Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
The vein which drains the foot and leg.
A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.
A species of gram-negative, non-spore-forming bacteria isolated from the natural cavities of man and other animals and from necrotic lesions, abscesses, and blood.
The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.
Infections with bacteria of the genus FUSOBACTERIUM.
Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
A superinfection of the damaged oropharyngeal mucosa by FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM leading to the secondary septic THROMBOPHLEBITIS of the internal jugular vein.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
A vein which arises from the right ascending lumbar vein or the vena cava, enters the thorax through the aortic orifice in the diaphragm, and terminates in the superior vena cava.
The inferior and superior venae cavae.
Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).
Veins which drain the liver.
The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.
DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS of an upper extremity vein (e.g., AXILLARY VEIN; SUBCLAVIAN VEIN; and JUGULAR VEINS). It is associated with mechanical factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Primary) secondary to other anatomic factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Secondary). Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness, and swelling in the arm.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
A syndrome characterized by a transient loss of the ability to form new memories. It primarily occurs in middle aged or elderly individuals, and episodes may last from minutes to hours. During the period of amnesia, immediate and recent memory abilities are impaired, but the level of consciousness and ability to perform other intellectual tasks are preserved. The condition is related to bilateral dysfunction of the medial portions of each TEMPORAL LOBE. Complete recovery normally occurs, and recurrences are unusual. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp429-30)
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.
Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
Forced expiratory effort against a closed GLOTTIS.
Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.
The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
Creation of a small incised opening in a vein to permit the passage of a needle or cannula for withdrawal of blood, administration of medication, or in diagnostic or therapeutic catheterization. (Dorland, 28th ed.; Stedman, 26th ed.)
An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.
Catheters that are inserted into a large central vein such as a SUBCLAVIAN VEIN or FEMORAL VEIN.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.
Central retinal vein and its tributaries. It runs a short course within the optic nerve and then leaves and empties into the superior ophthalmic vein or cavernous sinus.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
A spectrum of congenital, inherited, or acquired abnormalities in BLOOD VESSELS that can adversely affect the normal blood flow in ARTERIES or VEINS. Most are congenital defects such as abnormal communications between blood vessels (fistula), shunting of arterial blood directly into veins bypassing the CAPILLARIES (arteriovenous malformations), formation of large dilated blood blood-filled vessels (cavernous angioma), and swollen capillaries (capillary telangiectases). In rare cases, vascular malformations can result from trauma or diseases.
The major progestational steroid that is secreted primarily by the CORPUS LUTEUM and the PLACENTA. Progesterone acts on the UTERUS, the MAMMARY GLANDS and the BRAIN. It is required in EMBRYO IMPLANTATION; PREGNANCY maintenance, and the development of mammary tissue for MILK production. Progesterone, converted from PREGNENOLONE, also serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
The period in the ESTROUS CYCLE associated with maximum sexual receptivity and fertility in non-primate female mammals.
A nonchromaffin paraganglion located in the wall of the jugular bulb. The most common tumors of the middle ear arise from this tissue. (Lockard, Desk Reference for Neuroscience, 1992, p114)
Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.

Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound to control bleeding. (1/870)

OBJECTIVE: High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage from punctures in blood vessels. The objective of the current study was to investigate the capability of HIFU to stop bleeding after a more severe type of vascular injury, namely longitudinal incisions of arteries and veins. METHODS: The superficial femoral arteries, common femoral arteries, carotid arteries, and jugular veins of four anesthetized pigs were exposed surgically. A longitudinal incision, 2 to 8 mm in length, was produced in the vessel. HIFU treatment was applied within 5 seconds of the onset of the bleeding. The HIFU probe consisted of a high-power, 3.5-MHz, piezoelectric transducer with an ellipsoidal focal spot that was 1 mm in cross section and 9 mm in axial dimension. The entire incision area was scanned with the HIFU beam at a rate of 15 to 25 times/second and a linear displacement of 5 to 10 mm. A total of 76 incisions and HIFU treatments were performed. RESULTS: Control of bleeding (major hemosatsis) was achieved in all 76 treatments, with complete hemostasis achieved in 69 treatments (91%). The average treatment times of major and complete hemostasis were 17 and 25 seconds, respectively. After the treatment, 74% of the vessels in which complete hemostasis was achieved were patent with distal blood flow and 26% were occluded. The HIFU-treated vessels showed a consistent coagulation of the adventitia surrounding the vessels, with a remarkably localized injury to the vessel wall. Extensive fibrin deposition at the treatment site was observed. CONCLUSION: HIFU may provide a useful method of achieving hemostasis for arteries and veins in a variety of clinical applications.  (+info)

Adventitial delivery minimizes the proinflammatory effects of adenoviral vectors. (2/870)

PURPOSE: Adenovirus-mediated arterial gene transfer is a promising tool in the study of vascular biology and the development of vascular gene therapy. However, intraluminal delivery of adenoviral vectors causes vascular inflammation and neointimal formation. Whether these complications could be avoided and gene transfer efficiency maintained by means of delivering adenoviral vectors via the adventitia was studied. METHODS: Replication-defective adenoviral vectors encoding a beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene (AdRSVnLacZ) or without a recombinant gene (AdNull) were infused into the lumen or the adventitia of rabbit carotid arteries. Two days after infusion of either AdRSVnLacZ (n = 8 adventitial, n = 8 luminal) or AdNull (n = 4 luminal), recombinant gene expression was quantitated by histochemistry (performed on tissue sections) and with a beta-gal activity assay (performed on vessel extracts). Inflammation caused by adenovirus infusion was assessed 14 days after infusion of either AdNull (n = 6) or vehicle (n = 6) into the carotid adventitia. Inflammation was assessed by means of examination of histologic sections for the presence of neointimal formation and infiltrating T cells and for the expression of markers of vascular cell activation (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). To measure the systemic immune response to adventitial infusion of adenovirus, plasma samples (n = 3) were drawn 14 days after infusion of AdNull and assayed for neutralizing antibodies. RESULTS: Two days after luminal infusion of AdRSVnLacZ, approximately 30% of luminal endothelial cells expressed beta-gal. Similarly, 2 days after infusion of AdRSVnLacZ to the adventitia, approximately 30% of adventitial cells expressed beta-gal. beta-gal expression was present in the carotid adventitia, the internal jugular vein adventitia, and the vagus nerve perineurium. Elevated beta-gal activity (50- to 80-fold more than background; P <.05) was detected in extracts made from all AdRSVnLacZ-transduced arteries. The amount of recombinant protein expression per vessel did not differ significantly between vessels transduced via the adventitia (17.1 mU/mg total protein [range, 8.1 to 71.5]) and those transduced via a luminal approach (10.0 mU/mg total protein [range, 3.9 to 42.6]). Notably, adventitial delivery of AdNull did not cause neointimal formation. In addition, vascular inflammation in arteries transduced via the adventitia (ie, T-cell infiltrates and ICAM-1 expression) was confined to the adventitia, sparing both the intima and media. Antiadenoviral neutralizing antibodies were present in all rabbits after adventitial delivery of AdNull. CONCLUSION: Infusion of adenoviral vectors into the carotid artery adventitia achieves recombinant gene expression at a level equivalent to that achieved by means of intraluminal vector infusion. Because adventitial gene transfer can be performed by means of direct application during open surgical procedures, this technically simple procedure may be more clinically applicable than intraluminal delivery. Moreover, despite the generation of a systemic immune response, adventitial infusion had no detectable pathologic effects on the vascular intima or media. For these reasons, adventitial gene delivery may be a particularly useful experimental and clinical tool.  (+info)

Antithrombotic efficacy of thrombin inhibitor L-374,087: intravenous activity in a primate model of venous thrombus extension and oral activity in a canine model of primary venous and coronary artery thrombosis. (3/870)

The small molecule direct thrombin inhibitor L-374,087 was characterized across species in an in vitro activated partial thromboplastin clotting time (aPTT) assay and in vivo in rhesus monkey and dog thrombosis models. In vitro in rhesus, dog, and human plasma, L-374,087 concentrations eliciting 2-fold increases in aPTT were 0.25, 1.9, and 0.28 microM, respectively. In anesthetized rhesus monkeys, 300 microgram/kg bolus plus 12 microgram/kg/min and 300 microgram/kg bolus plus 30 microgram/kg/min L-374,087 i.v. infusions significantly reduced jugular vein thrombus extension, with both regimens limiting venous thrombus extension to 2-fold that of baseline thrombus mass compared with a 5-fold extension observed in the vehicle control group. Antithrombotic efficacy in the rhesus with the lower-dose regimen was achieved with 2.3- to 2.4-fold increases in aPTT and prothrombin time. In a conscious instrumented dog model of electrolytic vessel injury, the oral administration of two 10 mg/kg L-374,087 doses 12 h apart significantly reduced jugular vein thrombus mass, reduced the incidence of and delayed time to occlusive coronary artery thrombosis, and significantly reduced coronary artery thrombus mass and ensuing posterolateral myocardial infarct size. Antithrombotic efficacy in the dog was achieved with 1.6- to 2.0-fold increases in aPTT at 1 to 6 h after oral dosing with L-374,087. These results indicate significant antithrombotic efficacy against both venous and coronary arterial thrombosis with L-374,087 with only moderate elevations in aPTT or prothrombin time. The oral efficacy of L-374,087 characterizes this compound as a prototype for the further development of orally active direct thrombin inhibitors.  (+info)

Pulmonary clearance of adrenomedullin is reduced during the late stage of sepsis. (4/870)

Polymicrobial sepsis is characterized by an early, hyperdynamic phase followed by a late, hypodynamic phase. Although upregulation of adrenomedullin (ADM), a novel potent vasodilatory peptide, plays an important role in producing cardiovascular responses during the progression of sepsis, it remains unknown whether the clearance of this peptide is altered under such conditions. To determine this, male adult rats were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) followed by fluid resuscitation. At 5 h (i.e., the hyperdynamic phase of sepsis) or 20 h (the hypodynamic phase) after CLP, the animals were injected with 125I-labeled ADM through the jugular vein. Blood and tissue samples (including the lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, spleen, mesentery, liver, brain, skeletal muscle, heart, and skin) were harvested 30 min after the injection and the radioactivity was determined. The results indicate that there were no significant alterations in tissue [125I]ADM distribution at 5 h after CLP compared to shams. At 20 h after CLP, however, there was a significant decrease in radioactivity in the lungs. In contrast, a significant increase of radioactivity was observed in all other organs except the liver and kidneys. The pulmonary distribution of [125I]ADM was found to be far greater than in any other organs tested, irrespective of the effect of sepsis. In separate groups of animals, injection of [125I]ADM into the left ventricle resulted in a significant decrease in radioactivity in the lungs of both sham and septic animals at 20 h after surgery. These results suggest that the lungs are the primary site of ADM clearance, which is significantly diminished during the late stage of sepsis. The decreased clearance of ADM by the lungs may play an important role in maintaining the sustained levels of plasma ADM under such conditions.  (+info)

Effects of repeated jugular puncture on plasma cortisol concentrations in loose-housed dairy cows. (5/870)

In three experiments, the effects of venipuncture on plasma cortisol concentrations were studied in loose-housed dairy cows. In Exp. 1, two blood samples were collected 18 min apart on three alternate days from 20 dairy cows for studying their adrenocortical response to a single venipuncture. To further evaluate the effect of cows anticipating venipuncture, in Exp. 2, 15 dairy cows were sequentially venipunctured once daily on 12 successive days in a randomized order in groups of five, starting 15 min apart. In Exp. 3, 10 primiparous cows were used on three alternate days to study habituation to serial sampling (i.e., collection of five blood samples by venipuncture, 15 min apart). In cows accustomed to handling, jugular puncture did not affect cortisol concentrations in plasma collected 18 min later. Average daily cortisol concentrations varied between 2.07 +/- .38 and 3.81 +/- .56 ng/mL in the first (t = 0) and between 1.43 +/- .15 and 2.61 +/- .72 ng/mL in the second (t = 18) blood samples. Likewise, when cows were sampled sequentially once a day, the order of sampling between and within groups did not influence (P > .05) plasma cortisol concentrations. In contrast, primiparous dairy cows that were less used to being handled showed an average increase in cortisol concentrations when five samples were collected by venipuncture 15 min apart. During successive sampling sessions, however, the cows did not decrease or increase plasma cortisol concentrations in response to repeated serial sampling at the group level (P > .05). Between individuals, the maximum effect of repeated venipuncture on cortisol concentrations (4.5 to 22.6 ng/mL), the time at which the effect reached its maximum (30 to 60 min), and the consistency of the response pattern over successive series varied largely. The results of this study show that in cows that were accustomed to handling and to being restrained, baseline cortisol concentrations can be measured in single blood samples that are collected by jugular puncture within 1 min after first approaching the cow. When successive blood samples need to be collected within 15 to 20 min, jugular puncture may induce an increase in cortisol concentration, which seems to depend on the handling experience of the animals and on individual differences.  (+info)

Transjugular liver biopsy in the 1990s: a 2-year audit. (6/870)

BACKGROUND: In view of the changing nature of transjugular liver biopsy, we performed an audit of the safety, adequacy and clinical impact of such biopsies in our centre over a 2-year period from 1995 to 1997. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-seven transjugular biopsies were carried out in 145 patients, with prothrombin time >5 s over control and/or platelet count <50 x 10(9)/L and/or gross ascites. RESULTS: Major complications were two (1.3%) capsular perforations, which were easily plugged with coils without sequelae. Biopsy sample was adequate for histological diagnosis in 90%, inadequate in 6% and technically unsuccessful in 4% of cases. Mean biopsy size was 14.8+/-7.7 (1-51) mm. Adequacy did not differ between cases with and without cirrhosis. Transjugular biopsy had a clinical impact (specific diagnosis or influence on patient's management) in 50% of acute liver disease, 62% of chronic liver disease and 87% of transplant patients (P<0.001). In chronic liver disease, it had a significantly greater clinical impact in cases trying to establish the stage rather than diagnosis (84% vs. 35%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Transjugular liver biopsy is a safe procedure for high-risk patients providing an adequate liver sample even in cirrhosis. It has a clinical impact in more than 80% of transplant patients and for staging chronic liver disease, but in only 50% (acute) or 35% (chronic) of liver disease when a diagnosis is sought.  (+info)

Pharmacokinetic advantage of intra-arterial cyclosporin A delivery to vascularly isolated rabbit forelimb. I. Model development. (7/870)

Effective antirejection therapy with minimal systemic morbidity is required if limb transplantation is to become a clinical reality. We investigated whether i.a. infusion of cyclosporin A (CSA) into the vascularly isolated rabbit forelimb will distribute drug homogeneously to the tissues and produce higher local drug levels than same-dose i.v. treatment, thereby improving the therapeutic index. CSA 4.0 mg/kg/day was infused continuously via osmotic minipump into either the right brachial artery (i.a. group) or jugular vein (i.v. group) of New Zealand rabbits. Ligation of all muscles at the right mid-arm level was performed in the i.a. group to eliminate collateral circulation and simulate allografting, while leaving bone and neurovasculature intact. On day 6, CSA concentrations were measured in skin, muscle, bone, and bone marrow samples taken from different compartments of the right and left forearms in the i.a. group and right forearm only in the i.v. group. There were no significant differences between compartmental CSA levels in all tissues examined on the locally treated, right side during i.a. infusion, indicating that drug streaming from the catheter tip is not occurring in our model. During i.a. infusion, mean CSA concentrations were 4- to 7-fold higher in the right limb than in the left limb in all four tissues examined. Tissue CSA levels in the left limb were equivalent to those achieved during i.v. infusion, but CSA concentrations in blood, kidney, and liver were higher during i.a. infusion. These favorable, preliminary, single-dose pharmacokinetic results warrant further investigation in our novel rabbit model.  (+info)

