Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
Cationic ionophore antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces lasaliensis that, among other effects, dissociates the calcium fluxes in muscle fibers. It is used as a coccidiostat, especially in poultry.
A polyether antibiotic which affects ion transport and ATPase activity in mitochondria. It is produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.
A cyclododecadepsipeptide ionophore antibiotic produced by Streptomyces fulvissimus and related to the enniatins. It is composed of 3 moles each of L-valine, D-alpha-hydroxyisovaleric acid, D-valine, and L-lactic acid linked alternately to form a 36-membered ring. (From Merck Index, 11th ed) Valinomycin is a potassium selective ionophore and is commonly used as a tool in biochemical studies.
An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.
A divalent calcium ionophore that is widely used as a tool to investigate the role of intracellular calcium in cellular processes.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to POTASSIUM ions.
'Ethers' in a medical context are a class of organic compounds used as medication, particularly as an inhalational agent to induce and maintain general anesthesia, characterized by their ability to produce a state of unconsciousness while providing muscle relaxation and analgesia.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to SODIUM ions.
A proton ionophore. It is commonly used as an uncoupling agent and inhibitor of photosynthesis because of its effects on mitochondrial and chloroplast membranes.
A proton ionophore that is commonly used as an uncoupling agent in biochemical studies.
A group of peptide antibiotics from BACILLUS brevis. Gramicidin C or S is a cyclic, ten-amino acid polypeptide and gramicidins A, B, D are linear. Gramicidin is one of the two principal components of TYROTHRICIN.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Compounds with a 5-membered ring of four carbons and an oxygen. They are aromatic heterocycles. The reduced form is tetrahydrofuran.
Butylamines are a class of organic compounds where a butyl group is attached to an amine functional group, with the general structure (C4H9)NHR or (C4H9)NR'R", commonly used as stimulants, entactogens, and psychedelics.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
Electrodes which can be used to measure the concentration of particular ions in cells, tissues, or solutions.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to PROTONS.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
Solution titration in which the end point is read from the electrode-potential variations with the concentrations of potential determining ions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
'Methylamines' are organic compounds consisting of a methyl group (CH3) linked to an amino group (-NH2), with the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group, and they exist as colorless gases or liquids at room temperature.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.
Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.
A carbodiimide that is used as a chemical intermediate and coupling agent in peptide synthesis. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)
2-Hydroxy-N-phenylbenzamides. N-phenyl substituted salicylamides. Derivatives have been used as fungicides, anti-mildew agents and topical antifungal agents. In concentrated form may cause irritation of skin and mucous membranes.
A toxic dye, chemically related to trinitrophenol (picric acid), used in biochemical studies of oxidative processes where it uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. It is also used as a metabolic stimulant. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
Agents useful in the treatment or prevention of COCCIDIOSIS in man or animals.
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of CELL MEMBRANES to CALCIUM ions.
Metallochrome indicator that changes color when complexed to the calcium ion under physiological conditions. It is used to measure local calcium ion concentrations in vivo.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A highly poisonous compound that is an inhibitor of many metabolic processes, but has been shown to be an especially potent inhibitor of heme enzymes and hemeproteins. It is used in many industrial processes.
An acidifying agent that has expectorant and diuretic effects. Also used in etching and batteries and as a flux in electroplating.
A potentially neurotoxic 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative long used as a topical anti-infective, intestinal antiamebic, and vaginal trichomonacide. The oral preparation has been shown to cause subacute myelo-optic neuropathy and has been banned worldwide.
The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
'Pyrans' are heterocyclic organic compounds containing a six-membered ring with one oxygen atom and five carbon atoms, which can be found in various natural substances and synthesized compounds, and may have potential applications in medicinal chemistry.
Lanthanum. The prototypical element in the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol La, atomic number 57, and atomic weight 138.91. Lanthanide ion is used in experimental biology as a calcium antagonist; lanthanum oxide improves the optical properties of glass.
Chemical agents that uncouple oxidation from phosphorylation in the metabolic cycle so that ATP synthesis does not occur. Included here are those IONOPHORES that disrupt electron transfer by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
Artificial, single or multilaminar vesicles (made from lecithins or other lipids) that are used for the delivery of a variety of biological molecules or molecular complexes to cells, for example, drug delivery and gene transfer. They are also used to study membranes and membrane proteins.
Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.
Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.
A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Inorganic or organic salts and esters of arsenic acid.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms with a valence of plus 2, which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
Organic compounds that contain two nitro groups attached to a phenol.
A class of compounds composed of repeating 5-carbon units of HEMITERPENES.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of man and animals, animal and plant products, infections of soft tissue, and soil. Some species may be pathogenic. No endospores are produced. The genus Eubacterium should not be confused with EUBACTERIA, one of the three domains of life.
Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.
Quinolines substituted in any position by one or more amino groups.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
A class of morphologically heterogeneous cytoplasmic particles in animal and plant tissues characterized by their content of hydrolytic enzymes and the structure-linked latency of these enzymes. The intracellular functions of lysosomes depend on their lytic potential. The single unit membrane of the lysosome acts as a barrier between the enzymes enclosed in the lysosome and the external substrate. The activity of the enzymes contained in lysosomes is limited or nil unless the vesicle in which they are enclosed is ruptured. Such rupture is supposed to be under metabolic (hormonal) control. (From Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
A group of often glycosylated macrocyclic compounds formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES cyclized into a large (typically 12, 14, or 16)-membered lactone. Macrolides belong to the POLYKETIDES class of natural products, and many members exhibit ANTIBIOTIC properties.
A calcium channel blocker that is a class IV anti-arrhythmia agent.
A sesquiterpene lactone found in roots of THAPSIA. It inhibits CA(2+)-TRANSPORTING ATPASE mediated uptake of CALCIUM into SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM.
One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.
A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.
An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.
The secretion of histamine from mast cell and basophil granules by exocytosis. This can be initiated by a number of factors, all of which involve binding of IgE, cross-linked by antigen, to the mast cell or basophil's Fc receptors. Once released, histamine binds to a number of different target cell receptors and exerts a wide variety of effects.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.
Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.
The prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in the systemic therapy of amebic liver abscesses.
A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The vapor state of matter; nonelastic fluids in which the molecules are in free movement and their mean positions far apart. Gases tend to expand indefinitely, to diffuse and mix readily with other gases, to have definite relations of volume, temperature, and pressure, and to condense or liquefy at low temperatures or under sufficient pressure. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A closely related group of toxic substances elaborated by various strains of Streptomyces. They are 26-membered macrolides with lactone moieties and double bonds and inhibit various ATPases, causing uncoupling of phosphorylation from mitochondrial respiration. Used as tools in cytochemistry. Some specific oligomycins are RUTAMYCIN, peliomycin, and botrycidin (formerly venturicidin X).
An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Protein-lipid combinations abundant in brain tissue, but also present in a wide variety of animal and plant tissues. In contrast to lipoproteins, they are insoluble in water, but soluble in a chloroform-methanol mixture. The protein moiety has a high content of hydrophobic amino acids. The associated lipids consist of a mixture of GLYCEROPHOSPHATES; CEREBROSIDES; and SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS; while lipoproteins contain PHOSPHOLIPIDS; CHOLESTEROL; and TRIGLYCERIDES.
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.
A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.
The increase in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
Organic or inorganic compounds that contain the -N3 group.
Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.
A non-pathogenic species of LACTOCOCCUS found in DAIRY PRODUCTS and responsible for the souring of MILK and the production of LACTIC ACID.
An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.

