Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Device Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Metals, Heavy: Metals with high specific gravity, typically larger than 5. They have complex spectra, form colored salts and double salts, have a low electrode potential, are mainly amphoteric, yield weak bases and weak acids, and are oxidizing or reducing agents (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Joint DiseasesZinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Cadmium: An element with atomic symbol Cd, atomic number 48, and atomic weight 114. It is a metal and ingestion will lead to CADMIUM POISONING.Nickel: A trace element with the atomic symbol Ni, atomic number 28, and atomic weight 58.69. It is a cofactor of the enzyme UREASE.Copper: A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Niobium: Niobium. A metal element atomic number 41, atomic weight 92.906, symbol Nb. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Manganese: A trace element with atomic symbol Mn, atomic number 25, and atomic weight 54.94. It is concentrated in cell mitochondria, mostly in the pituitary gland, liver, pancreas, kidney, and bone, influences the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides, stimulates hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and is a cofactor in many enzymes, including arginase and alkaline phosphatase in the liver. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1992, p2035)Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Penile Prosthesis: Rigid, semi-rigid, or inflatable cylindric hydraulic devices, with either combined or separate reservoir and pumping systems, implanted for the surgical treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.Chromium: A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Cobalt: A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.Sonication: The application of high intensity ultrasound to liquids.Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Arthritis, Infectious: Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Tantalum: Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)Joint Capsule: The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Visual Prosthesis: Artificial device such as an externally-worn camera attached to a stimulator on the RETINA, OPTIC NERVE, or VISUAL CORTEX, intended to restore or amplify vision.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Sacroiliac Joint: The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.Mercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Lead: A soft, grayish metal with poisonous salts; atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19, symbol Pb. (Dorland, 28th)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Silver: Silver. An element with the atomic symbol Ag, atomic number 47, and atomic weight 107.87. It is a soft metal that is used medically in surgical instruments, dental prostheses, and alloys. Long-continued use of silver salts can lead to a form of poisoning known as ARGYRIA.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Neural Prostheses: Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.Aluminum: A metallic element that has the atomic number 13, atomic symbol Al, and atomic weight 26.98.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Gemella: A genus that has been reclassified into BACILLALES incertae sedis because of its ambiguous taxonomy. Previously it was considered part of the Staphylococcaceae family.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Ossicular Prosthesis: An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Cadmium Chloride: A cadmium halide in the form of colorless crystals, soluble in water, methanol, and ethanol. It is used in photography, in dyeing, and calico printing, and as a solution to precipitate sulfides. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Staphylococcus lugdunensis: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family STAPHYLOCOCCACEAE. It is responsible for skin and soft-tissue infections among others, and is part of the normal human skin flora.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Temporomandibular Joint Disc: A plate of fibrous tissue that divides the temporomandibular joint into an upper and lower cavity. The disc is attached to the articular capsule and moves forward with the condyle in free opening and protrusion. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p92)Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Acromioclavicular Joint: The gliding joint formed by the outer extremity of the CLAVICLE and the inner margin of the acromion process of the SCAPULA.AmputeesSurgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Sternoclavicular Joint: A double gliding joint formed by the CLAVICLE, superior and lateral parts of the manubrium sterni at the clavicular notch, and the cartilage of the first rib.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Maxillofacial Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Larynx, Artificial: A device, activated electronically or by expired pulmonary air, which simulates laryngeal activity and enables a laryngectomized person to speak. Examples of the pneumatic mechanical device are the Tokyo and Van Hunen artificial larynges. Electronic devices include the Western Electric electrolarynx, Tait oral vibrator, Cooper-Rand electrolarynx and the Ticchioni pipe.Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.Rifampin: A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Eye, Artificial: A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Carpometacarpal Joints: The articulations between the CARPAL BONES and the METACARPAL BONES.Penile Implantation: Surgical insertion of cylindric hydraulic devices for the treatment of organic ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Metals, Alkali: Metals that constitute group 1(formerly group Ia) of the periodic table. They are the most strongly electropositive of the metals. Note that HYDROGEN is not considered an alkali metal even though it falls under the group 1 heading in the periodic table.Synovial Membrane: The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Arthritis, Experimental: ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.DislocationsBone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.
