Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Physician Impairment: The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.United StatesPhysician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Obstetrics: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Attitude to Computers: The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Physician Self-Referral: Referral by physicians to testing or treatment facilities in which they have financial interest. The practice is regulated by the Ethics in Patient Referrals Act of 1989.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Professional Autonomy: The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Private Practice: Practice of a health profession by an individual, offering services on a person-to-person basis, as opposed to group or partnership practice.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.Occupational Health Physicians: Physicians employed in a company or corporate setting that is generally not in the health care industry.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.CaliforniaGift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Manitoba: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Its capital is Winnipeg. Taking its name from Lake Manitoba, itself named for one of its islands, the name derived from Algonquian Manitou, great spirit. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p724 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p332)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Hospital-Physician Joint Ventures: A formal financial agreement made between one or more physicians and a hospital to provide ambulatory alternative services to those patients who do not require hospitalization.Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Newfoundland and Labrador: Province of Canada consisting of the island of Newfoundland and an area of Labrador. Its capital is St. John's.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.GermanyMedical Order Entry Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, that enable providers to initiate medical procedures, prescribe medications, etc. These systems support medical decision-making and error-reduction during patient care.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Independent Practice Associations: A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Personnel Turnover: A change or shift in personnel due to reorganization, resignation, or discharge.SwitzerlandFee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Communication Barriers: Those factors, such as language or sociocultural relationships, which interfere in the meaningful interpretation and transmission of ideas between individuals or groups.Institutional Practice: Professional practice as an employee or contractee of a health care institution.IsraelPhysician-Nurse Relations: The reciprocal interaction of physicians and nurses.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Nova Scotia: A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NEW BRUNSWICK; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Halifax. The territory was granted in 1621 by James I to the Scotsman Sir William Alexander and was called Nova Scotia, the Latin for New Scotland. The territory had earlier belonged to the French, under the name of Acadia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p871 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p384)Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Relative Value Scales: Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.Medical Staff: Professional medical personnel who provide care to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Patient Simulation: The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Gatekeeping: The controlling of access to health services, usually by primary care providers; often used in managed care settings to reduce utilization of expensive services and reduce referrals. (From BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1999)Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Burnout, Professional: An excessive stress reaction to one's occupational or professional environment. It is manifested by feelings of emotional and physical exhaustion coupled with a sense of frustration and failure.Licensure, Medical: The granting of a license to practice medicine.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Ambulatory Care Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of ambulatory care services and facilities.WisconsinMassachusettsStudents, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.WashingtonDocumentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Codes of Ethics: Systematic statements of principles or rules of appropriate professional conduct, usually established by professional societies.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.
Volume 322, Issue 7278, Page 69. Retrieved on 2007-10-06. Sibbald B (2001-02-20), Doctors asked to take pledge to shun drug ... Patients can use a directory provided by the group to find doctors who have taken the pledge. The group claims that doctors ... American College of Physicians. Retrieved on 2007-10-06. Lenzer J (2005-09-24), Doctors refuse exhibit space to group ... Most of the group's approximately 500 members are doctors, though some are physician assistants, nurses and other practitioners ...
I don't think the issue has been resolved. When we were talking about the conclusions, he [Brind] wanted to make the strongest ... I tried to temper them a little bit, but Dr. Brind is very adamant about his opinion." Experts believe Brind overlooks the ... Brind was an invitee to the National Cancer Institute's conference on the abortion-breast-cancer issue where he was the only ... Issues Law Med. 30: 129-39. Brind, J (2005). "Induced abortion as an independent risk factor for breast cancer: A critical ...
"Physicians Inspect Pesthouse Sites". San Francisco Call. 87 (94). 4 March 1902. Retrieved 1 February 2017. "New Fire Houses in ... Bond Issue". San Francisco Call. 87 (17). 17 December 1901. Retrieved 1 February 2017. "Site Remains to be Selected". San ...
"Coal Ash The toxic threat to our health and environment" (PDF). Physicians for Social Responsibility. Retrieved 3 March 2016. " ... "Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management and Environmental Issues" (PDF). Electric Power Research Institute. Retrieved 3 March ... "How Breathing Coal Ash Is Hazardous To Your Health" (PDF). Physicians for Social Responsibility. Retrieved 3 March 2016. ... "Coal Ash Toxics: Damaging to Human Health" (PDF). Physicians for Social Responsibility. Retrieved 3 March 2016. "Lead and ...
William H. Foege, physician. A lifelong battle against disease". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 26, 2009. " ... Foege W (April 2002). "Keynote address: issues in overcoming iron deficiency". J Nutr. 132 (4 Suppl): 790S-3S. PMID 11925483. ... "2001 Wittenberg Award recipient Dr. William Foege". The Luther Institute. Retrieved September 28, 2009. Strauss E (2001). "Mary ... 2005 Honorary Doctor of Medical Sciences, Yale University, 2005 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal, Sabin Vaccine Institute, 2006 ...
p. 2. Gerrard, David (8 October 2003). "Capable sports doctor an integral team member". Doctor. "Heslop, John Herbert and ... "Alert Newsletter: Issue 153". Royal Society of New Zealand. 9 November 2000. Retrieved 2 October 2014. "Heslop Medal" (PDF). ...
