Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.
Infections with bacteria of the genus KLEBSIELLA.
A species of gram-negative bacteria causing URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS and SEPTICEMIA.
Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
A group of beta-lactam antibiotics in which the sulfur atom in the thiazolidine ring of the penicillin molecule is replaced by a carbon atom. THIENAMYCINS are a subgroup of carbapenems which have a sulfur atom as the first constituent of the side chain.
Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.
An enzyme system that catalyzes the fixing of nitrogen in soil bacteria and blue-green algae (CYANOBACTERIA). EC 1.18.6.1.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the liver as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.
The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.
Gram-negative, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature. Both motile and non-motile strains exist. The species is closely related to KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE and is frequently associated with nosocomial infections
Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.
Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.
Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial derived from CEPHALORIDINE and used especially for Pseudomonas and other gram-negative infections in debilitated patients.
Single or multiple areas of PUS due to bacterial infection within the hepatic parenchyma. It can be caused by a variety of BACTERIA, local or disseminated from infections elsewhere such as in APPENDICITIS; CHOLECYSTITIS; PERITONITIS; and after LIVER TRANSPLANTATION.
A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the first step of histidine catabolism, forming UROCANIC ACID and AMMONIA from HISTIDINE. Deficiency of this enzyme is associated with elevated levels of serum histidine and is called histidinemia (AMINO ACID METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS).
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the intestines of humans and a wide variety of animals, as well as in manure, soil, and polluted waters. Its species are pathogenic, causing urinary tract infections and are also considered secondary invaders, causing septic lesions at other sites of the body.
A non-heme iron-sulfur protein isolated from Clostridium pasteurianum and other bacteria. It is a component of NITROGENASE, which is active in nitrogen fixation, and consists of two subunits with molecular weights of 59.5 kDa and 50.7 kDa, respectively.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.
Beta-lactam antibiotics that differ from PENICILLINS in having the thiazolidine sulfur atom replaced by carbon, the sulfur then becoming the first atom in the side chain. They are unstable chemically, but have a very broad antibacterial spectrum. Thienamycin and its more stable derivatives are proposed for use in combinations with enzyme inhibitors.
Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.
A granulomatous disease caused by KLEBSIELLA RHINOSCLEROMATIS infection. Despite its name, this disease is not limited to the nose and NASOPHARYNX but may affect any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, sometimes with extension to the lip and the skin.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that is frequently isolated from clinical specimens. Its most common site of infection is the urinary tract.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the natural environment (soil, water, and plant surfaces) or as an opportunistic human pathogen.
Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.
An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.
Semisynthetic thienamycin that has a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including many multiresistant strains. It is stable to beta-lactamases. Clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of infections of various body systems. Its effectiveness is enhanced when it is administered in combination with CILASTATIN, a renal dipeptidase inhibitor.
Cyclic polypeptide antibiotic from Bacillus colistinus. It is composed of Polymyxins E1 and E2 (or Colistins A, B, and C) which act as detergents on cell membranes. Colistin is less toxic than Polymyxin B, but otherwise similar; the methanesulfonate is used orally.
A sugar alcohol formed by the reduction of ribose.
Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.
A semisynthetic cephamycin antibiotic resistant to beta-lactamase.
Semisynthetic broad-spectrum cephalosporin.
Non-susceptibility of an organism to the action of the cephalosporins.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in water, sewage, soil, meat, hospital environments, and on the skin and in the intestinal tract of man and animals as a commensal.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Semisynthetic, broad-spectrum, AMPICILLIN derived ureidopenicillin antibiotic proposed for PSEUDOMONAS infections. It is also used in combination with other antibiotics.
A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.
The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
A building block of penicillin, devoid of significant antibacterial activity. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of urea and water to carbon dioxide and ammonia. EC 3.5.1.5.
4-carbon straight chain aliphatic hydrocarbons substituted with two hydroxyl groups. The hydroxyl groups cannot be on the same carbon atom.
Electrophoresis in which a pH gradient is established in a gel medium and proteins migrate until they reach the site (or focus) at which the pH is equal to their isoelectric point.
Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
A TETRACYCLINE analog, having a 7-dimethylamino and lacking the 5 methyl and hydroxyl groups, which is effective against tetracycline-resistant STAPHYLOCOCCUS infections.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.
Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.
A genus of bacteria causing GRANULOMA INGUINALE and other granulomatous lesions.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.
A monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic originally isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum. It is resistant to beta-lactamases and is used in gram-negative infections, especially of the meninges, bladder, and kidneys. It may cause a superinfection with gram-positive organisms.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in humans and other animals including MAMMALS; BIRDS; REPTILES; and AMPHIBIANS. It has also been isolated from SOIL and WATER as well as from clinical specimens such as URINE; THROAT; SPUTUM; BLOOD; and wound swabs as an opportunistic pathogen.
Polyhydric alcohols having no more than one hydroxy group attached to each carbon atom. They are formed by the reduction of the carbonyl group of a sugar to a hydroxyl group.(From Dorland, 28th ed)
Porins are protein molecules that were originally found in the outer membrane of GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA and that form multi-meric channels for the passive DIFFUSION of WATER; IONS; or other small molecules. Porins are present in bacterial CELL WALLS, as well as in plant, fungal, mammalian and other vertebrate CELL MEMBRANES and MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP, L-glutamate, and NH3 to ADP, orthophosphate, and L-glutamine. It also acts more slowly on 4-methylene-L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 6.3.1.2.
Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.
An enzyme that catalyzes the dehydration of 1,2-propanediol to propionaldehyde. EC 4.2.1.28.
A cephalosporin antibiotic.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the urologic patient.
Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.
Broad-spectrum semisynthetic penicillin derivative used parenterally. It is susceptible to gastric juice and penicillinase and may damage platelet function.
Clavulanic acid and its salts and esters. The acid is a suicide inhibitor of bacterial beta-lactamase enzymes from Streptomyces clavuligerus. Administered alone, it has only weak antibacterial activity against most organisms, but given in combination with other beta-lactam antibiotics it prevents antibiotic inactivation by microbial lactamase.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
A method where a culturing surface inoculated with microbe is exposed to small disks containing known amounts of a chemical agent resulting in a zone of inhibition (usually in millimeters) of growth of the microbe corresponding to the susceptibility of the strain to the agent.
Monocyclic, bacterially produced or semisynthetic beta-lactam antibiotics. They lack the double ring construction of the traditional beta-lactam antibiotics and can be easily synthesized.
A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria found in soil and water. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs or irregular clumps, and sometimes in chains of varying lengths.
A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*27 allele family.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.
A group of derivatives of naphthyridine carboxylic acid, quinoline carboxylic acid, or NALIDIXIC ACID.
Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
The interference in synthesis of an enzyme due to the elevated level of an effector substance, usually a metabolite, whose presence would cause depression of the gene responsible for enzyme synthesis.
Reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of sugar alcohols to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2. and EC 1.1.99.
A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)
Anogenital ulcers caused by Calymmatobacterium granulomatis as distinguished from lymphogranuloma inguinale (see LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM) caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. Diagnosis is made by demonstration of typical intracellular Donovan bodies in crushed-tissue smears.
A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.
A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.
Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of a phenol sulfate to yield a phenol and sulfate. Arylsulfatase A, B, and C have been separated. A deficiency of arylsulfatases is one of the causes of metachromatic leukodystrophy (LEUKODYSTROPHY, METACHROMATIC). EC 3.1.6.1.
DNA elements that include the component genes and insertion site for a site-specific recombination system that enables them to capture mobile gene cassettes.
The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
A metallic element with the atomic symbol Mo, atomic number 42, and atomic weight 95.94. It is an essential trace element, being a component of the enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and nitrate reductase. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A five-carbon sugar alcohol derived from XYLOSE by reduction of the carbonyl group. It is as sweet as sucrose and used as a noncariogenic sweetener.
The natural bactericidal property of BLOOD due to normally occurring antibacterial substances such as beta lysin, leukin, etc. This activity needs to be distinguished from the bactericidal activity contained in a patient's serum as a result of antimicrobial therapy, which is measured by a SERUM BACTERICIDAL TEST.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped enterobacteria that can use citrate as the sole source of carbon.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms occur in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. The species are either nonpathogenic or opportunistic pathogens.
Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.
A family of signal transducing adaptor proteins that control the METABOLISM of NITROGEN. They are primarily found in prokaryotes.
Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.
A genus of gram-negative bacteria of the family MORAXELLACEAE, found in soil and water and of uncertain pathogenicity.
Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are associated with plants as pathogens, saprophytes, or as constituents of the epiphytic flora.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.

Antibiotic synergy and antagonism against clinical isolates of Klebsiella species. (1/765)

Minimal inhibitory concentrations of kanamycin, gentamicin, amikacin, cephalothin, and chloramphenicol were determined in Trypticase soy broth for 70 clinical isolates of Klebsiella species. Gentamicin and amikacin were the most active on a weight basis. Chloramphenicol was more active than kanamycin, and cephalothin was the least active of all. Studies using a microtiter modification of the checkerboard technique were performed to evaluate the comparative activity of the three aminoglycosides in combination with either chloramphenicol or cephalothin. The cephalothin-aminoglycoside combinations demonstrated synergy in >80% of the isolates tested. No antagonism was noted. The chloramphenicol-aminoglycoside combinations showed antagonism in 35 to 45% of the isolates tested. The data suggest that the chloramphenicol-aminoglycoside combinations be used with caution when treating serious infections where Klebsiella is a potential pathogen.  (+info)

Strength and regulation of the different promoters for chromosomal beta-lactamases of Klebsiella oxytoca. (2/765)

The two groups of chromosomal beta-lactamases from Klebsiella oxytoca (OXY-1 and OXY-2) can be overproduced 73- to 223-fold, due to point mutations in the consensus sequences of their promoters. The different versions of promoters from blaOXY-1 and blaOXY-2 were cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene of pKK232-8, and their relative strengths were determined in Escherichia coli and in K. oxytoca. The three different mutations in the OXY beta-lactamase promoters resulted in a 4- to 31-fold increase in CAT activity compared to that of the wild-type promoter. The G-->T transversion in the first base of the -10 consensus sequence caused a greater increase in the promoter strength of the wild-type promoter than the two other principal mutations (a G-to-A transition of the fifth base of the -10 consensus sequence and a T-to-A transversion of the fourth base of the -35 sequence). The strength of the promoter carrying a double mutation (transition in the Pribnow box and the transversion in the -35 hexamer) was increased 15- to 61-fold in comparison to that of the wild-type promoter. A change from 17 to 16 bp between the -35 and -10 consensus sequences resulted in a ninefold decrease of the promoter strength. The expression of the blaOXY promoter in E. coli differs from that in K. oxytoca, particularly for promoters carrying strong mutations. Furthermore, the blaOXY promoter appears not to be controlled by DNA supercoiling or an upstream curved DNA, but it is dependent on the gene copy number.  (+info)

Genetic characterization of resistance to extended-spectrum beta-lactams in Klebsiella oxytoca isolates recovered from patients with septicemia at hospitals in the Stockholm area. (3/765)

Two beta-lactamase gene regions were characterized by DNA sequencing in eight clinical isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca. The blaOXY-2a region encoded a beta-lactamase nearly identical to OXY-2 (one amino acid residue substituted) and conferred aztreonam and cefuroxime resistance on the K. oxytoca isolates. Overproduction of OXY-2a was caused by a G-to-A substitution of the fifth nucleotide in the -10 consensus sequence of blaOXY-2a. The blaOXY-1a was identified in a susceptible strain, and the OXY-1a enzyme differed from OXY-1 by two amino acid residues.  (+info)

