Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)
A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.
Organic chemicals that form two or more coordination links with an iron ion. Once coordination has occurred, the complex formed is called a chelate. The iron-binding porphyrin group of hemoglobin is an example of a metal chelate found in biological systems.
An iron-binding cyclic trimer of 2,3-dihydroxy-N-benzoyl-L-serine. It is produced by E COLI and other enteric bacteria.
A cyclic peptide consisting of three residues of delta-N-hydroxy-delta-N-acetylornithine. It acts as an iron transport agent in Ustilago sphaerogena.
Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.
An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)
Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.
Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.
Natural product isolated from Streptomyces pilosus. It forms iron complexes and is used as a chelating agent, particularly in the mesylate form.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
An iron-binding beta1-globulin that is synthesized in the LIVER and secreted into the blood. It plays a central role in the transport of IRON throughout the circulation. A variety of transferrin isoforms exist in humans, including some that are considered markers for specific disease states.
A class of weak acids with the general formula R-CONHOH.
Stable iron atoms that have the same atomic number as the element iron, but differ in atomic weight. Fe-54, 57, and 58 are stable iron isotopes.
Five-membered heterocyclic ring structures containing an oxygen in the 1-position and a nitrogen in the 3-position, in distinction from ISOXAZOLES where they are at the 1,2 positions.
An enzyme that utilizes NADH or NADPH to reduce FLAVINS. It is involved in a number of biological processes that require reduced flavin for their functions such as bacterial bioluminescence. Formerly listed as EC 1.6.8.1 and EC 1.5.1.29.
Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.
Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.
Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.
Natural compounds containing alternating carbonyl and methylene groups (beta-polyketones), bioenergenetically derived from repeated condensation of acetyl coenzyme A via malonyl coenzyme A, in a process similar to fatty acid synthesis.
A diverse family of extracellular proteins that bind to small hydrophobic molecules. They were originally characterized as transport proteins, however they may have additional roles such as taking part in the formation of macromolecular complexes with other proteins and binding to CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Inorganic or organic compounds that contain divalent iron.
Benzoate derivatives substituted by one or more hydroxy groups in any position on the benzene ring.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria in the family ALTEROMONADACEAE. The inability to utilize carbohydrates is a distinguishing feature from other genera in the family.
Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.
Complex cytotoxic antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces flocculus or S. rufochronmogenus. It is used in advanced carcinoma and causes leukopenia.
A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.
A lipocalin that was orignally characterized from human TEARS. It is expressed primarily in the LACRIMAL GLAND and the VON EBNER GLANDS. Lipocalin 1 may play a role in olfactory transduction by concentrating and delivering odorants to the ODORANT RECEPTORS.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
A reagent used for the determination of iron.
A multifunctional iron-sulfur protein that is both an iron regulatory protein and cytoplasmic form of aconitate hydratase. It binds to iron regulatory elements found on mRNAs involved in iron metabolism and regulates their translation. Its RNA binding ability and its aconitate hydrolase activity are dependent upon availability of IRON.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped or pleomorphic bacteria which are halotolerant. Members of this genus are capable of growth in sodium chloride concentrations of up to 20% or more. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
A glycoprotein albumin from hen's egg white with strong iron-binding affinity.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Disorders in the processing of iron in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing, & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS, which is found in SOIL and WATER.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
A multifunctional iron-sulfur protein that is both an iron regulatory protein and cytoplasmic form of aconitate hydratase. It binds to iron regulatory elements found on mRNAs involved in iron metabolism and regulates their translation. Its rate of degradation is increased in the presence of IRON.
Ligases that catalyze the joining of adjacent AMINO ACIDS by the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds between their carboxylic acid groups and amine groups.
A technique for growing plants in culture solutions rather than in soil. The roots are immersed in an aerated solution containing the correct proportions of essential mineral salts. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
An imperfect fungus that produces ochratoxins and contaminates EDIBLE GRAIN and coffee beans.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.
Mechanisms of action and interactions of the components of the IMMUNE SYSTEM.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Proteins that are secreted into the blood in increased or decreased quantities by hepatocytes in response to trauma, inflammation, or disease. These proteins can serve as inhibitors or mediators of the inflammatory processes. Certain acute-phase proteins have been used to diagnose and follow the course of diseases or as tumor markers.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.
Chloro(7,12-diethenyl-3,8,13,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-2,18-dipropanoato(4-)-N(21),N(22),N(23),N(24)) ferrate(2-) dihydrogen.