" "Patient Confidentiality at Issue in 1985 Murder Case" "Dr. Bierenbaum's Missing Wife"(Crime Library) Las Vegas Review ... "Doctor Gets 20 Years to Life For the Murder of His Wife" (New York Times) "A man saw surgeon's wife the day she disappeared ... People of the State of New York v. Robert Bierenbaum was a landmark decision, setting precedent on upholding physician-patient ... Lisa DePaulo profiled the Bierenbaum case in her story, "Intimations of Murder" published in the September 2000 issue of Vanity ...
dr. Algirdas Girininkas, dr. Artūras Dubonis, prof. dr. Zigmantas Kiaupa, prof. habil. dr. Jūratė Kiaupienė, dr. Česlovas ... The opportunity to issue a fundamental and comprehensive academic work arose in 2000, when a programme sponsored by the ... dr. Vytautas Kazakevičius, dr. Ilona Vaškevičiūtė, dr. Rasa Banytė Rowell, and dr. Darius Baronas; the responsible editor was ... Tomas Ostrauskas, dr. Vygandas Juodagalvis, hab. dr. Algirdas Girininkas ir dr. Džiugas Brazaitis. Its responsible editor was ...
Other issues raised included: - prisoners forbidden to wear watches. - no radio or TV. - no access to outside physicians. - no ... The only medical help was from physicians on reserve duty doing a one-month tour of duty. There were many cases of skin ... Each unit had three toilets and was issued with 1 liter of chlorine every 20 days. According to DCI, the main problems were: ...
The "Chief Physician" inscription left on her grave by her High Priest son implies that she held a position in which she taught ... Robert F. Phalen (2017). Core Ethics for Health Professionals: Principles, Issues, and Compliance. Springer. p. 77. ISBN ... The physician Merit Ptah should not be confused with Merit-Ptah, the wife of Ramose, the Governor of Thebes and Vizier under ... Another know women physician of ancient Egypt is Peseshet. Ptah and Peseshet are regarded as the earliest recorded woman ...
Issue 04 / December 2010, pp 827-848; doi:10.1017/S0018246X10000452 Stride P, Lopes Floro K. "Henry VIII, McLeod syndrome and ... Jacquetta's curse". J R Coll Physicians Edinb. 43: 353-60. doi:10.4997/JRCPE.2013.417. PMID 24350322. Crandall BF, Spence MA ( ...
Some central issues of palliative are caring for patients at home while adequate care can be given there, reducing or ... London: Royal College of Physicians. pp. 59-100. ISBN 1-86016-283-5. Guidance was reviewed in 2011 and no changes were made. ... London: Royal College of Physicians. pp. 113-33. ISBN 1-86016-283-5. Hasnain M, Vieweg WV, Baron MS, Beatty-Brooks M, Fernandez ... London: Royal College of Physicians. pp. 135-46. ISBN 1-86016-283-5. Goodwin VA, Richards SH, Taylor RS, Taylor AH, Campbell JL ...
"Tobacco Use, Prevention and Cessation". American Academy of Family Physicians. Retrieved 15 June 2016. "The American Academy of ... Pediatrics Issues Sweeping Recommendations on Tobacco and E-Cigarettes". American Academy of Pediatricians. Retrieved 15 June ... Association American Lung Association American Medical Association Institute of Medicine American Academy of Family Physicians ...
... physician assistants support physicians in a range of health care settings and work under the direction of a licensed physician ... 2006). Nursing issues: Primary health care nurse practitioners. Retrieved from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/pubs/nurs-infirm/ ... by NPs or NP/physician teams are considerably less than care provided by physicians within office visits or by physician-only ... On average there is less than one physician per 1,000 people in rural areas, compared to two or more physicians per 1,000 ...
". "JetBrains Releases Bug and Issue Tracking Beta". Dr.Dobb's. http://forum.jetbrains.com/thread/YouTrack-1803 "YouTrack REST ... It focuses on query-based issue search with auto-completion, manipulating issues in batches, customizing the set of issue ... Importing existing projects and issues from other bug tracking systems. Creating, modifying, getting all the issues attributes ... Searching for issues is implemented via search query syntax and performed from a single search box. YouTrack is cross-platform ...
DR; Flicek, P (January 2015). "Ensembl 2015". Nucleic Acids Research. 43 (Database issue): D662-9. doi:10.1093/nar/gku1010. ... 43 (Database issue): D18-22. doi:10.1093/nar/gku1120. PMID 25477381. Cunningham, F; Amode, MR; Barrell, D; Beal, K; Billis, K; ... 42 (Database issue): D32-7. doi:10.1093/nar/gkt1030. PMID 24217914. Kodama, Y; Mashima, J; Kosuge, T; Katayama, T; Fujisawa, T ... 43 (Database issue): D470-8. doi:10.1093/nar/gku1204. PMID 25428363. NHGRI, Tony Burdett, Emma Hastings, Dani Welter, SPOT, ...
