A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.
Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)
Surgical procedures employed to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS such as MYOPIA; HYPEROPIA; or ASTIGMATISM. These may involve altering the curvature of the CORNEA; removal or replacement of the CRYSTALLINE LENS; or modification of the SCLERA to change the axial length of the eye.
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.
A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.
The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.
The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.
Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.
The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
A surgical technique to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS of the EYE, such as MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. In this method, a flap of CORNEAL EPITHELIUM is created by exposure of the area to dilute alcohol. The flap is lifted and then replaced after laser ablation of the subepithelial CORNEA.
Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.
A procedure to surgically correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS by cutting radial slits into the CORNEA to change its refractive properties.
Measurement of the thickness of the CORNEA.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.
Diseases of the cornea.
The period following a surgical operation.
A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.
Inflammation of the cornea.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.
Relatively bright light, or the dazzling sensation of relatively bright light, which produces unpleasantness or discomfort, or which interferes with optimal VISION, OCULAR. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
A parasympatholytic anticholinergic used solely to obtain mydriasis or cycloplegia.
The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.
Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the eye parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus behind the retina, as a result of the eyeball being too short from front to back. It is also called farsightedness because the near point is more distant than it is in emmetropia with an equal amplitude of accommodation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Lasers which use a solid, as opposed to a liquid or gas, as the lasing medium. Common materials used are crystals, such as YAG (YTTRIUM aluminum garnet); alexandrite; and CORUNDUM, doped with a rare earth element such as a NEODYMIUM; ERBIUM; or HOLMIUM. The output is sometimes additionally modified by addition of non-linear optical materials such as potassium titanyl phosphate crystal, which for example is used with neodymium YAG lasers to convert the output light to the visible range.
Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.
Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.
The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.
The use of photothermal effects of LASERS to coagulate, incise, vaporize, resect, dissect, or resurface tissue.
Treatment using irradiation with LASER light of low power intensity so that the effects are not due to heat, as they are in LASER THERAPY.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.
A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
Infection in humans and animals caused by any fungus in the order Mucorales (e.g., Absidia, Mucor, Rhizopus etc.) There are many clinical types associated with infection of the central nervous system, lung, gastrointestinal tract, skin, orbit and paranasal sinuses. In humans, it usually occurs as an opportunistic infection in patients with a chronic debilitating disease, particularly uncontrolled diabetes, or who are receiving immunosuppressive agents. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The surgical removal of the contents of the orbit. This includes the eyeball, blood vessels, muscles, fat, nerve supply, and periosteum. It should be differentiated from EYE EVISCERATION which removes the inner contents of the eye, leaving the sclera intact.
Removal of all of the organs and adjacent structures of the pelvis. It is usually performed to surgically remove cancer involving the bladder, uterine cervix, or rectum. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.
An order of zygomycetous fungi, usually saprophytic, causing damage to food in storage, but which may cause respiratory infection or MUCORMYCOSIS in persons suffering from other debilitating diseases.

LASIK for post penetrating keratoplasty astigmatism and myopia. (1/236)

AIMS: To report the results of a series of patients who were treated with LASIK to correct post penetrating keratoplasty ametropia. METHODS: 26 eyes of 24 patients underwent LASIK to correct astigmatism and myopia after corneal transplantation; 14 eyes also received arcuate cuts in the stromal bed at the time of surgery. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent was -5.20D and the mean preoperative astigmatism was 8.67D. RESULTS: The results of 25 eyes are reported. The mean 1 month values for spherical equivalent and astigmatism were -0.24D and 2.48D respectively. 18 eyes have been followed up for 6 months or more. The final follow up results for these eyes are -1.91D and 2.92D for spherical equivalent and astigmatism. The patients undergoing arcuate cuts were less myopic but had greater astigmatism than those not. The patients receiving arcuate cuts had a greater target induced astigmatism, surgically induced astigmatism, and astigmatism correction index than those eyes that did not. One eye suffered a surgical complication. No eyes lost more than one line of BSCVA and all eyes gained between 0 and 6 lines UCVA. CONCLUSIONS: LASIK after penetrating keratoplasty is a relatively safe and effective procedure. It reduces both the spherical error and the cylindrical component of the ametropia. Correction of high astigmatism may be augmented by performing arcuate cuts in the stromal bed.  (+info)

Corneal wound healing following laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK): a histopathological study in rabbits. (2/236)

AIMS: To investigate the histopathological changes of rabbit corneas after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and to evaluate the corneal wound healing process. METHODS: A LASIK was performed on white rabbit eyes. Postoperatively, rabbits were killed on days 1 and 7, and at 1, 3, and 9 months. RESULTS: Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) positive material and disorganised collagen fibre were seen along the interface of the corneal flap even 9 months after operation. CONCLUSIONS: The wound healing process still continued at 9 months after LASIK indicating that a much longer time than expected was required for corneal wound healing following LASIK.  (+info)

Corneal stromal changes induced by myopic LASIK. (3/236)

PURPOSE. Despite the rapidly growing popularity of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in correction of myopia, the tissue responses have not been thoroughly investigated. The aim was to characterize morphologic changes induced by myopic LASIK in human corneal stroma. METHODS: Sixty-two myopic eyes were examined once at 3 days to 2 years after LASIK using in vivo confocal microscopy for measurement of flap thickness, keratocyte response zones, and objective grading of haze. RESULTS: Confocal microscopy revealed corneal flap interface particles in 100% of eyes and microfolds at the Bowman's layer in 96.8%. The flaps were thinner (112 +/- 25 microm) than intended (160 microm). The keratocyte activation in the stromal bed was greatest on the third postoperative day. Patients with increased interface reflectivity due to abnormal extracellular matrix or activated keratocytes at > or = 1 month (n = 9) had significantly thinner flaps than patients with normal interface reflectivity (n = 18; 114 +/- 12 versus 132 +/- 22 microm, P = 0.027). After 6 months the mean density of the most anterior layer of flap keratocytes was decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Keratocyte activation induced by LASIK was of short duration compared with that reported after photorefractive keratectomy. The flaps were thinner than expected, and microfolds and interface particles were common complications. The new findings such as increased interface reflectivity associated with thin flaps and the apparent loss of keratocytes in the most anterior flap 6 months to 2 years after surgery may have important clinical relevance.  (+info)

Effect of myopic LASIK on corneal sensitivity and morphology of subbasal nerves. (4/236)

PURPOSE: To investigate whether the morphology of the subbasal nerves corresponds to corneal sensitivity after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). METHODS: In a case series study, 59 patients were examined at 2 to 4 hours, 3 days, 1 to 2 weeks, 1 to 2 months, 3 months, or 6 or more months after undergoing LASIK for myopia, by using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer and an in vivo confocal microscope, and were compared with control subjects. Corneal sensitivity and confocal images of subbasal nerves were obtained centrally and 2 mm nasally and temporally. Subbasal nerve fiber bundles (NFBs) were grouped as follows: corneas with no nerve images; corneas with short (<200 microm), unconnected NFBs; corneas with long (> or =200 microm) NFBs without interconnections; and corneas with long NFBs with interconnections. RESULTS: Corneal sensitivity was at its lowest at 1 to 2 weeks after LASIK. Sensitivity of the hinge area was higher than temporal or central areas at every time point. At 6 or more months the sensitivity values were comparable with the values observed in control subjects. The central area showed mainly short, unconnected subbasal NFBs, even at 6 months. In general, the temporal area presented with long NFBs from 3 months onward, whereas the nasal area showed long NFBs at every time point. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the corneal areas with no nerve images or short, unconnected NFBs are associated with lower sensitivities than corneal areas with long NFBs with or without interconnections. In vivo confocal microscopy reveals LASIK-induced alterations of subbasal nerve morphology and thus enables a direct comparison of corneal sensory innervation and sensitivity.  (+info)

Six-month results of hyperopic and astigmatic LASIK in eyes with primary and secondary hyperopia. (5/236)