For the application of artificial joints it will likely be combined with certain metals and metal alloys like cobalt, chrome, ... The prosthesis may need to be replaced due to complications such as infection or prosthetic fracture. Replacement may be done ... The main controversies are the best or most appropriate bearing surface - metal/polyethylene, metal-metal, ceramic-ceramic; ... the most successful and common form of arthroplasty is the surgical replacement of a joint or joint surface with a prosthesis. ...
This is done in an effort to conserve the natural joint since prosthetic joints ultimately wear out and have to be replaced. A ... Surgeons may treat these types of fracture by replacing the fractured bone with a prosthesis arthroplasty. Alternatively the ... treatment is to reduce the fracture (manipulate the fragments back into a good position) and fix them in place with metal ... The vasculature to the femoral head is easily disturbed during fractures or from swelling inside the joint capsule. This can ...
Currently, joints are removed and replaced with prosthetic limbs. This alleviates pain, allows a greater range of motion, and ... The ankle joint is then rotated 180 degrees and is attached to the former knee joint, becoming a new knee joint. This allows ... With the permanent prostheses, a putty like substance is injected into the implant site to keep the body, mainly the immune ... Synthetic bones and metal plates can also be inserted to abate the pain. Arthroplasty is very similar to arthrodesis. It ...
... as a metal hook withstands acids or lye, and does not react to solvents like a prosthetic glove or human skin). Prosthetic ... manually operated locking polymer prosthetic knee joint. Table. List of knee joint technologies based on the literature review ... Most microprocessor controlled knee-joints are powered by a battery housed inside the prosthesis. The sensory signals computed ... In the prosthetics industry a trans-femoral prosthetic leg is often referred to as an "AK" or above the knee prosthesis. A ...
The main objectives of the prosthetic design for ankle joint replacements are: to replicate original joint function, by ... ankle arthrodesis and the excellent results attained by arthroplasty at other human joints have encouraged numerous prosthesis ... with a polyethylene meniscal bearing interposed between the two metal bone-anchored components. This meniscal bearing should ... Goodfellow, John; O'Connor, John (1978). "The mechanics of the knee and prosthesis design". Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. ...
Prosthetic heart valves Radial head prosthesis It is also used in automotive industries where a desired amount of friction is ... In fiber form, it is used to reinforce plastics and metals (see Carbon fiber and Graphite-reinforced plastic). Pebble bed ... Pyrolytic carbon is also in medical use to coat anatomically correct orthopaedic implants, a.k.a. replacement joints. In this ... The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 81 (5): 635-48. PMID 10360692. "Ascension PIP: Summary of Safety and Probable Benefit ...
... the TMJ Metal-on-Metal Total Joint Replacement System, and the Christensen TMJ Fossa-Eminence System (patient specific partial ... NICE (2014) 'Total prosthetic replacement of the temporomandibular joint', NICE interventional procedure guidance , ([IPG500 ... Vitek-Kent Proplast-Teflon partial & total prosthesis were manufactured from 1982 to 1990 in Houston TX. TMJ prostheses became ... allowing the joint space to be visualized on a monitor and explored by the surgeon. Arthroscopy is also used in other joints ...
... hip joints, knee joints, shoulder and elbow joints) for more than half a century. Artificial joints (referred to as prostheses ... be tailored to help the physician safely apply the bone cement into the bone bed to either anchor metal or plastic prosthetic ... The active substances are released locally after implant placement of the new joint, i.e. in the immediate vicinity of the new ... The necessary rehabilitation is comparatively simple for patients who have had a cemented-in prosthesis implanted. The joints ...
