Czech Republic: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.AustriaHistoriography: The writing of history; the principles, theory, and history of historical writing; the product of historical writing. (Webster, 3d ed)HistoryHistory, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Catatonia: A neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by one or more of the following essential features: immobility, mutism, negativism (active or passive refusal to follow commands), mannerisms, stereotypies, posturing, grimacing, excitement, echolalia, echopraxia, muscular rigidity, and stupor; sometimes punctuated by sudden violent outbursts, panic, or hallucinations. This condition may be associated with psychiatric illnesses (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; MOOD DISORDERS) or organic disorders (NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME; ENCEPHALITIS, etc.). (From DSM-IV, 4th ed, 1994; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Empiricism: One of the principal schools of medical philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome. It developed in Alexandria between 270 and 220 B.C., the only one to have any success in reviving the essentials of the Hippocratic concept. The Empiricists declared that the search for ultimate causes of phenomena was vain, but they were active in endeavoring to discover immediate causes. The "tripod of the Empirics" was their own chance observations (experience), learning obtained from contemporaries and predecessors (experience of others), and, in the case of new diseases, the formation of conclusions from other diseases which they resembled (analogy). Empiricism enjoyed sporadic continuing popularity in later centuries up to the nineteenth. (From Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, p186; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.United StatesAccounts Payable and Receivable: Short-term debt obligations and assets occurring in the regular course of operational transactions.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Automatic Data Processing: Data processing largely performed by automatic means.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling Information Systems: Computer-based systems for use in personnel management in a facility, e.g., distribution of caregivers with relation to patient needs.New YorkNew York CityFetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Hepatitis, Infectious Canine: A contagious disease caused by canine adenovirus (ADENOVIRUSES, CANINE) infecting the LIVER, the EYE, the KIDNEY, and other organs in dogs, other canids, and bears. Symptoms include FEVER; EDEMA; VOMITING; and DIARRHEA.Teratogenesis: The formation of CONGENITAL ABNORMALITIES.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Laboratory Proficiency Testing: Assessments aimed at determining agreement in diagnostic test results among laboratories. Identical survey samples are distributed to participating laboratories, with results stratified according to testing methodologies.Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.BrazilFacial Neuralgia: Neuralgic syndromes which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.Cellulases: A family of glycosidases that hydrolyse crystalline CELLULOSE into soluble sugar molecules. Within this family there are a variety of enzyme subtypes with differing substrate specificities that must work together to bring about complete cellulose hydrolysis. They are found in structures called CELLULOSOMES.Dichlorvos: An organophosphorus insecticide that inhibits ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE.GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go: A family of heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein alpha subunits that were originally identified by their ability to inhibit ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Members of this family can couple to beta and gamma G-protein subunits that activate POTASSIUM CHANNELS. The Gi-Go part of the name is also spelled Gi/Go.Encephalitis, Japanese: A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)Leukoencephalitis, Acute Hemorrhagic: A fulminant and often fatal demyelinating disease of the brain which primarily affects young adults and children. Clinical features include the rapid onset of weakness, SEIZURES, and COMA. It may follow a viral illness or MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE infections but in most instances there is no precipitating event. Pathologic examination reveals marked perivascular demyelination and necrosis of white matter with microhemorrhages. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp924-5)Cryptococcus neoformans: A species of the fungus CRYPTOCOCCUS. Its teleomorph is Filobasidiella neoformans.Immune Evasion: Methods used by pathogenic organisms to evade a host's immune system.Meningitis, Cryptococcal: Meningeal inflammation produced by CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS, an encapsulated yeast that tends to infect individuals with ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other immunocompromised states. The organism enters the body through the respiratory tract, but symptomatic infections are usually limited to the lungs and nervous system. The organism may also produce parenchymal brain lesions (torulomas). Clinically, the course is subacute and may feature HEADACHE; NAUSEA; PHOTOPHOBIA; focal neurologic deficits; SEIZURES; cranial neuropathies; and HYDROCEPHALUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp721-2)Peroxiredoxins: A family of ubiquitously-expressed peroxidases that play a role in the reduction of a broad spectrum of PEROXIDES like HYDROGEN PEROXIDE; LIPID PEROXIDES and peroxinitrite. They are found in a wide range of organisms, such as BACTERIA; PLANTS; and MAMMALS. The enzyme requires the presence of a thiol-containing intermediate such as THIOREDOXIN as a reducing cofactor.Cryptococcosis: Infection with a fungus of the species CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS.Disulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Cryptococcus: A mitosporic Tremellales fungal genus whose species usually have a capsule and do not form pseudomycellium. Teleomorphs include Filobasidiella and Fidobasidium.Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Semisynthetic derivative of ergot (Claviceps purpurea). It has complex effects on serotonergic systems including antagonism at some peripheral serotonin receptors, both agonist and antagonist actions at central nervous system serotonin receptors, and possibly effects on serotonin turnover. It is a potent hallucinogen, but the mechanisms of that effect are not well understood.N,N-Dimethyltryptamine: An N-methylated indoleamine derivative and serotonergic hallucinogen which occurs naturally and ubiquitously in several plant species including Psychotria veridis. It also occurs in trace amounts in mammalian brain, blood, and urine, and is known to act as an agonist or antagonist of certain SEROTONIN RECEPTORS.Mescaline: Hallucinogenic alkaloid isolated from the flowering heads (peyote) of Lophophora (formerly Anhalonium) williamsii, a Mexican cactus used in Indian religious rites and as an experimental psychotomimetic. Among its cellular effects are agonist actions at some types of serotonin receptors. It has no accepted therapeutic uses although it is legal for religious use by members of the Native American Church.Tryptamines: Decarboxylated monoamine derivatives of TRYPTOPHAN.Hallucinogens: Drugs capable of inducing illusions, hallucinations, delusions, paranoid ideations, and other alterations of mood and thinking. Despite the name, the feature that distinguishes these agents from other classes of drugs is their capacity to induce states of altered perception, thought, and feeling that are not experienced otherwise.Psilocybine: The major of two hallucinogenic components of Teonanacatl, the sacred mushroom of Mexico, the other component being psilocin. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Harmaline: A beta-carboline alkaloid isolated from seeds of PEGANUM.
Meyer was married to Charlotte Amalie Henriette Koller (1868-1953), the daughter of Karl Theodor Fredrik Koller (1827-1897) and ... "Koller, Karl Theodor Fredrik". Salmonsens konversationsleksikon. Retrieved August 1, 2016. ...
In 1884, Karl Koller used cocaine for ocular surgery. The same year, Herman Knapp used cocaine for retrobulbar block. In 1914, ...
John Koller takes a different viewpoint than Karl Potter's interpretation. John Koller suggests artha is not an attitude, ... Karl Potter explains it as an attitude and capability that enables one to make a living, to remain alive, to thrive as a free ... It is neither an end state nor an endless goal of aimlessly amassing money, claims Karl Potter, rather it is an attitude and ... 12-13 Karl H. Potter (2002), Presuppositions of India's Philosophies, Motilal Banarsidass, ISBN 978-81-208-0779-2, pp. 1-29 ...
At age 10, he was treated by the ophthalmologist Karl Koller. Leake discovered the anesthetic divinyl ether. One of his ...
In 1884, Karl Koller became the first to describe the anesthetic properties of cocaine. The following year, Corning injected ... Koller, K (1884). "Über die verwendung des kokains zur anästhesierung am auge" [On the use of cocaine for anesthesia on the eye ...
Werder was the base of Luftwaffe general Karl Koller during the Battle of Berlin. After the end of the war, Soviet troops were ...
Austrian ophtalmologist Karl Koller first used cocaine as a local anesthetic for eye surgery. 1890. German surgeon Themistocles ... Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner discovered the basic A-B-AB-O blood types. 1903. Dutch physician Willem Einthoven invented ...
From 1901 until 1903 the tower was completely rebuilt under the direction of the architect Karl Koller. He raised the tower ...
On 23 April, as the Soviets tightened the encirclement of Berlin, Göring consulted Karl Koller and Lammers. All agreed that ...
Karl Koller (a close associate of Sigmund Freud, who would write about cocaine later) experimented with cocaine for ophthalmic ...
It was first used in 1859 by Karl Koller, at the suggestion of Sigmund Freud, in eye surgery in 1884. German surgeon August ... Koller, K (1884). "Über die verwendung des kokains zur anästhesierung am auge" [On the use of cocaine for anesthesia on the eye ...
September 15 - The invention of local anesthesia by Karl Koller is made public, at a medical congress in Heidelberg, Germany. ...
At the same time Air General (General der Flieger) Karl Koller had ordered JV 44 to relocate to Prague and continue fighting. ... Peltz, who was the brother-in-law of Hans-Karl Stepp, died on 10 August 2001 in Munich. Front Flying Clasp of the Luftwaffe in ...