Characterization and nucleotide sequence of a Klebsiella oxytoca cryptic plasmid encoding a CMY-type beta-lactamase: confirmation that the plasmid-mediated cephamycinase originated from the Citrobacter freundii AmpC beta-lactamase. (4/765)

Plasmid pTKH11, originally obtained by electroporation of a Klebsiella oxytoca plasmid preparation into Escherichia coli XAC, expressed a high level of an AmpC-like beta-lactamase. The enzyme, designated CMY-5, conferred resistance to extended-spectrum beta-lactams in E. coli; nevertheless, the phenotype was cryptic in the K. oxytoca donor. Determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of pTKH11 revealed that the 8,193-bp plasmid encoded seven open reading frames, including that for the CMY-5 beta-lactamase (blaCMY-5). The blaCMY-5 product was similar to the plasmidic CMY-2 beta-lactamase of K. pneumoniae and the chromosomal AmpC of Citrobacter freundii, with 99.7 and 97.0% identities, respectively; there was a substitution of phenylalanine in CMY-5 for isoleucine 105 in CMY-2. blaCMY-5 was followed by the Blc and SugE genes of C. freundii, and this cluster exhibited a genetic organization identical to that of the ampC region on the chromosome of C. freundii; these results confirmed that C. freundii AmpC was the evolutionary origin of the plasmidic cephamycinases. In the K. oxytoca host, the copy number of pTKH11 was very low and the plasmid coexisted with plasmid pNBL63. Analysis of the replication regions of the two plasmids revealed 97% sequence similarity in the RNA I transcripts; this result implied that the two plasmids might be incompatible. Incompatibility of the two plasmids might explain the cryptic phenotype of blaCMY-5 in K. oxytoca through an exclusion effect on pTKH11 by resident plasmid pNBL63.  (+info)

Use of microdilution panels with and without beta-lactamase inhibitors as a phenotypic test for beta-lactamase production among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens. (5/765)

Over the past decade, a number of new beta-lactamases have appeared in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae that, unlike their predecessors, do not confer beta-lactam resistance that is readily detected in routine antibiotic susceptibility tests. Because optimal methodologies are needed to detect these important new beta-lactamases, a study was designed to evaluate the ability of a panel of various beta-lactam antibiotics tested alone and in combination with beta-lactamase inhibitors to discriminate between the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, AmpC beta-lactamases, high levels of K1 beta-lactamase, and other beta-lactamases in 141 isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens possessing well-characterized beta-lactamases. The microdilution panels studied contained aztreonam, cefpodoxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, with and without 1, 2, and 4 microg of clavulanate per ml or 8 microg of sulbactam per ml and cefoxitin and cefotetan with and without 8 microg of sulbactam per ml. The results indicated that a minimum panel of five tests would provide maximum separation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase high AmpC, high K1, and other beta-lactamase production in Enterobacteriaceae. These included cefpodoxime, cefpodoxime plus 4 microg of clavulanate per ml, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, and ceftriaxone plus 8 microg of sulbactam per ml. Ceftriaxone plus 2 microg of clavulanate per ml could be substituted for cefpodoxime plus 4 microg of clavulanate per ml without altering the accuracy of the tests. This study indicated that tests with key beta-lactam drugs, alone and in combination with beta-lactamase inhibitors, could provide a convenient approach to the detection of a variety of beta-lactamases in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.  (+info)

Ankylosing spondylitis in monozygotic twins: studies on immunological parameters. (6/765)

OBJECTIVE: To examine immunological parameters that might explain disease discordance in monozygotic twin pairs with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). METHODS: 11 monozygotic twin pairs (nine with AS, two with undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy) were investigated. The peripheral T cell receptor Vbeta repertoire was investigated using FACS analysis and 14 different Vbeta antibodies. In addition serum samples were tested for antibodies to Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Peripheral blood lymphocyte reactivity against a number of bacteria was investigated by interferon gamma ELISPOT assays. RESULTS: Twins suffering from AS showed cellular hyporeactivity against K pneumoniae, S pyogenes, C albicans in the ELISPOT assays compared with healthy twins. In contrast with the antibody data, where no significant differences were observed between the two groups, AS concordant twins showed the most pronounced differences in their Vbeta repertoire on CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Cellular hyporeactivity of peripheral blood cells to bacterial antigens might reflect defective T cell responses allowing bacterial antigens to persist in diseased patients. There are probably other environmental factors that influence disease concordance.  (+info)

Membrane association and multimerization of secreton component pulC. (7/765)

The PulC component of the Klebsiella oxytoca pullulanase secretion machinery (the secreton) was found by subcellular fractionation to be associated with both the cytoplasmic (inner) and outer membranes. Association with the outer membrane was independent of other secreton components, including the outer membrane protein PulD (secretin). The association of PulC with the inner membrane is mediated by the signal anchor sequence located close to its N terminus. These results suggest that PulC forms a bridge between the two membranes that is disrupted when bacteria are broken open for fractionation. Neither the signal anchor sequence nor the cytoplasmic N-terminal region that precedes it was found to be required for PulC function, indicating that PulC does not undergo sequence-specific interactions with other cytoplasmic membrane proteins. Cross-linking of whole cells resulted in the formation of a ca. 110-kDa band that reacted with PulC-specific serum and whose detection depended on the presence of PulD. However, antibodies against PulD failed to react with this band, suggesting that it could be a homo-PulC trimer whose formation requires PulD. The data are discussed in terms of the possible role of PulC in energy transduction for exoprotein secretion.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of TEM-59 (IRT-17), a novel inhibitor-resistant TEM-derived beta-lactamase in a clinical isolate of Klebsiella oxytoca. (8/765)

A clinical isolate of Klebsiella oxytoca (Kox 443) was found to have a low-level resistance to broad-spectrum penicillins (MICs of amoxicillin and ticarcillin, 256 and 32 microg/ml, respectively), without substantial potentiation by 2 microg of clavulanic acid per ml (amoxicillin- and ticarcillin-clavulanate, 128 and 8 microg/ml, respectively), while being fully susceptible to cephalosporins and other beta-lactam antibiotics. These resistances were carried by a ca. 50-kb conjugative plasmid that encodes a single beta-lactamase with a pI of 5.6. Compared to TEM-2, this enzyme exhibited a 3- to 30-fold higher Km and a decreased maximal hydrolysis rate for beta-lactams; higher concentrations of suicide inactivators (5- to 500-fold higher concentrations giving a 50% reduction in hydrolysis) were required for inhibition. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed identity between the blaTEM gene of Kox 443 and the blaTEM-2 gene, except for a single A-to-G change at position 590, leading to the amino acid change from Ser-130 Gly. This mutation has not been reported previously in the TEM type beta-lactamases produced by clinical strains, and the novel enzyme was called TEM-59 (alternative name IRT-17). This is the first description of an inhibitor-resistant TEM-derived enzyme in the species K. oxytoca.  (+info)