Intimal thickening and hyperlipidemia in experimental primate vascular autografts. (8/870)

Intimal thickening is a significant cause of late failure of aorto-coronary vein grafts. The microscopic appearance of this thickening has some similarities to the microscopic appearance of arterial atherosclerosis, and it has been suggested that hyperlipidemia may play a role in its pathogenesis. This study examines the morphology and lipid composition of autologous vein and artery grafts in normal and hyperlipidemic rhesus monkeys. Grafts were examined six months after insertion by light and electron microscopy and tissue lipids were determined quantitatively. Intimal thickening occurred in all grafts. Specific morphological and lipid compositional features of the grafts were influenced by the type of tissue used for grafting and the presence or absence of hyperlipidemia. However, the degree of intimal thickening per se could not be related to either of these two factors. It is concluded that surgical transplantation in this model provides the most powerful stimulus for intimal thickening and any additional effect on this process by hyperlipidemia is small.  (+info)

AMAYA ZUNIGA, William F et al. Internal jugular vein cannulation: How much safety can we offer?. Rev. colomb. anestesiol. [online]. 2015, vol.43, n.1, pp.76-86. ISSN 0120-3347.. Introduction: Central venous catheterization, performed by the anatomical landmark technique, has a mechanical complication rate between 5% and 19%. This technique has been modified and new approaches have been implemented aiming to improve patient safety. With the introduction of ultrasonography in the clinical practice, and recently in central venous catheter insertion, the rate of complications has dropped over time. Objective: To measure the clinical application of the algorithm Successful ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation. Methods: A descriptive, prospective, case series study. Patients over 18 years of age were selected, and the informed consent documentation was filled out appropriately. Patients with masses, anatomical abnormalities, insertion site infections and coagulopathy (International ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Accelerated reendothelialization with suppressed thrombogenic property and neointimal hyperplasia of rabbit jugular vein grafts by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of C-type natriuretic peptide. AU - Ohno, N.. AU - Itoh, H.. AU - Ikeda, T.. AU - Ueyama, K.. AU - Yamahara, K.. AU - Doi, K.. AU - Yamashita, J.. AU - Inoue, M.. AU - Masatsugu, K.. AU - Sawada, N.. AU - Fukunaga, Y.. AU - Sakaguchi, S.. AU - Sone, M.. AU - Yurugi, T.. AU - Kook, H.. AU - Komeda, M.. AU - Nakao, K.. N1 - Copyright: Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.. PY - 2002/4/9. Y1 - 2002/4/9. N2 - Background - Vein graft disease limits the late results of coronary revascularization. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) inhibits the growth of vascular smooth muscle cells. Given the effects of CNP on cGMP cascade, we hypothesized that transfected CNP genes modulate endothelial repair and thrombogenicity in the vein graft. Methods and Results - Autologous rabbit jugular vein grafts were incubated ex vivo ...
Central venous catheterization has an essential role in the management of patients who are critically ill, and patients who have special operative interventions. In general, the bigger the vein cross sectional area and diameter the easier the catheterization will be. There are different maneuvers to increase internal jugular vein caliber. These include; passive legs elevation, hepatic or abdominal compression, Trendelenburg position, Valsalva maneuver, and positive end-expiratory pressure. The objective of the study is to evaluate the effect of passive legs elevation and hepatic compression on the diameter and the cross-sectional area of the right internal jugular vein. This prospective study included 80 adult patients ASA class I and II. Patients who had any contraindication to the passive legs elevation or hepatic compression, or those with disruption of the local neck anatomy; were excluded from the study. Patients were evaluated for their right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area and
View details of top internal jugular vein catheterization hospitals in Gurgaon. Get guidance from medical experts to select best internal jugular vein catheterization hospital in Gurgaon
How To Do Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation, Ultrasound-Guided - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the Merck Manuals - Medical Professional Version.
We describe a rare neurological presentation of internal jugular vein thrombosis induced by central venous catheter placement in a patient with cancer. A 71-year-old man gave a 3-week history of dysphagia and dysarthria with left-sided neck pain and headache. He was receiving chemotherapy for appendiceal adenocarcinoma. On examination, he had left 9th-12th cranial neuropathies, manifesting as voice hoarseness, decreased palatal movement, absent gag reflex, weakness of scapular elevation and left-sided tongue wasting. CT scan of neck showed the left subclavian central venous catheter tip was in the left internal jugular vein. Skull base MRI showed thrombus within the left jugular foramen extending intracranially. We diagnosed Collet-Sicard syndrome secondary to thrombosis in the sigmoid-jugular venous complex. His headache and neck pain resolved 2 days after removing the catheter and starting anticoagulation. Collet-Sicard syndrome is an unusual syndrome of lower cranial nerve palsies, often ...
22 issue)1 had demonstrated the use of the needle- needle is a very small, 22-gauge needle that can guide technique in their video of internal jugular enter the jugular vein with little discomfort to vein cannulation. As noted in the video, it can be the patient. Accidental puncture of the carotid difficult to determine the location of the tip of artery with this small needle generally does not the needle, which may be either in front of or lead to major bleeding. The micropuncture tech- behind the narrow cross-sectional plane of the nique is particularly helpful in children, in pa- ultrasound image. With the use of a needle guide, tients taking an anticoagulant, and in situations the operator can direct the needle tip such that it requiring immediate access. Unintentional pene- intersects the middle of the image on the screen tration of the posterior wall of the internal jugular at the depth prescribed by the guide. This tech- vein during placement of a central catheter oc- nique has been shown ...
Variations in the origin and termination of external jugular vein are common and are reported in the past. However, variations in the course of external jugular vein are uncommon. During routine dissection classes for medical undergraduates, we came across the unusual formation and course of right external jugular vein and absence of common facial vein, in an approximately 60-year-old male cadaver of Indian origin. External jugular vein was formed by the continuation of undivided trunk of retromandibular vein. Following its formation, it passed vertically superficial to sternocleidomastoid muscle to the lower part of occipital triangle. In the occipital triangle it pierced the investing layer of deep cervical fascia and passed deep to the inferior belly of omohyoid muscle and coursed through the subclavian triangle. Then, it terminated at the junction of subclavian vein with internal jugular vein. Facial vein joined with submental vein and finally drained into internal jugular vein. Further, the ...
Abstract:. This study used three-dimensional information from Stealth navigation technology during simulated right internal jugular vein cannulation to define the initial needle trajectory taken when using three approaches: landmark (LM), short-axis (SAX) ultrasound and long-axis (LAX) ultrasound. Nineteen volunteers indicated the entry site and needle direction (track) they would use in performing right internal jugular vein cannulation by the three approaches. The likelihood of cannulation success, arterial puncture and needle direction were recorded. Volunteers were asked to assess the suitability of the simulation system for validity and educational benefit. The SAX track crossed the jugular vein more frequently than the LAX and LM tracks (SAX: 94%; LAX: 80%; LM: 47% [SAX versus LM, P ,0.01]). The mean indicated needle direction in the coronal plane for LM, SAX and LAX were -4, 13 and 11 degrees, respectively. The track associated with the LAX technique would have entered the carotid artery ...
LALWANI, Rekha; RANA, Kum Kum; DAS, Srijit y KHAN, Riyazul Qamar. Communication of the External and Internal Jugular Veins: A Case Report . Int. J. Morphol. [online]. 2006, vol.24, n.4, pp.721-722. ISSN 0717-9502. http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022006000500033.. The external jugular vein, which traverses the sternocleidomastoid muscle superficially, is known to exhibit variations in its formation and course. There are less reports on the communication of the external and internal jugular vein. During routine cadaveric dissection, we detected an abnormal communication of the external jugular vein and the internal jugular vein, in a 45 year male cadaver. The knowledge of both normal and abnormal anatomy of the superficial veins of the neck may be important for clinicians performing catheterization and surgeons operating in the region of the neck. The presence of such anomalous communications may also be important for radiologists performing angiographic and sonographic studies. Palabras clave : ...
A 69-year-old woman with end-stage renal failure discontinued continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and commenced temporary haemodialysis because of resistant peritonitis. Right internal jugular vein haemodialysis catheter placement was performed. The cuffed, tunnelled haemodialysis catheter was inserted using the modified Seldinger technique. When haemodialysis was initiated the following day, blood could not be aspirated from the catheter and the patient complained of central chest pain during the aspiration. Subsequent venography and computed tomography scan of the thorax showed that the catheter was placed extraluminally into the posterior mediastinum. The importance of a chest radiograph after placement of a central venous catheter is highlighted by this case report. Subtle deviations in catheter position from normal should alert the physician to the possibility of catheter misplacement and lead to further investigation ...
The aim of this study was to share our observations pertaining to the anatomy and position of the right internal jugular vein with respect to carotid artery
TY - JOUR. T1 - Surgical treatment of symptomatic cervical venous hum. AU - Brennan, F. J.. AU - Salerno, T. A.. PY - 1981. Y1 - 1981. N2 - A 28-year-old woman presented with pulsating tinnitus in the right ear and a venous hum heard over the right internal jugular vein. Maneuvers which abolished the hum also eliminated the tinnitus. Permanent symptomatic relief was achieved by ligation of the right internal jugular vein.. AB - A 28-year-old woman presented with pulsating tinnitus in the right ear and a venous hum heard over the right internal jugular vein. Maneuvers which abolished the hum also eliminated the tinnitus. Permanent symptomatic relief was achieved by ligation of the right internal jugular vein.. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019351050&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019351050&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/s0022-5223(19)37673-1. DO - 10.1016/s0022-5223(19)37673-1. M3 - Article. C2 - 7453215. AN - SCOPUS:0019351050. VL - ...
ICD-10-PCS code 05NM0ZZ for Release Right Internal Jugular Vein, Open Approach is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range - Upper Ve
Internal jugular vein cannulation has become a routinary and clinically important aspect of medical care in critically ill patients. The landmark-guided technique usually affords rapid and easy vascular access, but it is not always successful and may be complicated by arterial puncture, hematoma, pneumothorax. A prospective, descriptive study is reported on the use and success of ultrasound-assisted central vein catheterization in dialysis patients who had an indication for internal jugular vein catheterization. Data were collected prospectively on number of punctures, needle passes, and success rates. Over a 6-year period, there were 220 attempts at internal jugular catheterization in 205 patients and ultrasound guidance was used in 210 of the 220 (95%) attempts. Incidences of successful puncture and cannulation using ultrasound were 100% (210 out of 210) and 99.5% (209 out of 210), respectively, compared with 80% (8 out of 10) and 80% (8 out of 10) in the landmark group. With the availability ...
Although the pulsatility (±1 mm Hg) and rate of perfusate flow (1 mL/min) through the isolated segments do not precisely match the conditions in the rabbit jugular vein in vivo, the newly developed model allowed us to study the effects of an enhanced perfusion pressure on gene expression in the vessel wall in situ. With the aid of this model, we were able to substantiate earlier findings in cultured endothelial cells of a stretch- and/or deformation-induced increase in prepro-ET-1 mRNA abundance9 and ET-1 release.7 8 The pressure-induced upregulation of prepro-ET-1 expression in the endothelium and that of the ETB-R in the smooth muscle did not follow the pattern of an all-or-nothing response but were clearly dependent on the duration and intensity of the increase in perfusion pressure. Most important, however, these changes in gene expression did not occur at physiological pressure levels that, depending on the animals posture and heart cycle, can be estimated for the external rabbit jugular ...
PURPOSE: To investigate the neovascularization after exposure of the external jugular venous endothelium in an experimental model. METHODS: The sample was composed of 60 male rats of Wistar OUT B breed provided by animal colony of the Medicine College of Juazeiro do Norte, weighing 250 to 350g, aged 90-120 days. Randomized study in OUT B Wistar rats, open, with 60 days duration. The animals were distributed into three groups of 20 specimens and were subjected to the following: Group 1: neck incision with dissection, ligation and section of the external jugular vein. Group 2: neck incision with dissection and ligation of the external jugular vein. Group 3: cervicotomy without dissection of the external jugular vein without ligation or section. The animals were sacrificed, half of them in 30 days and the other half within 60 days. The material in block harvested from the operated site were sectioned and stained for immunohistochemistry with CD34 marker. RESULTS: Neovascularization occurred with ...
Objective. Echogenic technology has recently enhanced the ability of cannulas to be visualized during ultrasound-guided vascular access. We studied whether the use of an EC could improve visualization if compared with a nonechogenic vascular cannula
Various causes of abnormal sensations in the laryngopharynx have been considered. In our case, a pulsating bulge in the posterior wall of the left oropharynx was detected by inspection of the oral cavity, and we additionally performed imaging tests leading to a diagnosis of jugular phlebectasia. Because jugular phlebectasia frequently develops in childhood and on the right side, congenital thinning of the carotid sheaths and the presence of an anatomic venous perfusion impairment have been suggested.2,3 Although rare, there are reports of this disease in adults.1,4 Acquired factors such as inflammation, injury, and the state of Valsalva strain are considered to contribute to its development in adults.2. In many cases with jugular phlebectasia, imaging tests such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound show characteristic findings leading to a definitive diagnosis. Laryngeal diverticulum, laryngocele, and superior mediastinal tumors and cysts are important mass lesions that show size changes ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Extending the limits for mitral valve replacement in low-weight infants using a stented bovine jugular vein graft. AU - Trezzi, Matteo. AU - Cetrano, Enrico. AU - Albano, Antonio. AU - Carotti, Adriano. PY - 2015/9/1. Y1 - 2015/9/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940108660&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940108660&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2015.06.019. DO - 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2015.06.019. M3 - Article. C2 - 26183194. AN - SCOPUS:84940108660. VL - 150. SP - 729. EP - 730. JO - Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. JF - Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. SN - 0022-5223. IS - 3. ER - ...
Objective To investigate if the respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava diameter (?DIVC) and right internal jugular vein diameter (?DRIJ) are correlated in mechanically ventilated patients. patients were responders and 32 measurements showed agreement (weighted Kappa = 0.65). The area under the ROC 1561178-17-3 IC50 curve was 0.903 (95%CI 0.765 - 0.973; cut-off value = 11.86). Conclusion The respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava and the right internal jugular veins are correlated and showed significant agreement. Evaluation of right internal jugular vein distensibility appears to be a surrogate marker for inferior vena cava vein distensibility for evaluating fluid responsiveness. Research Ethics Committee approved this study (no 38077214.1.0000.5335 - Plataforma Brasil) without the need for a consent form. Measurements A single critical care physician with a certificate of ultrasound evaluation (basic competence),(18) performed all of the ultrasound examinations (Siemens ...
In this report, we describe a 48-year old non-smoker man who presented with dyspnea, light headedness, plethoric facies, neck swelling and swollen collateral veins on the front of the chest wall after extracting his molar tooth due to dental caries and tooth pain. Right internal jugular vein thrombosis was seen on the neck CT angiography. Lemierres disease was suspected and systemic antibiotics in addition to anticoagulant were started. Two months later the patient presented with characteristic genital and oral aphthous ulcers. A final diagnosis of Behçet vasculitis was made and the patient received high dose of immunosuppressive therapy. Dental extraction in Behçet disease may cause the disease flare up and large vessel thrombosis.
Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Access - ... ultrasound confirms central line after ultrasound-guided right internal jugular right internal jugular vein central line placement,
