Iritis: Inflammation of the iris characterized by circumcorneal injection, aqueous flare, keratotic precipitates, and constricted and sluggish pupil along with discoloration of the iris.ConjunctivitisMucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome: An acute, febrile, mucocutaneous condition accompanied by swelling of cervical lymph nodes in infants and young children. The principal symptoms are fever, congestion of the ocular conjunctivae, reddening of the lips and oral cavity, protuberance of tongue papillae, and edema or erythema of the extremities.Coronary Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.Immunoglobulins, Intravenous: Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Iridocyclitis: Acute or chronic inflammation of the iris and ciliary body characterized by exudates into the anterior chamber, discoloration of the iris, and constricted, sluggish pupil. Symptoms include radiating pain, photophobia, lacrimation, and interference with vision.Uveitis, Anterior: Inflammation of the anterior uvea comprising the iris, angle structures, and the ciliary body. Manifestations of this disorder include ciliary injection, exudation into the anterior chamber, iris changes, and adhesions between the iris and lens (posterior synechiae). Intraocular pressure may be increased or reduced.Uvea: The pigmented vascular coat of the eyeball, consisting of the CHOROID; CILIARY BODY; and IRIS, which are continuous with each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ophthalmia, Sympathetic: Granulomatous uveitis which follows in one eye after a penetrating injury to the other eye; the secondarily affected eye is called the sympathizing eye, and the injured eye is called the exciting or activating eye.Ophthalmia Neonatorum: Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.

Confocal microscopy in the iridocorneal endothelial syndrome. (1/48)

AIMS: To report the appearances of iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome from real time, white light confocal microscopy. METHODS: Three consecutive patients, each with ICE syndrome, were examined prospectively. Corneal specular and confocal microscopic examinations were performed in all three patients. In the first patient, a penetrating keratoplasty was performed and the cornea was examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. No surgery was performed in the remaining two patients. RESULTS: In the first patient corneal oedema prevented endothelial specular microscopy. Confocal microscopy performed before penetrating keratoplasty successfully revealed abnormal epithelial-like endothelial cells. Histological examinations of the cornea following penetrating keratoplasty revealed the presence of multilayered endothelial cells with epithelial features (microvilli). In the remaining two patients, specular microscopy showed the presence of ICE cells with typical dark/light reversal. Confocal microscopy demonstrated groups of endothelial cells with epitheloid appearances. In all three patients, the contralateral endothelial appearance was normal by specular and confocal microscopy, except for moderate endothelial polymegathism in one patient. Epithelial-like endothelial cells were characterised by prominent nuclei on confocal microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The application of confocal microscopy indicates that the ICE syndrome is characterised by epitheloid changes in the endothelium. Confocal microscopy may be used to diagnose the ICE syndrome by demonstrating epithelial-like endothelial cells with hyperreflective nuclei. This technique is especially of value in cases of corneal oedema, since specular microscopy may fail to image the endothelium in such cases.  (+info)

Effect of local corticosteroids on antibody-forming cells in the eye and draining lymph nodes. (2/48)

Significant numbers of antibody-forming cells (AFC) have been found in the cornea, uveal tract, and draining lymph nodes after the intracorneal injection of bovine gamma-globulin (BGG). To study the effect of locally administered corticosteroids on these antibody-forming tissues, we made unilateral intracorneal injections of rabbit eyes with BGG. These we followed immediately with subconjunctival injections of 10 mg. of triamcinolone suspension, and then with a second round of 10 mg. injections seven days later. A control group of animals received the BGG injections followed by two subconjunctival saline injections. We killed the animals on postinjection days 6, 9, 12, 15, and 21, and tested the draining lymph nodes, homolateral uveal tissue, and homolateral cornea for AFC by a modification of the Jerne placque technique. The local steroids had no effect on the number of AFC produced in the draining lymph nodes or on the circulating antibody response, but they reduced the number of AFC in the homolateral uveal tracts and corneas. Clinically there was less inflammatory response in the steroid-treated eyes than in the control eyes. The possible mechanisms by which corticosteroids achieve their anti-immunologic and anti-inflammatory benefits are discussed.  (+info)

Prolonged prodrome, systemic vasculitis, and deafness in Cogan's syndrome. (3/48)

Cogan's syndrome is a rare, multisystem disease which occurs predominantly in children and young adults. It was originally described as the combination of interstitial keratitis and audiovestibular disturbance, but other forms of ocular disease, as well as systemic vasculitis, have since been recognised as part of the syndrome. Diagnosis can be difficult if the various manifestations occur separately, but early recognition is important because prompt treatment may prevent deafness. Two cases are presented here illustrating the features of this disease, and providing histological evidence of systemic vasculitis in both.  (+info)

Blockage of complement regulators in the conjunctiva and within the eye leads to massive inflammation and iritis. (4/48)