Their device which is manufactured by CR Equipments is a single-axis, manually operated locking polymer prosthetic knee joint.[ ... Most microprocessor controlled knee-joints are powered by a battery housed inside the prosthesis. ... as a metal hook withstands acids or lye, and does not react to solvents like a prosthetic glove or human skin). ... In the prosthetics industry a trans-femoral prosthetic leg is often referred to as an "AK" or above the knee prosthesis. ...
... the surgeon can remove the arthritic portions of the joint and then secure the ball and socket prostheses within the joint. The ... Shoulder replacement is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the glenohumeral joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant ... Various materials can be used to make prostheses, however the majority consist of a metal ball that rotates within a ... Arthritis is a condition that affects the cartilage of the joints. As the cartilage lining wears away, the protective lining ...
FDA - Implants and Prosthetics. *International Medical Devices Database - Recalls, Safety Alerts and Field Safety Notices of ... The many examples of implant failure include rupture of silicone breast implants, hip replacement joints, and artificial heart ... ocular prosthesis, and injectable filler.[1][2][3] Other organs and systems[edit]. Other types of organ dysfunction can occur ... Thus, heart valve failure is likely to threaten the life of the individual, while breast implant or hip joint failure is less ...
... ocular prosthetics, facial prosthetics, somato prosthetics, and dental implants. ... Artificial limbs: The right arm is an example of a prosthesis, and the left arm is an example of myoelectric control. ... Implants, such as artificial hip joints, are generally extensively regulated due to the invasive nature of such devices. ... hip and knee joint implants, silicone gel-filled breast implants, implanted cerebellar stimulators, implantable pacemaker pulse ...
insertion of prosthetic parts when needed. Pins or screws to set and hold bones may be used. Sections of bone may be replaced ... He was also the first to illustrate the various cannulae and the first to treat a wart with an iron tube and caustic metal as a ... Orthopedic surgery, operations/surgeries and other procedures on bones and joints (ICD-9-CM V3 76-81, ICD-10-PCS 0P-S) ... pioneered the Symes Amputation for the ankle joint and successfully carried out the first hip disarticulation. ...
Fingers can for example, be made of a chain with a metal wire run through it.[58] Hands that resemble and work more like a ... The prosthesis has sensors which enable the patient to sense real feeling in its fingertips.[53] ... Current robotic and prosthetic hands receive far less tactile information than the human hand. Recent research has developed a ... Inverse kinematics refers to the opposite case in which required joint values are calculated for given end effector values, as ...
... , also known as shoulder arthroplasty or glenohumeral arthroplasty, was pioneered by the French surgeon Jules Emile Péan in 1893.[3] His procedure consisted of physically smoothing the shoulder joint and implanting platinum and rubber materials. The next notable case in the evolution of shoulder replacement procedures was in 1955 when Charles Neer conducted the first hemiarthroplasty, essentially replacing only the humeral head, leaving the natural shoulder socket, or glenoid, intact.[3] This procedure grew exponentially in popularity as time progressed; however, patients often developed cartilage loss on their glenoid surface as well, leading to pain and glenoid erosion. This prompted the development of a procedure to replace not only the humeral component, but the glenoid component as well.[3]. Throughout the development of the procedures, it became well accepted that the rotator cuff muscles were essential to producing the best outcomes in terms of strength, range of ...
... is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the glenohumeral joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. Such joint replacement surgery generally is conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe physical joint damage. Shoulder replacement surgery is an option for treatment of severe arthritis of the shoulder joint. Arthritis is a condition that affects the cartilage of the joints. As the cartilage lining wears away, the protective lining between the bones is lost. When this happens, painful bone-on-bone arthritis develops. Severe shoulder arthritis is quite painful, and can cause restriction of motion. While this may be tolerated with some medications and lifestyle adjustments, there may come a time when surgical treatment is necessary. There are a few major approaches to access the shoulder ...