TY - JOUR. T1 - Anatomical variations of the internal jugular vein: The role of ultrasonography. AU - Geraci, Girolamo. AU - Cajozzo, Massimo. AU - Lena, Adriana. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Purpose: In many places, especially in emergency department, central venous catheter is still inserted using anatomical landmark guidance with a success rate up to 97.6% and complications up to 15%. This study was aimed to determine by the support of ultrasono-graphy (US) the anatomical variations of the internal jugular vein (IJV) in relation with other structures of the neck, such as the common carotid artery (CCA). Material and Methods: 830 patients requiring central vein catheterization (CVC) were in-cluded in the analysis. The position of the IJV in relation to the other structures of the neck was demonstrated by portable ultrasonography. Results: The mean diameter of IJV was 10.3 mm in right and 10.5 mm in left side of neck, in male (p , 0.05) and 9.1 mm in right and 10.5 mm in left side of neck, in ...
Diagnosis Code S15.312D information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
The jugular vein is the most frequent site of intravenous injection and catheter placement in the horse.. The most common cause of clotting of the jugular vein is irritation and clot formation from an intravenous catheter. Horses that are very systemically ill are much more likely to have this complication. It is especially common in horses that have intestinal inflammation (colitis and enteritis). Horses that are very ill post-colic surgery are also at higher risk for this problem.. Horses can live a normal life with only one jugular vein. Most even survive loss of both jugulars. The jugular vein is the main avenue for return of blood to the heart from the head. When a horse loses its jugular vein, the head swells transiently because of back pressure in the vessels from the damming effect of the clot. Horses that lose both jugular veins may have chronically swollen heads.. ...
1. Legler D, Nugent M. Doppler localization of the internal jugular vein facilitates central venous cannulation. Anesthesiology. 1984;60(5):481-2.. 2. Rothschild JM. Ultrasound guidance of central vein catheterization. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No 43. Making Health Care Safer A critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices. AHRQ. 2001;43:245-53.. 3. Brass P, Hellmich M, Kolodziej L, et al. Ultrasound guidance versus anatomical landmarks for internal jugular vein catheterization. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;1:CD006962.. 4. Leung J, Duffy M, Finckh A. Real-Time ultrasonographically-guided Internal jugular vein catheterization in the emergency department increases success rates and reduces complications: a randomized, prospective study. Ann Emerg Med. 2006;48(5):540-7.. 5. Fields JM, Piela NE, Au AK, et al. Risk factors associated with difficult venous access in adult ED patients. Am J Emerg Med. 2014;32(10):1179-82.. 6. Alexandrou E. The One Million Global Catheters PIVC worldwide ...
To the Editor: Observing jugular venous pressure (JVP) is central to cardiovascular examination. Lewis, in 1930,1 was the first to report the use of the external jugular vein as a manometer for recording pressure in the right atrium. Unfortunately, some textbooks on clinical examination and many clinical teachers incorrectly state that the external jugular is unreliable for measuring JVP and that only the internal jugular should be used. The problem with this is that the internal jugular vein is located deep within the neck, where it is covered by the sternomastoid muscle and is therefore not usually visible.. ...
After reviewing the postoperative chest X ray film, we will check the position of the central venous catheter tip. The possible pisition of catheter tip is as follows:. (1) Superior vena cava and Rirht Atrium junction (2)Right internal jugular vein (3)Left Internal jugular vein (4)Right Axillary vein (5)Lt. Axillary vein ...
Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurologic disease of undetermined background. Recent discoveries suggest that this disease could be a venous pathology. The study has been done to assess veins in the neck in multiple sclerosis patients, in order to confirm findings by researches from Ferrara. There were examined 8 patients with proven diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. They were performed color Doppler examination of their internal jugular veins and vertebral veins. Abnormalities were found in all patients, but no universal anatomical pattern of venous pathology existed. There were found: occlusion of one internal jugular vein - 2 patients, stenosis of one internal jugular vein - 4 patients, stenosis of both internal jugular veins - 2 patients, stiff but not yet narrowed internal jugular vein - 1 patient, reflux in internal jugular vein - 2 patients, stenosis of vertebral veins - 3 patients, reflux in vertebral veins - 1 patient. Although further studies are needed to establish the actual role for ...
MATERIALS AND METHODS: To validate the model outcomes, we used supine average arterial and venous extracerebral blood flow, obtained by using phase-contrast MR imaging from 49 individuals with stenosis in the acquisition plane at the level of the disc between the second and third vertebrae of the left internal jugular vein, 20 with stenosis in the acquisition plane at the level of the disc between the fifth and sixth vertebrae of the right internal jugular vein, and 38 healthy controls without stenosis. Average data from a second group of 10 healthy volunteers screened with an echo-color Doppler technique were used to evaluate flow variations due to posture change. ...
The study was aimed to establish normal Doppler blood flow parameters of right common carotid artery and right external jugular vein in 20 clinically healthy non-gravid adult buffaloes. The Doppler blood flow parameters were also studied in ten buffaloes suffering from reticulo-diaphragmatic hernia and the changes in the various blood flow parameters were compared with that of healthy buffaloes. The correlations among various blood flow parameters like the pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systole velocity, end diastole velocity, time average maximum velocity, time averaged mean velocity and volume flow for each vessel and between the vessels were worked out in healthy buffaloes. These parameters, when compared with those recorded in buffaloes suffering from reticulo-diaphragmatic hernia, revealed a significant decrease in peak systole velocity, end diastole velocity, time average maximum velocity and time averaged mean velocity of external jugular vein while the common carotid artery ...
The posterior external jugular vein is a tributary of the external jugular vein. Gross anatomy Origin and course Forms from the confluence of several superficial veins in the posterosuperior neck and posterior scalp. It passes superficially ov...
The anterior jugular vein is a vein in the neck. It begins near the hyoid bone by the confluence of several superficial veins from the submaxillary region. It descends between the median line and the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoideus muscle, and, at the lower part of the neck, passes beneath that muscle to open into the termination of the external jugular vein, or, in some instances, into the subclavian vein. It varies considerably in size, bearing usually an inverse proportion to the external jugular; most frequently there are two anterior jugulars, a right and left; but sometimes only one. Its tributaries are some laryngeal veins, and occasionally a small thyroid vein[disambiguation needed]. Just above the sternum the two anterior jugular veins communicate by a transverse trunk, the venous jugular arch, which receive tributaries from the inferior thyroid veins; each also communicates with the internal jugular. There are no valves in this vein. Section of the neck at about the level ...
Garg N, Garg N. Jugular venous pulse: an appraisal. J Indian Acad Clin Med 2000;1;261-9. Chua Chiaco JM, Parikh NI, Fergusson DJ. The jugular venous pressure revisited. Cleve Clin J Med 2013;80:638-44. DOI: https://doi.org/10.3949/ccjm.80a.13039 Applefeld MM. The jugular venous pressure and pulse contour. In: Walker HK, Hall WD, Hurst, JW, eds. Clinical methods: the history, physical, and laboratory examinations. Boston, MA: Butterworth; 1990. pp 107-111. Drazner MH, Rame JE, Stevenson LW, Dries DL. Prognostic importance of elevated jugular venous pressure and a third heart sound in patients with heart failure. N Engl J Med 2001;345:574-81. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa010641 Beggs CB, Magnano C, Shepherd SJ, et al. Aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility in healthy individuals is affected by impaired cerebral venous outflow. J Magn Reson Imaging 2014;40:1215-22. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.24468 Hatt A, Cheng S, Tan K, et al. MR elastography can be used to measure brain stiffness ...
ULTRASONOGRAPHY was performed in a 79-yr-old man to determine the spatial relationship between his common carotid artery (CCA) and internal jugular vein (IJV) to guide central venous catheter placement before surgery. This figure revealed IJV duplication (A), with two unusually small IJVs. One (5 mm wide) was on the lateral side of the neck along the CCA; the other (10 mm wide) was on the medial side along the CCA (B), midway between the clavicle head and mandible angle (C). The medial IJV had a curved course and crossed the CCA. The lateral IJV was straight and joined the medial branch approximately 45 mm from the clavicle, forming a single IJV measuring 13 mm wide, 6.6 mm thick, and 8.0 mm deep at a point 30 mm from the clavicle (D ...
The patient, who had a history of duodenocephalopancreasectomy, came to our attention when she developed bowel occlusion. She underwent emergency bowel resection due to bowel necrosis caused by adhesions. A central venous catheter (CVC) was then positioned in the right internal jugular vein. Since bleeding was recorded from the abdominal drainage, antithrombotic prophylaxis with enoxaparin was started on day 3. On postoperative day 4 the patients right arm became edematous. A Duplex ultrasound scan (DUS) showed mural thrombosis of the right internal jugular vein. A intravenous infusion of heparin sodium was started. A DUS performed 36 hours later showed recanalization of the vessel was almost complete. The edema in the arm gradually subsided and after 4 days had resolved. Enoxaparin was therefore substituted for heparin sodium. Successive DUS showed complete resolution of the thrombus, and the CVC was removed. Enoxaparin was replaced by warfarin continued for another 2 months.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Wandering bullet embolizing to the pulmonary artery. T2 - A case report. AU - Agarwal, Surendra K.. AU - Singh, Amrendra. AU - Kathuria, Manoj. AU - Ghosh, Probal K.. PY - 2007/4. Y1 - 2007/4. N2 - Whilst a missile embolizing to the right side of the heart is a common occurrence, embolization to the pulmonary arteries is rare. We report a case of a bullet entering through the right internal jugular vein to the right ventricle, and then migrating to the left pulmonary artery, and its management. To our knowledge, this is the first reported such case from the Indian subcontinent.. AB - Whilst a missile embolizing to the right side of the heart is a common occurrence, embolization to the pulmonary arteries is rare. We report a case of a bullet entering through the right internal jugular vein to the right ventricle, and then migrating to the left pulmonary artery, and its management. To our knowledge, this is the first reported such case from the Indian subcontinent.. UR - ...
Introduction: Internal jugular vein ectasia is a condition in which there is a dilatation of the internal jugular vein. A patient usually presents in the first decade with swelling in the neck, which aggravates in size while straining or coughing. This is a very rare condition and the chances of misdiagnosis are quite high. It is diagnosed by proper history taking, examination, and radiological study. Case Report: We reported the case of a seven-year-old female presenting with right-sided swelling in the neck aggravating in size while straining or coughing. Regular follow-up was advised. Swelling regression was observed after one year of follow-up without any surgical treatment. Conclusion: This is a self-limiting condition and usually the treatment is not warranted. Regular follow-up is advised for the patient.
When placing an IJ central line, many potential complications are similar between the right and left sides. These include inadvertent carotid artery puncture, pneumothorax, and infection. A potential complication unique tot he left IJ is related to the fact that the thoracic duct is the main lymphatic channel of the body that drains into the junction of the left subclavian vein left internal jugular vein. It can potentially be injured when the central line cath is inserted on the left IJ.. ...
An internal jugular vein is one of two veins that are located on both sides of the neck. The main function of these veins is to...
The internal jugular vein is a major blood vessel that drains blood from important body organs and parts, such as the brain, face, and neck. Anatomically, there are two of these veins that lie along each side of the neck. They each rest beside the thyroid gland at the center
The external jugular vein receives the greater part of the blood from the exterior of the cranium and the deep parts of the face, being formed by the junction of the posterior division of the retromandibular vein with the posterior auricular vein. It commences in the substance of the parotid gland, on a level with the angle of the mandible, and runs perpendicularly down the neck, in the direction of a line drawn from the angle of the mandible to the middle of the clavicle at the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoideus. In its course it crosses the sternocleidomastoideus obliquely, and in the subclavian triangle perforates the deep fascia, and ends in the subclavian vein lateral to or in front of the scalenus anterior, piercing the roof of the posterior triangle. It is separated from the sternocleidomastoideus by the investing layer of the deep cervical fascia, and is covered by the platysma, the superficial fascia, and the integument; it crosses the cutaneous cervical nerve, and its upper ...
The external jugular vein (EJV) drains the head, face and part of the scapular region. Gross anatomy Origin The posterior division of the retromandibular vein and posterior auricular vein unite within the parotid gland to form the external jug...
The external jugular vein is increasingly being used as the recipient vein in head and neck tissue transfers, and for cannulation to conduct diagnostic procedures or intravenous therapies. The variations in the patterns of its course, and knowledge o
S15.291S is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of other specified injury of right external jugular vein, sequela. Code valid for the year 2020
http://journals.lww.com/neurosurgery/Ab ... se.36.aspx OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with associated elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is a rare complication of central venous catheterization but has not been reported as a result of blunt trauma. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: ...
presión venosa yugular (es); pression veineuse jugulaire (fr); Tekanan vena jugularis (id); Tętno żylne (pl); 頸部血管突出 (zh-hant); 颈部血管突出 (zh-cn); pressió jugular (ca); jugular venous pressure (en); ضغط الوريد الوداجي (ar); 頸靜脈擴張 (zh); 颈部血管突出 (zh-hans) 颈部血管突出 (zh ...
The arch goes over the five metatarsals medial segment. The left internal jugular vein curves forward and joins the subclavian vein and then crosses over the left common carotid artery at the necks root. The great saphenous vein is the how to do a strand test in hairdressing major superficial vein of the medial leg and thigh
Central venous catheterization is a common procedure carried out in a hospital setting and is used for a variety of reasons including intravenous administration of specific drugs, parenteral nutrition, hemodialysis, and to aid in the diagnosis of cardiac failure. This module teaches you how to safely prepare for and insert a central venous catheter into the jugular vein. Including both Learn and Test modes, the online simulator offers a clinical scenario that tests your ability to perform a central venous catheterization of the right internal jugular vein. Practice the steps of the procedures online as often as you want, until you feel confident.. If you are not a medical student or physician, you may prefer the other version of this module, which includes all the procedural information needed by professionals in other roles: /shop/clinical/medicinenursing/vascular-procedures/central-venous-catheterization-internal-jugular. Youll Learn. ...
Looking for online definition of anterior jugular vein in the Medical Dictionary? anterior jugular vein explanation free. What is anterior jugular vein? Meaning of anterior jugular vein medical term. What does anterior jugular vein mean?
Procedure is a chapter in the book, Emergency Medicine, containing the following 34 pages: Head Tilt-Chin Lift, Jaw Thrust, Nasopharyngeal Airway, Oropharyngeal Airway, Airway Suction, Chest Compressions, IV Access, Central IV Access, Intraosseous Access, Peripheral IV Access, PICC Line, Umbilical Artery Catheter, Umbilical Vein Catheter, Hypodermoclysis, Hypodermoclysis Technique, Oxygen Delivery, High Flow Oxygen, Moderate Flow Oxygen, Low Flow Oxygen, Ineffective Oxygen Delivery, Positive Pressure Ventilation, Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage, Emergency Procedure, Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization, Ultrasound-Guided Antecubital Line, Tourniquet, Spine Board, Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection, Difficult Intravenous Access in Children, Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta, Rapid Internal Jugular Vein Line, Cervical Spine Immobilization, Four-Person Log Roll, Evaporative Cooling.
Establishing a long-term vascular access in patients exhibiting vascular access exhaustion is challenging. In this study, we reported a case of a direct catheterization in the superior vena cava of a hemodialysis patient with vascular access exhaustion and original dysfunctional catheter inserted via the left internal jugular vein. The direct catheterization was performed with cuffed tunnel catheter (CUFF) and guided by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and multidetector computed tomography venography (MDCTV). The DSA and MDCTV results revealed an occlusion in the right innominate vein and thromboses in the left innominate, right internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. The distal end of the superior vena cava was localized clearly by the original CUFF under DSA. Directed at the distal end of the superior vena cava, a 0.5-cm secondary puncture was introduced below the lateral head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle via the right neck area. This study is one of the few reports ...