A species of nonpathogenic fluorescent bacteria found in feces, sewage, soil, and water, and which liquefy gelatin.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that causes vascular wilts on a wide range of plant species. It was formerly named Erwinia chrysanthemi.
Periplasmic proteins that scavenge or sense diverse nutrients. In the bacterial environment they usually couple to transporters or chemotaxis receptors on the inner bacterial membrane.
Membrane glycoproteins found in high concentrations on iron-utilizing cells. They specifically bind iron-bearing transferrin, are endocytosed with its ligand and then returned to the cell surface where transferrin without its iron is released.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.
A complex of ferric oxyhydroxide with dextrans of 5000 to 7000 daltons in a viscous solution containing 50 mg/ml of iron. It is supplied as a parenteral preparation and is used as a hematinic. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1292)
Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)
Sets of enzymatic reactions occurring in organisms and that form biochemicals by making new covalent bonds.
A disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a triad of HEMOSIDEROSIS; LIVER CIRRHOSIS; and DIABETES MELLITUS. It is caused by massive iron deposits in parenchymal cells that may develop after a prolonged increase of iron absorption. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)
A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
Proteins, usually acting in oxidation-reduction reactions, containing iron but no porphyrin groups. (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1993, pG-10)
A species of imperfect fungi from which the antibiotic fumigatin is obtained. Its spores may cause respiratory infection in birds and mammals.
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN); A toxic liquid or colorless gas. It is found in the smoke of various tobacco products and released by combustion of nitrogen-containing organic materials.
A mitosporic Onygenales fungal genus causing HISTOPLASMOSIS in humans and animals. Its single species is Histoplasma capsulatum which has two varieties: H. capsulatum var. capsulatum and H. capsulatum var. duboisii. Its teleomorph is AJELLOMYCES capsulatus.
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
... is a mucosal pathogen and produces the hydroxamate type alcaligin siderophore under iron-limited conditions. Genes involved in ... Bordetella bronchiseptica의 alcaligin siderophore 생합성 유전자인 alcA에 관한 연구. 황호순,김영희,김삼웅,유종언,유아영,강호영,이태호,Hwang,,Ho-Soon,Kim,,Young- ... alc 오페론 중 promoter와 alcA 유전자만을 가지는 재조합 플라스미드를 B. bronchiseptica Hl에 도입하였을 때 alcaligin siderophore의 생산이 회복됨을 확인할 수 있었다. 이상의 ... The mutant strain produced reduced amount of siderophore as expected. When a plasmid containing complete alcA gene was ...
Siderophores are small organic molecules produced by microorganisms under iron-limiting conditions which enhance the uptake of ... iron powder rotary dryer, iron powder rotary dryer Alibaba.com offers 934 iron powder rotary dryer products. About 9% of these ... small scrap crusheramroninternationalin, manufacturing amp supplying iron scrap shredder , centralcast iron crushercast iron ... iron powder, coke, aluminum, iron, iron oxide, carbon powder, charcoal powder, slag, gypsum, tailings, sewage sludge, kaolin, ...
Microbes such as bacteria and fungi secret natural compounds known as "siderophores" to siphon essential nutrients like iron ... "We essentially created an artificial siderophore to improve the way materials select and bind uranium," he said. ... The journal article is published as "Siderophore-Inspired Chelator Hijacks Uranium from Aqueous Medium." ... Popovs took inspiration from the chemistry of iron-hungry microorganisms. ...
As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the ... As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the ... As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the ... As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Voltammetric Estimation of Iron(III) Thermodynamic Stability Constants for Catecholate Siderophores Isolated from Marine ... Siderophores of Marinobacter aquaeolei: petrobactin and its sulfonated derivatives.. Biometals. 22(4):565-71. ... Competition Among Marine Phytoplankton for Different Chelated Iron Species. Nature. 400:858-861. ...
Interactions Between Iron Availability, Aluminium Toxicity and Fungal Siderophores Biometals : an International Journal on the ...
For example, production of photo-active iron-binding ligands has highlighted how bacteria may mediate enhanced iron uptake ... However, we believe Marinobacter s importance extends beyond just producing siderophores, and one speculation is that they may ...
Cultured under Conditions Mimicking the previous download going Lung Reveals examined Iron Acquisition via the Siderophore ...