... , or ankle arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace the damaged articular surfaces of the human ankle joint with prosthetic components. This procedure is becoming the treatment of choice for patients requiring arthroplasty, replacing the conventional use of arthrodesis, i.e. fusion of the bones. The restoration of range of motion is the key feature in favor of ankle replacement with respect to arthrodesis. However, clinical evidence of the superiority of the former has only been demonstrated for particular isolated implant designs. Since the early 1970s, the disadvantages of ankle arthrodesis and the excellent results attained by arthroplasty at other human joints have encouraged numerous prosthesis designs also for the ankle. In the following decade, the disappointing results of long-term follow-up clinical studies of the pioneering designs has left ankle arthrodesis as the surgical treatment of choice for these ...
An artificial facet replacement is a joint prosthesis intended to replace the natural facets and other posterior elements of the spine, restoring normal (or near-normal) motion while providing stabilization of spinal segments. It is typically used as an adjunct to laminectomy, laminotomy, neural decompression, and facetectomy, in lieu of standard lumbar fusion. The prosthesis is indicated for back and leg pain caused by central or lateral spinal stenosis, degenerative disease of the facets with instability, and grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis with objective evidence of neurological impairment. Patents related to facet replacement have been around since the 1980s; more intense research into artificial facet replacement as an effective and marketable prosthesis has been ongoing since the mid-2000s. Prominent researched options include: ACADIA: a facet replacement implant "designed to reproduce facet motion while restoring normal stability and motion," first tested in ...
Limb prostheses include both upper- and lower-extremity prostheses. Upper-extremity prostheses are used at varying levels of amputation: forequarter, shoulder disarticulation, transhumeral prosthesis, elbow disarticulation, transradial prosthesis, wrist disarticulation, full hand, partial hand, finger, partial finger. A transradial prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces an arm missing below the elbow. Upper limb prostheses can be categorized in three main categories: Passive devices, Body Powered devices, Externally Powered (myoelectric) devices. Passive devices can either be passive hands, mainly used for cosmetic purpose, or passive tools, mainly used for specific activities (e.g. leisure or vocational). An extensive overview and classification of passive devices can be found in a literature review by Maat et.al.[7] A passive device can be static, meaning the device has no movable parts, or it can be adjustable, meaning its ...
Limb prostheses include both upper- and lower-extremity prostheses. Upper-extremity prostheses are used at varying levels of amputation: forequarter, shoulder disarticulation, transhumeral prosthesis, elbow disarticulation, transradial prosthesis, wrist disarticulation, full hand, partial hand, finger, partial finger. A transradial prosthesis is an artificial limb that replaces an arm missing below the elbow. Upper limb prostheses can be categorized in three main categories: Passive devices, Body Powered devices, Externally Powered (myoelectric) devices. Passive devices can either be passive hands, mainly used for cosmetic purpose, or passive tools, mainly used for specific activities (e.g. leisure or vocational). An extensive overview and classification of passive devices can be found in a literature review by Maat et.al.[4] A passive device can be static, meaning the device has no movable parts, or it can be adjustable, meaning its ...
... is the putative medical condition involving deposition and build-up of metal debris in the soft tissues of the body. Metallosis has been hypothesized to occur when metallic components in medical implants, specifically joint replacements, abrade against one another. Metallosis has also been observed in some patients either sensitive to the implant or for unknown reasons even in the absence of malpositioned prosthesis. Though rare, metallosis has been observed at an estimated incidence of 5% of metal joint implant patients over the last 40 years. Women may be at slightly higher risk than men. If metallosis occurs, it may involve the hip and knee joints, the shoulder, ...
... or metal poisoning is the toxic effect of certain metals in certain forms and doses on life. Some metals are toxic when they form poisonous soluble compounds. Certain metals have no biological role, i.e. are not essential minerals, or are toxic when in a certain form. In the case of lead, any measurable amount may have negative health effects. Often heavy metals are thought as synonymous, but lighter metals may also be toxic in certain circumstances, such as beryllium and lithium. Not all heavy metals are particularly toxic, and some are essential, such as iron. The definition may also include trace elements when in abnormally high doses may be toxic. An option for treatment of metal poisoning may be chelation therapy, which is a ...