PURPOSE: To assess the safety and efficacy of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia and hyperopic astigmatism and develop a LASIK nomogram for primary hyperopia or hyperopia secondary to myopic refractive surgery using the VISX STAR S2. METHODS: Prospective evaluation of LASIK in 46 primary eyes and 29 secondary eyes with fogged manifest sphere from +0.5 diopters (D) to +6.0 D and cylinder from 0 to +5.0 D. RESULTS: Mean manifest spherical equivalent (SE) in patients with primary hyperopia was +2.50 D +/- 0.93 preoperatively and +0.70 D +/- 1.19 at 6 months. At 6 months, 79% of primary hyperopes had uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) of 20/40 or better; 63% were within +/- 1 D of emmetropia. One primary hyperope lost 2 lines of best spectacle-corrected vision (BCVA) at 1 month. Complications included transient epithelial defect (6.5%), epithelial cells in the interface (4.3%), diffuse lamellar keratitis (4.3%), haze (2.2%), and mild irregular astigmatism (2.2%). In those with secondary hyperopia, mean manifest SE was +1.70 D +/- 0.82 preoperatively and -0.27 D +/- 0.95 at 6 months. At 6 months, 83% of secondary hyperopes had UCVA of 20/40 or better; 74% were within +/- 1 D of emmetropia. No secondary hyperope lost > or = 2 lines of BCVA. Complications included intraoperative bleeding (3.4%), intraoperative epithelial defect (3.4%), transient interface debris (3.4%), significant dry eye (3.4%), blood in interface (3.4%), irregular astigmatism (6.9%), slight decentration (6.9%), trace haze (6.9%), mild epithelial ingrowth not requiring removal (3.4%), or corneal irregularity (3.4%). CONCLUSION: These early data suggest that LASIK for hyperopia from +0.5 to +6 D and astigmatism from 0 to +5 D using the VISX STAR S2 benefits from a nomogram adjusted for preoperative refraction, age, and prior refractive surgery and is safe and effective. Patients with secondary hyperopia achieved more correction than those with primary hyperopia, although the accuracy and predictability of LASIK in both groups has improved with the nomogram adjustments.  (+info)

Long-term results of laser in situ keratomileusis for high myopia. (6/236)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for high myopia after a follow-up of two years. A total of 42 eyes from 33 patients with high myopia (range: -9.00 D to -25.50 D) were studied. LASIK was performed using an automated microkeratome (Steinway, USA) and OmniMed II excimer laser with the standard MKM program (Summit Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA) in all patients. The patients were followed up at one, three, six, 12 and 24 months. During follow-up manifest refraction and best corrected and uncorrected visual acuity were measured. Any complications were also analyzed. The two-year follow-up results were as follows. The mean postoperative manifest spherical equivalents (MSE) were -0.51 D at one month, -1.09 D at three months, -1.78 D at six months, -2.17 D at 12 months and -2.61 D at 24 months. Myopic regression continued during the two-year follow-up (p < 0.05). The accuracy of the intended postoperative correction within +/- 2.00 D was 73.8% at one month, 69.1% at three months, 52.4% at six months, 52.4% at 12 months, and 45.2% at 24 months. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was unchanged or increased in 35 eyes (83.3%). Only three eyes (7.2%) lost two or more lines of BCVA. This was due to irregular astigmatism in one eye, macular degeneration in one eye, and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in one eye. In this study, LASIK was effective and safe in the correction of high myopia, however continuous myopic regression was seen over the two-year follow-up. Refining the nomogram to adjust for progressive myopic regression will be necessary in order to obtain better results.  (+info)

Corneal flap dimensions in laser in situ keratomileusis using the Innovatome automatic microkeratome. (7/236)

To evaluate the thickness and size consistency of the corneal flap created with the Innovatome automatic microkeratome and to determine any correlation between preoperative variables and these corneal flap dimensions, we performed a prospective study comprising of 268 eyes of 143 patients having laser in situ keratomileusis. Either No. 170 or No. 190 blade was used, and preoperative variables including the central corneal thickness, keratometry (K) reading, spherical equivalent, and the blade type were measured. The mean central corneal flap thickness was 138.8 +/- 23.5 microns (range, 71.6-193.7 microns) in blade 170 group, and 148.3 +/- 25.4 microns (range, 80.3-211.7 microns) in blade 190 group. No relationship was found between the corneal flap thickness and the preoperative K reading or the spherical equivalent, but the corneal flap thickness increased with the preoperative central corneal thickness. The mean vertical flap diameter was 9.18 +/- 0.25 mm (range, 8.50-9.75 mm) in blade 170 group, and 9.50 +/- 0.31 mm (range, 8.75-10.00 mm) in blade 190 group. No relationship was found between the corneal flap diameter and the preoperative central corneal thickness or the spherical equivalent, but the corneal flap size increased with the preoperative K reading.  (+info)

Ocular deviation after unilateral laser in situ keratomileusis. (8/236)

Laser keratomileusis and excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy in situ are widely used therapies for treating myopia. The corrections of refractive error by glasses or contact lens result in a relatively equal refractive correction on both eyes. However, refractive surgery on a single eye can cause a focus disparity between both eyes and may result in the impairment of fusion leading to strabismus. This article aims to report a case where diplopia and esotropia occurred 1 month after laser keratomileusis (LASIK) in situ for the correction of myopia.  (+info)

Myopia can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

1. Genetics: Myopia can run in families, and people with a family history of myopia are more likely to develop the condition.
2. Near work: Spending too much time doing close-up activities such as reading or using digital devices can increase the risk of developing myopia.
3. Poor posture: Slouching or leaning forward can cause the eye to focus incorrectly, leading to myopia.
4. Nutritional deficiencies: A diet lacking in essential nutrients such as vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids may contribute to the development of myopia.
5. Eye stress: Prolonged eye strain due to excessive near work or other activities can lead to myopia.

Symptoms of myopia include:

1. Difficulty seeing distant objects clearly
2. Headaches or eye strain from trying to focus on distant objects
3. Squinting or rubbing the eyes to try to see distant objects more clearly
4. Difficulty seeing in low light conditions
5. Blurry vision at a distance, with close objects appearing clear.

Myopia can be diagnosed with a comprehensive eye exam, which includes a visual acuity test, refraction test, and retinoscopy. Treatment options for myopia include:

1. Glasses or contact lenses: These corrective lenses refract light properly onto the retina, allowing clear vision of both close and distant objects.
2. Laser eye surgery: Procedures such as LASIK can reshape the cornea to improve its curvature and reduce myopia.
3. Orthokeratology (ORTHO-K): A non-surgical procedure that uses a specialized contact lens to reshape the cornea while you sleep.
4. Myopia control: This involves using certain treatments or techniques to slow down the progression of myopia in children and young adults.
5. Multifocal lenses: These lenses have multiple focal points, allowing for clear vision of both near and distant objects without the need for glasses or contact lenses.

In conclusion, myopia is a common vision condition that can be caused by a variety of factors and symptoms can include difficulty seeing distant objects clearly, headaches, and eye strain. Treatment options include glasses or contact lenses, laser eye surgery, ORTHO-K, myopia control, and multifocal lenses. It is important to consult an eye doctor for a comprehensive evaluation and to determine the best course of treatment for your specific case of myopia.

Astigmatism can occur in people of all ages and is usually present at birth, but it may not become noticeable until later in life. It may also develop as a result of an injury or surgery. Astigmatism can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery, such as LASIK.

There are different types of astigmatism, including:

1. Corneal astigmatism: This is the most common type of astigmatism and occurs when the cornea is irregularly shaped.
2. Lens astigmatism: This type of astigmatism occurs when the lens inside the eye is irregularly shaped.
3. Mixed astigmatism: This type of astigmatism occurs when both the cornea and lens are irregularly shaped.

Astigmatism can cause a range of symptoms, including:

* Blurred vision at all distances
* Distorted vision (such as seeing objects as being stretched out or blurry)
* Eye strain or fatigue
* Headaches or eye discomfort
* Squinting or tilting the head to see clearly

If you suspect you have astigmatism, it's important to see an eye doctor for a comprehensive eye exam. Astigmatism can be diagnosed with a visual acuity test and a retinoscopy, which measures the way the light enters the eye.

Astigmatism is a common vision condition that can be easily corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery. If you have astigmatism, it's important to seek professional treatment to improve your vision and reduce any discomfort or strain on the eyes.