Acetylcholine-induced membrane potential changes in endothelial cells of rabbit aortic valve. (1/1922)

1. Using a microelectrode technique, acetylcholine (ACh)-induced membrane potential changes were characterized using various types of inhibitors of K+ and Cl- channels in rabbit aortic valve endothelial cells (RAVEC). 2. ACh produced transient then sustained membrane hyperpolarizations. Withdrawal of ACh evoked a transient depolarization. 3. High K+ blocked and low K+ potentiated the two ACh-induced hyperpolarizations. Charybdotoxin (ChTX) attenuated the ACh-induced transient and sustained hyperpolarizations; apamin inhibited only the sustained hyperpolarization. In the combined presence of ChTX and apamin, ACh produced a depolarization. 4. In Ca2+-free solution or in the presence of Co2+ or Ni2+, ACh produced a transient hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. In BAPTA-AM-treated cells, ACh produced only a depolarization. 5. A low concentration of A23187 attenuated the ACh-induced transient, but not the sustained, hyperpolarization. In the presence of cyclopiazonic acid, the hyperpolarization induced by ACh was maintained after ACh removal; this maintained hyperpolarization was blocked by Co2+. 6. Both NPPB and hypertonic solution inhibited the membrane depolarization seen after ACh washout. Bumetanide also attenuated this depolarization. 7. It is concluded that in RAVEC, ACh produces a two-component hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. It is suggested that ACh-induced Ca2+ release from the storage sites causes a transient hyperpolarization due to activation of ChTX-sensitive K+ channels and that ACh-activated Ca2+ influx causes a sustained hyperpolarization by activating both ChTX- and apamin-sensitive K+ channels. Both volume-sensitive Cl- channels and the Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter probably contribute to the ACh-induced depolarization.  (+info)