The most common forms of biological weathering are the release of chelating compounds (i.e. organic acids, siderophores) and of ... acidifying molecules (i.e. protons, organic acids) by plants so as to break down aluminium and iron containing compounds in the ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Photochemical reactivity of siderophores produced by marine heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria based on characteristic Fe ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Self-assembling amphiphilic siderophores from marine bacteria.. Science. 287(5456):1245-7. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Self-assembling amphiphilic siderophores from marine bacteria.. Science. 287(5456):1245-7. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Self-assembling amphiphilic siderophores from marine bacteria.. Science. 287(5456):1245-7. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Membrane affinity of the amphiphilic marinobactin siderophores.. J Am Chem Soc. 124(45):13408-15. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Photochemical reactivity of siderophores produced by marine heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria based on characteristic Fe ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Loihichelins A-F, a suite of amphiphilic siderophores produced by the marine bacterium Halomonas LOB-5.. J Nat Prod. 72(5):884- ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ... Self-assembling amphiphilic siderophores from marine bacteria.. Science. 287(5456):1245-7. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
We investigate siderophores in microbial iron uptake, metalloenzyme halogenation, catechol adhesion & lignin disassembly. ...
A scientific society devoted to the study of metals in biological systems.
For example, iron oxides are converted to iron hydroxides and the hydration of anhydrite forms gypsum.[37] ... such as certain organic acids and siderophores) and of carbon dioxide and organic acids by plants. Roots can build up the ... The most commonly observed is the oxidation of Fe2+ (iron) by oxygen and water to form Fe3+ oxides and hydroxides such as ... All are converted into a mixture of clay minerals and iron oxides.[31] The resulting soil is depleted in calcium, sodium, and ...
animals of levels, other as their download fourier analysis and hausdorff, mass-surveillance, and siderophore. A Martian theft ... with Derivatives of Adamantane or with Orally international interactions as nutrient models for Treating Iron Overload. Journal ...
The Kümmerli group publishes their collaborative work on iron-driven phytopathogen control by natural rhizosphere microbiomes ... The Kümmerli group publishes their work on drivers of siderophore-mediated social interactions in natural bacterial communities ... The Kümmerli group publishes their review on bacterial siderophores in community and host interactions ... The Kümmerli group publishes their work on genetic constraints of siderophore cooperation exploitation in Burkholderia ...
Cefiderocol: a siderophore cephalosporin with activity against carbapenem-resistant and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative ... THE BATTLE FOR IRON STRUCTURE RESISTANCE MECHANISMS MOA * MICROBIOLOGY ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY SURVEILLANCE DATA DIAGNOSTIC ...
  • Self-assembling amphiphilic siderophores from marine bacteria. (ucsb.edu)
  • Loihichelins A-F, a suite of amphiphilic siderophores produced by the marine bacterium Halomonas LOB-5. (ucsb.edu)
  • Microbes such as bacteria and fungi secret natural compounds known as "siderophores" to siphon essential nutrients like iron from their hosts. (eteconline.org)
  • Importantly, the siderophore-like activity was only observed when the CDM cultures were inoculated to relatively high density with bacteria that had been grown overnight to log or early stationary phase in CDM or buffered yeast extract. (northwestern.edu)
  • 1995. Voltammetric Estimation of Iron(III) Thermodynamic Stability Constants for Catecholate Siderophores Isolated from Marine Bacteria and Cyanobacteria . (ucsb.edu)
  • For example, production of photo-active iron-binding ligands has highlighted how bacteria may mediate enhanced iron uptake rates by phytoplankton. (edu.au)
  • Siderophores of Marinobacter aquaeolei: petrobactin and its sulfonated derivatives. (ucsb.edu)
  • However, we believe Marinobacter s importance extends beyond just producing siderophores, and one speculation is that they may represent a keystone microbial species in algal-associated communities. (edu.au)
  • Siderophores are small organic molecules produced by microorganisms under iron-limiting conditions which enhance the uptake of iron to the microorganisms. (view-event.de)
  • The most common forms of biological weathering are the release of chelating compounds (i.e. organic acids, siderophores) and of acidifying molecules (i.e. protons, organic acids) by plants so as to break down aluminium and iron containing compounds in the soils beneath them. (jimmypattonofficial.com)
  • Popovs took inspiration from the chemistry of iron-hungry microorganisms. (eteconline.org)
  • 1999. Competition Among Marine Phytoplankton for Different Chelated Iron Species . (ucsb.edu)
  • In environment, the ferric form of iron is insoluble and inaccessible at physiological pH (7.35-7.40). (view-event.de)
  • constructs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian Epidemic Strain 1( AES-1) Cultured under Conditions Mimicking the previous download going Lung Reveals examined Iron Acquisition via the Siderophore Pyochelin. (peterzahn.com)
  • animals of levels, other as their download fourier analysis and hausdorff, mass-surveillance, and siderophore. (peacefulspiritmassage.com)

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