Klebsiella terrigena BudR protein: a transcriptional activator controlling the butanediol fermentation pathway in Klebsiella terrigena; MW 32 kDa; amino acid sequence given in first source; GenBank Z48600
OBJECTIVE To investigate the characteristics of biological, and clinical epidemiology of acquired pneumonia caused by a new type of Klebsiella, K. planticola. METHOD 9 strains of K. planticola were isolated from respiratory samples of patients, in vitro, biological and serologic identification were done, in vivo, infected animal models were also evaluated. Clinical epidemiological inquiries were also performed. RESULT 9 strains biological features were different from those of the other Klebsiella. The 9 patients ages were over forty and the primary disease was the third type tuberculosis of lungs. Using of antituberculosis drugs for long term as well as penicillins might be the predisposing factors, corticosteroids were used in 3 of the 9 patients, Combined infection with other pathogens in addition to K. planticola occurred in 8 patients, in 7/8, Candida albicans was identified. Drug sensitive tests show that all of them were resistant to penicillins and sensitive to the second and third
A GE BACTERIUM THAT COULD HAVE KILLED ALL PLANTS Dr. Elaine Inghams Testimony (Executive Summary) before the (New Zealand) Royal Commission on Genetic Modification Executive Summary February 2001 Executive Summary of DR. Inghams Testimony: Genetically engineered organisms have not been adequately assessed for their environmental or human health effects. It is inadequate to subject ORGANISMS to the tested [sic] required for non-living chemical pesticides, and conclude that there will be no adverse or risky effects from release of those organisms based on that testing. A graduate student of mine, no longer working in the field of engineered organisms, and I did some research on a particular engineered bacterium that had been approved by the USEPA for field testing. No environmental effects were detected during pesticide or toxicity testing with this organism. However, Michael Holmes discovered that the engineered bacterium, Klebsiella planticola with a additional alcohol gene, killed all the ...
Klebsiellae are also important in nosocomial infections among adult and pediatric populations. Klebsiellae account for approximately 8% of all hospital-acquired infections. In the United States, depen... more
Ismigen information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Teva, Ismigen indications, usages and related health products lists
Ommunal information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Altana Pharma, Ommunal indications, usages and related health products lists
This is a retrospective chart review. This proposed study aims to document the risk factors for quinolone resistance in bloodstream isolates of Klebsiella species. Additionally, the adequacy of empiric antibiotic therapy for Klebsiella bloodstream infections will be assessed. This research is (c) important because identification of risk factors may allow earlier initiation of appropriate therapy in patients infected with these bacteria. Additionally, we will identify whether horizontal spread is responsible for this increasing trend ...
The fermentation process didnt kill the modified K. planticola--it was still there, ready to turn dead plant material into alcohol. The bigger problem? It didnt even wait until the plants were dead to start. The normal K. planticola bacterium result in a benign layer of slime on the living root systems it inhabits, but the engineered version would also be producing alcohol in this slime--with levels as high as 17 parts per million, and anything beyond one or two parts of alcohol per million is lethal to all known plant life. So the engineered K. planticola basically gives all plant life it touches severe alcohol poisoning, putting them more than 10 times over the lethal limit of fucked up. Like a frat house during pledge week, K. planticola would force all new plants it encountered to drink well beyond their reasonable limits. But unlike frat house rushes, its not just freshman idiots who are affected, its everybody. So maybe that analogy isnt entirely accurate: Its more like a bleak ...
In my daughter throat culture has been seen klebsiella spp bacteria . Has anyone dealt with this before? Does she need antibiotic or not? My daughter is good and has no symptoms like coughing or fever, and so on
2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BDO) is a promising bio-based chemical because of its wide industrial applications. Previous studies on microbial production of 2,3-BDO has focused on sugar fermentation. Alternatively, biodiesel-derived crude glycerol can be used as a cheap resource for 2,3-BDO production; however, a considerable formation of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) and low concentration, productivity, and yield of 2,3-BDO from glycerol fermentation are limitations. Here, we report a high production of 2,3-BDO from crude glycerol using the engineered Klebsiella oxytoca M3 in which pduC (encoding glycerol dehydratase large subunit) and ldhA (encoding lactate dehydrogenase) were deleted to reduce the formation of 1,3-PDO and lactic acid. In fed-batch fermentation with the parent strain K. oxytoca M1, crude glycerol was more effective than pure glycerol as a carbon source in 2,3-BDO production (59.4 vs. 73.8 g/L) and by-product reduction (1,3-PDO, 8.9 vs. 3.7 g/L; lactic acid, 18.6 vs. 9.8 g/L). When the double
An armA-producing Klebsiella oxytoca isolate, strain 157, was detected after screening of 447 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in China. K. oxytoca 157 was resistant to aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin and most β-lactams. Resistance to aminoglycosides and β-lactams could be transferred to recipient Escherichia coli by conjugation. armA, bla CTX-M-15 and bla TEM-1 genes were detected in K. oxytoca 157 and transconjugant E. coli strain 600(pEC157). Mutation of aa 87 in GyrA was found in K. oxytoca 157. A plasmid of ∼55 kb was extracted from K. oxytoca 157(pKO157) and E. coli 600(pEC157). Southern blot hybridization confirmed that the armA, bla CTX-M-15 and bla TEM-1 genes were all located on this conjugative plasmid (pEC157). PCR mapping was also performed to investigate the genetic environment of armA. The armA gene was found to be flanked by the same putative transposable elements as reported previously in E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Citrobacter freundii
TY - JOUR. T1 - Producing 2,3-butanediol from agricultural waste using an indigenous Klebsiella sp. Zmd30 strain. AU - Wong, Chiao Ling. AU - Huang, Chien Chang. AU - Lu, Wei Bin. AU - Chen, Wen Ming. AU - Chang, Jo Shu. N1 - Funding Information: The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from Taiwans National Science Council under grant numbers 99-2221-E-006-137-MY3 , 98-2221-E-006-240-MY3 , 100-3113-E-006-016 , and 101-3113-E-006-015 . The support received from the Top University grant (also known as 5-year-50-billion grant) of National Cheng Kung University is also appreciated. Copyright: Copyright 2012 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2012/12/15. Y1 - 2012/12/15. N2 - This study aimed to develop a low cost and high efficiency process for 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO) production by using Klebsiella sp. Zmd30 isolated from a hydrogen-producing anaerobic sludge. First, the effects of glucose concentration and nitrogen source on 2,3-BDO production with the Zmd30 strain were ...
In the study presented here, the performance of FTIR and MALDI-TOF MS for typing clinical Klebsiella isolates was evaluated with regard to the discriminatory power of these rapid analysis methods. WGS was employed as a reference to analyze a set of Klebsiella strains recovered from clinical specimens. The adjusted Rand index was used to determine the congruency of the respective spectrum-based typing method in comparison to the reference (31).. High agreement between FTIR- and WGS-based clustering was obtained in our study. This is in line with reports that found good discrimination of other clinically or environmentally relevant Gram-negative organisms, such as Y. enterocolitica (11, 36), E. coli (10), and Klebsiella oxytoca (37). These findings might reflect the fact that FTIR spectra are prominently shaped by components of the Gram-negative cell wall or capsule molecules and that high diversity among these structures (e.g., O antigens or capsule types) underlies successful discrimination by ...
Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC ® 700324D™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Klebsiella oxytoca strain LBM 90.11.033 TypeStrain=False Application:
The genus Klebsiella belongs to the tribe Klebsiellae, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The organisms are named after Edwin Klebs, a 19th century German microbiologist.
In the late 1980s R. planticola was genetically modified by inserting a plasmid from Zymomonas mobilis. This plasmid codes for the enzyme pyruvate decarboxylase which, along with alcohol dehydrogenase already present in the bacteria allow it to produce ethanol. The bacteria already does produce ethanol when metabolizing hexoses and pentoses, but very inefficiently. R. planticola was chosen to receive this gene as it already had metabolic pathways to breakdown pentose sugars such as xylose, which is a main component of agricultural and forest residues.[22][23] The results showed that the genetically modified strain could produce ethanol but were killed at concentrations of ethanol greater than 5%. The modified strain also produced more ethanol at lower pH (5.4) and ethanol production decreased as pH increased.[22]. In the early 1990s a biotech company set out to solve a problem: how to destroy crop residue safely. Some crops residues harbor plant pathogens. Burning is occasionally used to ...
Other names: ATCC 13883, Bacillus pneumoniae, Bacterium pneumoniae crouposae, CCUG 225, CIP 82.91, DSM 30104, HAMBI 450, Hyalococcus pneumoniae, IFO 14940, K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella sp. M-AI-2, Klebsiella sp. PB12, Klebsiella sp. RCE-7, LMG 2095, NBRC 14940, NCTC 9633 ...
Other names: ATCC 13883, Bacillus pneumoniae, Bacterium pneumoniae crouposae, CCUG 225, CIP 82.91, DSM 30104, HAMBI 450, Hyalococcus pneumoniae, IFO 14940, K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella sp. M-AI-2, Klebsiella sp. PB12, Klebsiella sp. RCE-7, LMG 2095, NBRC 14940, NCTC 9633 ...
Urinary tract infection (UTI) constitutes a serious health problem that affects millions of people each year. UTI is the most common infection in patients with indwelling urinary catheters, and the incidence of UTI in this patient group is ∼100% within a month. Between 15% and 25% of patients in general hospitals will have a urinary catheter in place sometime during their stay (37). Urinary catheters are also extensively used in aged-care facilities. Unfortunately, catheters are extremely prone to bacterial biofilm formation. In the United States, catheter-associated UTI was estimated to cause close to 1 million additional hospital days per year (34). E. coli and Klebsiella are the top two species in UTI and are generally excellent biofilm formers (12). Iron is essential for bacterial growth, and bacteria like E. coli and Klebsiella species possess a battery of iron uptake systems to cope with low-iron environments like urine. Fur is the central regulator of these systems. Fur has a ...
Free Online Library: TEM & SHV genes in extended spectrum [beta]-lactamase producing Klebsiella species & their antimicrobial resistance pattern.(Temoneira, Sulphydryl variable, Report) by Indian Journal of Medical Research; Health, general Biological sciences Beta lactamases Genetic aspects Physiological aspects Drug resistance in microorganisms Genes Microbial drug resistance
Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive technology that allows for the production of precisely designed complex structures for energy absorbing applications from a wide range of metallic materials. Geometrical imperfections of the SLM fabricated lattice structures, which form one of the many thin struts, can lead to a great difference in prediction of their behavior. This article deals with the prediction of lattice structure mechanical properties under dynamic loading using finite element method (FEA) with inclusion of geometrical imperfections of the SLM process. Such properties are necessary to know especially for the application of SLM fabricated lattice structures in automotive or aerospace industries. Four types of specimens from AlSi10Mg alloy powder material were manufactured using SLM for quasi-static mechanical testing and determination of lattice structure mechanical properties for the FEA material model, for optical measurement of geometrical accuracy, and for low-velocity impact
We describe a Klebsiella oxytoca infection outbreak in a renal transplant unit that involved seven patients. All strains belonged to a single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern and were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, and aztreonam but susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, and imipenem. Chromosomal beta-lactamase hyperproduction was caused by a point mutation in the bla(OXY-2) gene promoter region ...
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Klebsiella oxytoca ATCC ® 700324™ Designation: LBM 90.11.033 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain Quality control of VITEK ® 2 ID-GNB card
Question - Child has step, culture positive for klebsiella oxytoca. Meaning and preventive measure?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Asthma, Ask an Allergist and Immunologist
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacteria of genus Klebsiella and family Enterobacteriaceae. They are members of normal intestinal flora of humans and animals and may be isolated from a variety of environmental sources. K. pneumoniae was first […]. ...
Hi I hope you folks dont mind, I am posting this for my mama. She has fibro and last year contracted a life threatening Klebsiella infection which...
Im not sure how to go about doing this. I feel like its an easy question but im thinking to far into it. I want to say that Davis would be the first person to be let off & Carter would be the last person to be let off. Im not sure what order the rest would be in though. I ... ...
A mover pushes a couch a distance of 4 m to the top of a ramp into the back of a truck using 500 N of force. A) What is the work input of the mover? B) What is the movers power if the task takes 10s? C) If the mass of the couch is 100 kg and the back of the truck is 1.5 m ... ...
1EEX: How a protein generates a catalytic radical from coenzyme B(12): X-ray structure of a diol-dehydratase-adeninylpentylcobalamin complex.
words that start with enterobacteria, words starting with enterobacteria, words that begin with enterobacteria, words beginning with enterobacteria
Klebsiella oxytoca produces sucrose isomerase which catalyses the conversion of sucrose to isomaltulose, a new generation of sugar. From the previous study, palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca was succesfully isolated from sapodilla fruit (Manilkara zapota). The full-length palI gene sequence of Klebsiella oxytoca was cloned in E. coli DH5α. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 498 residues which includes conserved motif for sucrose isomerisation {sup 325}RLDRD{sup 329} and 97% identical to palI gene from Klebsiella sp. LX3 (GenBank:AAK82938.1). This fragment was succesfullly ligated into the expression vector pET-32b using overlap-extension PCR and cloned in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. DNA sequencing result shows that palI gene of Klebsiella oxytoca was inserted in-frame in pET-32b. This is the first report on cloning of palI gene from Klebsiella oxytoca. ...