The cyclo-oxygenase-dependent regulation of rabbit vein contraction: evidence for a prostaglandin E2-mediated relaxation. (2/1922)

1. Arachidonic acid (0.01-1 microM) induced relaxation of precontracted rings of rabbit saphenous vein, which was counteracted by contraction at concentrations higher than 1 microM. Concentrations higher than 1 microM were required to induce dose-dependent contraction of vena cava and thoracic aorta from the same animals. 2. Pretreatment with a TP receptor antagonist (GR32191B or SQ29548, 3 microM) potentiated the relaxant effect in the saphenous vein, revealed a vasorelaxant component in the vena cava response and did not affect the response of the aorta. 3. Removal of the endothelium from the venous rings, caused a 10 fold rightward shift in the concentration-relaxation curves to arachidonic acid. Whether or not the endothelium was present, the arachidonic acid-induced relaxations were prevented by indomethacin (10 microM) pretreatment. 4. In the saphenous vein, PGE2 was respectively a 50 and 100 fold more potent relaxant prostaglandin than PGI2 and PGD2. Pretreatment with the EP4 receptor antagonist, AH23848B, shifted the concentration-relaxation curves of this tissue to arachidonic acid in a dose-dependent manner. 5. In the presence of 1 microM arachidonic acid, venous rings produced 8-10 fold more PGE2 than did aorta whereas 6keto-PGF1alpha and TXB2 productions remained comparable. 6. Intact rings of saphenous vein relaxed in response to A23187. Pretreatment with L-NAME (100 microM) or indomethacin (10 microM) reduced this response by 50% whereas concomitant pretreatment totally suppressed it. After endothelium removal, the remaining relaxing response to A23187 was prevented by indomethacin but not affected by L-NAME. 7. We conclude that stimulation of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway by arachidonic acid induced endothelium-dependent, PGE2/EP4 mediated relaxation of the rabbit saphenous vein. This process might participate in the A23187-induced relaxation of the saphenous vein and account for a relaxing component in the response of the vena cava to arachidonic acid. It was not observed in thoracic aorta because of the lack of a vasodilatory receptor and/or the poorer ability of this tissue than veins to produce PGE2.  (+info)

Differences in the actions of some blockers of the calcium-activated potassium permeability in mammalian red cells. (3/1922)

1. The actions of some inhibitors of the Ca2+-activated K+ permeability in mammalian red cells have been compared. 2. Block of the permeability was assessed from the reduction in the net loss of K+ that followed the application of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (2 microM) to rabbit red cells suspended at a haematocrit of 1% in a low potassium solution ([K]0 0.12-0.17 mM) at 37 degrees C. Net movement of K+ was measured using a K+-sensitive electrode placed in the suspension. 3. The concentrations (microM +/- s.d.) of the compounds tested causing 50% inhibition of K+ loss were: quinine, 37 +/- 3; cetiedil, 26 +/- 1; the cetiedil congeners UCL 1269, UCL 1274 and UCL 1495, approximately 150, 8.2 +/- 0.1, 0.92 +/- 0.03 respectively; clotrimazole, 1.2 +/- 0.1; nitrendipine, 3.6 +/- 0.5 and charybdotoxin, 0.015 +/- 0.002. 4. The characteristics of the block suggested that compounds could be placed in two groups. For one set (quinine, cetiedil, and the UCL congeners), the concentration-inhibition curves were steeper (Hill coefficient, nH, > or = 2.7) than for the other (clotrimazole, nitrendipine, charybdotoxin) for which nH approximately 1. 5. Compounds in the first set alone became less active on raising the concentration of K+ in the external solution to 5.4 mM. 6. The rate of K+ loss induced by A23187 slowed in the presence of high concentrations of cetiedil and its analogues, suggesting a use-dependent component to the inhibitory action. This was not seen with clotrimazole. 7. The blocking action of the cetiedil analogue UCL 1274 could not be overcome by an increase in external Ca2+ and its potency was unaltered when K+ loss was induced by the application of Pb2+ (10 microM) rather than by A23187. 8. These results, taken with the findings of others, suggest that agents that block the red cell Ca2+-activated K+ permeability can be placed in two groups with different mechanisms of action. The differences can be explained by supposing that clotrimazole and charybdotoxin act at the outer face of the channel whereas cetiedil and its congeners may block within it, either at or near the K+ binding site that determines the flow of K+.  (+info)

