply porous Skin and Bone Integrated Pylon (SBIP) presented an infection-free skin-implant interface both after implantation into the dorsum and after implantation into the residuum after below-knee amputation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Table 1 Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients commonest of which was below knee (53%) (see Table 3). (who.int)
  • Conclusions: The results of the present long-term clinical study suggest that excellent clinical and radiographic results were achieved with both the press-fit condylar Sigma mobile and fixed-bearing cruciate-retaining total knee designs. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Percutaneous porous devices used in bone-anchored prostheses have the potential for initial integration with the skin, as demonstrated in animal studies by various research groups ( 7 - 9 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • In many embodiments, a stem of the prosthesis comprising the above elements is adapted to be inserted into a bone cavity, and is eventually affixed firmly thereto by fibrous tissue and bony ingrowth. (justia.com)
  • At the forefront of current practice in this art are several techniques generally recognized as significant advancements in improving the biological compatibility of the prosthesis-to-bone interface and they are discussed below. (justia.com)
  • This refers to an embedment system in which the metal stem of a prosthesis is cemented into intimate contact with porous hollow bone structure. (justia.com)
  • A major advantage of this system is more uniform distribution of mechanical loads, elimination of relative motion between prosthesis and bone, and the achievement of much lower load per unit area (psi loading) than in devices of the earlier art, such lower loading more closely approaching the normal bone loading of undamaged natural skeletal structure. (justia.com)
  • Initial ingrowth of the patient's tissue into the prosthesis is, of necessity, fibrous and does not tend to develop calcium-rich bone until months or years postoperatively. (justia.com)
  • Background: We are aware of no study that has compared press-fit condylar Sigma fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total knee prostheses in the same patients after more than ten years of follow-up. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • 4. Outcomes of 447 SCORE® highly congruent mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasties after 5-10 years follow-up. (nih.gov)
  • This thesis presents the design and evaluation of a novel biomimetic active knee prosthesis capable of emulating intact knee biomechanics during level-ground walking. (mit.edu)
  • The biomechanics and energetics of human running using an elastic knee exoskeleton While the effects of series compliance on running biomechanics are well. (mit.edu)
  • Finally, dr Janssen recommended surgery of the knee: a knee prosthesis. (rpajanssen.nl)
  • I feel that surgery of the other knee may still be postponed for some years. (rpajanssen.nl)
  • PRI Femoral Impactor Block for knee prosthesis surgery. (fda.gov)
  • The pain increased progressively with cartilage loss in both knees. (rpajanssen.nl)
  • This preliminary study compared the antagonistic active knee prosthesis with subjects' prescribed knee prostheses. (mit.edu)
  • Experiences of a 55 year old patient after total knee prosthesis . (rpajanssen.nl)
  • We found no significant clinical advantage for a mobile-bearing over a fixed-bearing total knee prosthesis. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Testimonial text, related to the topic, or introduction text to the topic complex total hip and knee bla bla bla. (aofoundation.org)
  • 7. [Laxity and functional results of Miller-Galante total knee prosthesis with posterior cruciate ligament sparing after a 6-year follow-up]. (nih.gov)
  • 16. [Influence of the tibial slope on tibial translation and mobility of non-constrained total knee prosthesis]. (nih.gov)
  • The indications, complications, and pitfalls for knee arthrocentesis generally can be applied to other joints ( Tables 2 and 3 ) . (aafp.org)
  • By 2030, an estimated 4 million hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed per year in the United States. (medscape.com)
  • Ottobock launched the first fully microprocessor-controlled knee in 1997 and remains the world's leading manufacturer of MPKs to this day. (ottobock.com)
  • An effusion of the knee often produces detectable suprapatellar or parapatellar swelling. (aafp.org)
  • At this early stage, the patient begins knee movement, sometimes using a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine and exercises. (medscape.com)
  • Posttraumatic arthritis is form of arthritis that develops after an injury to the knee. (aaos.org)
  • Design Optimization of an Above-Knee Prosthesis with Energy Regenerati" by Taylor Barto, Holly Warner et al. (csuohio.edu)
  • Several parameters characterize the prosthesis design. (csuohio.edu)
  • We are currently optimizing the prosthesis design to achieve accurate tracking of the knee angle. (csuohio.edu)
  • The goal of this project is to uncover the principles behind the biomechanical design and neuromuscular control of human legs in a variety of gaits and to transfer these principles to the design and control of powered leg prostheses and robotic rehabilitation devices. (nih.gov)
  • Agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis: A preliminary study in level-ground walking, Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development (JRRD), vol. 46, no. 3, pp. 361-73, 2009. (mit.edu)
  • The Biomechatronics Group is developing transtibial prostheses that produce net mechanical work. (mit.edu)
  • Proportional EMG Control of Ankle Plantar Flexion in a Powered Transtibial Prosthesis The human calf muscle generates 80% of the mechanical work to walk throughout stance-phase, powered plantar. (mit.edu)
  • What's the difference between a microprocessor knee and a mechanical knee prosthesis? (ottobock.com)
  • Mechanical knees are usually controlled by a mechanical lock, friction, or pneumatic or hydraulic fluids. (ottobock.com)
  • When you present with these symptoms, your doctor diagnoses knee instability by performing a thorough physical examination to test the stability of each ligament and may order imaging tests such as X-rays, MRI or CT scans to confirm on the diagnosis. (drsiwiec.com)
  • In human locomotion, the ankle plays an important energetic role, and supplies substantially more positive power than the knee and hip. (nih.gov)
  • This results in knee pain and stiffness. (aaos.org)
  • The powered knee system is comprised of two series-elastic actuators positioned in parallel in an agonist-antagonist configuration. (mit.edu)
  • Mitchell Sheinkop, M.D., will be the first in the U.S. to surgically implant the just-approved Nex Gen LPS-Flex mobile bearing knee on February 20, 2008 at the Neurologic and Orthopedic Hospital of Chicago. (news-medical.net)
  • We propose an active prosthesis to improve performance. (csuohio.edu)
  • The knee generally is easiest to aspirate when the patient is supine and the knee is extended. (aafp.org)
  • The patient is placed in the supine position, and the knee is extended (some physicians prefer to have the knee bent to 90 degrees). (aafp.org)
  • 14. Poor results of the Optetrak™ cemented posterior stabilized knee prosthesis after a mean 25-month follow-up: analysis of 110 prostheses. (nih.gov)
  • I could no longer walk without pain, sometimes not even bend my knee. (rpajanssen.nl)
  • Pain may cause a feeling of weakness or buckling in the knee. (aaos.org)