Three 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) nitroreductases from Klebsiella sp. C1 have different reduction capabilities that can degrade TNT by simultaneous utilization of two initial reduction pathways. Of these, nitroreductase II was purified to homogeneity by sequential chromatographies. Nitroreductase II...
Various selective media were assessed for their ability to detect and differentiate Klebsiella oxytoca and Escherichia coli in environmental water samples. Only two, Membrane Lauryl Sulphate agar and Deoxycholate Agar, could differentiate the two coliforms from each other and from the background heterotrophs in water and this was a consequence of E. colis ability to grow at 44°C and 37°C whereas Kl. oxytoca could only grow at 37°C. Modified M‐FC medium effectively differentiated Kl. oxytoca but not E. coli in environmental samples. Other media characterized the different coliforms in pure culture but failed to do likewise in environmental samples. For example, pure cultures of E. coli fluoresced when MUG was added to the medium but single colonies on a mixed species plate failed to do so. MT7 agar distinguished the two coliforms from water heterotrophs but not from each other.. Full text not available from this repository.. ...
A team of US researchers has discovered that three different species of Klebsiella bacteria can cause life-threatening infections in hospital patients and that all three share genes that confer resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics. The study, published this week in mSphere®, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, improves physicians understanding of Klebsiella infections and could point toward better ways to fight multi-drug resistant strains of these bacteria.
Other antibiotics used to treat susceptible isolates include ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate, ceftazidime, cefepime, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, moxifloxacin, mer... more
Bacteria of the genus Klebsiella are widely distributed in nature, in the soil and in water. They are also part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract, but usually in low numbers compared with E. coli. Klebsiella, especially strains of the species K. pneumonia, are opportunistic pathogens that can cause pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. In recent years there has been an increase in Klebsiella infections, especially in hospitals and due to multiple-antibiotic resistant strains. The most striking difference between most strains of Klebsiella and its close relatives E. coli and Salmonella is that Klebsiella cells have a thick coat of slime or extracellular polysaccharide which is called a capsule. The capsule protects the cells from dessication, and may also protect them from phagocytosis when they are in an animal host. Surprisingly, many strains of Klebsiella can fix nitrogen, i.e., they can reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia and amino acids.Strain 342 was isolated ...
A low-molecular-mass cytotoxin produced by Klebsiella oxytoca isolated previously from patients with antibiotic-associated haemorrhagic enterocolitis was purified, and its biological and chemical properties were elucidated. The toxin inhibited the syntheses of DNA and RNA by HEp-2 cells dose-dependently, whereas protein synthesis was only slightly inhibited, as measured by the incorporation of radioactive precursors. When synchronously cultured HEp-2 cells were examined in the presence of cytotoxin, inhibition of DNA synthesis occurred promptly within 5 h, but cell-rounding, the earliest visible morphological change, was not observed until 6 h after exposure. The intracellular levels of ATP decreased with an approximately similar time course. These results suggest that cytotoxicity toward HEp-2 cells is primarily due to the inhibitory effect of the cytotoxin on nucleic acid synthesis, possibly on DNA synthesis. Cell rounding and cell death were induced even in the absence of the cytotoxin after
His mother says: I have never gone on to have another child because my son is a full-time job, but he is a beautiful boy.. The infection that the couple claims their son had is called klebsiella oxytoca and the hospital is aware of a spate of incidents relating to it at the time. Klebsiella oxytoca causes infection in various parts of the body; it is a common infection and can be transferred from patient to patient. One of the resultant conditions is brain damage and sometimes renal failure.. The hospital has denied negligence and says the Health Authority said it was satisfied with the control measures in place at the time.. The mother said they felt let down by the hospital as they were certain the infection is the reason for her sons difficulties.. The hospitals medical director said: The Trust will contest any legal claim in this case, as the trust does not believe that the brain damage was caused by the Klebsiella oxytoca infection he had whilst he was in the SCBU unit in 1983.. He ...
General Information: This strain was isolated from a patient in 1994. Opportunistic pathogen that causes multiple hospital-acquired infections. This organism is the most medically important organism within the genus Klebsiella. It is an environmental organism found in water, soil, and on the surface of plants. Several strains have been isolated from plant tissues and are nitrogen-fixing endophytes that may be a source of nitrogen for the plant. Other strains can become opportunistic pathogens which infect humans, and typically causes hospital-acquired infections in immunocompromised patients. Major sites of infection include the lungs, where it causes a type of pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Klebsiella can also enter the bloodstream (bacterimia) and cause sepsis. The pathogen can also infect animals and cause inflammation of the uterus in horses as well as more generalized infections in other mammals. This organism expresses numerous pathogenicity factors, including multiple adhesins, ...
General Information: This strain was isolated from a patient in 1994. Opportunistic pathogen that causes multiple hospital-acquired infections. This organism is the most medically important organism within the genus Klebsiella. It is an environmental organism found in water, soil, and on the surface of plants. Several strains have been isolated from plant tissues and are nitrogen-fixing endophytes that may be a source of nitrogen for the plant. Other strains can become opportunistic pathogens which infect humans, and typically causes hospital-acquired infections in immunocompromised patients. Major sites of infection include the lungs, where it causes a type of pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Klebsiella can also enter the bloodstream (bacterimia) and cause sepsis. The pathogen can also infect animals and cause inflammation of the uterus in horses as well as more generalized infections in other mammals. This organism expresses numerous pathogenicity factors, including multiple adhesins, ...
Medical definition of pneumobacillus: a bacterium of the genus Klebsiella (K. pneumoniae) associated with inflammatory conditions of the respiratory …
The biochemical classification of the Klebsiella proposed by Cowan, Steel, Shaw, and Duguid (1960) has been applied to 50 strains isolated as the pure or predominant growth from sputum, and Klebsiella species have been correlated with the severity of the chest infection in the patient. A modification in nomenclature is suggested.
Raoultella planticola was originally considered to be a member of environmental Klebsiella. The clinical significance of R. planticola is still not well known. We describe the first case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by R. planticola. The identity of the organism was confirmed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with the appropriate antibiotics combined with operative drainage and debridement. R. planticola had been described as environmental species, but should be suspected in extensive necrotizing fasciitis after minor trauma in mild to moderate immunocompromised patients.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Raoultella planticola bacteremia-induced fatal septic shock following burn injury. AU - Yumoto, Tetsuya. AU - Naito, Hiromichi. AU - Ihoriya, Hiromi. AU - Tsukahara, Kohei. AU - Ota, Tomoyuki. AU - Watanabe, Toshiyuki. AU - Nakao, Atsunori. N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2018 The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2018/5/4. Y1 - 2018/5/4. N2 - Background: Raoultella planticola, a Gram-negative, aerobic bacillus commonly isolated from soil and water, rarely causes invasive infections in humans. Septic shock from R. planticola after burn injury has not been previously reported. Case presentation: A 79-year-old male was admitted to the emergency intensive care unit after extensive flame burn injury. He accidently caught fire while burning trash and plunged into a nearby tank filled with contaminated rainwater to extinguish the fire. The patient developed septic shock on day 10. The blood culture detected R. planticola, which was identified ...
Klebsiella oxytoca is primarily a health care-associated pathogen acquired from environmental sources. During October 2006-March 2011, a total of 66 patients in a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, acquired class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. oxytoca with 1 of 2 related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. New cases continued to occur despite reinforcement of infection control practices, prevalence screening, and contact precautions for colonized/infected patients. Cultures from handwashing sinks in the intensive care unit yielded K. oxytoca with identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns to cultures from the clinical cases. No infections occurred after implementation of sink cleaning 3×/day, sink drain modifications, and an antimicrobial stewardship program. In contrast, a cluster of 4 patients infected with K. oxytoca in a geographically distant medical ward without contaminated sinks was contained with implementation of active screening and contact ...
Read Faecal colonization of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and plasmid-mediated AmpC in Mozambican university students, BMC Infectious Diseases on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Klebsiella oxytoca (K. oxytoca) is a Gram-negative microbe generally associated with community and hospitalacquired infections. Due to its clinical significance, we evaluated the effect of biofield treatment on phenotype and biotype characteristics of K. oxytoca (ATCC 43165). The study was performed into three groups i.e. C (control), T1 (treatment, revived); and T2 (treatment, lyophilized). Subsequently, groups T1 and T2 were received biofield treatment and control group was remained as untreated. The antimicrobial sensitivity results showed 3.33% and 6.67% alteration in antimicrobials susceptibility in group T1 cells on day 5 and 10, respectively, and 3.33% alteration in antimicrobials susceptibility was observed in group T2 cells on day 10 as compared to control. The sensitivity patterns of cefazolin were changed from resistant (R) to intermediate (I) on day 5, and resistance (R) to susceptible (S) on day 10, in T1 cells of K. oxytoca. The MIC value of cefazolin was decreased by 2-fold in ...
Introduction: Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of Klebsiella species. K. pneumoniae is one of the most important bacteria causing nosocomial infections. This bacterium threatens public health and leads to increased hospital costs and mortality rate. The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance in K. pneumoniae in nosocomial infections.Methods: This study was performed on 51 samples of Klebsiella isolates from 500 patients in three units of Aleshtar hospital in 9 months. The antibiotic resistance of K. pneumoniae to 18 antibiotics was performed by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method.Results: The frequency of K. pneumonia among 500 samples was determined 51 cases (10.2%). The largest number of K. pneumoniae was isolated from the infectious unit (49.02%). The frequency of K. pneumoniae based on the source of infection for urine was 22 cases (43.14%), sputum 17 (33.33%), stool 6 (11.77%), wound 4 (7.84%), blood 2 (3.92%), and cerebrospinal fluid 0 (0%), respectively. K.
Klebsiella is a genus of nonmotile, Gram-negative, oxidase-negative, rod-shaped bacteria with a prominent polysaccharide-based capsule.. Klebsiella species are found everywhere in nature. This is thought to be due to distinct sublineages developing specific niche adaptations, with associated biochemical adaptations which make them better suited to a particular environment. They can be found in water, soil, plants, insects, animals, and humans. Klebsiella is named after German-Swiss microbiologist Edwin Klebs (1834-1913). Carl Friedlander described Klebsiella bacillus which is why it was termed Friedlander bacillus for many years. The members of the genus Klebsiella are a part of the human and animals normal flora in the nose, mouth and intestines. The species of Klebsiella are all gram-negative and non-motile. They tend to be shorter and thicker when compared to others in the Enterobacteriaceae family. The cells are rods in shape and generally measures 0.3 to 1.5 µm wide by 0.5 to 5.0 µm ...
Domain architectures containing the following SCOP superfamilies 51905,_gap_,55124,56014,_gap_ in Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae MGH 78578. Domain architectures illustrate each occurrence of 51905,_gap_,55124,56014,_gap_.
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Recently the emergence of pan-resistant bacterial pathogens was published in The Lancet Infectious Disease, online August 11, 2010. In this study 107 enterobacteria isolates from UK, India and Pakistan harbouring a broad spectrum metallo-β- lactamase 1 (called New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1; NDM-1) were found to be highly resistant against most antibiotics. Two Klebsiella isolates from the UK have been shown to be resistant against all available antibiotics. These isolates or the plasmids conveying resistance were shown to have been transferred also from country-to-country.. This is the true beginning of a post-antibiotic era, which will have a dramatic impact on our current urological practice. Enterobacteria are the most important species causing urinary tract infections (UTI). Most of the isolates harbouring this NDM-1 enzyme also were from community-acquired UTI.. Whereas in Gram-positive bacteria several new antibiotics are seen on the market, there will be no new antibiotics against ...
Intervention and Testing. Conjunctival swabs and corneal scrapings from the right eye were inoculated for culture. The isolate was analyzed for the presence of the mucoid phenotype and the ability to form biofilm. We also investigated whether the formation of biofilm by the corneal Klebsiella isolate is affected by N-acetylcysteine ...