Bcl-2 alters the balance between apoptosis and necrosis, but does not prevent cell death induced by oxidized low density lipoproteins. (4/1922)

Oxidized low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) participate in atherosclerosis plaque formation, rupture, and subsequent thrombosis. Because oxLDL are toxic to cultured cells and Bcl-2 protein prevents apoptosis, the present work aimed to study whether Bcl-2 may counterbalance the toxicity of oxLDL. Two experimental model systems were used in which Bcl-2 levels were modulated: 1) lymphocytes in which the (high) basal level of Bcl-2 was reduced by antisense oligonucleotides; 2) HL60 and HL60/B (transduced by Bcl-2) expressing low and high Bcl-2 levels, respectively. In cells expressing relatively high Bcl-2 levels (lymphocytes and HL60/B), oxLDL induced mainly primary necrosis. In cells expressing low Bcl-2 levels (antisense-treated lymphocytes, HL60 and ECV-304 endothelial cells), the rate of oxLDL-induced apoptosis was higher than that of primary necrosis. OxLDL evoked a sustained calcium rise, which is a common trigger to necrosis and apoptosis since both types of cell death were blocked by the calcium chelator EGTA. Conversely, a sustained calcium influx elicited by the calcium ionophore A23187 induced necrosis in cells expressing high Bcl-2 levels and apoptosis in cells expressing low Bcl-2 levels. This suggests that Bcl-2 acts downstream from the calcium peak and inhibits only the apoptotic pathway, not the necrosis pathway, thus explaining the apparent shift from oxLDL-induced apoptosis toward necrosis when Bcl-2 is overexpressed.  (+info)

Release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum increases mitochondrial [Ca2+] in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. (5/1922)

1. The Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator rhod-2 was used to measure mitochondrial [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) in single smooth muscle cells from the rat pulmonary artery, while simultaneously monitoring cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) with fura-2. 2. Application of caffeine produced an increase in [Ca2+]i and also increased [Ca2+]m. The increase in [Ca2+]m occurred after the increase in [Ca2+]i, and remained elevated for a considerable time after [Ca2+]i had returned to resting values. 3. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), which causes the mitochondrial membrane potential to collapse, markedly attenuated the increase in [Ca2+]m following caffeine application and also increased the half-time for recovery of [Ca2+]i to resting values. 4. Activation of purinoceptors with ATP also produced increases in both [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m in these smooth muscle cells. In some cells, oscillations in [Ca2+]i were observed during ATP application, which produced corresponding oscillations in [Ca2+]m and membrane currents. 5. This study provides direct evidence that Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, either through ryanodine or inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, increases both cytosolic and mitochondrial [Ca2+] in smooth muscle cells. These results have potential implications both for the role of mitochondria in Ca2+ regulation in smooth muscle, and for understanding how cellular metabolism is regulated.  (+info)

Mitochondrial regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and the InsP3-sensitive Ca2+ store in guinea-pig colonic smooth muscle. (6/1922)