Our study bears some limitations. The incidence of primary catheter malposition was lower than expected. Consequently, despite the large number of included patients, the sensitivity is easily influenced by one additional or fewer false-negative case. Another limitation of postprocedural ultrasound in comparison to chest x-ray film is that the microbubble test provides confirmation that the catheter tip resides in the superior vena cava or upper right atrium, but is not able to locate exact tip position. Therefore, certain cardiac anomalies may predispose to false-negative tests if they are asymptomatic. For example, a recent case report described a malpositioned central line, placed via the left internal jugular vein into a persistent left superior vena cava. Initially, this was missed by the microbubble test and only detected after chest x-ray film and a formal transthoracic echocardiogram.41 A limitation of ultrasound to detect postprocedural pneumothorax is that mandating the presence of a ...
BACKGROUND:. Using cerebral oxygen venous saturation post-cardiac arrest (CA) is limited because of a small sample size and prior to establishment of target temperature management (TTM). We aimed to describe variations in jugular bulb oxygen saturation during intensive care in relation to neurological outcome at 6 months post- CA in cases where TTM 33°C was applied.. METHOD:. Prospective observational study in patients over 18 years, comatose immediately after resuscitation from CA. Patients were treated with TTM 33°C M and received a jugular bulb catheter within the first 26 hours post-CA. Neurological outcome was assessed at 6 months using the Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) and dichotomized into good (CPC 1-2) and poor outcome (CPC 3-5).. RESULTS:. Seventy-five patients were included and 37 (49%) patients survived with a good outcome at 6 months post-CA. No differences were found between patients with good outcome and poor outcome in jugular bulb oxygen saturation. Higher values were ...
How to avoid central venous catheter malposition?. The safe use of ultrasound is now seen as standard of care. After vessel puncture and the guidewire is inserted the vessel should be scanned again with the ultrasound probe to ensure the guidewire is seen within the vessel. Using a longitudinal view you can also make sure the wire is passing down the vein and isnt sticking in the posterior wall.. The J tip of the guidewire could theoretically be angled to ensure the guidewire passes down the vein and towards the right atrium. For subclavian vein cannulation the J tip should be angled so the tip faces caudad to encourage a turn towards the right atrium. Inserting the guidewire with the needle bevel facing down could also potentially encourage the guidewire to enter the brachiocephalic vein and subsequently the SVC. For internal jugular vein cannulation the J tip could be angled to the tip faces medially, to discourage the wire from turning into the ipsilateral subclavian vein. However in reality ...
The decedent sustained multiple sharp force injuries, including multiple stab wounds involving the chest and abdomen; multiple incised-stab wounds of the neck; and multiple incised or cutting wounds. Fatal wounds were identified involving the neck where there was transection of the left internal jugular vein and stab wounds of the chest and abdomen causing intrathoracic and intraabdominal hemorrhage. Of note the cutting wounds of the left and right hands, compatible with defensive wounds. In addition there were a number of blunt force injuries to the upper extremities and hands, likewise compatible with defensive wounds. The remainder of the autopsy revealed a normal, healthy adult male with no congenital anomalies. Routine toxicologic studies were ordered ...
Dyspnea & Edema & Increased Jugular Venous Pressure & Oliguria Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Congestive Heart Failure. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Venous outflow depends not only on the outflow pressure, but also on the venous resistance. Veins tend to collapse when external pressure exceeds intraluminal pressure, and venous resistance correspondingly increases. Venous resistance becomes infinitely high during occlusion. This phenomenon can interchangeably be described by the nonlinear venous outflow resistance or the change in effective venous outflow pressure (Starling resistor). Starling resistor is implied in the classic definition of cerebral perfusion pressure (mean arterial pressure minus intracranial or venous pressure, whichever comes higher): CPP = MAP - ICP, when ICP , CVP, and CPP = MAP - CVP when CVP , ICP.4 Jugular veins are exposed to atmospheric pressure and collapse with the head-up position.6 This collapse can be directly observed when jugular vein distention (JVD - external jugular vein collapse point) moves with the body tilt. Complete cessation of flow in both jugular veins was observed in 2/23 healthy volunteers at 15 ...
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Cephalad displacement of the internal jugular vein with exposed superior jugular bulb in the middle ear cavity is an anatomical variation that may have a segmen
Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization is a frequently performed procedure. Amongst others, IJV is increasingly being used as a temporary route for hemodialysis catheter placement in patients with renal failure, as is thought to be safer than subclavian or femoral vein sites. In the vast majority of cases, IJV cannulation is successful and uncomplicated, but some times may be associated with potentially serious traumatic complications such as inadverted arterial puncture or laceration, pleural and mediastinal injuries, pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemomediastinum. Arterial injury can result in the development of hematoma, hemothorax, pseudoaneurysm or arteriovenous fistula 5678 . These complications usually occur subsequently to arterial catheterization rather than arterial puncture alone. When identified, prompt vascular surgery and radiology consultation is required.. The most common arterial injury associated with IJV cannulation is carotid artery puncture. Complications caused by ...
During attempted cannulation of the right internal jugular vein, you puncture the carotid artery in a patient who is to be heparinized intraoperatively.. 1. What is your management?. 2. Would you proceed with the case?. 3. How does heparin anticoagulate?. Heparin binds to antithrombin III and the activated forms of factors II, X, XI, XII, and XIII, having an anticoagulant effect of about ninety minutes. It may produce qualitative or quantitative platelet abnormalities.. 4. The patient is resistant to heparinization. What is the defect?. Antithrombin III deficiency. 5. What is the treatment? Fresh frozen plasma.. 5. What tests measure the intrinsic and common pathways? For the intrinsic pathway, phospholipid is added to the patients plasma, and the time taken for clot formation is taken. Decreased fibrinogen and dysfibrinogenemias prolong both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The partial thromboplastin time, or PTT, measures all factors of the intrinsic and common paths, except factor XIII. A ...
Author(s): Ash, Adam J.; Raio, Christopher | Abstract: This is a case report describing the ultrasound-guided placement of a peripheral intravenous catheter into the internal jugular vein of a patient with difficult vascular access. Although this technique has been described in the past, this case is novel in that the Seldinger technique was used to place the catheter. This allows for safer placement of a longer catheter (2.25
The use of US to reduce the number of complications related to vascular access for CVC placement has been evaluated in numerous previous studies in a variety of clinical settings. Recent Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses summarize the current evidence for US guidance versus anatomic landmark techniques for CVC placement in the IJV [22], SV [23], and FV [23] with regard to complications of CVC placement. These meta-analyses included adult and pediatric patients treated in the intensive care unit or the operating room and compared conventional landmark techniques with techniques using static or real-time US or Doppler US. The primary outcome measure was the total rate of peri-interventional complications and adverse events.. For the IJV, 35 trials enrolling a total of 5108 patients were included in the meta-analysis [22]. The analysis demonstrated that the use of US for CVC placement in the IJV reduces the total rate of complications compared with conventional landmark techniques (US, ...
The open surgical venous cut-down technique is widely performed in cases of long-term treatment including administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, or replacement therapies. However, it has been recommended to avoid this technique considering the resultant unpredictable alterations in the veins draining the relevant site, especially in patients who may need central venous cannulation (CVC) during disease progression. We aimed to report on CVC in a 5-year-old child who had previously undergone bilateral internal jugular venous access by the open venous cut-down technique, in order to highlight the importance of performing the Rapid Central Vein Assessment protocol prior to any intervention and considering to abandon the use of the open surgical venous cut-down technique by gaining experience with ultrasound-guided percutaneous techniques. ...
1. Arya, R., Shehata, HA., Patel, RK., et al. Internal jugular vein thrombosis after assisted conception therapy. Brit J Haematol, 2001, 115, p. 153-155.. 2. Baglin, T., Gray, E., Greaves, M., et al. Clinical guidelines for testing for heritable thrombophilia. Brit J Haematol, 2010, 149(2), p. 209-220.. 3. Bates, SM., Greer, IA., Middeldorp, S., et al. American College of Chest Physicians. VTE, thrombophilia, antithrombotic therapy, and pregnancy: Antithrombotic therapy and prevention of thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest, 2012, 141(2 suppl), p. 691-736.. 4. Bauersachs, RM., Manolopoulos, K., Hoppe, I., et al. More on: the „ART behind the clot: solving the mystery. J Thromb Haemost, 2007, 5, p. 438-439.. 5. Cohen, Y., Tulandi, T., Almog, B., et al. Prolonged activation of the coagulation system during in vitro fertilization cycles. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol, 2017, 216, p. 111-115.. 6. Česká společnost pro ...
LF01087U Designed for learning and practicing CVC techniques, the Central Venous Cannulation Simulator is directed to the emergency medical field. ACLS and ATLS participants will find this simulator to be the ideal trainer. Anatomically accurate, palpation is exactly the same as on a patient. The sternal notch, sternocleidomastoid, clavicle, and other supporting features make this simulator a pleasure to work with. Internal features include a replaceable muscle and bone section, subclavian, internal jugular, external jugular, and carotid. Use of a Swan-Ganz catheter is possible and changing of the internal tubing is extremely easy. The neck of the simulator is positioned to the left, making landmark identity quite easy visually. The sternal notch sinks 1-1.5 cm when palpated. All external and internal landmarks correlate to a live patient. Modified to meet ATLS and ACLS standards, this simulator has proven itself in the emergency medical field. The consultant for this project was Forrest M. ...
V KHELGI1, 2 A GUPTA1, 2,. 1Renal unit, Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland; 2Rural School of Medicine, University of Queensland Toowoomba, Queensland. Background: Chylous ascitis (CA) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients is a very rare complication. Due to its milky appearance, it can be confused with peritonitis. There are case reports of CA in patients on PD associated with drugs (calcium channel blockers, everolimus), infections (tuberculosis), malignancy and anatomic disruptions to chyle-containing lymphatic channels. We present a case of a young male who developed CA after insertion of right internal jugular Permcath and resolved completely after removal of the same with no further recurrences.. Case Report: A 23 year-old male acutely developed abdominal discomfort after right internal jugular Permcath insertion. His background includes end stage kidney disease secondary (ESKD) to CAKUT and solute failure on PD. As tenckhoff catheter was in situ, fluid was drained and sent for ...
We would like to comment on the recently published study entitled Mystery of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency: Identical Venographic and Ultrasound Findings in Patients with MS and Controls by McAuliffe and Kermode.1. The study aimed to analyze a very interesting and controversial topic that recently produced much debate in medical and patients circles. In our opinion, to achieve their goal, the authors used questionable design and methodology, which resulted in numerous limitations of their study.1. Namely, the limited number of the patients and control subjects included makes the whole series inconclusive. Data were missing about the training of actual investigators concerning chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), keeping in mind that the patients examined were their initial 30 cases.1. The authors found internal jugular vein narrowing in 8 of 9 patients without MS by use of venography, but they did not perform sonography (ultrasound) examination before ...
Looking for online definition of jugular notch in the Medical Dictionary? jugular notch explanation free. What is jugular notch? Meaning of jugular notch medical term. What does jugular notch mean?
OBJECTIVE: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is characterized by combined stenoses of the principal pathways of extracranial venous drainage, including the internal jugular veins (IJVs) and the azygous (AZY) vein, with development of collateral circles and insufficient drainage shown by increased mean transit time in cerebral magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion studies. CCSVI is strongly associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study evaluated the safety of CCSVI endovascular treatment and its influence on the clinical outcome of the associated MS. METHODS: Sixty-five consecutive patients with CCSVI, subdivided by MS clinical course into 35 with relapsing remitting (RR), 20 with secondary progressive (SP), and 10 with primary progressive (PP) MS, underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Vascular outcome measures were postoperative complications, venous pressure, and patency rate. Neurologic outcome measures were cognitive and motor ...
Where to place a central venous catheter is a decision driven mainly by individual experience and preference. The limited evidence available has not established any site as superior; the subclavian position has been reported as being less infection-prone, but more likely to cause pneumothorax, compared to other sites. A large French randomized trial adds significantly to the evidence base.. Authors of the 3SITES study randomized more than 3,000 patients in France requiring central venous catheterization to have their line placed in either the internal jugular, subclavian, or femoral position.. To increase power (i.e., to reduce the number of enrolled patients needed to confidently find an effect), the primary outcome was a composite of either a catheter related bloodstream infection, or a deep venous thrombosis at the site.. Ultrasound was only used two-thirds of the time in internal jugular line placements (vs. 16% in subclavian line placements).. Chlorhexidine antiseptic was used less than ...
Ultrasound guidance in supraclavicular subclavian vein (SCV) catheterization is a relatively new concept. Traditional infraclavicular SCV catheterization is poorly amenable to ultrasound guidance because of the overlying clavicle, which can make visualization and direct guidance difficult. Supraclavicular SCV catheterization for central line placement has several advantages: practicality in cardiopulmonary arrest, decreased incidence of central line infections, lower risk of pneumothorax, and decreased incidence of thrombosis.. The patient should be placed in a neutral supine position with or without Trendelenburg positioning. The anatomy should be surveyed with ultrasound to identify the SVC before beginning the procedure. Place a high-frequency transducer in the transverse orientation just lateral to the trachea to identify the internal jugular vein. (Image 1.). The internal jugular is typically slightly lateral to the carotid artery, is oval or triangular in shape, and may vary in size with ...
CVC Insertion Simulator II features three interchangeable pads for thorough experiential training: 1) Transparent anatomical block to gain anatomical understanding in pre-training for catheterization; 2) Landmark puncture pad for teaching three methods of CVC approaches; a) Internal jugular; b) Subclavian vein; and c) Supraclavicular; and 3) Ultrasound puncture pad for introductory training to acquire basics of ultrasound-guided puncture. Axillary vein and internal jugular vein approaches are available. CVC offers palpation, true-to-life needle tip resistance, success and failure confirmation, and cannultation with anatomically correct venous bifurcation. ...
The purpose of this article is to investigate characteristics of cine phase contrast-calculated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and velocity measures in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving standard medical treatment who had been diagnosed with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). This case-controlled, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-blinded study included 15 patients with RR MS who presented with significant stenoses (,/=50% lumen reduction on catheter venography) in the azygous or internal jugular veins. Eight patients underwent PTA in addition to medical therapy immediately following baseline assessments (case group) and seven had delayed PTA after 6 months of medical therapy alone (control group). CSF flow and velocity measures were quantified over 32 phases of the cardiac cycle by a semiautomated method. Outcomes were compared between groups at baseline and at 6 and 12 months of the ...
The purpose of this article is to investigate characteristics of cine phase contrast-calculated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and velocity measures in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving standard medical treatment who had been diagnosed with chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). This case-controlled, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-blinded study included 15 patients with RR MS who presented with significant stenoses (,/=50% lumen reduction on catheter venography) in the azygous or internal jugular veins. Eight patients underwent PTA in addition to medical therapy immediately following baseline assessments (case group) and seven had delayed PTA after 6 months of medical therapy alone (control group). CSF flow and velocity measures were quantified over 32 phases of the cardiac cycle by a semiautomated method. Outcomes were compared between groups at baseline and at 6 and 12 months of the ...