The problem of solid waste is an issue of global importance due to the socio-environmental and unsanitary conditions that influence negatively the quality of life of citizens and the ecosystem. The current reality forces to implement a kind of strategies that contemplate the investigation of microorganisms as well as their capacity to biodegrade these residues. Bacteriological contamination was characterized in the solid waste generated within the central field of the Autonomous University of Chiriquí, Province of Chiriquí, Panama. This study was classified with a mixed approach, correlational descriptive scope and non-experimental design. The sample corresponded to 306 bags of solid waste collected in five randomly places. The methods of analysis were divided into field and laboratory sampling. The techniques used were quartering and identification of enterobacteria present in these residues. It was obtained as results that the bacterium with more frequency was Klebsiella sp. with 33%, ...
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Bakteri dari genus Klebsiella tersebar luas di alam, di dalam tanah dan di air. Mereka juga merupakan bagian dari flora normal saluran usus, namun biasanya dalam jumlah rendah dibandingkan dengan E. coli. Klebsiella, terutama strain dari spesies K. pneumonia, adalah patogen oportunistik yang dapat menyebabkan pneumonia, infeksi saluran kencing, dan bakteremia. Dalam beberapa tahun terakhir…
Question - Skin infection on face, klebsiella, bactrim . Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Klebsiella infection, Ask an Internal Medicine Specialist
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A trial of the Enterotube system for the identification of Enterobacteriaceae and a comparison with the methods at present in use in the Tygerberg Hospital Microbiology Laboratory, were carried out.
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Pill with imprint PALI 9 is Pink, Elliptical / Oval and has been identified as Invega 9 mg. It is supplied by Janssen Pharmaceuticals.
"Klebsiella aerogenes". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 548.. *Type strain of Klebsiella aerogenes at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Klebsiella aerogenes[1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, ... with consequences for the name Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved Lists 1980)". International Journal of ... "Enterobacter aerogenes Hormaeche and Edwards 1960 (Approved Lists 1980) and Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved ...
Jabri E, Carr MB, Hausinger RP, Karplus PA (May 19, 1995). "The crystal structure of urease from Klebsiella aerogenes". Science ... Martin PR, Hausinger RP (Oct 5, 1992). "Site-directed mutagenesis of the active site cysteine in Klebsiella aerogenes urease". ... X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean), Klebsiella aerogenes and Sporosarcina ... Klebsiella spp., Morganella, Providencia, and possibly Serratia spp. Brucella Staphylococcus saprophyticus Staphylococcus ...
Klebsiella spp., Lactobacillus spp., Methanobacterium spp., Brevundimonas bullata, Paracoccus spp. and Luteimonas aestuarri ...
Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. Chromosomal events, specially gene aplification, seem also to be relevant to this ...
Nonsymbiotic nitrogen-fixing microorganisms such as Halomonas sp., Paracoccus sp., Klebsiella sp., Slackia sp., and ...
strain CF8 (65 kDa) and a Rhodococcus sp.-Klebsiella sp. mixed-culture consortium. The heterotrimer is noted as being similar ... CBB1 and in several species within the genera Alcaligenes, Rhodococcus, and Klebsiella. Caffeine dehydrogenase found in ... 8-trimethylallantoin by resting cells in a Rhodococcus and Klebsiella mixed culture. Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), the ...
Klebsiella sp. Major bacteria resistant to cefoxitin include: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Enterococci Listeria ...
Klebsiella species. Pseudomonas cepacia, a.k.a. Burkholderia cepacia. Nocardia. Fungi Aspergillus species. Aspergillus has a ...
... most Klebsiella sp., Neisseria sp., Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella ureae, Proteus mirabilis, P. penneri, Pseudomonas sp., ... Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus sp. (not P. mirabilis and P. penneri), Plesiomonas shigelloides, Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella ...
Klebsiella, Citrobacter). The assay is intended to be an indicator of fecal contamination; more specifically of E. coli which ...
Klebsiella planticola Monnet D, Freney J (April 1994). "Method for differentiating Klebsiella planticola and Klebsiella ... Drancourt, M; Bollet, C; Carta, A; Rousselier, P (2001). "Phylogenetic analyses of Klebsiella species delineate Klebsiella And ... Klebsiella cf. planticola B43 - Encyclopedia of Life. EOL (2011-09-28). Retrieved on 2011-10-21. "2010 Annual Checklist :: ... R. planticola is quite similar in appearance to Klebsiella pneumoniae and must be identified based on growth habits or DNA ...
Klebsiella granulomatis infection is most popularly known as "donovanosis" in medical community. University College Cork (was ... The scientific name was ultimately changed to Klebsiella granulomatis based on the phylogenetic relationship with the genus ... Richens, John (2006). "Donovanosis and Klebsiella spp.". In Stephen Gillespie; Peter M. Hawkey (eds.). Principles and Practice ... and Klebsiella granulomatis as that of donovanosis. The son of a judge in India, he was born in Calcutta and completed his ...
Alan Ebringer (8 November 2012). Ankylosing spondylitis and Klebsiella. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 19. ISBN 978-1- ...
Emergence in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae clinical isolates of the VIM-4 metallo-beta-lactamase encoded by a ... Capsular types of Klebsiella. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 91, 92-104 (1952). Edwards PR, Fife MS. Eleven undescribed ... Emergence of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM-1) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC-2) in South Africa. Journal ... Rare case of failure by an automated system to detect extended-spectrum beta-lactamase in a cephalosporin-resistant Klebsiella ...
Klebsiella and Proteus spp., are frequently associated with stone disease. The presence of Gram positive bacteria such as ... A urine pH of 8.5 or 9.0 is indicative of a urea-splitting organism, such as Proteus, Klebsiella, or Ureaplasma urealyticum; ... Escherichia coli is the single most common microorganism, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus spp., to cause urinary tract ... Klebsiella (11%), Pseudomonas (11%), the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (9%), and Enterococcus (7%) among others. Urinary ...
Barus, T.; Hanjaya, I.; Sadeli, J.; Lay, B. W.; Suwanto, A.; Yulandi, A. (2013). "Genetic Diversity of Klebsiella spp. Isolated ...
The causative organism, Klebsiella granulomatis, was called Calymmatobacterium granulomatis, and some sources still use this ... Boye K, Hansen DS (February 2003). "Sequencing of 16S rDNA of Klebsiella: taxonomic relations within the genus and to other ... The organism was recently reclassified under the genus Klebsiella, a drastic taxonomic change since it involved changing the ... Granuloma inguinale is a bacterial disease caused by Klebsiella granulomatis (formerly known as Calymmatobacterium granulomatis ...
ISBN 978-0-8385-8529-0. "Klebsiella pneumoniae in Healthcare Settings". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Page last ... Klebsiella pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis, Staphylococcus aureus, ...
In Klebsiella pneumoniae the cystathionine β-synthase is encoded by mtcB, while the γ-lyase is encoded by mtcC. Humans are ... Seiflein, T. A.; Lawrence, J. G. (2006). "Two Transsulfurylation Pathways in Klebsiella pneumoniae". Journal of Bacteriology. ...
Other commonly implicated bacteria include Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella ... Klebsiella spp., Clostridium spp., Lactobacillus spp., Bacteroides spp. and the fungi Candida spp. are all capable of such a ...
Schembri MA, Blom J, Krogfelt KA, Klemm P (August 2005). "Capsule and fimbria interaction in Klebsiella pneumoniae". Infection ... Dorman MJ, Feltwell T, Goulding DA, Parkhill J, Short FL (November 2018). "Klebsiella pneumoniae Defined by density-TraDISort ... Neisseria meningitidis Klebsiella pneumoniae Haemophilus influenzae Pseudomonas aeruginosa Salmonella However, some gram- ... "Role of bacterial capsule in local and systemic inflammatory responses of mice during pulmonary infection with Klebsiella ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SQ1, Klebsiella sp. strain ABR11, Klebsiella oxytoca TauN1, Agrobacterium sp. strain ABR2, and ...
... was a Danish physician and bacteriologist whose dissertation Om Klebsiella (About Klebsiella) was the first scientific study ... Her thesis Om Klebsiella (1956) was one of the first scientific papers addressing the presence of bacterial cross-infection. ... Works include: Ørskov, Ida (1956). Om Klebsiella: en oversigt (in Danish). Busck. Ørskov, Frits; Ørskov, Ida (September 1975 ... leading to a national Salmonella Centre and an international Klebsiella Centre. In 1968, she was appointed overlæge (head of ...
Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, enterococci, and staphylococci). P. vulgaris is highly resistant to antibiotics because ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus spp. ), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Exposure to higher doses of radiation is associated with ...
eds.). Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Citrobacter, and Proteus. In: Baron's Medical Microbiology (4th ed.). ...
... and Klebsiella spp. Intra-abdominal infections - e.g. peritonitis Bone and joint infections - S. aureus, Streptococcus spp. CNS ... meningitidis Klebsiella spp. Burkholderia cepacia Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris Enterobacter spp. Bacteroides spp. ...
Pseudomonas aeruginosa and various species of Klebsiella). Most cases of pyelonephritis start off as lower urinary tract ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp. Urinary incontinence* is leakage of urine, usually due to ...
HS-1 also has antimicrobial effects on some bacterial species, i.e. Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas ...
Klebsiella is named after German-Swiss microbiologist Edwin Klebs (1834-1913). Carl Friedlander described Klebsiella bacillus ... and new techniques were followed to construct vaccines against Klebsiella. However, currently, no Klebsiella vaccine has been ... In plant systems, Klebsiella can be found in a variety of plant hosts. K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca are able to fix atmospheric ... The species of Klebsiella are all gram-negative and usually non-motile. They tend to be shorter and thicker when compared to ...
Enterobacter Infections at eMedicine "Klebsiella aerogenes". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 548. Type strain of Klebsiella aerogenes at ... Klebsiella aerogenes, previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, ... and Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved Lists 1980) share the same nomenclatural type (ATCC 13048) on the Approved ... Lists and are homotypic synonyms, with consequences for the name Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved Lists 1980 ...
"Klebsiella aerogenes". NCBI Taxonomy Browser. 548.. *Type strain of Klebsiella aerogenes at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Klebsiella aerogenes[1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, ... with consequences for the name Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved Lists 1980)". International Journal of ... "Enterobacter aerogenes Hormaeche and Edwards 1960 (Approved Lists 1980) and Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. 1971 (Approved ...
Klebsiella infections commonly occur among sick patients in healthcare settings who are receiving treatment for other ... How Klebsiella bacteria are spread. To get a Klebsiella infection, a person must be exposed to the bacteria. For example, ... Drug-resistant Klebsiella. Some Klebsiella bacteria have become highly resistant to antibiotics. When bacteria such as ... Treating Klebsiella infections. Klebsiella infections that are not drug-resistant can be treated with antibiotics. Infections ...
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... wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/cp-cre-klebsiella-spp/case-definition/2018/) ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae, a common gut bacteria, causes problems when it moves outside the gut and causes infection. Learn about ... Medscape: "Klebsiella Infections.". Emergency Medicine News: "Breaking News: Deadly Klebsiella Pneumoniae Strain Resistant to ... CDC: "Klebsiella pneumoniae in Healthcare Settings.". UpToDate: "Clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of Klebsiella ... But klebsiella pneumoniae can be dangerous if they get into other parts of your body, especially if youre already sick. They ...
Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Klebsiella Infections Q&A Which CBC findings suggest Klebsiella infections?. Updated: ... encoded search term (Which CBC findings suggest Klebsiella infections?) and Which CBC findings suggest Klebsiella infections? ... Epidemiological study of klebsiella infection in the special care baby unit of a London hospital. J Clin Pathol. 1980 Apr. 33(4 ... Carbapenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae due to the New Delhi Metallo-ß-lactamase. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Feb. 52(4):481-4 ...
Over the past decade, Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a major clinical and public health threat. In this Review, Wyres, ... Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of antimicrobial-resistant opportunistic infections in hospitalized patients. The ... Description of Klebsiella africanensis sp. nov., Klebsiella variicola subsp. tropicalensis subsp. nov. and Klebsiella variicola ... demonstration that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella variicola. Int. J. Syst. Evol. ...
Klebsiella sp. 2N3. ›Klebsiella sp. C1(2016). ›Klebsiella sp. M-AI-2. ›Klebsiella sp. PB12. ›Klebsiella sp. RCE-7. ›LMG 2095. › ... Klebsiella pneumonia. ›Klebsiella pneumoniae (Schroeter 1886) Trevisan 1887. ›Klebsiella pneumoniae aerogenes. › ... Klebsiella. Strains i. › 1033-5P14 / KAY2026 ,1033-5P14, KAY2026, ssp. 1033 5P1 / KAY2026. › ATCC 10031 / DSM 681 / NBRC 3512 ... Klebsiella aerogenes (Kruse) Taylor et al. 1956. ›ATCC 13883. More ». ›Bacillus pneumoniae. ›Bacterium pneumoniae crouposae. › ...
Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Klebsiella Infections Q&A Which Klebsiella pathogen may cause neonatal bacteremia?. ... encoded search term (Which Klebsiella pathogen may cause neonatal bacteremia?) and Which Klebsiella pathogen may cause neonatal ... Epidemiological study of klebsiella infection in the special care baby unit of a London hospital. J Clin Pathol. 1980 Apr. 33(4 ... Carbapenem resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae due to the New Delhi Metallo-ß-lactamase. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Feb. 52(4):481-4 ...
What does Klebsiella look like. ?. what does Klebsiella look like what does Klebsiella look like what does Klebsiella look like ... Is it klebsiella produce endospore. ?. no species of klebsiella produce endospores..klebsiella do produce capsule which helps ... Is Klebsiella pneumonia motile. ?. No, Klebsiella pneumoniae is non-motile. No, Klebsiella pneumoniae is non-motile. ... Can men catch klebsiella. ?. Klebsiella is a gram negative bacteria and like any other bacteria does not discriminate between ...