Taxonomic resolution issues deriving from the multiplicity and redundancy problems can be dealt with by integrating phytolith ... ISBN 0-306-44208-6. Ciochon, RL; Piperno, DR; Thompson, RG (1990). "Opal phytoliths found on the teeth of the extinct ape ... doi:10.1007/s00334-011-0341-z. Hart, Thomas C. (2016). "Issues and directions in phytolith analysis". Journal of Archaeological ... Jr, George V. Roberts; Susan C. Mulholland; Rapp, George Robert (1992). Phytolith systematics: emerging issues. New York: ...
ISBN 0-7656-1478-2. Igel, Lee (May-June 2008). "The history of health care as a campaign issue" (PDF). Physician Executive. 34 ... The issue of health insurance reform in the United States has been the subject of political debate since the early part of the ... Physicians would receive a periodic payment for a set of defined services, such as care coordination that integrates all ... Instead, President Obama issued Executive Order 13535, reaffirming the principles in the Hyde Amendment. This concession won ...
"Events and issues that made the news in 1971". Your story, our story. National Archives of Australia. Retrieved March 20, 2011 ... ISBN 0-520-21379-3. Maier, Thomas (2003). Dr. Spock. Basic Books. pp. 278-279. ISBN 0-465-04315-1. Rader, Gary (May 1967). " ... "Events and issues that made the news in 1972". Your story, our story. National Archives of Australia. Retrieved March 20, 2011 ... "Protest: Burning Issue". Time. April 28, 1967. Retrieved March 12, 2011. Jezer, Martin (May 1967). "In Response To: We Won't Go ...
Driebergen: Kerk en Wereld (special issues brochure, 13 pages). Prof. dr. A.A. van Ruler, 1948 - at the University of Amsterdam ... Dr. Betteke van Ruler is a scholar in academic theory and practice in Public Relations and Communication science. Betteke van ... Dr. James Stappers of the Radboud University Nijmegen (KUN). Later that year she moved full-time to the department of ... Dr. Arnold van Ruler. 2016 Public Relations: too little emphasis on communication. In Communication Management Review, I. 2015 ...
She found that women found doctors through links of friends and acquaintances and was four degrees separated from the doctor on ... Issues in Criminology, 6(1), pp.33-53. Event held in honor of Harrison White Harrison, Daniel (2001). Theory, Networks, and ... White was born on March 21, 1930 in Washington, D.C.. He had three siblings and his father was a doctor in the US Navy. ... who used social network analysis in her groundbreaking study of how women seeking an abortion found willing doctors before Roe ...
"United Doberman Club: Health Issues in Dobermans". Retrieved 18 June 2011. "Doberman Pinscher Club of Canada: Health Issues in ... Krawiec DR; Heflin D. (1992). "Study of prostatic disease in dogs: 177 cases (1981-1986)". J Am Vet Med Assoc. 200 (8): 1119-22 ... Bennett, P.C.; Perini, E. (2008). "Tail docking in dogs: a review of the issues". Australian Veterinary Journal. 81 (4): 208-18 ...
Doctor John Henry Pinkard (1866-1934) was a Roanoke, Virginia businessman and "Yarb Doctor" or "Herb Doctor" who concocted ... The real issues in the war against quackery are the principles, including scientific rationale, encoded into consumer ... "Dr.Oz-endorsed diet pill study was bogus, researchers admit". cbsnews.com. 20 October 2014. "Dr. Oz Green Coffee Bean Study ... Physicians Edinb. 29 (3): 258-61. PMID 11624001. "Diet advice 1893 style lost doctor his job". Daily Express. 2 January 2008. ...
During her career, Dr. Blumenthal has made important contributions to raising the profile of women's health issues and the ... Dr. Blumenthal has received numerous honorary doctorates and medals, and has been named a top doctor by the New York Times, ... "Physicians: Dr. Susan J Blumenthal". Changing the Face of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved January 8, ... "Doctor Honoris Causa for Susan J. Blumenthal , Sapienza - Università di Roma". en.uniroma1.it. Retrieved 2016-01-08. "Dr. Susan ...
From beginning to end, if there are no further issues and Court permitting, it takes around six months. If there are any ... Squibb, G. D. (1977). Doctors' Commons. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-825339-7. Getzler, J. S. (2004) "Cresswell, ... as to issue a divorce petition, it is clear that the marriage has irretrievably broken down and it would be futile to try to ... who practised civil law from Doctors' Commons, adding to the obscurity of the proceedings. Divorce was de facto restricted to ...
This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to ... to the natural phenomenon that the doctor inventors had discovered. That made the claimed subject matter patent-ineligible as a ... "framing the patent eligible subject matter issue as an issue of claim breadth." Rantanon agrees with Dyk that "Section 112(a) ... The district court said: "[T]he claims at issue pose a substantial risk of preempting the natural phenomenon of paternally ...
Dr. McDonalds office is located in Burke 310.. Contact Dr. McDonald. Dr. Marcia Ozier. Contact Dr. Ozier. Dr. Stephen Perrott ... Her research primarily focuses on issues of organizational justice and interpersonal mistreatment in the workplace. ... Dr. Mark Fleming. Dr. Mark Fleming is the CN Professor of Safety Culture. He received his Bachelors in Psychology and Masters ... Dr. Steven Carroll. Dr. Carroll is a Senior Lecturer, and has been working for the Department of Psychology since 2012. He has ...