Small for size and flow syndrome (SFSF) is one of the most challenging complications following extended hepatectomy (EH). After EH, hepatic artery flow decreases and portal vein flow increases per 100 g of remnant liver volume (RLV). This causes hypoxia followed by metabolic acidosis. A correlation between acidosis and posthepatectomy liver failure has been postulated but not studied systematically in a large animal model or clinical setting. In our study, we performed stepwise liver resections on nine pigs to defined SFSF limits as follows: step 1: segment II/III resection, step 2: segment IV resection, step 3: segment V/VIII resection (RLV: 75, 50, and 25%, respectively). Blood gas values were measured before and after each step using four catheters inserted into the carotid artery, internal jugular vein, hepatic artery, and portal vein. The pH, [Formula: see text], and base excess (BE) decreased, but [Formula: see text] values increased after 75% resection in the portal and jugular veins. EH ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Image intensification - A solution for difficult guidewire insertion for central venous access. T2 - A case report. AU - Weinberg, Laurence. AU - Yii BBiomed, Matthew. AU - Li BBiomed, Michael. AU - Louis BBiomed, Maleck. AU - Lee, Dong Kyu. AU - Doolan, Laurie. PY - 2020/2. Y1 - 2020/2. N2 - Presentation of case: A 56-year old male presented for an elective redo-sternotomy, aortic valve replacement, tricuspid valve annuloplasty, and coronary artery bypass grafting. During central vascular access using a standard Seldinger technique, resistance to two spring-wire guide wires was encountered when the wires were advanced through the patients internal jugular vein. Ultrasound provided limited views of the anatomical path of the guidewires and was unable to provide visualisation of the level or cause of obstruction. We describe the application of continuous image intensification to successfully identify the anatomical location and safe circumnavigation of guidewire obstruction ...
CHAPTER 67 SINUS THROMBOSIS The transverse (sigmoid) sinus is the venous channel most frequently affected by purulent infection, and from it the disease may spread: (1) backwards to the confluens sinuum (torcular); (2) rarely forwards to the superior petrosal and cavernous sinuses; or (3) downwards to the bulb and internal jugular vein in the neck. Thrombophlebitis of a venous sinus is one of the most common of otitic intracranial complications. It occurs in both acute and chronic suppurations, although more frequently in the latter. The infection usually passes through the bone to the walls of the sinus where an extra- dural perisinus abscess may be formed. Such an extradural abscess may be present for a considerable period before the wall of the sinus succumbs and a clot is formed on the adjacent wall of the vessel. If the process continues (Fig. 189) the thrombus spreads upwards and backwards as far as the entrance of the superior petrosal sinus and forwards and downwards to the jugular bulb. ...
Vuille-Dit-Bille, R N; Dierauer, Stefan; Aufdenblatten, C A; Ramseier, Leonhard E (2014). Operative Wachstumslenkung im Kindesalter. Swiss Medical Forum:723-727.. Vuille-Dit-Bille, R N; Ha-Huy, R; Stover, J F (2012). Changes in plasma phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine are associated with significant changes in intracranial pressure and jugular venous oxygen saturation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Amino Acids, 43(3):1287-1296.. Vuille-Dit-Bille, R N; Ha-Huy, R; Tanner, M; Stover, J F (2011). Changes in calculated arterio-jugular venous glutamate difference and SjvO2 in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Minerva Anestesiologica, 77(9):870-876.. Verrey, F; Singer, D; Ramadan, T; Vuille-Dit-Bille, R N; Mariotta, L; Camargo, S M R (2009). Kidney amino acid transport. Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology (Pflugers Archiv), 458(1):53-60.. ...
Synonyms for anterior jugular lymph nodes in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for anterior jugular lymph nodes. 8 words related to lymph: bodily fluid, body fluid, liquid body substance, humour, humor, chyle, cardiovascular system, circulatory system. What are synonyms for anterior jugular lymph nodes?
Nitric oxide (NO), produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), plays key roles in the cardiovascular system, including anti-inflammatory actions. Loss of NOS/NO activity may be important in inflammation and vascular injury in early vein grafts (VG). We used a recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad.nNOS), to augment NOS activity in VG. Methods: Male New Zealand White rabbits (n=16) underwent interposition venous bypass grafting to the carotid artery using the jugular vein. Ad.nNOS (5 × 10 9pfu/ml) was instilled into the VG for 20 minutes during surgery. Experimental vessels and controls were harvested at 3 or 7 days (n=4 all groups). Vessel wet weight /length ratio was measured, and frozen sections analysed for: (1) presence of NOS by NADPH diaphorase (NADPH/d) staining; (2) expression of adhesion molecules (VCAM, ICAM) and (3) inflammatory cell markers (CD18, RAM11) by immunohistochemistry, using computer-aided image analysis; (4) intimal thickness on histology. Results: Adhesion molecule expression,
Research on venous abnormalities in MS thus far has been limited to the IJV, and little is known about extracranial venous collateralization. The extrajugular drainage system consists of the vertebral venous system; the deep cervical veins, which anatomically are paraspinal toward the heart; and the anterior and external jugular veins, which receive blood from facial and superficial areas.8 Although the presence and structure of collateral veins have been assessed by using time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics venography, flow values were not quantitatively evaluated.9-11 The purpose of this work was to examine the relation of extracranial venous anatomy and flow in a large cohort of patients with MS and healthy controls (HCs) taken from our neuroimaging data base.12 Because of the complexity of the extracranial venous system, we have classified these vessels into 3 groups based on anatomic MR information and their drainage path: primary (ie, IJV), paraspinal, and superficial. We ...
Lymph nodes are organized in groups that drain specific regions of the body. This knowledge guides the clinician to inspect particular areas of anatomy when lymphadenopathy occurs. Lymphatic drainage of the head and neck is traditionally divided into 6 regions. The most important nodes in this grouping are around the internal jugular lymph nodes. The superior aspect is termed region II; it receives lymph from the supraglottic larynx, anterior nasopharynx, and c via submental and submandibular lymph nodes (region I). The middle portion of the internal jugular chain is region III; it collects drainage from the superior hypopharynx and superior larynx via direct drainage through lymphatic capillaries. The inferior part of the internal jugular chain is region IV; it collects drainage from the inferior hypopharynx, inferior larynx, and thyroid and supraclavicular regions. Region VI sits in the anterior aspect of the neck; it contains supraclavicular, pretracheal, and thyroid nodes, which drain into ...
0134]In an embodiment, the shunt 120 can be formed of at least one tube that communicates with the flow control assembly 125. The shunt 120 can be any structure that provides a fluid pathway for blood flow. The shunt 120 can have a single lumen or it can have multiple lumens. The shunt 120 can be removably attached to the flow control assembly 125, arterial access device 110, and/or venous return device 115. Prior to use, the user can select a shunt 120 with a length that is most appropriate for use with the arterial access location and venous return location. In an embodiment, the shunt 120 can include one or more extension tubes that can be used to vary the length of the shunt 120. The extension tubes can be modularly attached to the shunt 120 to achieve a desired length. The modular aspect of the shunt 120 permits the user to lengthen the shunt 120 as needed depending on the site of venous return. For example, in some patients, the internal jugular vein IJV is small and/or tortuous. The risk ...
Lymph nodes along the course of the subclavian vein. Drains (efferent) from apical axillary nodes; infraclavicular nodes and drains into the junction of the internal jugular vein and the subclavian vein. Region drained is upper limb, most of breast, anterolateral chest wall. ...
On Wednesday I had a transjugular liver biopsy. My liver function tests have continued to stay elevated and so we need to get some information. It was done in Interventional Radiology, with sedation, and they put a plastic catheter down my jugular vein through my neck, and took measurements of the pressures inside my liver and portal vein. I have never had this kind of biopsy before, all the rest have been through the abdomen. It wasnt bad, and I was sedated. But I remember saying, ouch ouch ouch! when they removed the plastic catheter and were inserting the metal cannula (which has a hook on the end, the doctor told me- glad I didnt see that!) And vaguely remember them saying they were giving me more medicine. They use the metal hook to take a few biopsy tissue samples of the liver. Before the procedure, the doctor explained that there was a chance because I am post liver transplant with different vein hook ups than most people, that they couldnt get the samples without going through my ...
What is a procedure like?. Patients are typically under general anesthesia and are given blood thinner during a procedure utilizing an AngioVac Cannula and Circuit. The procedure can be performed either percutaneously or open. In either procedure there are two access points required-an incision is made for the AngioVac Cannula and an incision is made for the reinfusion cannula. The access points may include any combination of the femoral veins and/or internal jugular veins.. An extracorporeal bypass circuit is created outside the body consisting of an outflow line, a centrifugal pump, a filter and an inflow line. Once the AngioVac Cannula and the reinfusion cannula are inserted into the veins the centrifugal pump is activated. This creates a one-way flow that provides suction at the tip of the AngioVac Cannula.. The AngioVac Cannula has a self-expanding nitinol funnel shaped, angled tip available in either 20 degrees or 180 degrees. When the nitinol tip is deployed using the sheath, the funnel ...
Umbilical vein catheterization may be a life-saving procedure in neonates who require vascular access and resuscitation. The umbilical vein remains patent and viable for cannulation until approximately 1 week after birth.
Of the two Jugular Vein, appears on Friday and the second column Second Opinion appears every Wednesday. He also writes the ... "Jugular Vein". Times of India. 30 July 2012. Archived from the original on 16 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012. "About the ... Jugular Vein is a satirical column that skewers everything, from the mundane to the serious. Its everyday focus and travel ... Delhi Belly and other misadventures in the middle kingdom (1991) A Taste for the Jugular (1994) The Great Indian Bores (1996) ...
Aberrant course of jugular veins. Michel aplasia is associated with LAMM syndrome(labyrinthine aplasia, microtia and ...
The neck contains the larynx, trachea, pharynx, esophagus, vasculature (carotid, subclavian, and vertebral arteries; jugular, ... brachiocephalic, and vertebral veins; thyroid vessels), and nervous system anatomy (spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral ...
"Kashmir is 'jugular vein' of Pakistan: President - Times of India". The Times of India. 23 March 2016. Retrieved 9 April 2018 ... "Kashmir jugular vein of Pakistan: Durrani". DAWN.COM. 16 December 2006. Retrieved 9 April 2018. Ahmed, Adeel (20 July 2016). " ... "jugular vein of Pakistan" and a currently disputed territory whose final status must be determined by the people of Kashmir. ...
Minister of Shipping Hurwitz, Samuel J (15 Oct 2013). "Chapter XI - The "Jugular Vein": Shipping". State Intervention in Great ...
This drains via the internal jugular veins. The flow of blood can cause the vein walls to vibrate creating a humming noise ... The difference is easily detected by placing a finger on the jugular vein when listening to the heart, which will abolish or ...
the internal jugular vein. the vagus nerve. part of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. the deep cervical lymph nodes. The carotid ... artery lies medial to the internal jugular vein, and the vagus nerve is situated posteriorly between the two vessels. In the ... It merges with the axillary sheath when it reaches the subclavian vein. The four major structures contained in the carotid ...
About 11 lb (5 kg) of pressure is required to compress the carotid artery; 4.4 lb (2 kg) for the jugular veins; and at least 15 ...
The internal jugular vein 3. The deep cervical lymph nodes 4. The 10th cranial nerve ( Vagus Nerve ) 5. The submandibular gland ... the internal jugular vein, and the vagus nerve, separated from the external carotid by the Styloglossus and Stylopharyngeus, ... superficial to which is the anterior facial vein, while imbedded in the gland is the facial artery and its glandular branches. ... 6. The submandibular lymph nodes 7. The Facial artery and vein 8. The 12th cranial nerve ( Hypoglossal Nerve ) This article ...
The lingual veins drain into the internal jugular vein. The floor of the mouth also receives its blood supply from the lingual ... The oral mucosa is very thin underneath the tongue, and is underlain by a plexus of veins. The sublingual route takes advantage ...
... "cutting the band's jugular vein". Following his departure from Ultravox Cann recorded a solo demo which was turned down by ...
The killer cut her jugular vein. Throughout September 2015, there were at least three more attacks on two men and one woman, ...
... and a cut to his jugular vein. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums said the attack was the first time a visitor had been ...
In this vein, the bacteria cause the formation of a thrombus containing these bacteria. Furthermore, the internal jugular vein ... Spread of infection to the nearby internal jugular vein provides a gateway for the spread of bacteria through the bloodstream. ... Liver and kidney function tests are often abnormal.[citation needed] Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein can be displayed ... Lemierre's syndrome refers to infectious thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. It most often develops as a ...
He missed his jugular vein and survived. As a way of giving thanks for his recovery, he created a large painting of the " ...
One cut straight through her jugular vein. He then chased her into the corridor where Susan Francis (Head of Languages), ...
They follow the anterior jugular veins either side of the midline. They drain into the deep cervical lymph nodes on the right ...
It is limited: the rear: the jugular vein; internal below and beyond: the facial vein; above and beyond: the hypoglossal nerve ... The triangle of Farabeuf is bounded by the internal jugular vein (posterior), common facial vein (anterior-inferior) and ...
"Once more Hitler goes for the jugular vein. He gets hold of my fanny and begins to squeeze and pinch, and hug me up. And he ...
Examination of the jugular veins may reveal elevated pressure (jugular venous distention). Examination of the lungs may reveal ... Sources of these disturbances are either automatic foci, often localized at one of the pulmonary veins, or a small number of ... Most commonly, CA electrically isolates the left atrium from the pulmonary veins, where most of the abnormal electrical ... favoring re-entries from the pulmonary veins. The rate of AF in smokers is 1.4 times higher than in non-smokers. However, snus ...
Paris (Mémoires), 1867, 2 sér., 4, 3-27 - Movements and noises that occur in the jugular veins. Du Rhythme cardiaque appelé ... These tests included analysis of jugular venous waves, heart gallop rhythm research, blood pressure testing and auscultatory ...
In both cases the jugular vein must be severed. Rules as to the character of the incision follow. Then comes a series of rules ... sticking the knife in under the veins), "hagramah" (cutting in another than the proper part of the animal), and "ikkur" ( ...
... the right internal jugular vein diverges from the artery. On the left side, however, the left internal jugular vein approaches ... it is also crossed by the superior and middle thyroid veins (which end in the internal jugular vein); descending in front of ... which is derived from the deep cervical fascia and encloses also the internal jugular vein and vagus nerve, the vein lying ... and the middle thyroid vein a little below the level of the cricoid cartilage; the anterior jugular vein crosses the artery ...
Blood samples were withdrawn from the contralateral jugular vein. Male and female calves weighing between 110 and 140 kg were ... Three male beagle dogs, weighing about 22 kg each, were dosed with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg at the cephalic vein. Blood samples were ... drawn from the same vein in the opposite leg. Meanwhile, urine was collected by catheterization. Pigs, five or six male and ...
The bacteria then invade the peritonsillar blood vessels where they can spread to the internal jugular vein.[4] In this vein, ... Lemierre's syndrome refers to infectious thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein.[1] It most often develops as a ... Furthermore, the internal jugular vein becomes inflamed. This septic thrombophlebitis can give rise to septic microemboli[9] ... Spread of infection to the nearby internal jugular vein provides a gateway for the spread of bacteria through the bloodstream. ...
Internal jugular vein in the carotid sheath. *Accessory nerve (XI). *Hypoglossal (XII) ... This area includes the jugular and hypoglossal canal and the foramen lacerum (through which the internal carotid artery passes ...
A man with congestive heart failure and marked jugular venous distension. External jugular vein marked by an arrow. ... 2O at the right atrium, jugular vein distension, positive abdominojugular test, and weight loss of more than 4.5 kg in 5 days ... Jugular venous pressure is frequently assessed as a marker of fluid status, which can be accentuated by eliciting hepatojugular ... This increase in volume or pressure backs up to the left atrium and then to the pulmonary veins. Increased volume or pressure ...
The jugular vein of the victim was ruptured causing blood loss and unconsciousness. The guard was taken to Jinnah Hospital for ...