... aerobic bacteria of the genus Klebsiella, certain species of which, as K. pneumoniae, are found in the respiratory, intestinal ... klebsiella. klavier, klaxon, kleagle, klebs, klebs-löffler bacillus, klebsiella, klebsiella pneumoniae, klee, klee, paul, ... any of several rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria of the genus Klebsiella, certain species of which, as K. pneumoniae, are found in ... Klebsiella definition, any of several rod-shaped, ...
Klebsiella and extended spectrum beta-lactamases.. Urban C1, Rahal JJ.. Author information. 1. Department of Medicine, The New ... During the past 14 years a rapid, world-wide increase in prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to late generation ... potentially arming Klebsiella pneumoniae with resistance to all therapeutically available antibiotics. More focused ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look ...
Klebsiella planticola Bagley et al. 1982. ›Klebsiella trevisanii. ›Klebsiella trevisanii Ferragut et al. 1983. ›NBRC 14939. › ... Klebsiella planticola. Other names i. ›ATCC 33531. ›CCUG 15718. ›CDC 4245-72. ›CIP 100751. ›DSM 3069. More ». ›IFO 14939. ›JCM ...
Each antibiotic is presented in three columns. The first column lists the name of the antibiotic. The middle column represents susceptibility in percent to that antibiotic. The 3rd column represents the number of isolates tested for that specific antibiotic ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-2, Buenos Aires, Argentina.. Pasteran FG, Otaegui L, Guerriero L, Radice G, Maggiora R, ...
A transcriptome analysis of Klebsiella in different tissues is warranted to shed light into tissue-induced Klebsiella ... Klebsiella in vivo lipid A. Enrique Llobet, Verónica Martínez-Moliner, David Moranta, Käthe M. Dahlström, Verónica Regueiro, ... Klebsiella in vivo lipid A. Enrique Llobet, Verónica Martínez-Moliner, David Moranta, Käthe M. Dahlström, Verónica Regueiro, ... Species m/z 1,866, not detected in the lipid A from Klebsiella grown in LB, has been previously found in the lipid A from a K. ...
Klebsiella pneumoniae is spread through exposure to the Klebsiella bacteria from an infected person, according to the U.S. ... Klebsiella pneumoniae is spread through exposure to the Klebsiella bacteria from an infected person, according to the U.S. ... The spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae can be stopped by strict adherence to hand washing and gown-wearing when in the presence of ... Many types of Klebsiella bacteria have become drug resistant, making treating the infection more difficult, according to the ...
As a case in point, take Klebsiella pneumoniae, which has been included on the World Health Organisations (WHO) list of ... Perhaps even more alarming is the number of strains with access to a pool of genes that can make Klebsiella hypervirulent - ... As a case in point, take Klebsiella pneumoniae, which has been included on the World Health Organizations (WHO) list of ... For instance, they discovered that Klebsiella can survive inside macrophages, which are the cells that play an essential part ...
Epidemiological Characteristics and Treatment Protocol for Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella Pneumoniae in China. *Klebsiella ... The prevalence of ESBL Klebsiella pneumonia in renal replacement therapy. *The prevalence of ESBL Klebsiella pneumonia in ... Klebsiella Pneumoniae Necrotizing Fasciitis: Clinical and Microbiological Features. *Necrotizing Fasciitis. Observational. * ... The Incidence of Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) Klebsiella Pneumonia in Patient on Renal Replacement Therapy. *End-stage ...
Learn about Klebsiella oxytoca, including common risk factors for this infection, the relationship to urinary tract infections ... Klebsiella oxytoca (KO) is one of several Klebsiella bacteria. These bacteria are naturally found in the intestinal tract, ... Klebsiella oxytoca and UTIs. Catheters are commonly used in a hospital or long-term care setting. Some people may not be able ... What Is Klebsiella Oxytoca?. Medically reviewed by Suzanne Falck, MD on. August 9, 2017. - Written by Kimberly Holland ...
... Designation: ART 2008133 TypeStrain=False Application: Modified Hodge Test (MHT) ... Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC® BAA-1705™) Strain Designations: ART 2008133 [D-05, 1338] / Type Strain: no / Biosafety Level: 2 ... Novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase, KPC-1, from a carbapenem-resistant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrob. ... Evaluation of methods to identify the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase in Enterobacteriaceae. J. Clin. Microbiol. 45(8): ...
... rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in ... klebsiella. kleb·si·el·la. noun. A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. ... Klebsiella f. *A taxonomic genus within the family Enterobacteriaceae - certain Gram-negative oxidase-negative, rod-shaped ... Origin of klebsiella. New Latin genus name after Edwin Klebs (1834-1913), German-American pathologist born in Königsberg ( ...
Klebsiella - A bacteria that frequently causes lung, urinary tract, intestinal, and wound infections, is clearly explained in ... Klebsiella - Glossary. Written & Compiled by Medindia Content Team. Medically Reviewed by The Medindia Medical Review Team on ... Medical Word - Klebsiella. Ans : A bacteria that frequently causes lung, urinary tract, intestinal, and wound infections. ...
Encapsulatus Klebsiella, also called Encapsulatus, is a genus of bacteria, of the tribe Escherichieae and family ... Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedländers bacillus) has been considered a significant respiratory pathogen since 1882. Klebsiella is ... Klebsiella, also called Encapsulatus, is a genus of bacteria, of the tribe Escherichieae and family Enterobacteriaceae, ... Sahly H, Podschun R, Ullmann U (2000) Klebsiella infections in the immunocompromised host. Adv Exp Med Biol 479:237-249PubMed ...
EPIDEMIOLOGY: Worldwide; 2/3 of all infection due to Klebsiella spp. are hospital-acquired; causes 3% of all acute bacterial ...
We report a Klebsiella pneumoniaeDSM2026 fermentation procedure for the efficient production of a key enzyme of 1,3-propanediol ... Fermentation Klebsiella pneumoniae 1,3-propanediol propanediol oxidoreductase This is a preview of subscription content, log in ... Homann, T., Tag, C., Biebl, H., Deckwer, W.D. & Schink, B. 1990 Fermentation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol by Klebsiella and ... Johnson, E.A. & Lin, E.C.C. 1987 Klebsiella pneumoniae 1,3-propanediol: NAD+ oxidoreductase. Journal of Bacteriology 169, 2050- ...
Scientists are finding the use of antibodies is a promising way to treat Klebsiella pneumoniae, which is usually resistant to ... The Klebsiella bacteria is responsible for 10 percent of all hospital-acquired infections in the United States. Burt ... March 13 (UPI) -- Scientists are finding the use of antibodies is a promising way to treat Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacteria ... The CDC said Klebsiella infections commonly occur among sick patients receiving treatment for other conditions. Most at risk ...
  • Klebsiella variicola is a species of bacteria which was originally identified as a benign endosymbiont in plants, but has since been associated with disease in humans and cattle as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Klebsiella [kleb−see−ell−uh] is a type of Gram-negative bacteria that can cause different types of healthcare-associated infections, including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, wound or surgical site infections, and meningitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Increasingly, Klebsiella bacteria have developed antimicrobial resistance, most recently to the class of antibiotics known as carbapenems . (cdc.gov)
  • Klebsiella bacteria are normally found in the human intestines (where they do not cause disease). (cdc.gov)
  • To get a Klebsiella infection, a person must be exposed to the bacteria. (cdc.gov)
  • In healthcare settings, Klebsiella bacteria can be spread through person-to-person contact (for example, from patient to patient via the contaminated hands of healthcare personnel, or other persons) or, less commonly, by contamination of the environment. (cdc.gov)
  • Some Klebsiella bacteria have become highly resistant to antibiotics. (cdc.gov)
  • When bacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae produce an enzyme known as a carbapenemase (referred to as KPC-producing organisms), then the class of antibiotics called carbapenems will not work to kill the bacteria and treat the infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Klebsiella species are examples of Enterobacterales, a normal part of the human gut bacteria, that can become carbapenem-resistant. (cdc.gov)
  • Nordmann P, Cuzon G, Naas T. The real threat of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing bacteria. (medscape.com)
  • What is the colony morphology of Klebsiella bacteria? (answers.com)
  • Klebsiella is a gram negative bacteria and like any other bacteria does not discriminate between the sex's. (answers.com)
  • any of several rod-shaped, aerobic bacteria of the genus Klebsiella, certain species of which, as K. pneumoniae, are found in the respiratory, intestinal, and genitourinary tracts of humans and animals and are sometimes pathogenic. (dictionary.com)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae is spread through exposure to the Klebsiella bacteria from an infected person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (reference.com)
  • Many types of Klebsiella bacteria have become drug resistant, making treating the infection more difficult, according to the CDC. (reference.com)
  • When a Klebsiella pneumoniae infection is diagnosed, laboratory tests are used to determine which antibiotics can properly treat the bacteria and cure the infection. (reference.com)
  • As the antibiotics we currently use are inefficient at targeting bacteria that live inside our cells, this finding has important clinical implications on how we treat Klebsiella infections," explains Bengoechea. (news-medical.net)
  • Klebsiella oxytoca (KO) is one of several Klebsiella bacteria. (healthline.com)
  • Each type of infection is the result of Klebsiella bacteria getting into your body. (healthline.com)
  • The most common bacteria associated with UTIs in women (including teens) are: Escherichia coli (approximately 80% of cases), Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Klebsiella , Enterobacter, and Proteus species. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Other bacteria that can cause otitis externa include Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and bacteria of the family called Streptococci. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Klebsiella, also called Encapsulatus, is a genus of bacteria, of the tribe Escherichieae and family Enterobacteriaceae, containing several species causing infections primarily of the respiratory tract in man and some of the lower animals (1). (springer.com)
  • The Klebsiella bacteria is responsible for 10 percent of all hospital-acquired infections in the United States. (upi.com)
  • March 13 (UPI) -- Scientists are finding the use of antibodies is a promising way to treat Klebsiella pneumoniae, a bacteria strain that causes about 10 percent of all hospital-acquired infections in the United States and is usually resistant to antibiotics. (upi.com)
  • The Klebsiella bacteria can be spread through person-to-person contact, the CDC said. (upi.com)
  • Abnormal collections of fluid within the organs in the abdomen may result from a variety of organisms, including the Klebsiella bacteria. (livestrong.com)
  • Like many bacteria, Klebsiella has become resistant to some common antibiotic treatments. (livestrong.com)
  • The CDC says that some Klebsiella strains have become resistant to carbapenem antibiotics, meaning these antibiotics won't work to kill the bacteria. (livestrong.com)
  • When a patient has received a diagnosis with a Klebsiella infection, sensitivity testing is often performed to determine which antibiotics will prove useful against that particular strain of bacteria. (livestrong.com)
  • I was prescribed Keflex for a Klebsiella oxytoca UTI, and I know that I shouldn't take any antibiotic if I am asymptomatic, however everything I read about this bacteria is pretty scary. (rutgers.edu)
  • Segregate cows with Klebsiella mastitis to avoid contamination of milking machine or environment with high bacteria loads. (cornell.edu)
  • Considering taking medication to treat complicated+appendicitis+caused+by+klebsiella+bacteria? (webmd.com)
  • Below is a list of common medications used to treat or reduce the symptoms of complicated+appendicitis+caused+by+klebsiella+bacteria. (webmd.com)
  • Klebsiella can be found often in stone material, and in an infected prostate, both of which can protect the bacteria from antibiotics and then re-seed bacteria into the urinary tract. (rutgers.edu)
  • The most common infection caused by Klebsiella bacteria outside the hospital is pneumonia. (wikidoc.org)
  • Klebsiella - a genus of bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that occurs in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A. Klebsiella is a bacteria that can cause different types of infections such as a urinary tract infection or pneumonia, and is considered a not very common pathogen among patients in the community (meaning outside the hospital). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 9) Another area of research surrounding 'Klebsiella pneumoniae' is learning about its presence in different regions of the world and understanding each of the different strains of the bacteria. (kenyon.edu)
  • The visualisation shows acquired resistance of three common bacteria, E.Coli, Klebsiella and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), to a range of antibiotics for each of the EU/EEA member states. (nesta.org.uk)
  • Chicken, turkey and pork sold in grocery stores harbors disease-causing bacteria known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new study. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacteria. (marketresearch.com)
  • Klebsiella Pneumoniae bacteria cause primary lobar pneumonia, which is common with alcoholics and people with compromised pulmonary function. (fineartamerica.com)
  • The most common bacteria that make this enzyme are gram-negative such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, but the gene for NDM-1 can spread from one strain of bacteria to another by horizontal gene transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, Klebsiella must enter the respiratory (breathing) tract to cause pneumoniae, or the blood to cause a bloodstream infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Unfortunately, these medical tools and conditions may allow Klebsiella to enter the body and cause infection. (cdc.gov)
  • What is Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infection? (webmd.com)
  • Taking certain antibiotics for a long time or other treatments also can raise your chances for a klebsiella infection. (webmd.com)
  • Most people who get a klebsiella infection recover. (webmd.com)