Transition metal oxides are compounds composed of oxygen atoms bound to transition metals. They are commonly utilized for their catalytic activity and semiconductive properties. Transition metal oxides are also frequently used as pigments in paints and plastics, most notably titanium dioxide. Transition metal oxides have a wide variety of surface structures which affect the surface energy of these compounds and influence their chemical properties. The relative acidity and basicity of the atoms present on the surface of metal oxides are also affected by the coordination of the metal cation and oxygen anion, which alter the catalytic properties of these compounds. For this reason, structural defects in transition metal oxides greatly influence their catalytic properties. The ...
... (ofte bare metal, fornorsket tungmetall eller tungrock) er en sjanger innen rockemusikken. Begrepet oppstod sent på 1960- og begynnelsen av 1970-tallet, men har siden endret betydning. Sjangeren kjennetegnes ofte av sterkt forsterkede og forvrengte gitarer, og drivende og tunge rytmer. Lydbildet kan ofte beskrives som «aggressivt», «mørkt» og/eller «dystert». Da heavy metal begynte som populærmusikalsk stil, fantes det ikke like mange begreper som vi har i dag. Heavy metal og hardrock betydde mer eller mindre det samme, men etter hvert som årene gikk ble det utviklet nye undersjangere (speed metal, thrash metal, power metal og så videre) i tillegg til at de «nye hardrock-bandene» begynte ofte å bruke helt nye effekter. De nye bandene var ofte dystrere, tyngre og ...
There is no metallurgical standard for pot metal. Common metals in pot metal include zinc, lead, copper, tin, magnesium, aluminium, iron, and cadmium. The primary advantage of pot metal is that it is quick and easy to cast. Because of its low melting temperature, it requires no sophisticated foundry equipment or specialized molds. Manufacturers sometimes use it to experiment with molds and ideas (e.g., prototypes) before casting final products in a higher quality alloy. Depending on the exact metals "thrown into the pot," pot metal can become unstable over time, as it has a tendency to bend, distort, crack, shatter, and pit with age. The low boiling point of zinc and fast cooling of newly cast parts often trap air bubbles within the cast part, weakening it. Many components ...
Death metal é um subgênero extremo do heavy metal. Tipicamente agrega guitarras com baixa afinação muito distorcidas, tocadas com técnicas como palm muting e tremolo picking, vocais urrados e gritos, bateria tocada de maneira agressiva e potente com uso de pedal duplo ou técnica de blast beat, alguns teclados ou atonalidade, ritmo extremamente rápido e mudanças abruptas de tempo. As letras das músicas de death metal podem abordar temas como a violência de filmes slasher, religião, satanismo, ocultismo, histórias de terror de Lovecraft, natureza, misticismo, mitologia, filosofia, ficção científica e política, e também podem descrever atos extremos como mutilação, dissecação, tortura, estupro, canibalismo e necrofilia.[3][4] Construído a partir da estrutura musical do thrash metal e da primeira onda do black metal, o death ...
Em 1981, Brian Slagel, fundador da Metal Blade Records, decidiu lançar uma compilação com bandas do metal underground sem gravadora. Durante toda a década de 80 e no começo dos anos 90 ele continuou a lançar volumes de compilações. Metal Massacre XII foi lançada em 1995 e era o último álbum da Metal Massacre até o volume XIII, lançado em 2006. Metal Massacre XIII diferiu dos lançamentos anteriores, que contava principalmente com bandas sem selo assinado, contendo bandas em sua maioria estabelecidas no plantel da Metal Blade. ...