Pain is felt due to the pressure applied to the internal jugular vein. Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid ...
Blood was drawn peripherally in a majority of patients, but a central line to jugular/subclavian/femoral veins may be used in ... There is now a greater appreciation of the generalized cellular injury and obstruction in hepatic vein sinuses, and hepatic VOD ... The most common severe adverse reactions were pulmonary edema/deep vein thrombosis, splenic rupture, and myocardial infarction ...
Talk:Anterior intercostal veins. *Talk:Anterior interosseous artery. *Talk:Anterior jugular vein ...
... jugular vein. Like it happened for his teacher with the anti-rabies vaccine, Roux needed to test the effectiveness of the ...
... where it is inserted through the skin at the chest and tunnels through to insert into the jugular vein in the neck ... Any accessible vein can be used although arm and hand veins are used most commonly, with leg and foot veins used to a much ... Central IV lines have their catheters that are advanced through a vein and empty into a large central vein (a vein within the ... The most convenient site is often the arm, especially the veins on the back of the hand, or the median cubital vein at the ...
The lingual veins, drain into the internal jugular vein. The floor of the mouth also receives its blood supply from the lingual ... Vein. lingual. Nerve. Sensory: Anterior 2/3: lingual nerve & chorda tympani Posterior 1/3: Glossopharyngeal nerve (IX) Motor ... The oral mucosa is very thin underneath the tongue, and is underlain by a plexus of veins. The sublingual route takes advantage ...
முதன்மைக் கட்டுரை: Jugular vein thrombosis. கழுத்துச் சிரை குழலியக்குருதியுறைமை என்பது தொற்றுநோய், சிரை வழி செலுத்தப்படும் ... முதன்மைக் கட்டுரை: Renal vein thrombosis. ஒரு குழலியக்குருதியுறைமை சிறுநீரக சிரையைத் தடை செய்வதே சிறுநீரக சிரைப் ... முதன்மைக் கட்டுரை: Portal vein thrombosis. வாயிற்சிரை குழலியக்குருதியுறைமை என்பது சிரையிய படிம உறைவின் ஒரு வகையாகும்; இது ... "Review article: portal vein thrombosis -- new insights into aetiology and management". Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics ...
... guided catheters which are passed into the hepatic vein either through the internal jugular vein or the femoral vein. ... Type 2 HRS is thought to be part of a spectrum of illness associated with increased pressures in the portal vein circulation, ... Hepatorenal syndrome usually affects individuals with cirrhosis and elevated pressures in the portal vein system (termed portal ... which is a small shunt placed to reduce blood pressure in the portal vein. Some patients may require hemodialysis to support ...
... internal jugular vein) ସ‌ହିତ ଓ ଇନଫିରିଅର ଥାଇରଏଡ ଯାଇ ବ୍ରାକିଓସେଫାଲିକ ଶିରା (brachiocephalic vein) ସ‌ହିତ ସଂଯୁକ୍ତ ହୋଇଥାଏ ।[୪] ...
The term Jugulum is reflected both by the internal and external jugular veins, which pass through the Jugulum. ...
... with the internal jugular vein and vagus nerve, the nerve lying on a plane posterior to the artery; medially, with the pharynx ... and hypoglossal nerves lie between the artery and the internal jugular vein. Unlike the external carotid artery, the internal ... and is surrounded by a number of small veins and by filaments of the carotid plexus, derived from the ascending branch of the ... extends from the carotid bifurcation until it enters the carotid canal in the skull anterior to the jugular foramen. At its ...
eMedicine Article on Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis by Dr. Dale K. Mueller,http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic2762.htm ... Webster GJ; Burroughs AK, Riordan SM (January 2005)։ «Review article: portal vein thrombosis - new insights into aetiology and ... Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Promote Deep Vein Thrombosis in Mice.»։ Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH։ PMID ... low molecular weight heparin and physical methods for preventing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following surgery ...
... the jugular arch, which joins the two anterior jugular veins, sits in front of the upper part of the trachea. The sternohyoid ... The upper part of trachea receives and drains blood through the inferior thyroid arteries and veins;[2] the lower trachea ... and the inferior thyroid veins below it.[2] In front of the lower trachea lies the manubrium of the sternum, the remnants of ... and the left brachiocephalic vein. The deep cardiac plexus and lymph nodes are also positioned in front of the lower trachea.[2 ...
... is a large node found in the proximity of where the posterior belly of the digastric muscle crosses the internal jugular vein. ...
Veins *Large collecting vessels, such as the subclavian vein, the jugular vein, the renal vein and the iliac vein. ... In all veins apart from the pulmonary vein, the saturation of hemoglobin is about 75%.[citation needed] (The values are ... The arteries and veins have three layers. The middle layer is thicker in the arteries than it is in the veins: *The inner layer ... The outer layer is Tunica adventitia and the thickest layer in veins. It is entirely made of connective tissue. It also ...
... internal jugular vein and vagus) and in front of the cervical viscera (larynx, oesophagus and pharynx). ...
Venous pressure is the vascular pressure in a vein or in the atria of the heart. It is much less than arterial pressure, with ... The jugular venous pressure (JVP) is the indirectly observed pressure over the venous system. It can be useful in the ... Baroreceptors in low pressure receptor zones (mainly in the venae cavae and the pulmonary veins, and in the atria) result in ... The portal venous pressure is the blood pressure in the portal vein. It is normally 5-10 mmHg[37] ...
pulmonary veins) → left atrium (atrial appendage) → mitral valve → left ventricle → aortic valve (aortic sinus) → (aorta and ... to relax very quickly after each contraction so as to quickly fill with the oxygenated blood flowing from the pulmonary veins. ... the typical five times greater pressure workload this chamber performs while accepting blood returning from the pulmonary veins ...
... the internal jugular vein or the femoral vein. Subclavian and jugular line placements may result in pneumothorax (air in the ... A PICC is inserted in a peripheral vein in the arm, such as the cephalic vein, basilic vein or brachial vein, and then advanced ... First described in 1975,[1] it is an alternative to central venous catheters in major veins such as the subclavian vein, ... This wire is provided to stiffen the (otherwise very flexible) line so it can be threaded through the veins. The wire is ...
en:Deep vein thrombosis (27) → 심부정맥 혈전증 *en:Dehydration (55) → 탈수 *en:Delayed puberty (8) → 사춘기지연 ... en:Jugular venous pressure (6). *en:Kaposi's sarcoma (36). *en:Ketamine (53) → 케타민 ...
Cardiac tamponade presents with dyspnea, tachycardia, elevated jugular venous pressure, and pulsus paradoxus.[16] The gold ... Risk factors include deep vein thrombosis, recent surgery, cancer, and previous thromboembolism.[2] It must always be ...
... where it is inserted through the skin at the chest and tunnels through to insert into the jugular vein in the neck ... Any accessible vein can be used although arm and hand veins are used most commonly, with leg and foot veins used to a much ... Central IV lines have their catheters that are advanced through a vein and empty into a large central vein (a vein within the ... A peripheral line is used on peripheral veins (the veins in the arms, hands, legs and feet). This is the most common type of IV ...
The jugular venous pulse tracing demonstrates a prominent a wave without a c or v wave being observed. The phonocardiograms ( ... Veins. Inflammation. *Phlebitis. Venous thrombosis /. Thrombophlebitis. *primarily lower limb *Deep vein thrombosis ... Phonocardiogram and jugular venous pulse tracing from a middle-aged man with pulmonary hypertension caused by cardiomyopathy. ... Signs of systemic congestion resulting from right-sided heart failure include jugular venous distension, ascites, and ...
Blood eventually enters the internal jugular vein. PhlebologyEdit. Look up phlebology in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... the great cardiac vein, the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein, the posterior vein of the left ventricle, and the vein ... the middle cardiac vein, the small cardiac vein, the smallest cardiac veins, and the anterior cardiac veins. Coronary veins ... Heart veins that go directly to the right atrium: the anterior cardiac veins, the smallest cardiac veins (Thebesian veins).[4] ...
The same response could be produced by injecting extract of jejunum mucosa into the jugular vein, showing that some factor in ...
External jugular vein. *24. Internal jugular vein. *25. Vertebral arteries. *26. Common carotid arteries ... ಶ್ವಾಸಕೋಶದಿಂದ ಹೊರಟ ಶುದ್ಧ ರಕ್ತವು ಶ್ವಾಸ ಶುದ್ಧರಕ್ತನಾಳಗಳ (the pulmonary vein) ಮೂಲಕ ಎಡ ಹೃತ್ಕರಣವನ್ನು ಹೋಗಿ ಸೇರುತ್ತದೆ.[೧೨] ... Pulmonary Vein; 4. Mitral Valve; 5. Aortic Valve; 6.Left Ventricle;7.Right Ventricle;; 8. Left Atrium;; 9. Right Atrium;; 10. ...
... and valves in veins, breathing, and pumping from contraction of skeletal muscles also influence blood pressure in veins.[23] ... Veins are described as the "capacitance vessels" of the body because over 70% of the blood volume resides in the venous system ... The capillaries connect to venules, and the blood then travels back through the network of veins to the right heart. The micro- ... Veins are more compliant than arteries and expand to accommodate changing volume.[22] ...
The superior and middle thyroid veins drain into the internal jugular vein, and the inferior thyroid vein drains into the ... Each parathyroid vein drains into the superior, middle and inferior thyroid veins. ... "a small compact yellow glandular body attached to the thyroid at the point where the veins emerged". The glands were first ... brachiocephalic vein. Lymphatic vessels from the parathyroid glands drain into deep cervical lymph nodes and paratracheal lymph ...
Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... that form in the deep veins of the legs or in the pelvic veins. Nevertheless, they can progress to the deep veins through the ... Since the veins return blood to the heart, if a piece of a blood clot formed in a vein breaks off it can be transported to the ... Renal vein thrombosis (thrombosis of the veins of the kidneys. Parodoxical embolism[edit]. Systemic embolism of venous origin ...
One of two jugular veins that collect the blood from the brain, the superficial parts of the face, and the neck. [WP,unvetted]. ... Vein which receives many veins draining the palate, brain, and the orbital, nasal, and auditory regions.[AAO] ... internal jugular vein. Go to external page http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/UBERON_0001586 Copy ...
The right external jugular vein has a somewhat direct line with the internal jugular veins, making it often easier to assess ... Its formed where the posterior auricular vein and the retromandibular veins posterior separation meet. This vein gets ... The parotid gland is where the external jugular vein starts. ... The subclavian vein receives the external jugular veins ...
Internal jugular vein abnormalities are a newly identified risk factor for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, and color Doppler ... Cite this: Jugular Vein Abnormalities Linked to Venous Sinus Thrombosis - Medscape - Jun 07, 2012. ... June 7, 2012 (Lisbon, Portugal) - Internal jugular vein (IJV) abnormalities are a newly identified risk factor for cerebral ... at its influx into the innominate vein (J1), at the point of the superior thyroid vein influx into the IJV (J2), and at the ...
Jugular vein definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up ... jugular vein. in Science. jugular vein. [jŭg′yə-lər]. *Either of the two large veins on either side of the neck in mammals that ... any of three large veins of the neck that return blood to the heart from the head and face ... jugular vein. in Medicine. jugular vein. n.. *Any of the three jugular veins: anterior, external, and internal. ...
Definition of internal jugular vein. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... internal jugular vein. Definition: main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura ... with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. ...
The left and right external jugular veins drain into the subclavian veins. The internal jugular veins join with the subclavian ... There is also another minor jugular vein, the anterior jugular vein, draining the submaxillary region. The jugular venous ... The jugular veins are veins that take deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. There are ... The jugular vein is the subject of a popular idiom in the English language, deriving from its status as the vein most ...
Jugular vein ectasia is a venous anomaly that commonly presents itself as a unilateral neck swelling in children and adults. It ... Gendeh, BS; Dhillon MK; Hamzah M. (March 1994). "Bilateral internal jugular vein ectasia: a report of two cases". J Laryngol ... is rare to have bilateral neck swelling due to internal jugular vein ectasia. ...
According to HealthGrades.com, jugular vein distension can be caused... ... Distension of the jugular veins results in a visible bulging of the neck, and it is usually a sign of serious illness or trauma ... Distension of the jugular veins results in a visible bulging of the neck, and it is usually a sign of serious illness or trauma ... What vein are intravenous injections most often given to?. A: Due to its accessibility, the most common vein used as the ...
The jugular veins are part of the circulatory drainage system for the head, carrying blood to the lungs for resupply with fresh ... The internal jugular vein drains most of the cerebral veins and outer portions of the face, while the external jugular vein ... comes from the front to join the external jugular before it connects to the internal jugular. The external jugular vein ... external jugular vein forms where the retro-mandibular and posterior auricular veins from the head converge, within the parotid ...
Among neck veins, aneurysms of the external jugular vein are extremely uncommon. We present a case of a woman with a history of ... External Jugular Vein Aneurysm Presenting as a Cervical Mass. Eleni E. Drakonaki,1 Emmanouil K. Symvoulakis,2 Anthoula ... Saccular aneurysms of the external jugular vein are uncommon and only rarely lead to serious complications. Access to ... B-mode and Doppler ultrasound examination revealed a saccular dilatation of the external jugular vein, suggesting a ...
Internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis is a rare complication in tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. We report a case of 26- ... Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis in Isolated Tuberculous Cervical Lymphadenopathy. Sanjay Khaladkar, Avadhesh Chauhan, Arijit ... The association between tuberculosis and deep vein thrombosis is rare. Awareness of IJV thrombosis in isolated cervical ...
See how others experience right internal jugular vein stenosis. Join the community to connect with others like you and learn ...
jugular vein engorgement synonyms, jugular vein engorgement pronunciation, jugular vein engorgement translation, English ... n. 1. A jugular vein. 2. The most vital part: a strategic attack aimed at the enemys... ... dictionary definition of jugular vein engorgement. adj. Of, relating to, or located in the region of the neck or throat. ... jugular. (redirected from jugular vein engorgement). Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.. Related to jugular vein ...
... it was discovered that she has a third Jugular vein and it... ... Google.com and type in jugular vein or swelling of jugular vein ... The only thing I could suggest is to go to a search site like Google.com and type in jugular vein or swelling of jugular vein ... it was discovered that she has a third Jugular vein and it is this extra vein that recently started to swell out or bulge when ... it was discovered that she has a third Jugular vein and it is this extra vein that recently started to swell out or bulge when ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world treatment information on Bilateral jugular vein stents at PatientsLikeMe. 0 patients ... bipolar I disorder or psoriasis currently have Bilateral jugular vein stents. ... What is Bilateral jugular vein stents?. Category: Surgeries false There are two jugular veins on either side of the neck; the ... internal veins are larger than the external veins. Stents placed during angioplasty procedure keeps the vessel or tissue in an ...
Any of several large vein... See the dictionary meaning, pronunciation, and sentence examples. ... Most people chose this as the best definition of jugular-vein: ... Either of the two large veins on either side of the neck in ... anatomy) Any of several veins on each side of the neck, which drain the brain, face and neck of deoxygenated blood. ... Either of two large veins in the neck carrying blood back from the head to the heart. ...
... anywhere from the intracranial IJ vein to the junction of the IJ and the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. It ... vein thrombosis refers to an intraluminal thrombus occurring ... Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis) and Internal Jugular Vein ... Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis Clinical Presentation. Updated: Mar 27, 2020 * Author: Dale K Mueller, MD; Chief Editor: ... Isolated internal jugular vein thrombosis: risk factors and natural history. Vasc Med. 2002 Aug. 7 (3):177-9. [Medline]. [Full ...
... youre looking at the external jugular vein. When the jugular vein is visible, its known as jugular vein distention (JVD). ... The internal jugular vein is more reliable than the external jugular vein because the internal blood vessel is in more of a ... Facial vein. Medically reviewed by the Healthline Medical Network. The facial vein, also referred to as the anterior vein of ... As a result, the chambers cant fill with blood properly, so blood can back up into veins, including the jugular veins. ...
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... anywhere from the intracranial IJ vein to the junction of the IJ and the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. It ... vein thrombosis refers to an intraluminal thrombus occurring ... Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis) and Internal Jugular Vein ... For femoral vein insertion, a jugular insertion kit is used to facilitate orientation; for jugular vein insertion, a femoral ... Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis Treatment & Management. Updated: Mar 26, 2018 * Author: Dale K Mueller, MD; Chief Editor: ...
We appreciate Woodhouses interest in our article1 and agree that teaching of the examination of the jugular venous pulsation ...
... Jug band music is one of the most original and distinctive of American musical genres. In the short ...