The test works by shining a light into the eye and measuring the way the light is distorted as it passes through the cornea. This distortion is caused by the curvature of the cornea and by any imperfections or abnormalities in its surface. The resulting distortion is called a "wavefront aberration."

The CWA test produces a map of the wavefront aberrations in the eye, which can be used to identify specific conditions and to determine the appropriate treatment. The test is painless and takes only a few minutes to perform.

CWA is commonly used to diagnose and monitor a range of eye conditions, including:

1. Astigmatism: This is a condition in which the cornea is irregularly shaped, causing blurred vision at all distances.
2. Nearsightedness (myopia): This is a condition in which close objects are seen clearly, but distant objects appear blurry.
3. Farsightedness (hyperopia): This is a condition in which distant objects are seen clearly, but close objects appear blurry.
4. Keratoconus: This is a progressive thinning of the cornea that can cause distorted vision and increase the risk of complications such as corneal scarring or blindness.
5. Other conditions such as presbyopia (age-related loss of near vision), amblyopia (lazy eye), and ocular injuries.

Overall, CWA is a valuable diagnostic tool for assessing the quality of the cornea and for diagnosing and monitoring a range of eye conditions. It can help eye care professionals to identify the underlying causes of vision problems and to develop effective treatment plans to improve vision and prevent complications.

1. Keratoconus: This is a progressive thinning of the cornea that can cause it to bulge into a cone-like shape, leading to blurred vision and sensitivity to light.
2. Fuchs' dystrophy: This is a condition in which the cells in the innermost layer of the cornea become damaged, leading to clouding and blurred vision.
3. Bullous keratopathy: This is a condition in which there is a large, fluid-filled bubble on the surface of the cornea, which can cause blurred vision and discomfort.
4. Corneal ulcers: These are open sores on the surface of the cornea that can be caused by infection or other conditions.
5. Dry eye syndrome: This is a condition in which the eyes do not produce enough tears, leading to dryness, irritation, and blurred vision.
6. Corneal abrasions: These are scratches on the surface of the cornea that can be caused by injury or other conditions.
7. Trachoma: This is an infectious eye disease that can cause scarring and blindness if left untreated.
8. Ocular herpes: This is a viral infection that can cause blisters on the surface of the cornea and lead to scarring and vision loss if left untreated.
9. Endophthalmitis: This is an inflammation of the inner layer of the eye that can be caused by bacterial or fungal infections, and can lead to severe vision loss if left untreated.
10. Corneal neovascularization: This is the growth of new blood vessels into the cornea, which can be a complication of other conditions such as dry eye syndrome or ocular trauma.

These are just a few examples of the many different types of corneal diseases that can affect the eyes. It's important to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms such as pain, redness, or blurred vision in one or both eyes. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications and preserve vision.

While there is no cure for keratoconus, there are several treatment options available to help manage the condition. These include eyeglasses or contact lenses, specialized contact lenses called rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, and corneal transplantation in severe cases. Other treatments that may be recommended include phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK), which involves removing damaged tissue from the cornea using a laser, or intacs, which are tiny plastic inserts that are placed into the cornea to flatten it and improve vision.

Keratoconus is relatively rare, affecting about 1 in every 2,000 people worldwide. However, it is more common in certain groups of people, such as those with a family history of the condition or those who have certain medical conditions, such as Down syndrome or sickle cell anemia. It typically affects both eyes, although one eye may be more severely affected than the other.

While there is no known cause for keratoconus, researchers believe that it may be linked to genetics, environmental factors, or a combination of both. The condition usually begins in adolescence or early adulthood and can progress over several years. In some cases, keratoconus can also be associated with other eye conditions, such as cataracts, glaucoma, or retinal detachment.

Also known as: Corneal inflammation, Eye inflammation, Keratoconjunctivitis, Ocular inflammation.

There are many different causes of pathological dilatation, including:

1. Infection: Infections like tuberculosis or abscesses can cause inflammation and swelling in affected tissues, leading to dilatation.
2. Inflammation: Inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease can cause dilatation of blood vessels and organs.
3. Heart disease: Conditions like heart failure or coronary artery disease can lead to dilatation of the heart chambers or vessels.
4. Liver or spleen disease: Dilatation of the liver or spleen can occur due to conditions like cirrhosis or splenomegaly.
5. Neoplasms: Tumors can cause dilatation of affected structures, such as blood vessels or organs.

Pathological dilatation can lead to a range of symptoms depending on the location and severity of the condition. These may include:

1. Swelling or distension of the affected structure
2. Pain or discomfort in the affected area
3. Difficulty breathing or swallowing (in the case of dilatation in the throat or airways)
4. Fatigue or weakness
5. Pale or clammy skin
6. Rapid heart rate or palpitations
7. Shortness of breath (dyspnea)

Diagnosis of pathological dilatation typically involves a combination of physical examination, imaging studies like X-rays or CT scans, and laboratory tests to identify the underlying cause. Treatment depends on the specific condition and may include medications, surgery, or other interventions to address the underlying cause and relieve symptoms.

Myopia occurs when the eyeball is too long or the cornea is too steep, causing light to focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it. Hyperopia is the opposite, where the eyeball is too short or the cornea is too flat, causing light to focus behind the retina. Astigmatism is caused by an irregularly shaped cornea, which causes light to focus at multiple points instead of one. Presbyopia is a loss of near vision that occurs as people age, making it harder to see close objects clearly.

In addition to these common refractive errors, there are other, less common conditions that can affect the eyes and cause blurred vision, such as amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (crossed eyes), and retinal detachment. These conditions can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, injury, or disease.

Refractive errors can have a significant impact on daily life, affecting everything from work and school performance to social interactions and overall quality of life. Fortunately, with the help of corrective lenses or surgery, many people are able to achieve clear vision and lead fulfilling lives.

There are several types of eye hemorrhages, including:

1. Subretinal hemorrhage: This type of hemorrhage occurs between the retina and the choroid, and can cause vision loss if the bleeding is severe.
2. Intravitreal hemorrhage: This type of hemorrhage occurs within the vitreous humor, the gel-like substance inside the eye. It can cause clouding of the lens and vision loss.
3. Retinal hemorrhage: This type of hemorrhage occurs on the surface of the retina and can cause vision loss if the bleeding is severe.
4. Choroidal hemorrhage: This type of hemorrhage occurs within the choroid, the layer of blood vessels between the sclera and retina. It can cause vision loss if the bleeding is severe.

Eye hemorrhages can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam, which includes visual acuity testing, dilated eye examination, and imaging tests such as fluorescein angiography or optical coherence tomography (OCT). Treatment for eye hemorrhages depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary, while in other cases, medication or surgery may be required to prevent further bleeding and restore vision.

Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, is a common vision condition in which close objects appear blurry while distant objects appear clear. This occurs when the eyeball is shorter than normal or the cornea is not curved enough, causing light rays to focus behind the retina rather than directly on it. Hyperopia can be treated with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery.

Word origin: Greek "hyper" (beyond) + "ops" (eye) + -ia (suffix denoting a condition or state)

First recorded use: 1690s

1. Infection: Bacterial or viral infections can develop after surgery, potentially leading to sepsis or organ failure.
2. Adhesions: Scar tissue can form during the healing process, which can cause bowel obstruction, chronic pain, or other complications.
3. Wound complications: Incisional hernias, wound dehiscence (separation of the wound edges), and wound infections can occur.
4. Respiratory problems: Pneumonia, respiratory failure, and atelectasis (collapsed lung) can develop after surgery, particularly in older adults or those with pre-existing respiratory conditions.
5. Cardiovascular complications: Myocardial infarction (heart attack), cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiac failure can occur after surgery, especially in high-risk patients.
6. Renal (kidney) problems: Acute kidney injury or chronic kidney disease can develop postoperatively, particularly in patients with pre-existing renal impairment.
7. Neurological complications: Stroke, seizures, and neuropraxia (nerve damage) can occur after surgery, especially in patients with pre-existing neurological conditions.
8. Pulmonary embolism: Blood clots can form in the legs or lungs after surgery, potentially causing pulmonary embolism.
9. Anesthesia-related complications: Respiratory and cardiac complications can occur during anesthesia, including respiratory and cardiac arrest.
10. delayed healing: Wound healing may be delayed or impaired after surgery, particularly in patients with pre-existing medical conditions.