A modular knee prosthesis includes a femoral stem having a proximal end portion. A femoral component includes a first ... Prosthetic cupule. US4883492. 26 May 1988. 28 Nov 1989. Sulzer Brothers Limited. Metal bone implant. ... Joint Medical Products Corporation. Sleeves for affixing artificial joints to bone. US4790854. 18 Mar 1988. 13 Dec 1988. ... a knee joint prosthesis according to other features is generally identified at reference 400. The knee joint prosthesis 400 ...
A prosthesis for replacement of a damaged joint or load-bearing structure in an animal or human body comprises a shaped ... j. Implantable prosthetic teeth. k. Calvarium replacement. The core, base, or structural element may be metal, suitably ... b. Stemmed joints for knees, elbows, fingers, or toes. c. Bone plates for use as replacements of articulating surfaces such as ... PROSTHETIC JOINT. 1971-07-20. Niebauer et al.. 3/191. 3462765. SURGICALLY IMPLANTABLE PROSTHETIC JOINT. 1969-08-26. Swanson. 3/ ...
... prosthetic components). The artificial joint consists of two stems made of high-quality ... Elbow replacement involves surgically replacing bones that make up the elbow joint with artificial elbow joint parts ( ... They are joined together with a metal and plastic hinge that allows the artificial elbow joint to bend. The artificial joints ... prosthetic components). The artificial joint consists of two stems made of high-quality metal. ...
Endoprosthesis is a prosthesis or prosthetic implant placed in the remaining bone. An endoprosthesis is usually made of metal ... The rotated ankle joint now functions as a new knee joint, and a prosthesis is attached to the reconstructed limb to equalize ... A variety of prosthetics are available. Specialized joints and devices are usually discussed later when the child is fully ... Fusing the joint may be used for tumours in or near the knee or shoulder joint. This involves removing the joint surfaces and ...
The prosthesis includes a body for implantation at least partially within the medullary canal of a long bone. The long bone ... The surface features are positioned to optimally transfer load from the prosthesis to the long bone. ... A ball and socket joint prosthesis for use in arthroplasty is provided. ... Prosthetic thumb joint and method of manufacture. US5658333. 9 May 1996. 19 Aug 1997. Depuy, Inc.. Prosthesis with highly ...
The prosthesis is then cast of molten metal in the mold, and the mold material is broken away and cleaned off, e.g., by an etch ... In a preferred embodiment, edge features cast in the surface of a metal prosthesis include dovetail, undercut or skewed faces ... The prosthesis may be cast in a mold having a complex surface interlock texture, and these molds may be mass produced by an ... so that new bone growth spans the gaps and penetrates into the prosthesis over an extended surface textured region. ...
Apparatus and method for advancing synovial fluid in a prosthetic joint. US7795349. 24 May 2006. 14 Sep 2010. Z Corporation. ... filling the shell with a molten metal or metal alloy such that the molten metal or metal alloy fills the cavities in the shell ... Such bone prostheses include components of artificial joints, such as elbows, hips, knees, and shoulders. An important ... filling the shell with a molten metal or metal alloy such that the molten metal or metal alloy fills the cavities in the shell ...
A prosthetic intramedullary femoral prosthesis provided with a separate preformed sheath made from an acrylic material which is ... dimensioned to enclose the prosthesis stem from the distal tip to a location on the stem which will be adjacent the proximal ... Metal shank US5314493A (en) * 1992-09-10. 1994-05-24. Mikhail Michael W E. Femoral hip joint prosthesis ... A61F2/30-Joints * A61F2/46-Special tools or methods for implanting or extracting artificial joints, accessories, bone grafts or ...
The present invention concerns articles having an outer surface that bears at least two layers of metal particles, wherein the ... Surgical prosthetic device with porous metal coating. US4145764. Jul 21, 1976. Mar 27, 1979. Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd.. ... Joint Medical Products Corporation. Porous-coated artificial joints. US4904265 *. Sep 9, 1988. Feb 27, 1990. Boehringer ... Joint prostheses, particularly in hip prostheses. US4483678. Jul 7, 1983. Nov 20, 1984. Ngk Spark Plug Co., Ltd.. Dental ...