Those travelling to Halifax are encouraged to call their physicians office to ensure their procedure is continuing. ... Facilities from across the health authority as well as the IWK Health Centre that have not been affected by the issue are ... The issue has forced the postponement of non-emergency surgeries at the QEII daily since April 20. ... "Patient safety is our main priority as we navigate this issue. We understand the difficulty, concern and worry that cancelling ...
QEII sterilization issue update Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 02:50PM. Nova Scotia Health Authority is now able to confirm the ... Physician Opportunities. Want to know more about practicing in NS? Learn more ... Call to report a technical issue with the "Need a Family Practice" registry service. ...
Dr. MacSween will review treatment benefits for select agents and how to appropriately select which patient for which new ... Call to report a technical issue with the "Need a Family Practice" registry service. ... Dr. Mary Catherine MacSween will present this years Atlantic Cardiovascular Society (ACS) Lecture "Update on Diabetes for 2017 ... Clinical Day in Cardiology is designed to educate physicians and healthcare professionals from Cape Breton and throughout Nova ...
Dr. Sapp soon heads to Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, to work with Dr. Stevenson and complete an ablation that will ... Call to report a technical issue with the "Need a Family Practice" registry service. ... Dr. Sapp, along with mentor Dr. William Stevenson, has led the development of the new ablation catheter, which extends deeper ... "Once we inserted the needle into the heart muscle, we could see it was coming from that deep area," Dr. Sapp explained. "And ...
Getting Your Child Help With Lyme-Related Issues. Lyme & School Information. 504/Special Ed Info. Auditory Hypersensitivity in Children With Lyme Disease Lyme Disease and Impact In School- Dr. Daniel Cameron. The Effects of Lyme Disease On Children & Schools. A School-Based Intervention to Increase Lyme Disease Preventive Measures- Elementary School-Aged Children. BLAST Summer 2017 Social Media Campaign- Prevention. Advocacy Centers for Disabilities Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Guide. Center For Parents and Information Resources. Disability Rights Legal Center. List of Disability Rights Organizations. LDA Information. More About Schooling Kids With Lyme Disease. Lyme Times- Childrens Education Issue- # 45 ...
"People with suspected nerve problems should talk to their doctors about screening tests, especially blood glucose, vitamin B12 ... according to new guidelines issued by the American Academy of Neurology. ... level and serum protein levels, since these tests can often point to common causes of neuropathy," guidelines author Dr. John D ...
Browse the Marvel Comics issue Doctor Strange (1974) #59. Learn where to read it, and check out the comics cover art, variants ...
Doctors Without Borders: Humanitarian Quests, Impossible Dreams of Médecins Sans Frontières * In the Eyes of Others: How People ...
Dr Art Caplan says screening and cognitive testing for older physicians isnt about age discrimination but rather patient ... I Reported My Older Physician Friend for Competency Issues - Medscape - Jun 26, 2019. ... According to PHYSICIANS. * Burnout Might Really Be Depression; How Do Doctors Cope? ... Should doctors have to undergo cognitive testing when they reach a certain age, say 65, 70, or even 75 years, in order to ...
Dr. Stone * 6. Final Battle. Dr. Stone * 7. The Power of Science. Dr. Stone * 8. That Which Destroys or Saves. Dr. Stone * 9. ... Dr. Stone * 1. Prison Break. Dr. Stone * 2. Experience Points. Dr. Stone * 3. Top Secret Mission. Dr. Stone * 4. Fateful 20 ... from Dr.Stone [Dr. Stone] (集英社 [Shueisha], 2017 series) #9. Indexer Notes Cover is a painted version of the splash page from ... Dr. Stone / cover / 1 page (report information) Pencils. Mu-jik Park [as Boichi]. Inks. Mu-jik Park [as Boichi]. Colors. Mu-jik ...
"I was entranced by an essay in Emergency Physicians Monthly . . . If you want to know what professional craftsmanship looks ... 24 - Tuned in with Sound Physicians By Mark L. Plaster, MD, JD ...
... On November 1, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released ... The final rule includes a 26.5% across-the-board reduction to Medicare payment rates for physicians, physical therapists, and ... updates 2013 payment amounts for physicians, physical therapists, and other health care professionals; and revises other ... the final 2013 Medicare physician fee schedule rule, which sets the therapy cap amount on outpatient therapy services for 2013 ...
... doctors of medicine, doctors of podiatry, doctors of chiropractic), why are doctors of physical therapy not also supported as ... CMS Issues Final 2014 Physician Fee Schedule Rule. The final 2014 Medicare physician fee schedule rule (.pdf) released by the ... Physician Quality Reporting System, Physician Compare, Physician Fee Schedule) but then not allow physical therapists to ... Do physicians have more stress when providing physical therapy services? Does electricity cost more when used by physicians? Do ...
"Issues of the Heart" is a collection of topics that we face through-out life. It is designed to present issue monthly and daily ... Dr. Woodley is the proud mother of Alexis and Alex Kelly. She is the surrogate mother of two girls Aliana and Araya. She is ... "Issues of the Heart" is a collection of powerful reflection activities to guide you on your journey toward self-awareness. ... reflections related to the issue. This reflection journal act as a user guide to process where you are and ignite your desire ...