It is important for patients to be aware of these potential complications and to discuss any concerns with their surgeon and healthcare team before undergoing surgery.

Mucormycosis is a relatively rare disease, but it can be severe and potentially life-threatening. The symptoms of mucormycosis can vary depending on the location of the infection, but they may include fever, fatigue, pain, swelling, and redness at the site of the infection.

Mucormycosis is usually diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies such as X-rays or CT scans. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the infected tissue and antifungal medications. In severe cases, hospitalization and intensive care may be necessary.

Prevention of mucormycosis involves avoiding exposure to fungal spores, keeping wounds clean and dry, and seeking medical attention if signs of infection are present. People with weakened immune systems, such as those with cancer, HIV/AIDS, or taking immunosuppressive medications, are at higher risk for developing mucormycosis and should take extra precautions to avoid exposure to fungal spores.

In conclusion, mucormycosis is a rare but potentially serious fungal infection that can affect various parts of the body. It is important to be aware of the risk factors and symptoms of mucormycosis, and to seek medical attention promptly if suspected. With early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, the prognosis for mucormycosis is generally good.

Some common types of orbital diseases include:

1. Orbital cellulitis: This is an infection of the tissues in the orbit that can be caused by bacteria or viruses. It can cause swelling, redness, and pain in the eye and eyelid.
2. Orbital abscess: This is a collection of pus in the orbit that can be caused by an infection. It can cause swelling, redness, and pain in the eye and eyelid.
3. Dacryostenosis: This is a blockage of the tear ducts that can cause tears to build up in the eye and eyelid.
4. Orbital pseudotumor: This is a condition in which there is inflammation in the orbit without any obvious cause. It can cause pain, swelling, and double vision.
5. Thyroid eye disease: This is a condition that affects the muscles and tissues around the eyes due to an overactive thyroid gland. It can cause double vision, puffy eyelids, and dryness in the eyes.
6. Graves' ophthalmopathy: This is a condition that affects the muscles and tissues around the eyes due to an autoimmune disorder. It can cause double vision, puffy eyelids, and dryness in the eyes.
7. Orbital lymphoid hyperplasia: This is a condition in which there is an abnormal growth of immune cells in the orbit. It can cause pain, swelling, and redness in the eye and eyelid.
8. Orbital sarcoidosis: This is a condition in which there are inflammatory lesions in the orbit due to a systemic autoimmune disorder called sarcoidosis. It can cause pain, swelling, and redness in the eye and eyelid.
9. Orbital pseudotumor: This is a condition that mimics a tumor but is actually caused by inflammation or abnormal blood vessels in the orbit. It can cause pain, swelling, and double vision.
10. Orbital metastasis: This is a condition in which cancer cells from another part of the body spread to the orbit. It can cause pain, swelling, and redness in the eye and eyelid.

It's important to note that this is not an exhaustive list and there may be other causes of orbital inflammation. If you are experiencing symptoms of orbital inflammation, it's important to see an eye doctor or a specialist as soon as possible for proper evaluation and treatment.

The most common paranasal sinus diseases include:

1. Acute Sinusitis: This is an infection of the paranasal sinuses that can be caused by a virus or bacteria. Symptoms include fever, headache, and facial pain or pressure.
2. Chronic Sinusitis: This is a persistent infection of the paranasal sinuses that can last for more than 12 weeks. Symptoms are similar to acute sinusitis, but may be less severe.
3. Rhinosinusitis: This is an inflammation of the nasal passages and paranasal sinuses that can be caused by infection or allergies. Symptoms include nasal congestion, facial pain or pressure, and headache.
4. Nasal Polyps: These are growths that occur in the lining of the nasal passages or paranasal sinuses. They can cause blockage of the nasal passages and sinuses, leading to breathing difficulties and other symptoms.
5. Cerebral Abscess: This is a collection of pus in the brain that can be caused by an infection that spreads from the paranasal sinuses. Symptoms include fever, headache, and neurological problems such as confusion or seizures.
6. Meningitis: This is an infection of the protective membranes (meninges) that cover the brain and spinal cord. It can be caused by bacteria or viruses and can lead to serious complications if left untreated.
7. Osteomyelitis: This is an infection of the bones of the face, which can be caused by spread of infection from the paranasal sinuses. Symptoms include facial pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected area.
8. Orbital Cellulitis: This is an infection of the tissues surrounding the eye that can be caused by spread of infection from the paranasal sinuses. Symptoms include protrusion of the eye, swelling of the eyelid, and difficulty moving the affected eye.
9. Endophthalmitis: This is an infection of the interior of the eye that can be caused by spread of infection from the paranasal sinuses. Symptoms include sudden severe pain, redness, and vision loss.
10. Cranial Nerve Palsy: This is a condition where one or more of the cranial nerves are affected by an infection, leading to symptoms such as double vision, drooping eyelid, or weakness of the facial muscles.

It's important to note that these complications can be serious and potentially life-threatening, so it's important to seek medical attention immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent or reduce the risk of these complications.