At the same time Air General (General der Flieger) Karl Koller had ordered JV 44 to relocate to Prague and continue fighting. ... following the death of Friedrich-Karl Müller. By the end of 1944, Bär's score had risen to 203. Bär's 204th and 205th victories ...
Flown by Karl Koller, the Munich aircraft was very successful and was awarded first prize in the height loss and distance flown ... Koller's greatest distance in one flight was 4.08 km (2.54 mi). He was runner-up to Willi Pelzner in the duration category; ... Nonetheless, Koller's total time of 31.6 minutes was made in only 25 flights and his average duration (76 seconds) was more ...
Karl Koller, chief of staff of Luftflotte 3 (Air Fleet 3 Generalfeldmarschall Hugo Sperrle). Some training units were mobilised ... Vizeadmiral Karl Dönitz, the (Befehlshaber der Unterseeboote, BdU, Commander of Submarines) was ordered to withdraw eight ...
On 5 February 1944, through the efforts of Günther Korten and Karl Koller, the Luftwaffe High Command (German: Oberkommando der ... Two Luftwaffe officers, Colonel Hugo Sperrle and Major General Karl-Friedrich Schweickhard (de) were put in charge of the ... ISBN 1-85367-712-4. Frieser, Karl-Heinz; John T. Greenwood (2005). The Blitzkrieg Legend: The 1940 campaign in the West. Naval ...
The details of the plan were worked out with Oberst (Colonel) Karl Koller, Generalfeldmarschall Hugo Sperrle's chief of staff, ...
It was at Stricker's institute that ophthalmologist Karl Koller, who at the suggestion of Freud, began his experimentation with ...
Hans Koller (ts), Joki Freund (ts), Karl Blume (bs), Pepsi Auer (p), Peter Trun] (b), Rudi Sehring (dr), Albert Mangelsdorff ( ... In the 1950s Mangelsdorff played with the bands of Joe Klimm (1950-53), Hans Koller (1953-54) (featuring Attila Zoller), Jutta ... Karl-Theodor Geier (b), Silvje Glojnaric (dr). 1962 Tension; (CBS) 62336,(L+R) LR41001; CD:CDLR71002; Günther Kronberg (as, bas ... Karl Berger, Wolfgang Dauner, Attila Zoller. 1969 Room 1220; (Konnex) KCD 5037; Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen (b), Daniel ...
On 9 June 1944, Karl Koller announced that a Gruppe of KG 200 equipped with special Focke-Wulf Fw 190s was ready for "total ...
In 1884 Morris was a member of the audience in Berlin when Karl Koller gave his first public demonstration of cocaine as a ...
Halsted read a report by the Austrian ophthalmologist Karl Koller, describing the anesthetic power of cocaine when instilled on ...
Karl Koller, a colleague of Freud's in Vienna, received that distinction in 1884 after reporting to a medical society the ways ... Popper, Karl. Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge. London: Routledge and Keagan Paul, 1963, pp. 33- ... Karl Popper, who argued that all proper scientific theories must be potentially falsifiable, claimed that Freud's ... also present and notable for their subsequent importance in the psychoanalytic movement were Karl Abraham and Max Eitingon from ...
Karl Koller (79), Austrian midfielder 26 January - Ivan Jensen (76), Danish midfielder 27 January - Aubrey Powell (90), Welsh ...
Karl Raimund Popper (1999). "Notes of a realist on the body-mind problem". All Life is Problem Solving (A lecture given in ... Koller, J. (2007) Asian Philosophies. 5th ed. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0-13-092385-0 ...
Karl Koller may refer to: Karl Koller (ophthalmologist) (or Carl Koller, 1857-1944), Austrian ophthalmologist Karl Koller ( ... general) (1898-1951), German Luftwaffe general Karl Koller (footballer) (1929-2009), Austrian football player. ...
Karl Koller (22 February 1898 - 22 December 1951) was a German General der Flieger and the Chief of the General Staff of Nazi ... Koller was represented within the bunker by General Eckhard Christian. Hitler ordered Koller to send his remaining planes and ... Koller was imprisoned by the British at Oxford; Charles Lindbergh visited him during this time. Koller was released in December ... 1944 with the stolid Koller, who was officially assigned the position on November 12. However, Koller was unable to reform the ...