This collection features AFP content on neonatology and newborn issues and related topics, including breastfeeding, ... Expanded Newborn Screening: Information and Resources for the Family Physician 01/15/2010 Universal Screening for Hearing Loss ... This collection features the best content from AFP, as identified by the AFP editors, on neonatology and newborn issues and ... Dont miss a single issue. Sign up for the free AFP email table of contents. ...
Female patients who are seen by male doctors are less likely to be assessed for heart disease risk than male patients, ... "Heart disease seen as a mans issue by many male doctors." Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 22 Jun. 2016. Web.. 20 Feb. ... Brazier, Y. (2016, June 22). "Heart disease seen as a mans issue by many male doctors." Medical News Today. Retrieved from. ... Dr. Delpech notes that physicians were less likely to gather details from female patients about smoking, cholesterol, and blood ...
... issued notices to 25 doctors across the state for engaging in unethical practices. These unethical practices, included ... PMC issues notices to 25 doctors for malpractices Punjab Medical Council (PMC) issued notices to 25 doctors across the state ... The letters issued to doctors read that the advertisements that appeared in various television channels were objectionable and ... PMC registrar issued notices to the doctors of Bathinda, Ludhiana, Chandigarh, Jalandhar, Amritsar and Faridkot, on October 1 ...
The main issue in this case is, are doctors allowed to do everything whats medical possible without the willing of the ... Complicated Medical Issues: Are Doctors Allowed to Do Everything Whats Medical Possible Without the Willing of the Patient?. ... My Opinion on Medical Issues. 1102 Words , 4 Pages not have a hard time working with a physician who is assisting suicide with ... Complicated Medical Issues: Are Doctors Allowed to Do Everything Whats Medical Possible Without the Willing of the Patient? ...
Am Fam Physician. 2005 Jun 15;71(12):2313-2317.. Patient information: See related handout on safe surfing, written by the ... Am Fam Physician. 2001;63:927-36.,941-2.. 26. Ott MC, Lundy LB. Tympanic membrane perforation in adults. How to manage, when to ... Aust Fam Physician. 2002;31:707-10.. 28. Dozier S, Wagner RF Jr, Black SA, Terracina J. Beachfront screening for skin cancer in ... Dr. Zoltan completed a family medicine residency at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla.... ...
It would not be a good idea in my opinion to just stop going to her and see another Dr. right now....jumping from Dr.to Dr. ... Im not sure why your Dr. would have trust issues with you unless you have had trouble with her before and your medicine?.... I ... My doctor is our family physician. I flushed my pills because that is someting that if dont have to have in my house, I dont. ... What type of Dr. has been prescribing the pain medicine to you?. You say that you are back on the patch...so had you tried ...
If drug therapy is desired, physicians and patients should select nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or skeletal muscle ... recommends in an evidence-based clinical practice guideline published today in Annals of Internal Medicine that physicians and ... American College of Physicians issues guideline for treating nonradicular low back pain. American College of Physicians ... American College of Physicians issues guideline for treating nonradicular low back pain Treatment recommendations include ...
22 organisations have issued a stark warning saying that Sydneys smoky air has become a public health emergency. The groups ... John Bonning: Australian doctors issue warning over Sydneys air quality Australian doctors issue warning over Sydneys air ... 22 organisations have issued a stark warning saying that Sydneys smoky air has become a public health emergency. ...
Engine issue causes headache for doctor. Readers Citroen DS3 goes back and forth to the dealer with a mystery engine fault. ... Dr Rachael Clifford bought her new Citroën DS3 in October 2012 for her 60-mile commute to and from her daily hospital rounds - ...
An Issue of Physician Assistant Clinics, Volume 2-3 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780323531467, 9780323531474 ... This issue of Physician Assistant Clinics, guest edited by Fred Wu and Dr. Michael E. Winters, is devoted to Emergency Medicine ... Emergency Medicine, An Issue of Physician Assistant Clinics, Volume 2-3 1st Edition. ... Articles in this outstanding issue include: Anaphylaxis; Back Pain Emergencies; Lethal Rashes; Pregnancy Disasters in the First ...