1. Mitochondrial regulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in guinea-pig single colonic myocytes has been examined, using whole-cell recording, flash photolysis of caged InsP3 and microfluorimetry. 2. Depolarization increased [Ca2+]c and triggered contraction. Resting [Ca2+]c was virtually restored some 4 s after the end of depolarization, a time when the muscle had shortened to 50 % of its fully relaxed length. The muscle then slowly relaxed (t = 17 s). 3. The decline in the Ca2+ transient was monophasic but often undershot or overshot resting levels, depending on resting [Ca2+]c. The extent of the overshoot or undershoot increased with increasing peak [Ca2+]c. 4. Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP; 5 microM), which dissipates the mitochondrial proton electrochemical gradient and therefore prevents mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation, slowed Ca2+ removal at high ( > 300 nM) but not at lower [Ca2+]c and abolished [Ca2+]c overshoots. Oligomycin B (5 microM), which prevents mitchondrial ATP production, affected neither the rate of decline nor the magnitude of the overshoot. 5. During depolarization, the global rhod-2 signal (which represents the mitochondrial matrix Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]m) rose slowly in a CCCP-sensitive manner during and for about 3 s after depolarization had ended. [Ca2+]m then slowly decreased over tens of seconds. 6. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake with thapsigargin (100 nM) reduced the undershoot and increased the overshoot. 7. Flash photolysis of caged InsP3 (20 microM) evoked reproducible increases in [Ca2+]c. CCCP (5 microM) reduced the magnitude of the [Ca2+]c transients evoked by flash photolysis of caged InsP3. Oligomycin B (5 microM) did not reduce the inhibition of the InsP3-induced Ca2+ transient by CCCP thus minimizing the possibility that CCCP lowered ATP levels by reversing the mitochondrial ATP synthase and so reducing SR Ca2+ refilling. 8. While CCCP reduced the magnitude of the InsP3-evoked Ca2+ signal, the internal Ca2+ store content, as assessed by the magnitude of ionomycin-evoked Ca2+ release, did not decrease significantly. 9. [Ca2+]c decline in smooth muscle, following depolarization, may involve mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Following InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release, mitochondrial uptake of Ca2+ may regulate the local [Ca2+]c near the InsP3 receptor so maintaining the sensitivity of the InsP3 receptor to release Ca2+ from the SR.  (+info)

Inhibition of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase impairs NO.-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations. (7/1922)

The superoxide anion (O-2.) appears to be an important modulator of nitric oxide (NO.) bioavailability. The present study was designed to characterize the role of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD) in endothelium-dependent relaxations. Cu/Zn SOD was inhibited with the Cu2+ chelator diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DETCA). In isolated canine basilar arteries, DETCA (7.6 x 10(-3) M) inhibited total vascular SOD activity by 46% (P < 0.0001, n = 6-8 dogs). DETCA (7.6 x 10(-3) M) significantly reduced relaxations to bradykinin and A-23187 (P < 0.05, n = 7-11). The inhibitory effect of DETCA was abolished by the O-2. scavenger 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron; 9.4 x 10(-3) M; P < 0.05, n = 6-13). Tiron significantly potentiated the relaxations to bradykinin in control rings (P < 0.05, n = 13), and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 3 x 10(-4) M) abolished these relaxations (P < 0.0001, n = 6). DETCA and Tiron had no effect on the relaxations to diethylamine-NONOate or forskolin (P > 0.05, n = 6). Our results demonstrate that endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by NO. are impaired after the inhibition of Cu/Zn SOD. Relaxations to bradykinin (but not A-23187) were significantly augmented by Tiron. Pharmacological scavenging of O-2. reverses the effect of Cu/Zn SOD inhibition.  (+info)

Sialyltransferase isoforms are phosphorylated in the cis-medial Golgi on serine and threonine residues in their luminal sequences. (8/1922)

ST6Gal-I (alpha2,6-sialyltransferase) is expressed as two isoforms, STTyr and STCys, which exhibit differences in catalytic activity, trafficking through the secretory pathway, and proteolytic processing and secretion. We have found that the ST6Gal-I isoforms are phosphorylated on luminal Ser and Thr residues. Immunoprecipitation of 35S- and 32P-labeled proteins expressed in COS-1 cells suggests that the STTyr isoform is phosphorylated to a greater extent than the STCys isoform. Analysis of domain deletion mutants revealed that STTyr is phosphorylated on stem and catalytic domain amino acids, whereas STCys is phosphorylated on catalytic domain amino acids. An endoplasmic reticulum retained/retrieved chimeric Iip33-ST protein demonstrates drastically lower phosphorylation than does the wild type STTyr isoform. This suggests that the bulk of the ST6Gal-I phosphorylation is occurring in the Golgi. Treatment of cells with the ionophore monensin does not significantly block phosphorylation of the STTyr isoform, suggesting that phosphorylation is occurring in the cis-medial Golgi prior to the monensin block. This study demonstrates the presence of kinase activities in the cis-medial Golgi and the substantial phosphorylation of the luminal sequences of a glycosyltransferase.  (+info)

Ionophores are compounds that have the ability to form complexes with ions and facilitate their transportation across biological membranes. They can be either organic or inorganic molecules, and they play important roles in various physiological processes, including ion homeostasis, signal transduction, and antibiotic activity. In medicine and research, ionophores are used as tools to study ion transport, modulate cellular functions, and as therapeutic agents, especially in the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections.