  • Liu C, Guo J. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hypermucoviscous and aerobactin positive) infection over 6 years in the elderly in China: antimicrobial resistance patterns, molecular epidemiology and risk factor. (medscape.com)
  • Genetic requirements for Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced liver abscess in an oral infection model. (medscape.com)
  • Lipocalin 2 is required for pulmonary host defense against Klebsiella infection. (medscape.com)
  • yes, Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae can be highly contagious. (answers.com)
  • Ratajczak H.V. (2005) Klebsiella, Infection and Immunity. (springer.com)
  • 2/3 of all infection due to Klebsiella spp. (msdsonline.com)
  • Klebsiella bacterial infections cause symptoms that vary depending on the site of the infection. (livestrong.com)
  • Mechanical ventilators, indwelling tubes that drain urine, burns and open wounds all favor the development of klebsiella infection. (livestrong.com)
  • Those who are living in long-term care facilities or are currently hospitalized and breathing with mechanical ventilators are at even higher risk of developing a lung infection from Klebsiella. (livestrong.com)
  • Because of the possibility of widespread infection with drug-resistant Klebsiella, a doctor should be consulted right away if symptoms do not improve after antibiotic treatment or if breathing difficulties, lethargy, altered behavior or changes in consciousness develop. (livestrong.com)
  • I would caution you though that Klebsiella can be associated with sequestering infection sources such as stones and prostatitis, so if you have not been screened for these in the last few months, I would recommend doing so. (rutgers.edu)
  • At some point this bug will become resistant and then I'm screwed, as from my research there is little the medical profession can do for a Klebsiella pneumoniae infection once it becomes resistant to carbapenems. (rutgers.edu)
  • Therefore, a diagnosis of Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella syndrome should be considered in all patients who present with KP infection with multiple organ abscesses. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Klebsiella infection are primarily associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae . (wikidoc.org)
  • Infection by Klebsiella pneumonia producing class A carbapenemases is a major clinical and public health problem in Israel and worldwide. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • As a sequela to the Klebsiella infection , puss associated with the abscesses can produce an empyema as well. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The incidence of Klebsiella infection to this space forming trapped air under the fascia is very rare. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • One study looked at approximately 450 cases of 'Klebsiella pneumoniae' infection worldwide to determine the effects of regionality (specifically different environments and different patients). (kenyon.edu)
  • Hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP) are genetic variants of K. pneumoniae which can cause life-threatening community-acquired infection in healthy individuals. (frontiersin.org)
  • Introduction: Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase infection has increased over the last few years worldwide, requiring the use of state-of-the-art antimicrobial agents. (usp.br)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae infection is caused when the organism is able to enter the lungs. (marketresearch.com)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae infection is very common in patients with underlying diseases like diabetes, chronic lung diseases and chronic alcoholics. (marketresearch.com)
  • The infection was identified as a carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain bearing the novel gene blaNDM-1. (wikipedia.org)
  • In healthcare settings, Klebsiella infections commonly occur among sick patients who are receiving treatment for other conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators (breathing machines) or intravenous (vein) catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are most at risk for Klebsiella infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthy people usually do not get Klebsiella infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Klebsiella infections that are not drug-resistant can be treated with antibiotics. (cdc.gov)
  • Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infections? (webmd.com)
  • Klebsiella infections can be dangerous, so doctors start treatment with antibiotics right away. (webmd.com)
  • Which CBC findings suggest Klebsiella infections? (medscape.com)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of antimicrobial-resistant opportunistic infections in hospitalized patients. (nature.com)
  • As a case in point, take Klebsiella pneumoniae, which has been included on the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of infections that desperately need new treatments. (news-medical.net)
  • Perhaps even more alarming is the number of strains with access to a pool of genes that can make Klebsiella hypervirulent - essentially a superbug capable of causing untreatable infections by breaking down a host's protective mechanisms. (news-medical.net)
  • Last but not least, in a landmark discovery, researchers uncovered the crucial role that interferons play in defending against Klebsiella infections. (news-medical.net)
  • Here he and his team are developing new therapeutics based on boosting our own defenses against Klebsiella infections. (news-medical.net)
  • Although we are still at the very early stages, these potential new treatments will have a major health impact, especially considering the increasing number of Klebsiella infections worldwide and the limited treatment options available," concludes Bengoechea. (news-medical.net)
  • A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in patients with diminished immunity, such as diabetics and alcoholics. (yourdictionary.com)
  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta lists the percentage of endemic hospital infections caused by Klebsiella at 8% and of epidemic outbreaks at 3% of all pathogens. (springer.com)
  • Sahly H, Podschun R, Ullmann U (2000) Klebsiella infections in the immunocompromised host. (springer.com)
  • The CDC said Klebsiella infections commonly occur among sick patients receiving treatment for other conditions. (upi.com)
  • One-tenth of all infections among 183 United States hospitals tested contracted the Klebsiella strain, according to a National Institutes of Health study in 2010. (upi.com)
  • People often develop klebsiella infections because they have impaired immunity from being sick or required medical interventions. (livestrong.com)
  • Though it lives harmlessly in human intestines, Klebsiella is capable of causing serious illnesses like pneumonia, infections in the blood and wound infections. (livestrong.com)
  • Klebsiella also proves a common cause of urinary tract infections. (livestrong.com)
  • Aminoglycosides like amikacin, tobramycin and gentamicin also treat Klebsiella infections. (livestrong.com)
  • The prescribing information for Levaquin indicates that physicians can use it to treat pneumonia and urinary tract infections caused by Klebsiella, while Factive can treat pneumonia. (livestrong.com)
  • A human neutrophil interacting with Klebsiella pneumoniae (pink), a multidrug-resistant bacterium that causes severe hospital infections. (eurekalert.org)
  • On January 27, 2011, a West Virginia county health department was notified of a cluster of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) cases detected by a local hospital (hospital A). CRKP infections frequently are resistant to a majority of antimicrobial agents and have an increased risk for morbidity and mortality ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Here we report a case of a new variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae), coming in lime light for its virulent nature and association with healthy individuals, highlighting the fact that virulent infections can initiate from the community. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Klebsiella ranks second to E. coli for urinary tract infections in older persons. (wikidoc.org)
  • [2] As a general rule, Klebsiella infections tend to occur in people with a weakened immune system from improper diet. (wikidoc.org)
  • Starting in 2010, there was a sharp increase in infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to carbapenems in the Emilia-Romagna region in Italy. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • To better understand potential contributions of foodborne Klebsiella pneumonia to human clinical infections, the multi-center research team compared K. pneumoniae isolates from retail meat products and human clinical specimens to assess their similarity based on whole genome sequencing. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • At the same time, the team found Klebsiella, including resistant strains, comprised 10 percent of the 1,728 positive cultures from patients with either urinary tract or blood infections in the Flagstaff area. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Funding for the research, 'Intermingled Klebsiella pneumoniae populations between retail meats and human urinary tract infections,' was provided by the Department of Defense Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center and the Department of Veterans Affairs. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Is the Subject Area "Klebsiella infections" applicable to this article? (plos.org)
  • Global Markets Direct's latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections - Pipeline Review, H2 2019, provides an overview of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. (marketresearch.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's Pharmaceutical and Healthcare latest pipeline guide Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections - Pipeline Review, H2 2019, provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (marketresearch.com)
  • The Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide also reviews of key players involved in therapeutic development for Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections and features dormant and discontinued projects. (marketresearch.com)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline guide helps in identifying and tracking emerging players in the market and their portfolios, enhances decision making capabilities and helps to create effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease). (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews pipeline therapeutics for Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide reviews key companies involved in Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects. (marketresearch.com)
  • The pipeline guide evaluates Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), drug target, route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (marketresearch.com)
  • Find and recognize significant and varied types of therapeutics under development for Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections (Infectious Disease). (marketresearch.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's, 'Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infections - Pipeline Review, H2 2015', provides an overview of the Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infections's therapeutic pipeline. (marketresearch.com)
  • This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infections, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases. (marketresearch.com)
  • It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Klebsiella Pneumoniae Infections and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects. (marketresearch.com)
  • The aim of this work was to investigate the epidemiological and genetic characteristics of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp) causing community-onset infections. (frontiersin.org)
  • What makes K.pneumoniae so problematic is the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella strains. (news-medical.net)
  • For a culture with a consistent detailed antibiotic pattern, we recommend ordering the Klebsiella pneumoniae QC strains listed in the CLSI manual. (atcc.org)
  • Dr. James Rahal, in a 1998 Journal of the American Medical Association article, reports Klebsiella strains had become resistant to these antibiotics at that time as well. (livestrong.com)
  • Price and his colleagues found that 47 percent of the 508 meat products purchased from grocery stores in 2012 harbored Klebsiella--and many of the strains recovered were resistant to antibiotics. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Agricultural operations often give food animals antibiotics to make them grow faster and to prevent diseases, a practice that can create conditions ideal for the emergence of resistant strains of Klebsiella, Price says. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Experiments were conducted with polymyxin B and two Klebsiella pneumonia isogenic strains (the wild type, KP_WT, and its transconjugant carrying the mobile colistin resistance gene, KP_MCR-1) to demonstrate that conducting two consecutive time-kill experiments (sequential TK) represents a simple approach to discriminate between pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics models. (asm.org)
  • The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalences, genotypes, and clonal relationships of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains in 98 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Riyadh. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Klebsiella strains that belong to serotypes or species specific for AS. (prohealth.com)
  • The average number of Klebsiella strains per patient was 1.7 for the AS group and 1.5 for the control group. (prohealth.com)
  • Regarding the K serotypes, 59 different types were identified, revealing a heterogeneous representation of Klebsiella strains, without a predominance of any serotype. (prohealth.com)
  • Altogether, when analyzed either separately or simultaneously according to O groups, K serotypes, and biochemically identified species, no evidence of the existence of AS-specific Klebsiella strains was obtained. (prohealth.com)
  • We aim to assess the clonal relatedness among carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPKP) strains infecting Egyptian pediatric cancer patients. (dovepress.com)
  • Emergence and Rapid Regional Spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae. (medscape.com)
  • Evaluation of methods to identify the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase in Enterobacteriaceae. (atcc.org)
  • Klebsiella is a dangerous bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae . (wikipedia.org)
  • Klebsiella variicola was described as a species of Klebsiella distinct from its closely related species Klebsiella pneumoniae in 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other Klebsiella species, K. variicola is gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, and covered by a polysaccharide capsule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bagley, S. T. Habitat association of Klebsiella species. (nature.com)
  • no species of klebsiella produce endospores. (answers.com)