... - Wikipédia. Karl Koller, né le 8 février 1929 et décédé le 24 janvier 2009, était un footballeur autrichien des ... Karl Koller (général) - Wikipédia. Karl Koller, né le 22 février 1898 et mort le 22 décembre 1951 , est un général allemand, ... Karl Koller (ophthalmologist) - Wikipedia. Karl Koller (December 3, 1857 - March 21, 1944) was an Austrian ophthalmologist who ... Karl Koller: The Introduction of Local Anesthesia - ResearchGate. Download Citation on ResearchGate , Karl Koller: The ...
MARiNA KOLLER Book Archive. , Inorganic. , The Porphyrin Handbook. Bioinorganic and Bioorganic by Roger Guilard, Karl Kadish, ... By Roger Guilard, Karl Kadish, Kevin M. Smith. The Porphyrin guide, quantity eleven: Bioinorganic and Bioorganic Chemistry ... Soziologie der Neurosen: Die Nervösen Störungen in Ihren by Karl Birnbaum * Grundriß der gerichtlichen Psychologie und ...
Koller, Marian Wolfgang. Scientist and educator, b. at Feistritz in Carniola, Austria, 31 October, 1792; d. of cholera at .... ... Kreil, Karl. Austrian meteorologist and astronomer, b. at Ried, Upper Austria, 4 Nov., 1798; d. at Vienna, 21 .... Kreiten, ... Kleutgen, Josef Wilhelm Karl. German theologian and philosopher, b. at Dortmund, Westphalia, 9 April, 1811; d. at St. Anton ... ...
In 1884, Karl Koller, an Austrian ophthalmologist, first used cocaine as an anesthetic during eye surgery. It was a popular and ... Markel, H. (2011, April 6). Über Coca: Sigmund Freud, Carl Koller, and Cocaine. Journal of the American Medical Association, ...
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Breitenbach, M., Weber, M., Rinnerthaler, M., Karl, T., and Breitenbach-Koller, L. (2015). Oxidative stress in fungi: its ...
In 1884 Karl Koller discovered cocaine and its use as a topical anesthetic. The first institution he lectured at in America was ...
Karl-Heinz Degenhardt, Hans Kerken, Karl Knörr, Siegfried Koller, Hans-Rudolf Wiedemann ...
Koller, L., T. Karl, T. Klade, R. Kodzius, A. Thur, R. Andrejic, and M. Breitenbach. 1995. Personal communication. ...
The physician Karl Koller discovered the anesthetic properties within the drug. *Sigmund Freud promoted the usage of refined ...
Hannelore Breitenbach-Koller Thomas Karl Paul Cullen Sukaniya Basu Dana Haskova Jiri Hasek ... M. Breitenbach, M. Rinnerthaler, M. Weber, H. Breitenbach-Koller, T. Karl, P. Cullen, S. Basu, D. Haskova. and J. Hasek declare ... Breitenbach M, Weber M, Rinnerthaler M, Karl T, Breitenbach-Koller L. Oxidative stress in fungi: its function in signal ... Michael Breitenbach, Mark Rinnerthaler, Manuela Weber, Hannelore Breitenbach-Koller, Thomas Karl, Paul Cullen, Sukaniya Basu, ...
Gaedcke named the compound "erythroxyline". In 1884, Austrian ophthalmologist Karl Koller (1857-1944) instilled a 2% solution ... Koller, K (1884). "Über die verwendung des kokains zur anästhesierung am auge" [On the use of cocaine for anesthesia on the eye ...
Leto kasneje je Karl Koller opisal anestetične učinke kokaina, Georges Gilles de la Tourette pa je opisal več motenj gibanja. ... 1864 je John Hughlings Jackson opisal izgubo govora po možganski poškodbi, leto kasneje je Otto Friedrich Karl Deiters razločil ...
... and the late Karl Koller, MD, into the ASCRS Ophthalmology Hall of Fame on Satu… ... Karl Koller, MD. Karl Koller, MD, (1857-1944) was an Austrian ophthalmologist whose name appears in histories of surgery and ... and the late Karl Koller, MD, into the ASCRS Ophthalmology Hall of Fame on Saturday, May 6. The ceremony will be held at 10:30 ... Koller began his medical career as a surgeon at the Vienna General Hospital and a colleague of Sigmund Freud. He introduced ...
Karl Koller introduced the use of cocaine for analgesic purposes in the field of ophthalmology [3]. The same year, Dr. William ...