Giledi O, Daya SM (September 2003). "Unexpected flap thickness in laser in situ keratomileusis". J Cataract Refract Surg. ... "BBC investigates regulation of laser eye surgery". www.aop.org.uk. Daya SM; Watson A; Sharpe JR; Giledi O; Rowe A; Martin R; ... In 2017 Daya was shown in a BBC documentary providing advice on how laser eye surgery is supposed to be performed. Daya has ... He has also worked in the fields of anterior segment and keratorefractive surgery, and the use of femtosecond laser during ...
Bielory, B. P.; o'Brien, T. P. (2011). "Allergic complications with laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis". Current Opinion in ... "Allergic conjunctivitis as a risk factor for laser in situ keratomileusis". Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 27 (9 ... DLK can also occur following myopic keratomileusis, in which a disc of corneal tissue is removed, shaped and sutured back into ...
Pallikaris IG, Siganos DS (1997). "Laser in situ keratomileusis to treat myopia: early experience". Journal of Cataract and ... Pallikaris IG, Kymionis GD, Astyrakakis NI (November 2001). "Corneal ectasia induced by laser in situ keratomileusis". Journal ... In a LASIK pre-procedure, a corneal flap is cut into the cornea and lifted to allow the excimer laser beam access to the ... When the flap again covers the cornea, the change in curvature generated by the laser ablation proceeds to the corneal surface ...
Jabbur NS, Stark WJ, Green WR (November 2001). "Corneal ectasia after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis". Archives of ...
Chao, C.; Azar, D. (2002). "Lamellar keratitis following laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis". Ophthalmology Clinics of North ... Machat was one of the first ophthalmologists in North America to perform laser vision correction in 1991 and the first to ... Machat was also the first refractive surgeon to use the Intralase femtosecond laser for flap creation in March 2003. Machat was ... Machat is primary author of the textbook Excimer Laser Refractive Surgery-Practice and Principles cited in peer-reviewed ...
"Laser in situ Keratomileusis Retreatment for Residual Myopia and Astigmatism". Journal of Refractive Surgery. CiteSeerX 10.1. ... His software is still used for laser eye surgical procedures. Computed Anatomy was sold in 1986 to a Japanese manufacturer of ...
Azar, Dimitri T.; Koch, Douglas (2002-11-26). LASIK (Laser in Situ Keratomileusis): Fundamentals, Surgical Techniques, and ... Excimer Laser Therapy: Phototherapeutic Keratectomy Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins; 1997 ISBN 978-0683303469 Azar DT. ... LASEK, PRK, and Excimer Laser Stromal Surface Ablation. New York, NY: Marcel Dekker; 2005. ISBN 978-0824754341 Melki SA, Azar ...
Quesnel, NM; Lovasik, JV; Ferremi, C; Boileau, M; Ieraci, C (Jun 2004). "Laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia and the ...
Laser-assisted in situ Keratomileusis (LASIK): The surgeon uses either a microkeratome or a femtosecond laser to cut a flap of ... Huang, X; He, X; Tan, X (2002). "Research of corneal ectasia following laser in-situ keratomileusis in rabbits". Yan Ke Xue Bao ... It is now generally replaced by laser thermal keratoplasty/laser thermokeratoplasty. Laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK) is a non- ... Laser Assisted Sub-Epithelium Keratomileusis (LASEK) is a procedure that also changes the shape of the cornea using an excimer ...
"Comparison of Intraocular Pressure before and after Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Refractive Surgery Measured with Perkins ... "Intraocular Pressure Measurements Using Dynamic Contour Tonometry after Laser In Situ Keratomileusis". Investigative ...
Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photo-refractive keratectomy (PRK) are popular procedures; while use of laser ... versus laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correcting myopia". Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2017 (2): CD011080. ... cite web}}: Missing or empty ,title= (help)CS1 maint: url-status (link) Kuryan J, Cheema A, Chuck RS (2017). "Laser-assisted ... epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) is increasing. Other surgical treatments for severe myopia include insertion of implants ...
Laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK): Laser eye surgery to reshape the cornea, so that glasses or contact lenses are ... Laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK): Laser thermal keratoplasty is a laser based non-destructive refractive procedure used to ... versus laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for hyperopia correction". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 6 (6 ... Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK): Resembles PRK, but uses alcohol to loosen the corneal surface. Epi-LASIK: Epi-LASIK is ...
Automated lamellar keratoplasty Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) Laser assisted subepithelial keratomileusis ( ... "Laser In-Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) - procedure, recovery, pain, complications, time, infection, medication, prep". www. ... Lasers may be used to treat nonrefractive conditions (e.g. to seal a retinal tear). Laser eye surgery or laser corneal surgery ... Laser photocoagulation, or photocoagulation therapy, is the use of a laser to seal a retinal tear. Pneumatic retinopexy Retinal ...
It has even produced secondary acronyms such as LASIK (Laser-ASsisted in Situ Keratomileusis). A related acronym and neologism ... Unlike laser and SQUID, many names of the new devices and techniques are commonly used in full spelling, e.g., scanning ... A good example is the word laser, an acronym for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation", and therefore all ... Consequently, laser is commonly written in small letters. ...
"Long-term corneal keratoctye deficits after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis" (PDF). Trans Am ... Apoptosis is observed after eye operations, including keratotomy and laser surgery, and may play a role in the development of ...
The procedure is distinct from LASIK (laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis), a form of laser eye surgery where a permanent ... Zhao, LQ; Zhu, H; Li, LM (2014). "Laser-Assisted Subepithelial Keratectomy versus Laser In Situ Keratomileusis in Myopia: A ... coining the term LASEK for laser epithelial keratomileusis. "Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK)" Accessed June 30, 2008. " ... Shortt, AJ; Allan, BD; Evans, JR (31 January 2013). "Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) versus photorefractive ...
"Laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) versus laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correcting myopia". ... The argon fluoride laser (ArF laser) is a particular type of excimer laser, which is sometimes (more correctly) called an ... Excimer Excimer laser Excimer lamp Krypton fluoride laser Electrolaser Nike laser Photolithography Moore's law Basting, D.; ... As a result, excimer laser lithography (with both ArF and KrF lasers) has been a crucial factor in the continued advance of the ...
... or Lasik (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis), commonly referred to as laser eye surgery or laser vision correction, ... Suarez E, Torres F, Vieira JC, Ramirez E, Arevalo JF (October 2002). "Anterior uveitis after laser in situ keratomileusis". ... Boes DA, Omura AK, Hennessy MJ (December 2001). "Effect of high-altitude exposure on myopic laser in situ keratomileusis". ... Simpson RG, Moshirfar M, Edmonds JN, Christiansen SM, Behunin N (2012). "Laser in situ keratomileusis in patients with collagen ...
Sanders D, Vukich JA (December 2006). "Comparison of implantable collamer lens (ICL) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis ... First, they are an alternative to the excimer laser procedure (LASIK), a form of eye surgery that does not work for people with ... PCO is a common side-effect of many cataract surgeries and is easily treatable with a one-time laser capsulotomy procedure (see ... They are easily treatable, and typically only require a one-time capsulotomy procedure (using a Nd:YAG laser) to clarify. The ...
"Review of current indications for combined very high fluence collagen cross-linking and laser in situ keratomileusis surgery". ... or SMILE corneal laser eye surgery. However, the physiological processes of post-LASIK ectasia seem to be different from ...
Delayed keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis. J. Cat Refract Surg 2000;26:925-928. Abbas UL, Hersh PS. of Late natural ... Effect of lamellar flap location on corneal topography after laser in situ keratomileusis. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000;26;992 ... Hersh PS, Steinert RF, Brint SF Phototherapeutic Keratectomy.versus laser in situ keratomileusis. Comparison of optical side ... Spherical and aspherical photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis for moderate to high myopia: Two ...
... very high-frequency ultrasound for 3-D pachymetric mapping of the corneal epithelium and stroma in laser in situ keratomileusis ... Several commercial HIFU systems are now in clinical use, although laser techniques based on this groundbreaking effort have ...
"Bilateral Salzmann-like nodular corneal degeneration after laser in situ keratomileusis imaged with anterior segment optical ... digital ultrasound for 3D pachymetric mapping of the corneal epithelium and stroma in laser in situ keratomileusis". Journal of ... digital ultrasound for 3D pachymetric mapping of the corneal epithelium and stroma in laser in situ keratomileusis". Journal of ... Lasers, and Imaging. 43 (1): 82-6. doi:10.3928/15428877-20110901-03. PMC 3261320. PMID 21902166. Reinstein, Dan Z; Gobbe, ...
"Comparison of Intraocular Pressure before and after Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Refractive Surgery Measured with Perkins ...
The advent of excimer laser technology (e.g., laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, or LASIK) also introduced a conundrum ... Kugler, L; Cohen, L; Haddad, W; Wang, MX (2010). "Efficacy of laser in situ keratomileusis in correcting anterior and non- ... Alpins, N; Stamatelatos, G (2008). "Clinical outcomes of laser in situ keratomileusis using combined topography and refractive ... such as laser in-situ keratomileus (LASIK). The Alpins Method is also used to plan cataract/toric intraocular lens (IOL) ...
... (ALK), also known as keratomileusis in situ, is a non-laser lamellar refractive procedure used ... On the down side, the results of ALK are not as highly predictable as with the laser procedures of LASIK or PRK. Other ...
... which provided the laser technology that is central in LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) surgery. The co-inventors ... Blum's most notable invention is the patent on the ultraviolet excimer laser, which is used in surgical and dental procedures, ...
... laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). Alpins has specialized in cataract and refractive surgery since founding NewVision ... The method can also be used to refine surgical techniques or correct laser settings in future procedures. The system underpins ... Koch, DD (1997). "Excimer laser technology: new options coming to fruition". Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery 23 (10 ... "Standardized analyses of correction of astigmatism by laser systems that reshape the cornea". Journal of refractive surgery 22 ...
... is an American eye surgeon who performed the first LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, or laser eye ... "Brief History of Laser Eye Surgery , LASIK and PRK". 13 October 2016. "First Cataract Surgeries with a Femtosecond Laser ... Slade performed the first laser cataract surgery in the United States in 2010. He also performed the first Raindrop Corneal ...
... laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (eye surgery) LBO - lithium triborate LiDAR - light detection and ranging LLLT - low- ... This is a list of acronyms and other initialisms used in laser physics and laser applications. Contents A B C D E F G H I K L M ... Fabry-Perot laser GRENOUILLE - grating-eliminated no-nonsense observation of ultrafast incident laser light e-fields HeNe - ... helium-neon laser HHG - high harmonic generation IR - infrared KLM - Kerr-lens modelocking LASEK - laser-assisted sub- ...
Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK), to treat nearsightedness, also using an excimer laser. Within one year of its FDA ... In 1991, shortly after the first laser to perform laser vision correction procedures in Canada was approved, LCA-Vision began ... An early advocate of applying laser technology in medical disciplines, he founded a laser technology device company and later, ... Laser Centers of America, Inc., LCA-Vision's corporate predecessor, was incorporated in 1985. The company served as a ...
... laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) and other types of refractive eye surgery. Surgical Eyes was featured in media outlets ... Promise and Risks of Laser Eye Surgery". The New York Times. KOMPAS Cyber Media/Health Edition Laser eye surgery - pros and ... news/ledger/stories/021102lasik.html here New site details downsides of laser eye surgery http://www.post-gazette.com/ ...
... laser MeSH E04.416.237.500 - keratectomy, photorefractive, excimer laser MeSH E04.416.237.750 - keratomileusis, laser in situ ... excimer laser MeSH E04.540.535 - keratotomy, radial MeSH E04.540.590 - keratomileusis, laser in situ MeSH E04.540.600 - lens ... laser MeSH E04.100.814.050.075.080 - angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted MeSH E04.100.814.050.120 - atherectomy MeSH E04.100. ... laser MeSH E04.416.075.080 - angioplasty, balloon, laser-assisted MeSH E04.416.237 - keratectomy, ...
... J ... Purpose: To compare the efficacy of conventional laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in treating corneal astigmatism and in ...
Femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) was first reported by Ratkay-Traub et al. in 2003 [1]. This ... Short-term complications of femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis cuts: review of 1210 consecutive cases [J] ... Changes in aberrations and biomechanics after femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) in eyes with ... To compare the 6-month changes in aberration and biomechanics after femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS ...
Changes in aberrations and biomechanics after femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) in eyes with ... Changes in aberrations and biomechanics after femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis (FS-LASIK) in eyes with ... Short-term complications of femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis cuts: review of 1210 consecutive cases [J] ... Three-year outcomes of small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and femtosecond laser-assisted laser in situ keratomileusis ...
Complications of laser-in-situ-keratomileusis.. Authors: Sridhar, Mittanamalli S. Rao, Srinivas K. Vajpayee, Rasik B. Aasuri, ... Laser-in-situ-keratomileusis (LASIK) has become a popular technique of refractive surgery because of lower postoperative ... Sridhar MS, Rao SK, Vajpayee RB, Aasuri MK, Hannush S, Sinha R. Complications of laser-in-situ-keratomileusis. Indian Journal ...
... ophthalmic market as an alternative to the mechanical microkeratome for the creation of flaps in laser in situ keratomileusis ( ... LASIK).1 The first device approved in the US was the IntraLase® Femtosecond Laser (Abbott Medical Optics) in 2001. The early ... successes of this device generated considerable interest in the technology, such that there are now five femtosecond laser ... It has been more than a decade since the femtosecond laser entered the ...
... in situ,/i, keratomileusis on Sub-Bowman keratomileusis versus femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis on the long-term visual ... Ceratomileuse Assistida por Excimer Laser In Situ; Miopia; Humanos; Ceratomileuse Assistida por Excimer Laser In Situ/métodos; ... To explore the long-term visual quality of the same subjects after sub-Bowman keratomileusis (SBK) or femtosecond laser in situ ... Sub-Bowman keratomileusis ,i,versus,/i, femtosecond laser ,i, ... Femtosecond laser; laser sub-Bowman keratomileusis; refractive ...
Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is also performed with the excimer laser, but with creation a flap involving the stroma. ... Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is performed with the excimer laser which can accurately ablate corneal tissue to an exact ... who underwent laser refractive correction in Al-Hakeem General Hospital in Annajaf city to correct their astigmatismic ... Astigmatism is corrected by either by toric lenses or surgical intervention including laser refractive surgery. ...
Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) S0810 Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) S0812 Phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) ...
Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis; Laser vision correction; Nearsightedness - Lasik; Myopia - Lasik; Farsightedness - Lasik ... LASIK uses an excimer laser (an ultraviolet laser) to remove a thin layer of corneal tissue. This gives the cornea a new shape ... You should be at least 18 years old (21 in some cases, depending on the laser used). This is because vision may continue to ... LASIK - laser eye surgery. www.aao.org/eye-health/treatments/lasik. Updated October 21, 2020. Accessed May 19, 2022. ...
Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery is increasingly common, with approximately 600,000 procedures ... Advances in technologies for laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery. Expert Rev Med Devices 2008;5:209-29. ... Because of the high level of humidity recommended by the manufacturers of the lasers used in LASIK procedures, it is possible ... VISX I. VISX STAR S4 IR Excimer laser system directions for use. Santa Clara, CA: VISX, Incorporated; 2006. ...
Although the primary application of femtosecond laser has been its use in the creation of Laser-Assisted in situ Keratomileusis ... Laser in situ keratomileusis monovision. J Cataract Refract Surg 2001;27:1449-552. doi:10.1016/S0886-3350(01)01001-X. ... Monovision laser in situ keratomileusis for pre-presbyopic and presbyopic patients. J Refract Surg 2004:325-8. ... Femtosecond laser in situ keratomileusis versus conductive keratoplasty to obtain monovision in patients with emmetropic ...
Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis - discharge; Laser vision correction - discharge; LASIK - discharge; Myopia - Lasik ... Laser photocoagulation - eye. Laser photocoagulation is eye surgery using a laser to shrink or destroy abnormal structures in ... Laser photocoagulation - eye. Laser photocoagulation is eye surgery using a laser to shrink or destroy abnormal structures in ... Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis - what to ask your doctor... ...
Laser in situ keratomileusis. Lasers Surg Med. 1990;10:463-468.. 2. Buratto L, Ferrari M, Genisi C. Keratomileusis for myopia ... 3. Buratto L, Ferrari M, Genisi C. Myopic keratomileusis with the excimer laser: 1-year follow-up. Refract Corneal Surg. 1993;9 ... 4. Looking back: the history of laser vision correction. http://www.lasik.com/articles/laser-vision-correction-history. ... with the excimer laser (Buratto technique): short-term results. Refract Corneal Surg. 1993:9(2 suppl);130-133. ...
Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ Keratomileusis, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted use Keratectomy, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted ...
Llorente, L.; Barbero, S.; Merayo, J.; Marcos, S. Total and corneal optical aberrations induced by laser in situ keratomileusis ... corneal surfaces after Small incision lenticule extraction and Femtosecond laser-assisted laser in-situ keratomileusis. ... special interest with the development of refractive surgery techniques to modify the optical power of the cornea by laser ...
LASIK stands for Laser Assisted in situ Keratomileusis, and it is a type of eye surgery used to correct vision. It has become ... LASIK stands for Laser Assisted in Situ Keratomileusis. In this procedure, a laser is used to reshape the cornea of the eye ... LASIK stands for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, and it is a type of laser vision correction surgery. It involves using ... LASIK stands for Laser Assisted in situ Keratomileusis, and it is a type of eye surgery used to correct vision. It has become ...
... laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). Most types of refractive surgery, including LASIK, use lasers to change the shape of ... Then theyll shine a laser into your eye. The laser will be programmed to change your cornea into the correct shape. Then ... LASIK uses a laser (a strong beam of light) to change the shape of the cornea and help make vision clearer. It works best for ... This image will guide the laser during surgery.. Just before surgery, your doctor will put drops in your eye to make it numb. ...
N asteroides has been implicated in ocular infections after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery. [12] ... American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, American Medical Association, Christian ...
Refractive surgery shift. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) has not recovered the popularity it enjoyed before the ... But femtosecond lasers may offer more sizzle than steak, says Pinto. "In the present marketplace of ideas, its hard to expect ... that femtosecond laser cataract surgery is going to ever become the standard of care in the way that phacoemulsification ...