A damaged, diseased hip joint can seriously impact quality of life, making the simplest of tasks, such as walking and standing ... A replacement hip joint offers many benefits, the most obvious being pain relief and improved function. ... These prosthetic parts are generally made of plastic and metal, consisting of a metal hip ball mated with a plastic hip socket. ... Replacement hip joints are designed to mimic the natural shape and function of normal hip joints. ...
The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or ... Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee joint with a man-made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis. ... Most artificial knee joints last 10 to 15 years. Some last as long as 20 years before they loosen and need to be replaced again ... The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or ...
The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or ... Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee joint with a man-made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis ... Most artificial knee joints last 10 to 15 years. Some last as long as 20 years before they loosen and need to be replaced again ... The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or ...
Prosthetic, and Surgical Appliances and Supplies, including news, information, and reports with HighBeam Business : Arrive ... inactive metals, and durable synthetics, gave specialists new ways to replace or mend body joints and parts. New materials and ... the metal most commonly used in joint replacement devices. According to Yogesh Vohra of the UAB Center for Nanoscale Materials ... Public acceptance of prostheses, as well as improvements in design, paralleled major wars during the eighteenth, nineteenth, ...
The prosthesis used in mammals may further comprise a second biocompatible material cross-linked to the grafted first ... Further, a prosthesis used in mammals, including an intraocular lens, comprises a polymer core and at least a first ... an artificial joint and other implantable prostheses. However, PMMA has several disadvantages in prosthetic use, including ... Examples of prostheses include artificial joints, valve replacements, skin grafts, vascular grafts, shunts, plates and contact ...
The prosthesis further has an artificial facet joint structure carried by the prosthesis body at a location spaced from the ... The prosthesis has a prosthesis body accommodating fixation to the vertebral body at or near a pedicle and without support by a ... The artificial facet joint structure is adapted and configured to replace all or a portion of a natural facet joint. ... The prosthesis body has a fastening element installed within the vertebral body at or near a pedicle. ...
The prosthetic joint can be made of plastic, metal, or ceramic.. What is a rotator cuff? ... Joint replacement surgery is a procedure that removes parts or all of a damaged or arthritic joint and puts a prosthesis in its ... Orthopedic surgeons diagnose and treat diseases and injuries involving the musculoskeletal system, including bones, joints, ... Arthroscopic surgery uses a small video camera, called an arthroscope, to observe, diagnose, or treat issues inside a joint. ...
All parts, including metal joints, were made from raw materials in the shop. Some prostheses were constructed of wood and ... A small prosthetic shop was operated by three mechanics, and the patients for whom prostheses were being prepared were serving ... Wounds of the joints. - Perforating joint wounds from small arms or high explosive shell fragments were frequently treated ... When infection developed in knee joints in which fractures had occurred into the joint, drainage was sometimes tried ...
Joint replacement surgery is an option for people struggling with joint pain, like knee pain. ... with prostheses made of either metal, plastic, or ceramic. The prosthetic components will improve joint stability, overall ... Artificial joints are now more durable and can be made to duplicate the original joint with a high degree of accuracy. New ... Joint Replacement Surgery. Why Joint Replacement Surgery?. Serious joint discomfort can have a significant impact on the ...
Learn more about basics of computerised microprocessor prosthetic legs from Ottobock, maker of C-Leg, the worlds most popular ... You also need something that attaches to the prosthetic knee joint on the bottom (a metal tube known as a pylon) and a ... All of these put together are known as a prosthetic "system" or prosthesis. Your prosthetic system will be unique to you and ... These more complex knee joints are designed to help you walk with a much more stable and efficient gait that more closely ...