Alternate veins for collecting blood include the transverse facial vein (A), cephalic vein (B), and the lateral thoracic vein ( ... alternate veins for collecting blood include the transverse facial vein, cephalic vein, and the lateral thoracic vein (Fig. 5-1 ... To avoid excessive venipuncture of the jugular veins of horses prone to venous thrombosis (e.g., horses with colitis) ... The lateral thoracic vein and cephalic vein (arrows) are prominent on this Belgium mare, but for some horses, the lateral ...
Palabras clave : External jugular vein; Internal jugular vein; Anatomical variations. · resumen en Español · texto en Inglés · ... we detected an abnormal communication of the external jugular vein and the internal jugular vein, in a 45 year male cadaver. ... LALWANI, Rekha; RANA, Kum Kum; DAS, Srijit y KHAN, Riyazul Qamar. Communication of the External and Internal Jugular Veins: A ... The external jugular vein, which traverses the sternocleidomastoid muscle superficially, is known to exhibit variations in its ...
... jugular veins explanation free. What is jugular veins? Meaning of jugular veins medical term. What does jugular veins mean? ... Looking for online definition of jugular veins in the Medical Dictionary? ... jugular vein distention. see jugular vein engorgement (below).. External jugular vein in the dog. By permission from McCurnin D ... jugular veins. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to jugular veins: internal jugular vein ...
... jugular vein explanation free. What is jugular vein? Meaning of jugular vein medical term. What does jugular vein mean? ... Looking for online definition of jugular vein in the Medical Dictionary? ... Related to jugular vein: external jugular vein, jugular vein distention. jugular vein. n.. Any of several large veins of the ... 2) External jugular vein; vena jugularis externa [NA6]. (3) Internal jugular vein; vena jugularis interna [NA6].. jugular vein ...
"Jugular Veins" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Jugular Veins" was a major or minor topic of these ... "Jugular Veins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... High incidence of late infective endocarditis in bovine jugular vein valved conduits. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2018 08; 156(2 ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Jugular Veins" by people in Profiles. ...
Rare Malpositions Following Insertion of the Left Jugular Vein Catheterization: Case Reports and Literature Review. DOI: ... Read more about Rare Malpositions Following Insertion of the Left Jugular Vein Catheterization: Case Reports and Literature ...
ANEURYSM OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY TREATED BY LIGATURE OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY AND INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN Br Med J 1921; 1 : ... ANEURYSM OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY TREATED BY LIGATURE OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY AND INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN. Br Med J 1921; 1 ... ANEURYSM OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY TREATED BY LIGATURE OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY AND INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN ... ANEURYSM OF EXTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY TREATED BY LIGATURE OF COMMON CAROTID ARTERY AND INTERNAL JUGULAR VEIN ...
Jugular Vein Sampling in Cushing Disease John L. Doppman, MD; Lynnette Nieman, MD; Edward Oldfield, MD ... Doppman JL, Nieman L, Oldfield E. Jugular Vein Sampling in Cushing Disease. Ann Intern Med. 1998;129:424. doi: 10.7326/0003- ... was to point out that the positive jugular vein samples were lower and more tightly clustered than the positive petrosal vein ... with surgically proven Cushing disease had positive findings on jugular vein sampling. Our intention in highlighting and ...
  • June 7, 2012 (Lisbon, Portugal) - Internal jugular vein (IJV) abnormalities are a newly identified risk factor for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), a new study shows. (medscape.com)
  • Nineteen (61.3%) patients had annulus stenoses, 9 (29.0%) had hypoplastic IJVs, 2 (6.5%) had a thrombosis in the IJV, and 1 (3.2%) had an anomalous valve within the vein. (medscape.com)
  • Cite this: Jugular Vein Abnormalities Linked to Venous Sinus Thrombosis - Medscape - Jun 07, 2012. (medscape.com)
  • Internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis is a rare complication in tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. (hindawi.com)
  • The association between tuberculosis and deep vein thrombosis is rare. (hindawi.com)
  • The symptoms and signs of internal jugular (IJ) vein thrombosis are often very subtle, making it easy to overlook the diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Internal jugular, subclavian, and axillary deep venous thrombosis and the risk of pulmonary embolism. (medscape.com)
  • Tovi F, Fliss DM, Gatot A, Hertzanu Y. Septic jugular thrombosis with abscess formation. (medscape.com)
  • Fuhrman T, Balatbat J, Frakes J, Metz R. Internal jugular thrombosis causing increased intracranial pressure and upper airway edema. (medscape.com)
  • Guidance for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. (medscape.com)
  • Sheikh MA, Topoulos AP, Deitcher SR. Isolated internal jugular vein thrombosis: risk factors and natural history. (medscape.com)
  • Uncomplicated cases of internal jugular (IJ) vein thrombosis seldom require surgical intervention. (medscape.com)
  • Rare indications for a superior vena cava (SVC) filter are similar to those of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremity when upper-extremity DVT is associated with an IJ vein thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Once a diagnosis of IJ vein thrombosis is made, consideration should be given to initiating anticoagulant therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Clearly, many patients do well without serious effects, as evidenced by the frequency with which IJ vein thrombosis is underdiagnosed. (medscape.com)
  • A later retrospective study demonstrated PE rates of 0.5% and 2.4% for isolated IJ vein thrombosis and combined subclavian/axillary vein and IJ vein thrombosis, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • Although surgical intervention is rarely necessary for uncomplicated cases, IJ vein thrombosis associated with a deep neck infection calls for drainage of any fluid collections and debridement of all infected tissue. (medscape.com)
  • Internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis is a rare vascular event. (medworm.com)
  • Introduction Oral anticoagulant therapy is widely used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, or for the prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (Raj et al. (medworm.com)
  • Here we present two cases of jugular vein thrombosis in burn patients, with diagnosis, risk factor analysis, and treatment approaches. (dovepress.com)
  • Severely burned patients have high risk of deep vein thrombosis occurrence due to multiple surgeries. (dovepress.com)
  • Once deep vein thrombosis is detected, a wide ultrasonography helps to find other thrombosis sites. (dovepress.com)
  • A technique using a single needlestick to place a tunneled central venous catheter in the jugular vein is being advocated for these fragile patients to preserve upper extremity veins, to avoid femoral vein placement, and to potentially reduce the risk of venous thrombosis. (appliedradiology.com)
  • By theoretically reducing the risks of catheter infection by avoiding the diaper area and thrombosis by using larger veins," the authors write, "it may be preferable in certain patient populations," such for whom placement of femoral central lines or PICCs is not preferable. (appliedradiology.com)
  • The authors also recommend that additional studies be conducted to evaluate if tunneled jugular venous access reduces the rate of venous thrombosis, chronic venous occlusion, and central line infection. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein is a relatively rare condition that can be induced by a variety of mechanical injuries. (bmj.com)
  • However, we recently came across a case of internal jugular vein (IJV) and cerebral sinus thrombosis after shiatsu massage of the neck. (bmj.com)
  • In addition, MRI of the neck with and without enhancement revealed thrombosis of the right IJV, starting from the junction with the right subclavian vein (see fig 1). (bmj.com)
  • Middle panel: MR image of the neck (A) T1-weighted, (B) T2-weighted, (C) post enhancement T1-weighted, and (D) coronal T2-weighted showing right internal jugular vein thrombosis without other structural abnormalities (arrows). (bmj.com)
  • Sonographic diagnosis of subclavian and internal jugular vein thrombosis. (harvard.edu)
  • rupture, and blockage by blood clots ( thrombosis thrombosis , obstruction of an artery or vein by a blood clot (thrombus). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • There was right internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis extending to involve right distal sigmoid sinus and right cavernous sinus. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • Thrombosis from IJV may extend inferiorly upto subclavian vein and superiorly upto cavernous, sigmoid or transverse sinuses. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • While the examination, lab work, and radiography were non-diagnostic, a bedside ultrasound revealed large internal jugular vein thrombosis as the cause of the patient's symptoms. (springermedizin.de)
  • Prompt diagnosis of internal jugular vein thrombosis is critical. (springermedizin.de)
  • This case illustrates the value of bedside ultrasound in the early diagnosis of internal jugular vein thrombosis in a patient with an initially non-diagnostic workup. (springermedizin.de)
  • Leibman Y, Ayalon M, Steiner IP (2009) Internal jugular venous thrombosis after in vitro fertilization. (springermedizin.de)
  • De Casso C, Ghosh S, Timms M, Morar P (2005) Superior mediastinal and internal jugular venous thrombosis presenting to the otolaryngologist. (springermedizin.de)
  • Baarslag HJ, Koopman MM, Reekers JA, van Beek EJ (2004) Diagnosis and management of deep vein thrombosis of the upper extremity: a review. (springermedizin.de)
  • Therapeutic anticoagulation (eg, for pulmonary embolism) increases the risk of bleeding with internal jugular cannulation, but this must be balanced against the increased risk of thrombosis (eg, stroke) if anticoagulation is reversed. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Results of the ultrasound performed about two months into the mission revealed a suspected obstructive left internal jugular venous thrombosis (blood clot) in one astronaut. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Internal jugular venous thrombosis has most often been associated with cancer, a central venous catheter, or ovarian hyperstimulation. (scitechdaily.com)
  • OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with associated elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is a rare complication of central venous catheterization but has not been reported as a result of blunt trauma. (thisisms.com)
  • CONCLUSION: We conclude that traumatic jugular vein thrombosis can be associated with significant elevation in ICP and that treatment with an endovascular stent can affect the rapid correction of intracranial hypertension in patients who are candidates for anticoagulation. (thisisms.com)
  • We present a case of a woman with a history of prior internal jugular vein catheterization who presented at a rural primary health care unit with a nontender progressively enlarging swelling in the right supraclavicular region. (hindawi.com)
  • The knowledge of both normal and abnormal anatomy of the superficial veins of the neck may be important for clinicians performing catheterization and surgeons operating in the region of the neck. (scielo.cl)
  • We hypothesize that corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulation will increase ACTH production from corticotroph adenomas so that the diagnostic information from jugular venous sampling would be equivalent to that obtained by catheterization of the petrosal sinuses. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Effect of the bevel direction of puncture needle on success rate and complications during internal jugular vein catheterization. (nih.gov)
  • Artery puncture and hematoma formation are the most common immediate complications during internal jugular vein catheterization. (nih.gov)
  • This study was performed to assess whether the bevel-down approach of the puncture needle decreases the incidence of posterior venous wall damage and hematoma formation during internal jugular vein catheterization. (nih.gov)
  • Three hundred thirty-eight patients for scheduled for thoracic surgery requiring central venous catheterization in the right internal jugular vein. (nih.gov)
  • Patients requiring internal jugular vein catheterization were enrolled and randomized to either the bevel-down group (n = 169) or the bevel-up group (n = 169). (nih.gov)
  • The internal jugular vein was assessed cross-sectionally and longitudinally after catheterization to identify any complications. (nih.gov)
  • The bevel-down approach of the right internal jugular vein may decrease the incidence of posterior venous wall damage and hematoma formation compared with the bevel-up approach, which implicates a reduced probability of carotid artery puncture with the bevel-down approach during internal jugular vein catheterization. (nih.gov)
  • To evaluate the effect of a 2-stage approach to the internal jugular vein when performing a central venous catheterization compared to the traditional one stage approach on the incidence of hematoma formation and success rate. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Ultrasound (US)-guided central venous catheterization is now considered standard of care according to recent clinical evidence, at least considering jugular vein approach. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Comparison of ultrasound-guided and landmark-based techniques for central venous catheterization via the external jugular vein in healthy anesthetized dogs. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Echogenic Technology Improves Cannula Visibility during Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization via a Transverse Approach. (biomedsearch.com)
  • See also Vascular Access , Central Venous Catheterization , and How To Do Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation . (merckmanuals.com)
  • These two reported fatal arterial complications during ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein add to other publications of complications after central vein catheterization. (springermedizin.at)
  • The internal jugular veins are used as a site for central vein catheterization. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Three-step method for ultrasound-guided central vein catheterization. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Right Internal Jugular Vein (RIJV) catheterization may be collapsed by the advancement of the needle and the pressure from ultrasonic probe, and the sutures are needed to fix the catheters after RIJV catheterization. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Central venous catheterization is an important means of clinical infusion and monitoring, in which the Right Internal Jugular Vein (RIJV) catheterization is mainly employed [ 1 , 2 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • STM not only maintains the vein size but also prevents the vein from collapsing during catheterization. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Due to trauma from a fall to the right side and previously failed catheterization attempts at the left subclavian and femoral veins, the left internal jugular vein was accessed. (cureus.com)
  • The jugular veins are veins that take deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, the left and right brachiocephalic veins join to form the superior vena cava, which delivers deoxygenated blood to the right atrium of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • They bring blood from your head to the superior vena cava, which is the largest vein in the upper body. (healthline.com)
  • The external jugular vein empties into the subclavian vein, and the internal jugular vein joins it to form the brachiocephalic vein, which carries the blood to the superior vena cava, where it continues to the heart. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Ultrasound-guided cannulation of the internal jugular vein uses real-time (dynamic) ultrasound to guide venipuncture and a guidewire (Seldinger technique) to thread a central venous catheter through the internal jugular vein and into the superior vena cava. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Inhibition of reflux of blood from the superior vena cava into the internal jugular vein by this valve is the most plausible cause of this disparity. (sportsterandme.com)
  • the internal jugular veins join with the subclavian veins to form the brachiocephalic veins, which join to form the superior vena cava. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The size of the external jugular veins and relative proximity to the superior vena cava compared to other common IV access points makes them useful for administering large volumes of fluid or blood in patients with traumatic injuries. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The brachiocephalic veins from both sides of the body merge to form a large short vein called the superior vena cava. (wisegeekhealth.com)
  • A large hollow tube is threaded into the internal jugular vein and advanced to the opening of the superior vena cava. (wisegeekhealth.com)
  • Given the stable hemodynamics, another internal jugular vein puncture was completed via the advancement of the guide wire through the right femoral vein [Figure 1]c, and a similar catheter was inserted. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • After identifying the right internal jugular vein with ultrasound imaging, a double-lumen central venous catheter was inserted using the modified Seldinger technique. (nih.gov)
  • The deep vein catheter should be carefully performed. (dovepress.com)
  • After the child is placed in the 45-degree lateral decubitus position, ultrasound is used to guide the needle over the shoulder through a 4-5 cm subcutaneous tract prior to entering the internal jugular vein thus creating a tunnel through which the catheter is placed. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Only one jugular catheter was removed more than 7 days following its placement, out of concern for infection. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Placement of an intravenous catheter in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein for central venous pressure determination, chemotherapy, hemodialysis, or hyperalimentation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Right internal jugular vein haemodialysis catheter placement was performed. (hkmj.org)