  • The first, published in November 2018 revealed that 60 to 80 percent of those surveyed did not share pertinent information with their provider regarding daily issues like diet and exercise. (medindia.net)
  • As a 2018 Deloitte survey showed, most physicians are willing to link approximately 10% of their total compensation to quality and cost measures. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • A day after the Bombay high court said the authorities were free to act against the agitators, over 1,200 resident doctors from KEM, Sion and Nair hospitals received showcause notices for not reporting to work for over 72 hours on Wednesday morning. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Meanwhile, the agitation threatened to go beyond Maharashtra's borders, with 20,000 resident doctors at government hospitals in Delhi deciding to go on mass casual leave between 9 am and 4 pm on Thursday. (hindustantimes.com)
  • revisions indicated that any regulatory approach to gainsharing/1 must include flexibility that allows hospitals and physicians to employ the model that best suits their circumstances. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • New physician investment in hospitals is generally prohibited. (bakerdonelson.com)
  • Projects under development are given a series of deadlines for completion, and all hospitals with physician ownership will have additional restrictions on operation in order to continue to qualify for the exceptions. (bakerdonelson.com)
  • Hospitals with outstanding issues should provide formal written comments on the proposed rule, to which CMS must respond when it issues the final rule. (bakerdonelson.com)
  • Overall, CMS does not provide much relief for hospitals that are completing construction or have other issues that need resolution as 2010 draws to a close. (bakerdonelson.com)
  • Entitled "Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Operating Rules for Health Care Electronic Funds Transfer and Remittance Advice Transactions," this rule is projected to save up to $9 billion over the next ten years for physicians, hospitals, and health plans. (jdsupra.com)
  • These operating rules will allow physician practices and hospitals to receive and post payments electronically, significantly decreasing administrative time and costs. (jdsupra.com)
  • Dec. 5 -- THURSDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of blood tests and other specialized assessments seems to be most effective in finding the cause of a common nerve problem called neuropathy, according to new guidelines issued by the American Academy of Neurology. (go.com)
  • PMC president Dr GS Grewal said, "PMC can't afford violation of rules and regulations of the ethical committee. (hindustantimes.com)
  • This issue obviously poses major ethical dilemmas and even legal implications. (bartleby.com)
  • About half of the book deals with psychological, social, and ethical issues, with an effort to discuss both sides of the issues. (annals.org)
  • In either case, essential constitutional issues as well as ethical and medical reflections enter the debate. (rowman.com)
  • While we at American Council on Science and Health have been determined to remain on the sidelines of the raging national debate about the fate of Terri Schiavo (this is largely a legal and ethical issue, not a scientific one), we cannot remain silent about the outrageous misrepresentation of scientific facts about this case that has been occurring in the past ten days. (mu.nu)
  • In Part Two of this handbook, the author will address the following ethical issues: Homosexuality, Abortion, Feminism, Capital Punishment, Death Ethics: Euthanasia, Biomedical Ethics - dealing with the Medical Implications of Artificial Insemination, and the issue of Surrogate Mothers. (askdavid.com)
  • Although by no means an exhaustive study on the foundation of Christian ethics, and contemporary ethical issues, this concise handbook is a MUST read for pastors, church leaders, and followers of Christ who want to be equipped with "knowledge" so that they are able to more effectively minister to this current culture facing an on-slot of ethical crises. (askdavid.com)
  • As per the code of medical ethics of the Medical Council of India, The Indian Medical (professional conduct, etiquette and ethics) Regulations, 2002, and guidelines issued by the PMC, registered medical practitioners cannot insert advertisements of any sorts anywhere in India. (hindustantimes.com)
  • This is a major difference from the guidelines issued last year by the US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF), which recommended against any routine use of the PSA test, concluding that any benefit is outweighed by harm. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • It is pertinent to mention here that nearly 20 doctors were served notices in the month of July and August for such practices. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The suggestions given by Dr Kler like spending more money by the government on health and forming a think tank of 20 or 25 doctors from different fields should be adopted at the earliest to stop these mall practices," Dr Grewal said. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The warning letter also notifies Dr. Berman of significant deviations from the FDA's quality system requirements and current good manufacturing practices (CGMPs), including deviations from manufacturing processes intended to keep implants sterile. (fda.gov)
  • I'm hoping to find comprehensive doctor that practices evidence based medicine, but is going to be really looking at outlier cases and causes, since the obvious causes have been ruled out by the doctors I've seen so far. (metafilter.com)
  • A literature search conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE® and Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC) identified relevant research about doctors between the years 1990 and 2013. (nih.gov)
  • In early 2007, DC published a bi-weekly run of one-shots depicting the search for a new Doctor Fate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our literature review found research on UK doctors for a variety of work-related illnesses with the prevalence varying depending on both specialty and seniority. (nih.gov)
  • A healthy HIV+ person can be a doctor, and isn't confined to infectious diseases as a specialty. (thebody.com)
  • A 4-page issue brief that looks at recent estimates of California's present and future physician supply, various issues that affect the state s physician workforce, and approaches for ensuring an adequate number and mix of primary care and specialty physicians, as well as a balanced geographic and demographic distribution. (kff.org)
  • A national survey of more than 200 pediatric primary care physicians found that while over three-quarters addressed at least one parental health issue, such as maternal depression or parental tobacco use, during child health visits and a majority recognized the impact of such issues on children's health, fewer felt responsible for addressing them. (eurekalert.org)