The open environment of the eye is continuously subject to an influx of foreign agents that can activate complement. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF), membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and CD59 are regulators that protect self-cells from autologous complement activation on their surfaces. They are expressed in the eye at unusually high levels but their physiological importance in this site is unstudied. In the rat, a structural analogue termed 5I2 antigen (5I2 Ag) has actions overlapping DAF and MCP. In this investigation, we injected F(ab')2 fragments of 5I2 mAb into the conjunctiva and aqueous humor, in the latter case with and without concomitant blockage of CD59. Massive neutrophilic infiltration of the stroma and iris resulted upon blocking 5I2 Ag activity. Frank necrosis of the iris occurred upon concomitant intraocular blockage of CD59. C3b was identified immunohistochemically, and minimal effects were seen in complement-depleted animals and in those treated with non-relevant antibody. The finding that blockage of 5I2 Ag function in periocular tissues and within the eye causes intense conjunctival inflammation and iritis demonstrates the importance of intrinsic complement regulators in protecting ocular tissues from spontaneous or bystander attack by autologous complement.  (+info)

Increased prevalence of familial autoimmunity in simplex and multiplex families with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. (5/48)

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the prevalence of autoimmunity among relatives of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is greater than that among relatives of healthy volunteer control subjects. METHODS: Interviews were used to obtain histories of the following disorders among living first- and second-degree relatives of 110 patients and 45 controls: alopecia areata, ankylosing spondylitis, dermatomyositis, Graves' disease, Hashimoto thyroiditis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, inflammatory bowel disease, iritis, JRA, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo. Chi-squares, odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Families of 23 JRA affected sibpairs were interviewed subsequently. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between patients and controls with regard to age, sex, ethnicity, or family size. Patients had 1,228 relatives and controls had 496 relatives. Of all the relatives of the patients, 155 had at least 1 autoimmune disorder, compared with 20 relatives of the controls (12.6% versus 4.0%; OR 3.4 [95% CI 2.1-5.7], P < 0.000001). The prevalence of autoimmunity was increased in first-degree and in second-degree relatives of patients (16.1% and 10.6%, respectively). The prevalence of Hashimoto thyroiditis was significantly higher in the relatives of patients (OR 3.5 [95% CI 1.6-7.9], P = 0.0008). The prevalences of other disorders were not significantly different. JRA affected sibpair families had an increased prevalence of autoimmunity (15.0%). A history of arthritis was found significantly more frequently in the JRA affected sibpair families, but not in the simplex families. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that the prevalence of autoimmunity is significantly higher among first- and second-degree relatives of JRA patients. This suggests that clinically different autoimmune phenotypes may share common susceptibility genes, which may act as risk factors for autoimmunity.  (+info)

An unusual case of late ocular changes after lightning injury. (6/48)

We describe a case of late ocular changes after lightning injury. One year after the injury, complete ankyloblepharon, severe dry eye, corneal opacity, healed iritis and mature cataracts were noted in both eyes of the patient.  (+info)

An ocular model of adenovirus type 5 infection in the NZ rabbit. (7/48)

Ocular adenoviral infections occur worldwide, and currently, there is no ocular animal model for evaluating new antivirals or studying pathogenesis. With a paired-eye design, an ocular model was developed in 32 New Zealand rabbits following topical and intrastromal inoculation with a clinical isolate of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 McEwen). Clinical signs of infection--conjunctivitis, corneal edema, subepithelial infiltrates, and iritis--and seroconversion were evaluated. Replicating virus on the ocular surface was determined by serial ocular titers. Reproducible acute ocular infection was demonstrated in 32 of 32 infected eyes (100%), with mean viral replication lasting for 8.3 days. Peak ocular viral titers (10(3) plaque forming units/ml) were achieved on day three after inoculation and represented a 2 log increase (100 times) over day one. Ocular viral replication was associated with acute conjunctivitis (24/34 eyes, 75%), and delayed-onset presumed immune-mediated clinical disease was associated with: blepharoconjunctivitis (21/32 eyes, 66%), iritis (29/32 eyes, 91%), corneal edema (32/32 eyes, 100%), and subepithelial corneal infiltrates (30/32 eyes, 94%). Seroconversion was demonstrated in 26 of 31 rabbits (84%). The study concludes that a potentially useful animal model of adenoviral ocular infection can be attained.  (+info)

Genetic modulation of antigen presentation by HLA-B27 molecules. (8/48)