Lasalocid is defined as an ionophore antibiotic, which is used as a growth promoter in animals and also as an anticoccidial agent. It works by increasing the permeability of the cell membrane to sodium ions, resulting in an imbalance of electrolytes within the cells and ultimately leading to the death of the organism. Lasalocid is available in a variety of forms, including feed additives, boluses, and premixes, and is used primarily in poultry and ruminants. It is important to note that lasalocid is not approved for use in animals intended for human consumption in all countries, and its use should always be in accordance with local regulations and guidelines.

Nigericin is not typically considered to have a "medical definition" as it is not a medication or therapeutic agent used in human medicine. However, it is a chemical compound that has been studied in laboratory research for its potential effects on various biological processes.

Nigericin is a polyether antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. It functions as an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across cell membranes. Specifically, nigericin can transport potassium (K+) and hydrogen (H+) ions across membranes, which can affect the balance of these ions inside and outside of cells.

In laboratory research, nigericin has been used to study various cellular processes, including the regulation of intracellular pH, mitochondrial function, and inflammation. However, it is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow therapeutic window.

Monensin is a type of antibiotic known as a polyether ionophore, which is used primarily in the veterinary field for the prevention and treatment of coccidiosis, a parasitic disease caused by protozoa in animals. It works by selectively increasing the permeability of cell membranes to sodium ions, leading to disruption of the ion balance within the cells of the parasite and ultimately causing its death.

In addition to its use as an animal antibiotic, monensin has also been studied for its potential effects on human health, including its ability to lower cholesterol levels and improve insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. However, it is not currently approved for use in humans due to concerns about toxicity and potential side effects.

Valinomycin is not a medical condition or treatment, but rather it is a naturally occurring antibiotic compound that is produced by certain strains of bacteria. Valinomycin is a cyclic depsipeptide, which means it is made up of a ring of amino acids and alcohols.

Valinomycin is known for its ability to selectively bind to potassium ions (K+) with high affinity and transport them across biological membranes. This property makes valinomycin useful in laboratory research as a tool for studying ion transport and membrane permeability. However, it has no direct medical application in humans or animals.

Calcimycin is a ionophore compound that is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces chartreusensis. It is also known as Calcineurin A inhibitor because it can bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase. In medical research, calcimycin is often used to study calcium signaling in cells.
It has been also used in laboratory studies for its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on certain types of cancer cells. However, it is not approved for use as a drug in humans.

Ionomycin is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound used in medical and biological research. Ionomycin is a type of ionophore, which is a molecule that can transport ions across cell membranes. Specifically, ionomycin is known to transport calcium ions (Ca²+).

In medical research, ionomycin is often used to study the role of calcium in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, and muscle contraction. It can be used to selectively increase intracellular calcium concentrations in experiments, allowing researchers to observe the effects on cell function. Ionomycin is also used in the study of calcium-dependent enzymes and channels.

It's important to note that ionomycin is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and narrow range of applications.

Potassium ionophores are chemical compounds that can transport potassium ions (K+) across biological membranes. They act as shuttles for potassium ions, allowing them to move from one side of the membrane to the other. This process is known as facilitated diffusion and helps maintain the balance of electrolytes inside and outside cells. Potassium ionophores are used in research to study the role of potassium ions in various cellular processes and have potential therapeutic applications in treating conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias and cancer. However, their use in clinical settings is still under investigation.

In medical or clinical terms, "ethers" do not have a specific relevance as a single medical condition or diagnosis. However, in a broader chemical context, ethers are a class of organic compounds characterized by an oxygen atom connected to two alkyl or aryl groups. Ethers are not typically used as therapeutic agents but can be found in certain medications as solvents or as part of the drug's chemical structure.