  • klebsiella do produce capsule which helps them differentiate from Escherichia coli Klebsiella is a gram negative short rods and usually only gram positive rods such as bacillus species produce endospores. (answers.com)
  • The type species is Klebsiella pneumoniae . (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibacterial Efficacy of Lytic Bacteriophages against Antibiotic-Resistant Klebsiella Species," TheScientificWorldJOURNAL , vol. 11, pp. 1332-1340, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • it is the type species of Klebsiella . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • DNA was extracted from the culture, and the KVAR_0717 gene of the Klebsiella species was PCR amplified and then subjected to Sanger sequencing. (asm.org)
  • By biochemical identification, Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most frequently occurring species, being found in 45 AS patients and 45 control patients. (prohealth.com)
  • Klebsiella quasipneumoniae was recently defined as a new species, yet its prevalence, niche, and propensity to acquire antimicrobial resistance genes are not fully described. (asm.org)
  • Annual counts and rates of Klebsiella species (Klebsiella spp. (www.gov.uk)
  • Klebsiella species (Klebsiella spp. (www.gov.uk)
  • This work enabled us to pinpoint sources that harbor disease-causing Klebsiella species and that are critical points in the control of Klebsiella mastitis. (nnyagdev.org)
  • Adams-Haduch JM, Potoski BA, Sidjabat HE, Paterson DL, Doi Y. Activity of Temocillin against KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. (medscape.com)
  • Antibiotic Intervention Trial in a Medical Intensive Care Unit to Reduce the Acquisition of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Pneumoniae. (pfizer.com)
  • Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a Klebsiella ozaenae plasmid-borne gene encoding a nitrilase specific for the herbicide bromoxynil. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Here, we present the crystal structures of CdiA-CT⋅CdiI complexes from Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and Escherichia coli 3006. (rcsb.org)
  • Surveillance in Asia, Latin America, and European revealed dramatically increasing resistance to cephalosporins amongst Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. (frontiersin.org)
  • To evaluate the prevalence and susceptibility of ESBL-producing organisms among Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli isolated from adult and pediatric patients in two Israeli hospitals. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • What Is Klebsiella Oxytoca? (healthline.com)
  • We applied this approach to an agriculturally relevant gene cluster from Klebsiella oxytoca encoding the nitrogen fixation pathway for converting atmospheric N 2 to ammonia. (pnas.org)
  • Blood cultures and cultures of the tip of a central venous catheter yielded Klebsiella oxytoca. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Disse SC, Meyer S, Baghai-Arassi A: Sepsis-associated purpura fulminans due to Klebsiella oxytoca. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • A taxa geral de sepse hospitalar por Klebsiella spp foi de 3,7%, identificando K. pneumoniae (91%), K. oxytoca (9%), e 55,6% de cepas multirresistentes. (usp.br)
  • 1.what types of disease caused by klebsiella pneumoniae? (answers.com)
  • Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae may be called Friedländer's Pneumonia , after Carl Friedländer . (wikidoc.org)
  • The spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae can be stopped by strict adherence to hand washing and gown-wearing when in the presence of a person diagnosed with Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to the CDC. (reference.com)
  • Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used two different bacteriophage viruses individually and then together to successfully treat research mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258). (scienceblog.com)
  • Bacteriophage Treatment Rescues Mice Infected with Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258. (scienceblog.com)
  • Antimicrobial resistance profile of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. (medscape.com)
  • Fig. 3: Geographical distribution of Klebsiella pneumoniae clones harbouring resistance to carbapenems and third-generation cephalosporins. (nature.com)
  • Fig. 4: Antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae . (nature.com)
  • Genomic analysis of diversity, population structure, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae , an urgent threat to public health. (nature.com)
  • The extrachromosomal genes which code for these enzymes often exist with genes expressing resistance to several other classes of antibacterial agents, potentially arming Klebsiella pneumoniae with resistance to all therapeutically available antibiotics. (nih.gov)
  • In an article from the American Society for Microbiology, Dr. Ling Ma reports 2009 study results that indicate Klebsiella may also have developed a resistance to this class of antibiotics. (livestrong.com)
  • Klebsiella possesses a chromosomal class a beta-lactamase giving it resistance to ampicillin . (wikidoc.org)
  • Conclusion: the treatment based on the combination of amikacin and meropenem can be used as a first alternative for the treatment of patients infected by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, since it is cost-effective and reduces the possibility of increased bacterial resistance. (usp.br)
  • I am a PhD cholar working on copper resistance mechanism in klebsiella pneumoniae. (protocol-online.org)
  • Enterobacter aerogenes Hormaeche and Edwards 1960 (Approved Lists 1980) and Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Klebsiella aerogenes' (Kruse) Taylor et al. (uniprot.org)
  • In fact, a synonym for Enterobacter aerogenes is Klebsiella mobilis. (answers.com)
  • Enterobacter aerogenes for test negetive and Klebsiella pneumoniae will test positve. (answers.com)
  • Klebsiella aerogenes Tindall et al. (atcc.org)
  • Klebsiella aerogenes utilized aromatic amino acids as sole sources of nitrogen but not as sole sources of carbon. (nih.gov)
  • 2) Ademas, en el ano de 1985 se reporto en el mismo pais la mutacion de la SHV-1, produciendo una nueva enzima (SHV-2), causante de la resistencia de Klebsiella ozaenae a las cefalosporinas de amplio espectro, y de alli su denominacion como BLEE. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pyogenic hepatic abscess and septic pulmonary emboli associated with Klebsiella ozaenae bacteremia. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We have reported a case of cryptogenic liver abscess with bacteremia and septic pulmonary emboli due to Klebsiella ozaenae. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is resistant to almost all antimicrobial agents, is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and poses a serious threat to public health. (dovepress.com)
  • Its economic impact can be devastating because vaccines and antimicrobial treatment have limited impact on severity of mastitis, milk loss, death and culling due to Klebsiella . (nnyagdev.org)
  • Novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase, KPC-1, from a carbapenem-resistant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae. (atcc.org)
  • Keywords: Hypervirulent strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Hpermucoviscous Klebsiella Syndrome, String test. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Another study done on a hypervirulent strain of 'Klebsiella pneumoniae' in China set out to investigate the genes pertaining to hypervirulence. (kenyon.edu)
  • Here we examine antibiotic susceptibility with a Class A β-lactamase+ invasive strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae that was isolated from a lethal outbreak within laboratory colonies of Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus monkeys. (mcponline.org)
  • 2006). Colistin-resistant isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae emerging in intensive care unit patients: first report of a multiclonal cluster. (wikidoc.org)
  • In this study, we use whole genome sequence data from 1668 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae to develop a XGBoost-based machine learning model that accurately predicts minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for 20 antibiotics. (nih.gov)
  • Thirteen patients with OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST392 have been reported by Sweden and Norway between January and April 2018 - all returning travellers with prior hospital admission in Gran Canaria. (europa.eu)
  • Klebsiella is among the enteric bacilli included in the coliform group, characterized as fermentative Gram-negative rods that inhabit the intestinal tract and nasopharynx of man and other animals without causing disease. (springer.com)
  • Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium related to Enterobacter (formerly Aerobacter ) and Serratia organisms which cause serious. (springer.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that is commonly found in the human digestive system. (livestrong.com)
  • This hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae strain, unlike other Gram negative organisms, has the ability to metastasize to distant organs causing a syndrome called Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella Syndrome. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Klebsiella is similar to E. coli in many respects, but there are differences too. (cornell.edu)
  • Like E. coli mastitis, Klebsiella mastitis originates from the environment. (cornell.edu)
  • The crystal structures of several forms from E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae NFeoB assemble into a funnel-like trimer with a cytoplasmic pore that could facilitate gating and passage of unhydrated ferrous irons ( 17 , 18 ). (asm.org)
  • 1971 (Approved Lists 1980) share the same nomenclatural type (ATCC 13048) on the Approved Lists and are homotypic synonyms, with consequences for the name Klebsiella mobilis Bascomb et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Study Evaluating the Role of Oral Antibiotics in an Aim to Eradicate Carrier State of Carbapenem- Resistant Klebsiella Pneumonia (KPC). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The University of California San Diego School of Medicine lists cephalosporin-type antibiotics as an option against Klebsiella. (livestrong.com)
  • The University of California at San Diego's Medical School lists fluoroquinolone antibiotics as a current option for Klebsiella treatment. (livestrong.com)
  • I havent, but i think for klebsiella, you probably do need antibiotics. (babycenter.com)
  • I know my mum, who has copd, has been on antibiotics for klebsiella, but i dont know which one. (babycenter.com)
  • Klebsiella organisms are resistant to multiple antibiotics. (medscape.com)
  • Our results demonstrate that dampening of Klebsiella pneumoniae susceptibility involves global remodeling of the bacterial proteome to counter the effects of antibiotics and stabilize growth. (mcponline.org)
  • The researchers used whole-genome DNA sequencing to compare the Klebsiella isolated from retail meat products with the Klebsiella isolated from patients and found that some isolate pairs were nearly identical. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • KPC-50 is a KPC-3 variant identified from a Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate recovered in Switzerland in 2019. (asm.org)
  • The Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) was detected in a carbapenem-resistant respiratory isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae in an Irish hospital. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • NDM-1 was first detected in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from a Swedish patient of Indian origin in 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • Which Klebsiella pathogen may cause neonatal bacteremia? (medscape.com)
  • We report a case of a 24-year-old liver transplant recipient who developed hepatic artery thrombosis and graft failure, which was complicated by subphrenic abscess and persistent Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae bacteremia. (asm.org)
  • Complete genome sequence of the N2-fixing broad host range endophyte Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and virulence predictions verified in mice. (genome.jp)
  • Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. (genome.jp)
  • Zhou Y, Wang X, Shen J, Lu Z, Liu Y. Endogenous Endophthalmitis Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Hypervirulent Klebsiella Pneumoniae: A Case Report and Literature Review. (medscape.com)
  • Klebsiella Trevisan, 1885 emend. (itis.gov)
  • Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a section through a Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterium. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Clinical epidemiology of the global expansion of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases. (medscape.com)
  • During the past 14 years a rapid, world-wide increase in prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to late generation cephalosporins has occurred. (nih.gov)
  • The main risk factors were previous antibiotic use, prematurity, low weight and central catheter.There were complications in 28.9% of the cases, with a mortality rate of 11%.The sepsis by Klebsiella spp. (usp.br)
  • Nesartnam, S.T., Wase, D.A.J. & Blakebrough, N. 1982 The susceptibility to ultrasonic disintegration of Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418. (springer.com)
  • Identification and Characterization of NDM-1-producing Hypervirulent (Hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae in China. (medscape.com)
  • Suzuki K, Yamaguchi T, Yanai M. Simultaneous occurrence of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae emphysematous prostatic abscess, emphysematous cystitis, and renal abscess. (medscape.com)
  • Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella syndrome it's in the community! (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella syndrome is a unique syndrome caused by a new variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP), characterized by abscess formation at distant body sites. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • So I'm sure some of you have read the battles I've had with MRSA osteomyelitis and my recent hemipelvectomy, but there is something else I have been battling this year, an ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae UTI. (rutgers.edu)
  • The preliminary results show Klebsiella pneumoniae which I know will come back as ESBL, and my white count is slightly elevated. (rutgers.edu)
  • QMPS research has shown that man healthy adult cows shed Klebsiella in their feces. (cornell.edu)
  • In previous work, we showed that on average 80% of healthy adult dairy cattle shed Klebsiella in their feces during the summer. (nnyagdev.org)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedländer's bacillus) has been considered a significant respiratory pathogen since 1882. (springer.com)
  • Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales and specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) are rapidly spreading worldwide. (asm.org)
  • Safety and Efficacy Study of Eradication of Carbapenem Resistant Klebsiella Pneumonia From the Gastrointestinal Tract by Probiotics. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A negative stool culture for Carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumonia. (clinicaltrials.gov)