Bilateral serous macular detachment following laser in situ keratomileusis.. Singhvi A; Dutta M; Sharma N; Pal N; Vajpayee RB. ... 1. [Krypton laser therapy. Use in secondary serous detachment of the retinal pigment epithelium and in multiple idiopathic ... Pathogenesis of laser-induced choroidal subretinal neovascularization.. Miller H; Miller B; Ishibashi T; Ryan SJ. Invest ... 810 nm diode grid laser treatment for massive chronic serous retinal detachment following combined kidney and pancreas organ ...
Best Eye Femtosecond Laser Surgery Package in China. LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) eye surgery is designed to correct ...
Femtosecond laser vs mechanical microkeratome for hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis. Gil-Cazorla, R., Teus, M. A., De ... Drusen detection in retro-mode imaging by a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Acton, J. H., Cubbidge, R. P., King, H., Galsworthy ...
... short for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, aims to improve vision by cutting a flap in the eye and then using a laser to ... There were no problems found with the laser devices used in the procedure, but U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspectors ...
LZH scientists successfully perform laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in vivo for the first time with a femtosecond laser. ... With Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (Slot), the LZH is applying for a patent for a innovative imaging method. SLOT is a ... It soon became clear that laser research in Hannover needed its own building and the planning for the construction in Hannover ... Milestone in physics: Gravitational waves are detected with a laser system from LZH. An international team of researchers from ...
To compare laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) outcomes between two wavefront-guided excimer laser systems in the treatment of ... 1 Comparison of 2 wavefront-guided excimer lasers for myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: one-year results. Yu CQ, Manche E. J ... Which laser is better for Wavefront LASIK?. Stanford Medicines LASIK study compares two lasers head-to-head ... Stanford Medicines "Laser Comparison Study": 50 patients (100 eyes) had Wavefront LASIK with the WaveLight Allegretto laser on ...
Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, or LASIK surgery, is often promoted as an effective, low-risk way to regain 20/20 vision ... The first laser was approved for LASIK eye surgery in 1998, meaning that patients have only been receiving the procedure on a ... In LASIK surgery, a laser is used to permanently change the shape of the cornea, the clear covering of the front of the eye. A ... Pulses from a computer-controlled laser reshape the section, after which the front flap of the cornea is replaced. ...
Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Laser Intrastromal Keratomileusis Laser-Assisted Stromal In Situ Keratomileusis Previous Indexing ... Corneal Surgery, Laser [E02.594.480] * Keratectomy, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted [E02.594.480.500] * Keratomileusis, Laser In ... Corneal Surgery, Laser [E04.378.500] * Keratectomy, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted [E04.378.500.500] * Keratomileusis, Laser In ... Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ Preferred Term Term UI T358463. Date10/12/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2000). ...
LASIK surgery (laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis) is the most frequently performed laser vision correction procedure. It ... After your laser eye surgery, your eye may feel a bit irritated for a few hours, but most patients are quite comfortable after ... Anesthetic drops are used to fully numb the eye before LASIK eye surgery begins; during the laser correction you may feel a ... There are some minimal restrictions in the first weeks following laser surgery, but many LASIK patients are able to resume ...
... your doctor might suggest laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), which reshapes the inner layers of the cornea; laser- ... This is an option for adults only (21 and older). Refractive surgery uses laser light beams to reshape the cornea so that light ...
  • To compare the efficacy of conventional laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in treating corneal astigmatism and in treating noncorneal ocular residual astigmatism. (nih.gov)
  • To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and predictability of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on the corneal flap for correction of residual myopia following myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). (nih.gov)
  • A 29-year-old woman who underwent laser in situ keratomileusis ( LASIK ) for myopic astigmatism in both eyes presented with severe pain , photophobia and decreased visual acuity in the left eye eight days after surgery . (bvsalud.org)
  • Laser-in-situ-keratomileusis (LASIK) has become a popular technique of refractive surgery because of lower postoperative discomfort, early visual rehabilitation and decreased postoperative haze. (who.int)
  • LASIK uses an excimer laser (an ultraviolet laser) to remove a thin layer of corneal tissue. (medlineplus.gov)
  • To review the literature concerning the relative advantages and disadvantages of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) flaps created with mechanical microkeratomes versus femtosecond laser systems. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • The results support current femtosecond laser technology as superior to mechanical microkeratomes for the creation of LASIK flaps in refractive surgery. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • It has been more than a decade since the femtosecond laser entered the ophthalmic market as an alternative to the mechanical microkeratome for the creation of flaps in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). (touchophthalmology.com)
  • By the end of 2008, it was estimated that 35-40 % of LASIK surgeries in the US were being performed using a femtosecond laser for flap creation. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery is increasingly common, with approximately 600,000 procedures performed each year in the United States ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • LASIK eye surgery is typically performed in an outpatient setting and involves the use of a machine-guided laser to reshape the lens of the eye to correct vision irregularities ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Although TLCHD staff reported that they did not observe obvious lapses in medication preparation or hand hygiene, they did note that clinic A used two humidifiers to maintain the 40%-50% relative humidity recommended by the manufacturer of the laser device used in the LASIK procedures ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Because of the high level of humidity recommended by the manufacturers of the lasers used in LASIK procedures, it is possible that additional LASIK clinics employ similar humidifier systems. (cdc.gov)
  • Laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is also performed with the excimer laser, but with creation a flap involving the stroma. (edu.iq)
  • The most common type of refractive surgery is called LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis). (nih.gov)
  • Most types of refractive surgery, including LASIK, use lasers to change the shape of the cornea. (nih.gov)
  • LASIK uses a laser (a strong beam of light) to change the shape of the cornea and help make vision clearer. (nih.gov)
  • LASIK stands for Laser Assisted in situ Keratomileusis, and it is a type of eye surgery used to correct vision. (bookofodds.com)
  • You may have heard of LASIK, a type of laser eye surgery that can help correct vision problems. (bookofodds.com)
  • LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) eye surgery is designed to correct refractive errors. (placidway.com)
  • There were no problems found with the laser devices used in the procedure, but U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspectors found problems with side-effect reporting systems at 17 LASIK vision correction centers. (reuters.com)
  • LASIK, short for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, aims to improve vision by cutting a flap in the eye and then using a laser to reshape the cornea. (reuters.com)
  • There may be less expensive alternatives, like Laser-Assisted in Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. (emergenresearch.com)
  • LASIK , which stands for laser in-situ keratomileusis, is a popular surgery that can correct vision in people who are nearsighted or farsighted , or who have astigmatism . (webmd.com)
  • LZH scientists successfully perform laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in vivo for the first time with a femtosecond laser. (lzh.de)
  • Which laser is better for Wavefront LASIK? (2020eyesite.com)
  • Stanford Medicine's "Laser Comparison Study": 50 patients (100 eyes) had Wavefront LASIK with the WaveLight Allegretto laser on one eye and the VISX CustomVue S4 IR laser on the other eye. (2020eyesite.com)
  • In this scientifically-controlled study, the "5th generation iFS 150 Intralase femtosecond laser" (All-Laser LASIK) was also used for all eyes of both groups. (2020eyesite.com)
  • One year after LASIK, both wavefront lasers safely and effectively treated nearsightedness. (2020eyesite.com)
  • To compare laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) outcomes between two wavefront-guided excimer laser systems in the treatment of myopia. (2020eyesite.com)
  • The predictability and self-reported clarity of vision of wavefront-guided LASIK were better with the small-spot scanning laser (WaveLight Allegretto). (2020eyesite.com)
  • Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, or LASIK surgery, is often promoted as an effective, low-risk way to regain 20/20 vision and avoid glasses or contacts. (citizen.org)
  • In LASIK surgery, a laser is used to permanently change the shape of the cornea, the clear covering of the front of the eye. (citizen.org)
  • A typical LASIK procedure involves using a mechanical blade or laser to cut a flap in the outer part of the cornea, leaving a small part attached at the edge of the flap to provide a hinge. (citizen.org)