An example of a medication with an ether group is the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl), which has a phenyl ether moiety in its chemical structure. Another example is the anesthetic sevoflurane, which is a fluorinated methyl isopropyl ether used for inducing and maintaining general anesthesia during surgeries.

It's important to note that 'ethers' as a term primarily belongs to the field of chemistry rather than medicine.

Sodium ionophores are substances that facilitate the transport of sodium ions (Na+) across biological membranes. Ionophores are molecules that can complex with ions and act as shuttles, carrying the ions through the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. Sodium ionophores specifically interact with sodium ions and help maintain electrochemical gradients, which are crucial for various physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and cell volume regulation. Some examples of sodium ionophores include gramicidin, monensin, and nigericin.

Carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) is a chemical compound that is often used in research and scientific studies. It is an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across biological membranes. CCCP specifically transports protons (H+ ions) across membranes.

In biochemistry and cell biology, CCCP is commonly used as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. This is a process by which cells generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) using the energy from the electron transport chain. By disrupting the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, CCCP prevents the synthesis of ATP and causes a rapid depletion of cellular energy stores.

The medical relevance of CCCP is primarily limited to its use as a research tool in laboratory studies. It is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine.

Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (CCP) is a chemical compound that functions as an ionophore, which is a type of molecule that can transport ions across biological membranes. CCP is specifically known to transport protons (H+) and has been used in research as a tool to study the role of proton transport in various cellular processes.

CCP is also a potent mitochondrial uncoupler, which means that it disrupts the normal functioning of the mitochondria, the energy-producing structures in cells. By doing so, CCP can cause a rapid and irreversible decline in ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production, leading to cell death.

Due to its potent toxicity, CCP is not used as a therapeutic agent but rather as a research tool to study mitochondrial function and cellular metabolism. It is important to handle this compound with care and follow appropriate safety protocols when working with it in the laboratory.

Gramicidin is not a medical condition but rather an antibiotic substance that is used in medical treatments.

Here's the scientific and pharmacological definition:

Gramicidin is a narrow-spectrum, cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from gram-positive bacteria of the genus Bacillus. It is an ionophore that selectively binds to monovalent cations, forming channels in lipid bilayers and causing disruption of bacterial cell membranes, leading to bacterial lysis and death. Gramicidin D, a mixture of at least four different gramicidins (A, B, C, and D), is commonly used in topical formulations for the treatment of skin and eye infections due to its potent antimicrobial activity against many gram-positive and some gram-negative bacteria. However, it has limited systemic use due to its potential toxicity to mammalian cells.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Furans are not a medical term, but a class of organic compounds that contain a four-membered ring with four atoms, usually carbon and oxygen. They can be found in some foods and have been used in the production of certain industrial chemicals. Some furan derivatives have been identified as potentially toxic or carcinogenic, but the effects of exposure to these substances depend on various factors such as the level and duration of exposure.

In a medical context, furans may be mentioned in relation to environmental exposures, food safety, or occupational health. For example, some studies have suggested that high levels of exposure to certain furan compounds may increase the risk of liver damage or cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health effects of these substances.

It's worth noting that furans are not a specific medical condition or diagnosis, but rather a class of chemical compounds with potential health implications. If you have concerns about exposure to furans or other environmental chemicals, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized advice and recommendations.

Butylamines are a class of organic compounds that contain a butyl group (a chain of four carbon atoms) attached to an amine functional group, which consists of nitrogen atom bonded to one or more hydrogen atoms. The general structure of a primary butylamine is R-NH2, where R represents the butyl group.

Butylamines can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. Some of them have important uses in industry as solvents, intermediates in chemical synthesis, or building blocks for pharmaceuticals. However, some butylamines are also known to have psychoactive effects and may be used as recreational drugs or abused.

It is worth noting that the term "butylamine" can refer to any of several specific compounds, depending on the context. For example, n-butylamine (also called butan-1-amine) has the formula CH3CH2CH2CH2NH2, while tert-butylamine (also called 2-methylpropan-2-amine) has the formula (CH3)3CNH2. These two compounds have different physical and chemical properties due to their structural differences.