  • As you look through the lists, a lot of these were mea culpas," said Dr. Eric Topol, chief academic officer of Scripps Health, a health care provider in San Diego. (nytimes.com)
  • The methodology applied by Ipsos is based on a telephone questionnaire with two targets: the general public target (a sample of 1,000 people aged 15 and over) and the doctors target (400 representative doctors: 200 general practitioners and 200 specialized practitioners). (webwire.com)
  • Stevens was introduced in a self-titled series called Fate, launched in the wake of Zero Hour in 1994, which was cancelled after 23 issues in September 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is imperative that physicians, and all people, speak out against hate and hate crimes and against those who foster or perpetrate it, as was seen in the tragic events that occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia," said Jack Ende, MD, MACP, president, ACP. (acponline.org)
  • Prof. Dr. Adolf Windorfer is an expert in epidemics, and from 1997 until 2006 he was in charge of public health in Lower Saxony. (bild.de)
  • The character then starred in The Book of Fate, which ran from February 1997 to January 1998 for twelve issues as part of DC's "Weirdoverse" imprint. (wikipedia.org)
  • The guideline developed by the BC Centre on Substance Use and endorsed by the province encourages primary-care doctors to provide treatment and ongoing care themselves unless a complicated addiction has taken hold. (thestar.com)
  • They wanted to know whether the gender of the physician and the patient would make a difference to the risk assessment. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • not have a hard time working with a physician who is assisting suicide with a patient who is suffering from a terminal illness or going through pain and suffering. (bartleby.com)
  • I believe this is morally acceptable for a physician to assist a patient with suicide because the patient just as well could commit suicide on his or her own. (bartleby.com)
  • Physicians should be allowed to end the terminally ill by painless means, especially if the patient or the family requests it. (bartleby.com)
  • VANCOUVER-Family doctors in British Columbia are being urged to annually screen every patient starting at age 12 to prevent addiction to alcohol, a leading cause of social and economic harms. (thestar.com)
  • However, many doctors hate to talk about end of life issues, so we often wait until, well, it's time- like when the patient is hanging on by a thread. (readthehook.com)
  • But, really, it is difficult to know what a patient would want because there are too many variables that can enter into end-of-life issues for most people. (readthehook.com)
  • Digestive Issues Gone in Only 6 Days! (drharveys.com)
  • I still battle with sugar unfortunately and I'm in no way saying it's good for me but for the record I can eat decent sized servings of candy and ice cream and soda and I have no digestive issues from it. (dietdoctor.com)
  • The NBC 6 Investigators randomly searched through the online profiles of more than a hundred doctors who do plastic surgery in South Florida and took the findings to Dr. Steven Rosenberg who sits on the Florida Board of Medicine. (nbcmiami.com)
  • These findings support stronger recommendations to protect all infants from tobacco smoke exposure," says Dr. Caroline Lodge, senior author. (chestnet.org)
  • In addition, the rule announces a 20.1% reduction in Medicare payment rates for physical therapists (PTs), physicians, and other health care professionals-a cut linked to the flawed sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula being discussed in Congress. (apta.org)
  • The new rule also updates payment amounts for physical therapists, physicians, and other health care professionals, makes changes to the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and revises other payment policies. (apta.org)
  • Dr. Raphaëlle Delpech, a general practitioner (GP) at Paris XI University and INSERM U1018 in Paris, France, and colleagues hypothesized that men might also be receiving better primary care than women. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Learn about RATIO, a skin care line created by Dr. Ordon and plastic surgeon Dr. Ritu Chopra that takes inspiration from nature's golden ratio - perfectly balanced symmetry. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • Concierge physicians can find ways of fulfilling their obligations to take care of people regardless of their ability to pay and to practise nondiscriminatory care. (timescolonist.com)
  • Specifically, what strategies might enable physicians to take an active role in reducing costs while protecting health care quality? (annals.org)
  • Recently, Annals has published 4 articles on health care costs, the last of which appears in this issue. (annals.org)
  • A higher threshold creates the inverse concern that, if physicians must pay more, then they may be incentivized to stint on care. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • Since then, Maryland has received federal approval of and implemented the Hospital Care Improvement Program, Maryland's physician gainsharing program, and the Episode Care Improvement Program, Maryland's bundled care initiative. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • The approach that a physician takes in a consultation with an adolescent might pose an additional barrier to optimal care. (cfp.ca)
  • Strategies to minimize existing barriers to adolescent-physician communication are needed to promote the identification of adolescent health risks and concerns so that physicians can provide better care for this group. (cfp.ca)
  • But the improvement in the lives of HIV-positive people everywhere is only in part due to the tireless efforts of doctors, researchers and health-care workers. (drdicksexadvice.com)
  • My primary care doctor is out of ideas and now I'm revisiting previous doctors to see if they have any suggestions. (metafilter.com)
  • If we have unhappy physician[s] or [burntout] doctors, they're not going to provide the type of care they need to. (beckersasc.com)
  • I've been suffering from fatigue, chronic pain, and weakness, plus a slew of other lesser symptoms, and though I've seen plenty of specialists, none of the doctors I've seen know what is wrong. (metafilter.com)
  • Do you have previous addiction issues? (healingwell.com)
  • By putting the responsibility on the person with the health issue you're waiting for people to get really, really sick and then we're forced to treat the downstream consequences of addiction, which for alcohol include liver disease, heart disease, various brain disorders and a whole host of cancers, not to mention the criminal justice and social fallout of alcohol addiction. (thestar.com)
  • Because he's an addiction doctor and…sometimes people with addictions are homeless I guess? (skepchick.org)