Isolated in 1859, it was first used by Karl Koller, at the suggestion of Sigmund Freud, in ophthalmic surgery in 1884. Before ...
Karl Koller of Vienna to work with coca leaves. Koller was an ophthalmologist, and he was looking for something to use during ... Koller had witnessed the event and Freud was certain it was then that Koller had found about the anesthetic qualities of the ... ophthalmologist Carl Koller. Koller went straight back to his laboratory, prepared a solution of cocaine and instilled it into ... Koller went on to try cocaine in his own and his assistants eyes and realised that he had found an agent that was not only an ...
... after Karl Koller, a colleague of Freuds in Vienna, presented a report to a medical society in 1884 outlining the ways in ... Karl Popper, "Philosophy of Science: A Personal Report," in British Philosophy in the Mid-Century: A Cambridge Symposium, ed. C ... Anti-Freud: Karl Krauss Criticism of Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry. Syracuse University Press, 1990. ISBN 0815602472. ... Popper, Karl. Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge. Routledge, 2002. ISBN 978-0415285940. ...
Breitenbach M, Weber M, Rinnerthaler M, Karl T and Breitenbach-Koller L: Oxidative stress in fungi: Its function in signal ...
In 1884 a young Viennese ophthalmologist named Karl Koller discovered that a mild solution of cocaine would, if introduced into ... Kollers discovery offered a solution to the 19th centurys pain problem. Cocaine could easily eliminate pain by being rubbed ... In July 1884, only months before Kollers discovery was announced to the world, the Provincial Medical Journal counselled its ...
... but the rediscovery of cocaines local anesthetic properties by his colleague Karl Koller proved to be of more permanent ... Koller introduced topical cocaine in eye operations, and soon cocaine was being used in many other forms of surgery. William ...
Karl Koller (1857-1944). This Austrian ophthalmologist experimented with cocaine as an anesthetic. The most infamous accounts ... are of Koller applying the drug to his own eye and then pricking it with needles. ...
Karl Koller). V roku 1886 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, keď študoval vo Viedni na univerzite napísal svoju druhú novelu so Sherlockom ...
  • Freud was fully aware of the painkilling properties of cocaine, but Dr. Koller recognized its tissue-numbing capabilities, and in 1884 demonstrated its potential as a local anesthetic to the medical community. (eyewiretoday.com)
  • In 1860, Niemann isolated the plant's active ingredient, cocaine,2 but it was not until 1884 that ophthalmic surgeon Karl Koller demonstrated that general anesthesia could be avoided for ophthalmic procedures by application of cocaine to the conjunctiva.3 Additional ester anesthetics, such as procaine and tetracaine, were created in the early 20th century, but these were noted to result in high rates of allergic contact dermatitis. (valuecarepharmacy.net)
  • Isolated in 1859 it was first used by Karl Koller in ophthalmic surgery in 1884 . (academickids.com)
  • When I returned from my holiday I found that not he, but another of my friends, Carl Koller (now in New York), whom I had also spoken to about cocaine , had made the decisive experiments upon animals' eyes and had demonstrated them at the Ophthalmological Congress at Heidelberg. (drugs-forum.com)
  • Karl Koller, né le 3 décembre 1857 à Schüttenhofen en Bohème et mort le 21 mars 1944 à New York, est un ophtalmologue autrichien. (culturevie.info)
  • Other ophthalmologists that have been nominated were Hjalmar Schiötz (tonometer), Karl Koller (topical anesthesia), and Jules Gonin (retinal detachment). (bvsalud.org)
  • Although Koller supported Göring against the Heer and the Kriegsmarine, he was one of Göring's harshest critics, writing that "one had the feeling that he [Göring] had no interest in bringing about an atmosphere of smooth cooperation, that he was almost afraid that this would lead to the establishment of a phalanx against himself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bornert O, Kocher T, Gretzmeier C, Liemberger B, Hainzl S, Koller U, Nyström A. Generation of rabbit polyclonal human and murine collagen VII monospecific antibodies: A useful tool for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa therapy studies. (eb-haus.org)
  • After planning to study law, Freud joined the medical faculty at University of Vienna to study under Darwinist Karl Claus. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • STUDENTS OF UMAINE: Angus Koller of Monmouth, Maine This summer, the senior chemistry major interned in the American Chemical Society Summer School in Nuclear and Radiochemistry at San Jose State University, and was named the program's Outstanding Student. (umaine.edu)