  • To compare the incidence of rainbow glare (RG) after femtosecond laser assisted-LASIK (FS-LASIK) using the upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser with different flap cut parameter settings. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who underwent FS-LASIK for correcting myopia and/or myopic astigmatism using upgraded WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser with original flap cut parameter settings was included in group A. Another consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who in the period immediately following group A underwent FS-LASIK using same laser platform with flap cut parameter setting changed was included in group B. (biomedcentral.com)
  • LASIK eye surgery (laser in-situ keratomileusis) is the preferred and most common laser eye surgery procedure to correct farsightedness (hyperopia). (keywhitman.com)
  • The LASIK procedure may vary based on the laser used. (keywhitman.com)
  • The doctors at Key-Whitman use the Wavelight® Allegretto Wave® Eye-Q for OptiLASIK™ and femtosecond blade-free lasers to perform LASIK eye surgery. (keywhitman.com)
  • During the LASIK procedure, a thin flap in the cornea is created using a laser and is gently lifted and folded back. (keywhitman.com)
  • Furthermore, the availability of acceptable donor tissue is expected to decrease with widespread use of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) for correcting refractive errors, because these surgically treated corneas are unacceptable donor tissue. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the subjective visual experience and ocular symptoms of fellow eyes treated with wavefront-optimized (WFO-) laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and wavefront-guided (WFG-) LASIK.Prospective randomized fellow eye, controlled study.Two hundred eyes of 100 subjects from a single academic center were enrolled and randomly assigned to treatment with WFO-LASIK in one eye and WFG-LASIK in the fellow eye. (stanford.edu)
  • The primary purpose is to quantify the satisfaction and health related quality of life of 500 active duty patients over a period of six months following state-of-the-art laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). (nih.gov)
  • This flap is then peeled back so that the excimer laser can reshape the corneal tissue underneath. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The amount of corneal tissue the excimer laser will remove is calculated ahead of time. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is performed with the excimer laser which can accurately ablate corneal tissue to an exact depth with minimal disruption of surrounding tissue, it is done by removing the epithelial layer up to Bowman layer which then ablate with anterior stroma. (edu.iq)
  • Monovision with an excimer laser is a well-established technique that corrects one eye for distance vision (usually dominant eye) and the other eye for near vision, resulting in intentional anisometropia. (bmj.com)
  • 2. Buratto L, Ferrari M, Genisi C. Keratomileusis for myopia with the excimer laser (Buratto technique): short-term results. (crstoday.com)
  • 3. Buratto L, Ferrari M, Genisi C. Myopic keratomileusis with the excimer laser: 1-year follow-up. (crstoday.com)
  • After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position. (nih.gov)
  • There were no differences between the two groups in age, baseline refraction, excimer laser ablation depth, postoperative uncorrected visual acuity and refraction. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It's a refractive surgery that uses a femtosecond laser or a small tool to create a flap on the cornea, which they fold back to get at the bare cornea. (smartshanghai.com)
  • Once it's exposed, they use another laser to reshape the cornea. (smartshanghai.com)
  • It uses a laser to cut a small lens-shaped tissue within the cornea, and then cut a small arc-shaped incision, like a smile (hence the name), through which the surgeon removes the lens-shaped tissue. (smartshanghai.com)
  • The laser will be programmed to change your cornea into the correct shape. (nih.gov)
  • The surgery shouldn't last longer than half an hour, and during it, patients recline in a chair while a doctor uses a laser system to change the shape of their cornea. (health.com)
  • During this part of the surgery, energy from a laser is focused in the tissue of your cornea, "creating thousands of bubbles of gas and water that expand and connect to separate the tissue underneath the cornea surface, creating a flap. (health.com)
  • During the procedure, an ophthalmologist will use a laser to painlessly remove a small amount of tissue, usually only a few micrometers thick, from the cornea. (bookofodds.com)
  • They'll use an instrument called a microkeratome or a femtosecond laser to make a thin flap in your cornea. (webmd.com)
  • Astigmatism is corrected by either by toric lenses or surgical intervention including laser refractive surgery. (edu.iq)
  • Spherocylindrical refractive outcomes were generally similar but higher order aberrations were reported as lower with femtosecond laser flap creation. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • 1 Comparison of 2 wavefront-guided excimer lasers for myopic laser in situ keratomileusis: one-year results. (2020eyesite.com)
  • The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) refraction was −3.89 diopters (D) ± 1.67 (SD) and −4.18 ± 1.73 D in the small-spot scanning laser group and variable-spot scanning laser group, respectively. (2020eyesite.com)
  • The name of the procedure stands for "Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis. (health.com)
  • Another factor to consider is the type of laser used for the procedure. (bookofodds.com)
  • Fibrinous anterior uveitis following laser in situ keratomileusis. (bvsalud.org)
  • It's an alternative for people who don't qualify for laser surgery, or who have thin or irregular corneas. (smartshanghai.com)
  • This image will guide the laser during surgery. (nih.gov)
  • Studies have reported success rates ranging from 80-98% 1-5 for monovision post laser vision correction (LVC), 91% for monovision after cataract surgery and 95% following clear lens extraction 6 with good satisfaction. (bmj.com)
  • After undergoing laser eye surgery, protective goggles will be used to shield the eyes overnight. (keywhitman.com)
  • They'll peel it back and use another laser to reshape the tissue underneath. (webmd.com)
  • IMSEAR at SEARO: Complications of laser-in-situ-keratomileusis. (who.int)
  • One eye of patients was treated with the Allegretto Wave Eye-Q system (small-spot scanning laser) and the fellow eye with the VISX Star Customvue S4 IR system (variable-spot scanning laser). (2020eyesite.com)
  • Subjectively, patients reported that the clarity of night and day vision was significantly better in the eye treated with the small-spot scanning laser. (2020eyesite.com)
  • The Wavelight Allegretto laser significantly improved High-Order Aberrations (From 0.38µ down to 0.33µ), but the VISX CustomVue laser made them worse (From 0.37µ up to 0.40µ). (2020eyesite.com)
  • A review of the literature available related to mechanical microkeratomes and femtosecond laser systems was conducted. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • 1 The first device approved in the US was the IntraLase ® Femtosecond Laser (Abbott Medical Optics) in 2001. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • Now, a more common and safer method is to use a different type of laser (femtosecond) to create the corneal flap. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The results flow into standards for measurement methods for the characterisation of laser radiation and components. (lzh.de)
  • A focused pulse of the laser causes photodisruption of the target tissue, effectively creating a microseparation that is then followed by an expanding cavitation bubble, which then collapses to a smaller size. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • When using femtosecond laser for flap creation, each pulse of the laser causes the generation of a small amount of microplasma at its focal point in the corneal tissue leading to formation of microscopic gas bubbles and cavitations, which then dissipate into surrounding tissue [ 5 , 6 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Twelve months postoperatively, all eyes in the small-spot scanning laser group and 92% in the variable-spot scanning laser group were within ±0.50 D of the intended correction (P = .04). (2020eyesite.com)
  • Laser-created flaps showed lower variability in flap thickness and greater variety in programmable flap geometry. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser system (Alcon Laboratories Inc., Fort Worth, TX) is a high pulse frequency (repetition rate of 200 kHz) and comparatively lower pulse energy system that can produce flaps in a shorter period of time, around 6 s. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All flaps were created by the WaveLight FS200 laser. (biomedcentral.com)
  • At that time, the small-spot scanning laser group had significantly less spherical aberration (0.12 versus 0.15) (P = .04) and significantly less mean total higher-order root mean square (0.33μm versus 0.40 μm) (P = .01). (2020eyesite.com)
  • Eyes treated with the small-spot scanning laser (WaveLight Allegretto) had significantly fewer HOAs. (2020eyesite.com)
  • To maintain a constant ablation time, the frequency of the laser system must rise as the spot size decreases. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • The fundamental theory behind the use of the femtosecond laser for flap creation is that the laser can perform cutting procedures, much like a blade. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • However, the femtosecond laser technique, as the resulting laser pattern may act as an optical grating, could be a major drawback. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Milestone in physics: Gravitational waves are detected with a laser system from LZH. (lzh.de)
  • The cleavage that occurs with the femtosecond laser is functionally equivalent to that which can be achieved with the cutting of a blade. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • To our knowledge, there is no published study on incidence rate and alleviating management of RG when using FS200 femtosecond laser. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Next, the surgeon basically uses a laser to remove corneal tissue, the amount of which varies from person to person. (health.com)
  • The upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser with original flap cut parameter settings could increase the incidence of RG. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Complication rates with femtosecond laser systems have dropped as the laser spot size and/or energy has decreased and shot frequency has increased. (touchophthalmology.com)
  • The amount of laser energy directed at your eye is controlled by a computer. (health.com)
  • The laser reshapes the underlying corneal tissue by emitting a computer-controlled beam of light that removes the exact amount of tissue in just a matter of seconds. (keywhitman.com)