  • That's not how genetics works Dr. Drew, and you should know that because you were an addiction specialist and that has a lot of the same letters as "geneticist. (skepchick.org)
  • Your doctor or physiotherapist has likely blamed that sciatic pain in your leg on problems with your spine, but as Dr Mitchell Yass argues, your back is not the culprit. (wddty.com)
  • Prof. Dr. Thamabovorn, head of Bumrungrad's Anesthesiology Department, graduated from the Faculty of Medicine (First Class Honors), Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, before continuing her studies at the University of California Los Angeles, USA, in the area of anesthesia for adult cardiac surgery and pediatric congenital heart surgery. (bumrungrad.com)
  • People with suspected nerve problems should talk to their doctors about screening tests, especially blood glucose, vitamin B12 level and serum protein levels, since these tests can often point to common causes of neuropathy," guidelines author Dr. John D. England, chairman of the neurology department at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, said in an academy news release. (go.com)
  • Anyway once COVID-19 started tearing through China, Drew used his platform on Fox News as well as his own podcast, "Dose of Dr. Drew," to constantly downplay the danger of the virus. (skepchick.org)
  • I know of a number of women who were told by their doctor that the baby they were carrying was at risk of some defect or abnormality, and abortion was recommended. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • In their 1990 book, The Life and Death Debate: Moral Issues of Our Time , J.P. Moreland and N.L. Geisler declared that there was "not a single national organisation for parents of handicapped children that was on record as favouring abortion for the handicapped. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • In each situation the doctors made it clear that abortion was the preferred option, but each of the three mothers refused, and they now have perfectly healthy and wonderful children. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • Life Issues, our daily radio commentary on abortion and related issues, is carried on over 1,100 radio outlets across the nation. (lifeissues.org)
  • Just as pilots are tested after a certain age to see whether they can function adequately, it seems to me that for physicians and nurses-people who hold lives in their hands-there ought to be some sort of mandated testing. (medscape.com)
  • A professor and epidemics expert has issued a stark swine flu warning - the deadly virus will kill 35,000 people in Germany by the end of the winter! (bild.de)
  • Dr C. Everett Koop, a world-renowned paediatric surgeon who served as Surgeon General of the United States under President Ronald Reagan from 1982 to 1989, spent much of his life working with "deformed" and handicapped people. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • The effects of air pollution on heart health are well known now, and it can be an issue for people in both urban and rural areas of the United States, explained Jeanette Stingone, PhD, of Mount Sinai Health System. (ajmc.com)
  • According to Dr. Cruse, research shows that after about 7 days, only 20 percent of people are still adhering to the diet they started. (bch.org)
  • The other issue is greater numbers of people that are becoming increasingly dependent on food banks. (belfasttelegraph.co.uk)
  • And actually, there's some evidence some people have wheat sensitivity issues without having celiac -- cutting out wheat would catch that as well. (metafilter.com)
  • This concise handbook on "ethics" will address many issues that our culture is struggling with that force people, many times, to make "tough choices" between "right" and "wrong. (askdavid.com)
  • Doctors recommend everyone use condoms, because although PrEP is very effective as a protection against HIV, it does not guard against the transmission of other sexually transmitted diseases. (drdicksexadvice.com)
  • Additional policies that will impact physical therapists include implementation of new functional status codes for reporting therapy services and updates to the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). (apta.org)
  • Dr. McAdoo's attorney told NBC 6 Investigators it was not the doctor's error because he doesn't maintain or manage the websites. (nbcmiami.com)
  • Dr. Ordon adds that not all skin growths are tags, which is why it's important to consult a specialist and to never attempt to remove one at home. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • When Maira's muscles began to waste away and she felt too weak to lift even her own body weight, she and her mother decided that enough was enough, and booked a trip to Brazil-where Maira's family are from-to consult the doctors there. (wddty.com)
  • If the issue is not resolved, doctors in other states like Punjab, Chandigarh, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh may also join the protest," said Dr Pankaj Solanki, president of the Federation of Resident Doctors' Association. (hindustantimes.com)
  • I did talk to the doctor before making potentially significant changes (like increasing my prescribed Vitamin D dose) or to ask for specific tests they hadn't already run (like a blood lead level, since I had potential occupational exposure and it wasn't something they had thought of). (metafilter.com)
  • The primary function of HLA-DR is to present peptide antigens, potentially foreign in origin, to the immune system for the purpose of eliciting or suppressing T-(helper)-cell responses that eventually lead to the production of antibodies against the same peptide antigen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Ordon and Dr. Chopra demonstrate a two-part procedure of Botox injections to mask fine lines followed by hyaluronic acid injections to add volume. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • The final rule includes a 26.5% across-the-board reduction to Medicare payment rates for physicians, physical therapists, and other professionals due to the flawed sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula. (apta.org)
  • By combining these insights with tapping, they can neutralize emotional issues, release stress, relieve physical symptoms, and get a good night's sleep. (emofree.com)
  • Meet with a psychologist to learn stress reduction techniques and reduce anxiety by talking in therapy about the issues which may be impacting on your physical well being. (healthtap.com)
  • They should speak to the their physician about the benefits and harms of testing to determine the best course of action. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • There is less evidence here of benefit," Dr. Carter said, but these men who are at higher risk need to know the benefits and harms of screening, he added. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • More Fun Comics #55 (May 1940) introduced the first Doctor Fate in his own self-titled six page strip. (wikipedia.org)