The prosthesis consists of enlarged midsection and a pair of oppositely projecting distal and proximal stem portions. The volar ... A one-piece surgically implantable prosthetic joint of molded silicone rubber. ... 2. A flexible prosthetic joint for replacing bone joints comprising an elongated body having a distal stem and an oppositely ... Generally, metals such as stainless steel alloys were used for this purpose. Such rigid structures, however, were subject to ...
Early prosthetic joint replacements met with little success but more recent prosthetic joints, including both off-the-shelf ... In older patients, the most appropriate joint replacement for the TMJ is the alloplastic prosthesis consisting of a metal ... 7). Hemi-prosthetic joints consisting of a prosthetic fossa alone have been well described and seem to work well [43]. However ... Unlike other joints in the body, the TMJ has had a long history of joint replacement materials consisting largely of autogenous ...
Harrod began researching metal allergies in artificial joints. She learned that they had been documented for about 20 years, ... Williams then proposed a two-stage surgery: He would remove the prosthetic joint and put in a spacer device impregnated with ... Then he would install the nickel-free prosthesis.. In March 2012, seven months after her seventh shoulder operation, she was ... During a March 2011 appointment with the Virginia surgeon, he informed her that her shoulder joint was composed of many metals ...
40: Prosthetic Arms Prostheses arms are different today from the old ones. The older kinds are wooden. The ones today are metal ... metal, and leather. The limbs found in Ancient Rome lacked the sophistication of joints found in those developed by the ... iron artificial leg was made by a brilliant man named Ambrose Pare he was the first known to employ an articulated knee joint. ... An ocular prosthetic does not provide vision; this would be a visual prosthetic. Someone with an ocular prosthetic is totally ...
... there has been an increasing trend of utilizing cobalt alloy-containing metal-on-metal prosthetic hip joints[1]. Conventional ... metal-on-metal hip prostheses and suspected cobalt toxicity to asymptomatic patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses have ... deposition of wear particles and metal ions in the joint space causes grey-black discoloration of the joint and elicits a ... The benefits touted by metal-on-metal prostheses is that there is less device wear since cobalt-alloy containing metal ...
... and prosthetic joints). Orthopedic devices are used for the treatment of degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) and bone ... metal fixed or polyethylene mobile component) was removed at diagnosis of infection. The removed prosthesis was sent for ... Of 37 PJI cases (17 hip prostheses, 14 knee prostheses, 4 shoulder prostheses, 1 elbow prosthesis, and 1 ankle prosthesis), ... Culture and PCR analysis of joint fluid in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. New Microbiol. 31 : 97-104. ...
  • 3. The modular knee prosthesis of claim 2 wherein said locking element threadably receives a fastener extending through said femoral component. (google.ca)
  • In fact, the main disadvantage of a hip replacement is that it is less stable than a native hip joint, thereby carrying with it an ever-present chance of dislocation. (hubpages.com)
  • On the other hand, apart from minor differences (such as head-cup radius relation, safeguard against dislocation) the mechanics of the joint are the same. (springer.com)
  • Sitting for more than 1 hour is to be prevented, and hip flexion beyond 60 degrees may cause dislocation of the prosthesis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Metallosis is not a good thing, as it is often a cause of early prosthesis failure, and the tissue damage resulting from metallosis can compromise subsequent revision arthroplasties. (upmc.edu)
  • With the continuous advances in material engineering and tissue engineering, prosthetic and biologic inter-positional arthroplasties hold the greatest promise for the painful first MPJ in the future. (aetna.com)
  • Titanium is the most bio-compatible of all metals due to its corrosion resistance, strength and low modulus. (titanium.org)
  • Some prostheses are engineered with roughened surfaces or porous coatings (such as hydroxy-apaptite) which hasten the bonding of titanium with adjacent hone. (titanium.org)
  • Titanium in the 21st century has emerged as a high-performance metal specified for demanding industrial, medical and commercial applications throughout the world. (titanium.org)
  • Titanium can also eliminate the problems of metal contamination. (titanium.org)