In studies of antigenic peptide presentation, we have found a healthy volunteer whose lymphoblastoid cells were unable to present three different virus-derived epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) despite expressing the correct restricting HLA-B27 molecules on the cell surface. B cell lines were established from other members of the donor's family, including individuals suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and related diseases, and were tested for their ability to function as target cells in the same assay. None of the eight B cell lines that expressed HLA-B27 presented a known peptide epitope to CTL. However, cells from a family member that expressed HLA-B8 could present an epitope peptide restricted by that molecule. The B27 molecule in this family proved to be the B2702 subtype on isoelectric focusing gels, appearing in exactly the same position as B2702 from other cell lines that did present the peptide. To exclude mutations resulting in noncharged amino acid substitutions, cDNA coding for B2702 was cloned from the proband's cell line and sequenced. No coding changes were found. The cloned cDNA was transfected into HLA-A- and B-negative HMy/C1R cells, and the B2702 molecules generated in this environment rendered these cells, after incubation with peptide, susceptible to lysis by peptide-specific CTL. These data are compatible with the presence of a factor(s), possibly HLA linked, interfering with antigen presentation by otherwise normal B2702 molecules in this family.  (+info)

  • 2,11,13) Other less common ocular findings in trigeminal trophic syndrome are neurotrophic keratitis, iritis , and corneal ulceration and opacification. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Complications - Iritis develops in about 12% of patients receiving an artificial lens after cataract surgery and 10% of patients receiving an implanted miniature telescope in the eye. (naturaleyecare.com)
  • His condition may have been brought on, it is now believed, by regular doses of mercury he was given to cure iritis , a painful condition of the eye. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Side-effect of certain medications can include iritis, such as an antibiotic called rifabutin (Mycobutin) for treating tuberculosis, and an antiviral medication called cidofovir (Vistide) used by HIV patients to treat an infection of retina, cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. (naturaleyecare.com)
  • Iritis is treated with antibiotics antibiotic, any of a variety of substances, usually obtained from microorganisms, that inhibit the growth of or destroy certain other microorganisms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Nontraumatic iritis is frequently associated with certain systemic diseases (diseases that affects multiple locations throughout the body), such as ankylosing spondylitis , Reiter syndrome, sarcoidosis , tuberculosis , inflammatory bowel disease , Behçet's disease, the HLA-B27-associated joint disorders, and psoriasis . (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Learn about uveitis -- often referred to as iritis -- in spondylitis and its family related diseases. (spondylitis.org)
  • Nontraumatic iritis often is associated with systemic diseases including juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Reiter syndrome, sarcoidosis, and ankylosing spondylitis. (statpearls.com)
  • Iritis can occur independently or in association with inflammation elsewhere in the body, such as the joints (arthritis or spondylitis) the teeth or sinuses, or the bowels (colitis). (eyes4kids.com)
  • Individuals suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and other HLAB27 related diseases are at a higher risk of developing Iritis. (naturalcurefor.com)
  • 37-year-old with iritis learns he has incurable ankylosing spondylitis. (go.com)
  • Up to 40 percent of all individuals with ankylosing spondylitis will experience at least one episode of iritis during the course of their disease. (go.com)
  • People with HLA-B27, a specific change in a gene that's essential for healthy immune system function, are more likely to develop iritis. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • Side-effect of certain medications can include iritis, such as an antibiotic called rifabutin (Mycobutin) for treating tuberculosis, and an antiviral medication called cidofovir (Vistide) used by HIV patients to treat an infection of retina, cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. (naturaleyecare.com)
  • Iritis is characterized by severe pain, usually radiating to the forehead and becoming worse at night. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If the iritis is severe and does not respond well to medication, you may need steroid injections, given under the conjunctiva (the membrane overlying the eyeball), or steroid pills which must be taken exactly as directed to help reduce serious side effects. (eyes4kids.com)
  • This is critically important, because an iritis that doesn't involve the cornea is typically managed with corticosteroids and cycloplegic agents. (reviewofoptometry.com)
Iritis and Uveitis Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, Causes
Iritis and Uveitis Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, Causes (emedicine.medscape.com)
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Iritis Uveitis | Boston Children's Hospital (childrenshospital.org)
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Iritis - Minor Irritation or Major Warning? - Natural Eye Care Blog: News & Research on Vision (naturaleyecare.com)
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Vistide (Cidofovir): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
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Rheumatoid Arthritis and Eye Health: Complications to Watch Out For  | HealthCentral
Rheumatoid Arthritis and Eye Health: Complications to Watch Out For | HealthCentral (healthcentral.com)
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Cortisone Dosage Guide with Precautions - Drugs.com (drugs.com)
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Iritis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Is It Serious? (emedicinehealth.com)
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Clinical Practice Guidelines : Acute red eye (rch.org.au)
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Uveitis: Symptoms, causes and treatment | All About Vision (allaboutvision.com)
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Local U.S. City Resources for Iritis on MedicineNet.com (medicinenet.com)
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Iritis Center by MedicineNet.com (medicinenet.com)
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Norrie disease: MedlinePlus Genetics (medlineplus.gov)
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What are the test called to see if you have Ankylosing Spondylitis? | Yahoo Answers (answers.yahoo.com)
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Male Urethritis Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, Causes (emedicine.medscape.com)
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Zonegran - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
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