  • An internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC) or a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is usually preferred to a subclavian CVC (which has a higher risk of bleeding and pneumothorax) or a femoral CVC (which has a higher risk of infection). (merckmanuals.com)
  • ABSTRACT We report a case of peripherally inserted central catheter PICC migration and perforation of the left internal jugular vein in a home health setting in an 80-year-old female. (sportsterandme.com)
  • the external or internal jugular vein for placement of a short peripheral catheter or for placement of a central venous catheter. (sportsterandme.com)
  • Once in place, the suture is used to anchor the catheter securely to the vein. (hilltoplabs.com)
  • Ultrasonographically guided insertion of a 15-cm catheter into the deep brachial or basilic vein in patients with difficult intravenous access. (semanticscholar.org)
  • On chest radiography for confirmation, the left internal jugular central venous catheter was seen projecting down the left paraspinal region. (cureus.com)
  • When attempting a left internal jugular vein central venous catheter placement, it is important to be aware of venous anomalies in order to prevent complications. (cureus.com)
  • The puncture site for insertion of the Groshong catheter of the TIVAD is through the subclavian vein (SV), internal jugular vein (IJV), femoral vein or axillary vein. (scirp.org)
  • anatomy) Any of several veins on each side of the neck, which drain the brain, face and neck of deoxygenated blood. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Internal Jugular Vein Describe the anatomy relevant to central venous access including femoral, internal jugular, external jugular, subclavian and peripheral veins The internal jugular vein: Originates at the jugular bulbThis is a dilatation. (sportsterandme.com)
  • Puncture of the posterior venous wall during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation seems to be common, making underlying artery at risk of injury. (springermedizin.at)
  • Ultrasound-guided vascular access in adults and children: beyond the internal jugular vein puncture. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Based on our clinical experience and a review of the current literature, this paper describes a large variety of ultrasound-guided vascular puncture techniques used in adults and children far beyond the well described puncture of the internal jugular vein. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In Japan, TIVADs are generally placed in position by the percutaneous subclavian vein puncture approach (SVPA). (scirp.org)
  • Using the internal jugular vein puncture approach (IJVPA), TIVADs could be placed more easily and safely. (scirp.org)
  • main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck uniting, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. (drugs.com)
  • Dr. Jia studied 51 consecutive patients with CVST and 30 healthy control participants using color Doppler flow imaging to evaluate the diameter and maximum flow velocity (Vmax) at 3 points along the IJV - at its influx into the innominate vein (J1), at the point of the superior thyroid vein influx into the IJV (J2), and at the bifurcation level of the common carotid artery (J3). (medscape.com)
  • The internal jugular runs with the common carotid artery and vagus nerve inside the carotid sheath. (wikipedia.org)
  • We studied whether the use of an EC could improve visualization if compared with a nonechogenic vascular cannula (NEC) during real-time ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation in the intensive care unit (ICU). (biomedsearch.com)
  • It is rare to have bilateral neck swelling due to internal jugular vein ectasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • What is Bilateral jugular vein stents? (patientslikeme.com)
  • No patients have reported taking Bilateral jugular vein stents. (patientslikeme.com)
  • There are no evaluations for Bilateral jugular vein stents. (patientslikeme.com)
  • Bilateral radical neck dissection with internal jugular vein extirpation, be it simultaneous or staged, results in severe cephalic venous hypertension. (ebscohost.com)
  • Internal jugular vein replacement using autogenous saphenous vein that is fashioned into a spiral conduit has been used in three patients undergoing bilateral or second side radical neck dissection. (ebscohost.com)
  • Bilateral Sampling of the Internal Jugular Vein To Distinguish between Mechanisms of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Dependent Cushing Syndrome. (ebscohost.com)
  • Presents a study on the safety of bilateral sampling of the internal jugular vein. (ebscohost.com)
  • We report on a bilateral external jugular vein anomaly found during the neck dissection of an approximately 75-year-old female cadaver, a case which has hitherto not been reported. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Trauma would not have caused my valvular bilateral jugular blockages. (thisisms.com)
  • In all other cases of infected IJ vein thrombus, prolonged antibiotic therapy specifically directed against anaerobic organisms should be promptly instituted as soon as blood cultures are obtained. (medscape.com)
  • We have present here a case of a 82- year- old male with chronic kidney disease who presented with left neck swelling and pain who was found to have a thrombus in the left internal internal jugular vein. (medworm.com)
  • Grayscale image demonstrates a large thrombus within the internal jugular vein. (visualdx.com)
  • One of two jugular veins that collect the blood from the brain, the superficial parts of the face, and the neck. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • There are four main types of veins: pulmonary and systemic, and superficial and deep. (reference.com)
  • It lies superficial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle as it passes down the neck to join the subclavian vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The internal jugular vein receives blood from the brain and superficial parts of the face and neck. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This vein collects blood from the superficial parts of the face, neck, and the brain. (proprofs.com)
  • The anterior jugular vein has its origin as the confluence of several small superficial submandibular veins. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Veins are subject to inflammation, dilatation or enlargement (as in a varicose vein varicose vein, superficial vessel that is abnormally lengthened, twisted, or dilated, seen most often on the legs and thighs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The external jugular veins are much smaller in diameter and found much more superficial as compared to the internal jugular veins. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Due to superficial abrasions from the fall to the right side of his neck, the left internal jugular vein was cannulated. (cureus.com)
  • Except for the pulmonary vein, which carries oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart, veins carry deoxygenated blood. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Bovine jugular valved conduit performs better in a dilated than in an obstructed pulmonary arterial tree. (ebscohost.com)
  • For transvenous cardiac pacing or pulmonary arterial monitoring, a right internal jugular or a left subclavian cannulation typically is preferred. (merckmanuals.com)
  • All veins except those returning blood from the pulmonary system carry deoxygenated blood. (verywellhealth.com)
  • There is also another minor jugular vein, the anterior jugular vein, draining the submaxillary region. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anterior jugular vein is a paired tributary of the external jugular vein . (radiopaedia.org)
  • It descends near the midline, medial to the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and in its inferior path, superior to the sternum , is connected to the contralateral anterior jugular vein by the jugular (venous) arch. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Either of the two large veins on either side of the neck in mammals that drain blood from the head and return it to the heart. (dictionary.com)
  • each side of the neck has two jugular veins, external and internal. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The six main veins-the right and left internal and external jugulars and the front anterior jugulars-that run down the front and side of the neck, carrying blood back to the heart from the head. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • the groove on each side of the neck in which the jugular vein can be located. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Usually, two of these veins can be found on each side of the neck. (proprofs.com)
  • Each of the internal jugular veins runs on either side of the neck under the sternocleidomastoid muscle. (verywellhealth.com)
  • At the distal (downstream) ends, external and internal jugular veins have one-way valves that prevent blood from flowing backward. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The internal jugular veins join with the subclavian veins more medially to form the brachiocephalic veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins. (harvard.edu)
  • These veins carry deoxygenated blood from the brain towards the heart. (huffpost.com)
  • The left and right external jugular veins drain into the subclavian veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Previously in the text we had commented that 16 of 20 patients (80%) with surgically proven Cushing disease had positive findings on jugular vein sampling. (annals.org)
  • Herein, we report a rare case of venous malformation originating from the external Jugular vein and surgically excised with no recurrence. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Narrowing or ligating jugular veins is performed surgically without any apparent issue. (thisisms.com)
  • Sterile eye lubricant is placed in both eyes, and the clipped skin area over the jugular vein is surgically prepared. (hilltoplabs.com)
  • The external jugular veins originate at the level of the angle of the mandible and continue to the base of the neck where they empty into the subclavian veins proximal (upstream) to the internal jugular veins. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The ballooning also results in formation of the occipital sinus, marginal sinus around the foramen magnum, and emissary veins. (ajnr.org)
  • They exit the cranium through the jugular foramen (foramen is a fancy medical term for a hole). (verywellhealth.com)
  • Parsons AJ, Alfa J. Carotid dissection: a complication of internal jugular vein cannulation with the use of ultrasound. (springermedizin.at)
  • Thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (Lemierre syndrome): clinical and CT findings. (medscape.com)
  • In multivariable models, among clinical, echocardiographic or biochemical variables, only increasing NT-proBNP and ultrasound assessment of internal jugular vein were independently associated with prognosis. (bmj.com)
  • I was amazed that a document first recorded nearly 1400 years ago would make reference to such a specific part of the human body, and I began to reflect on how the clinical significance of the jugular vein might relate to Islamic beliefs. (huffpost.com)
  • The jugular veins can have significant variation but rarely do those variants have clinical significance. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The internal and external jugular veins both have clinical significance. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Many clinical examples, from tricuspid regurgitation to heart failure, from right heart failure to both hypo- and hypervolemia illustrate that any time pressure and volume change within the intrathoracic systemic venous compartment a change also occurs in extrathoracic veins, such as in the intra-abdominal IVC or extra-thoracic internal jugular vein (IJV) [ 7 ]-[ 10 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Among neck veins, aneurysms of the external jugular vein are extremely uncommon. (hindawi.com)
  • The size of neck veins can be used to help diagnose specific health problems. (wisegeekhealth.com)
  • The right internal jugular vein is about 63 millimeters (mm) long while the left internal jugular vein averages about 53 mm long. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Paik P, Arukala S K, Sule A A (January 09, 2018) Right Site, Wrong Route ― Cannulating the Left Internal Jugular Vein. (cureus.com)
  • Although the right internal jugular vein is preferred, on occasion, the left internal jugular may have to be accessed. (cureus.com)
  • To investigate this hypothesis, isolated segments of the rabbit jugular vein were perfused at physiological (0 to 5 mm Hg) and nonphysiological (20 mm Hg) levels of intraluminal pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • The right external jugular vein has a somewhat direct line with the internal jugular veins, making it often easier to assess the pulse contour and the blood pressure in the thoracic vena cava (known as venous pressure). (innerbody.com)
  • ICD-10-PCS code 05SP0ZZ for Reposition Right External Jugular Vein, Open Approach is a medical classification as listed by CMS under Upper Veins range. (aapc.com)
  • The external jugular vein runs superficially to sternocleidomastoid. (wikipedia.org)
  • The external jugular vein, which traverses the sternocleidomastoid muscle superficially, is known to exhibit variations in its formation and course. (scielo.cl)
  • It terminates by passing deep to sternocleidomastoid muscle to drain into the external jugular vein. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The jugular veins are more prominent during expiration than during inspiration and are also prominent during cardiac decompensation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When the patient is sitting or in a semirecumbent position, the height of the jugular veins and their pulsations can provide an accurate estimation of central venous pressure and give important information about cardiac compensation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Jugular vein distention, which is quite massive, in a woman with cardiac tamponade Jugular vein distention occurs when the pressure inside the vena. (sportsterandme.com)
  • This is achieved via percutaneous needle placement into the mouse jugular vein under real‐time B‐mode ultrasound (US) imaging. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Unique, and potentially significant, advantages of this technique over others include: (1) direct visual confirmation of needle tip placement in the lumen of the vein, (2) immediate visual detection of extravascular extravasation of injectate, when compared to blinded techniques, such as tail vein injections, and (3) reduced morbidity and mortality compared to surgical vascular access techniques (i.e., jugular vein cannulation). (currentprotocols.com)
  • Ultrasound guidance for placement of internal jugular lines increases the likelihood of successful cannulation and reduces the risk of complications. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Ultrasound-guided Placement of Single-lumen Peripheral Intravenous Catheters in the Internal Jugular Vein September 6, 2018 Articles, Current Issue: Volume 19 Issue 5, Original Research, Technology in Emergency Medicine. (sportsterandme.com)
  • Because the internal jugular vein is such a large vein, it is often used for intravenous line placement. (wisegeekhealth.com)
  • Ultrasound guided infraclavicular axillary vein cannulation, coming of age. (semanticscholar.org)
  • and Seattle Children's Hospital conducted a study of all neonates and infants who had a single-stick tunneled central venous access procedure in either the jugular or femoral veins between March 2014 and September 2016, and weighed less than 5 kg (11 lbs) at the time. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Single-stick tunneled central venous access using the jugular veins in infants weighing less than 5 kg. (appliedradiology.com)
  • This study aimed to investigate the effect of ultrasound on the practice of internal jugular vein cannulation" Shelton et al (2016). (ivteam.com)
  • Any of several large veins of the neck that drain blood from the head. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Sonographic evaluation of intravascular volume status: Can internal jugular or femoral vein collapsibility be used in the absence of IVC visualization? (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The current study aims to explore the potential for using femoral (FV) or internal jugular (IJV) vein collapsibility as alternative sonographic options in the absence of adequate IVC visualization. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Lead author Will S. Lindquester, MD, of the Division of Interventional Radiology and Image Guided Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, reported that 91% of the jugular catheters were functional throughout the entire treatment. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Lysostaphin has been shown to clear S. aureus biofilms in vitro, and in this study we determined whether lysostaphin could also eradicate established S. aureus biofilms on implanted jugular vein catheters in mice. (nih.gov)
  • Jugular vein catheterized mice (four to six per group) challenged with S. aureus developed multiorgan infection and biofilm infections on the catheters. (nih.gov)
  • In another set of experiments, implanted jugular vein catheters in mice were pre-instilled with lysostaphin to determine whether this pre-treatment would protect the mice from biofilm infection. (nih.gov)
  • In this study, we aimed to compare area measurements using ultrasonography and efficiency of varying Trendelenburg degrees on the area measurements, for two different entry points used as internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation points in newborns" Karaaslan et al (2018). (ivteam.com)
  • The parotid gland is where the external jugular vein starts. (innerbody.com)
  • external jugular vein forms where the retro-mandibular and posterior auricular veins from the head converge, within the parotid gland on either side of the mandible (lower jaw). (healthline.com)
  • The posterior division of the retromandibular vein and posterior auricular vein unite within the parotid gland to form the external jugular vein, at the angle of the mandible . (radiopaedia.org)
  • A stand-in for the jugular venous pulse. (ebscohost.com)
  • Presents a suggestion on how to determine a patient's jugular venous pulse (JVP). (ebscohost.com)
  • It is directly continuous with the transverse sinus, accompanying the internal carotid artery as it passes down the neck, and joins with the subclavian vein to form the innominate vein. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It's formed where the posterior auricular vein and the retromandibular vein's posterior separation meet. (innerbody.com)