In a medical context, butylamines may be encountered as drugs of abuse or as components of pharmaceuticals. Some examples of butylamine-derived drugs include certain antidepressants, anesthetics, and muscle relaxants. However, it is important to note that these compounds are often highly modified from their parent butylamine structure, and may not resemble them closely in terms of their pharmacological properties or toxicity profiles.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Biological transport, active is the process by which cells use energy to move materials across their membranes from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. This type of transport is facilitated by specialized proteins called transporters or pumps that are located in the cell membrane. These proteins undergo conformational changes to physically carry the molecules through the lipid bilayer of the membrane, often against their concentration gradient.

Active transport requires energy because it works against the natural tendency of molecules to move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration, a process known as diffusion. Cells obtain this energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is produced through cellular respiration.

Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose and amino acids into cells, as well as the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters. The sodium-potassium pump, which helps maintain resting membrane potential in nerve and muscle cells, is a classic example of an active transporter.

Ion-Selective Electrodes (ISEs) are a type of chemical sensor that measure the activity of specific ions in a solution. They work by converting the chemical response into an electrical signal, which can then be measured and analyzed. The electrode is coated with a membrane that is selectively permeable to a particular ion, allowing for the detection and measurement of that specific ion in the presence of other ions.

ISEs are widely used in various fields such as clinical chemistry, biomedical research, environmental monitoring, and industrial process control. In medical diagnostics, ISEs are commonly used to measure the levels of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium in biological samples like blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

The response of an ISE is based on Nernst's equation, which relates the electrical potential across the membrane to the activity of the ion being measured. The selectivity of the electrode for a particular ion is determined by the type of membrane used, and the choice of membrane depends on the application and the specific ions to be measured.

Overall, Ion-Selective Electrodes are important tools in medical diagnostics and research, providing accurate and reliable measurements of ion activity in biological systems.

Proton ionophores are substances that increase the permeability of cell membranes to hydrogen ions (protons). They facilitate the transport of protons across biological membranes, which can affect various physiological processes such as pH regulation, ATP synthesis, and signal transduction. Some examples of proton ionophores include gramicidin D, nigericin, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). These substances are often used in research to manipulate membrane potentials and study cellular processes. However, they can also have harmful effects on cells and tissues, especially at high concentrations or under prolonged exposure.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Potentiometry is a method used in analytical chemistry to measure the potential (or voltage) difference between two electrodes, which reflects the concentration of an ion or a particular molecule in a solution. It involves setting up an electrochemical cell with two electrodes: a working electrode and a reference electrode. The working electrode is immersed in the test solution and its potential is measured against the stable potential of the reference electrode.

The Nernst equation can be used to relate the potential difference to the concentration of the analyte, allowing for quantitative analysis. Potentiometry is often used to measure the activity or concentration of ions such as H+, Na+, K+, and Cl-, as well as other redox-active species.

In medical testing, potentiometry can be used to measure the concentration of certain ions in biological fluids such as blood, urine, or sweat. For example, it can be used to measure the pH of a solution (the concentration of H+ ions) or the concentration of glucose in blood using a glucometer.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Methylamines are organic compounds that contain a methyl group (CH3) and an amino group (-NH2). They have the general formula of CH3-NH-R, where R can be a hydrogen atom or any organic group. Methylamines are derivatives of ammonia (NH3), in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by methyl groups.

There are several types of methylamines, including:

1. Methylamine (CH3-NH2): This is the simplest methylamine and is a colorless gas at room temperature with a strong odor. It is highly flammable and reactive.
2. Dimethylamine (CH3)2-NH: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature with an unpleasant fishy odor. It is less reactive than methylamine but still highly flammable.
3. Trimethylamine (CH3)3-N: This is a colorless liquid at room temperature that has a strong, unpleasant odor often described as "fishy." It is less reactive than dimethylamine and is used in various industrial applications.

Methylamines are used in the production of various chemicals, including pesticides, dyes, and pharmaceuticals. They can also be found naturally in some foods and are produced by certain types of bacteria in the body. Exposure to high levels of methylamines can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Ruminants are a category of hooved mammals that are known for their unique digestive system, which involves a process called rumination. This group includes animals such as cattle, deer, sheep, goats, and giraffes, among others. The digestive system of ruminants consists of a specialized stomach with multiple compartments (the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum).

Ruminants primarily consume plant-based diets, which are high in cellulose, a complex carbohydrate that is difficult for many animals to digest. In the rumen, microbes break down the cellulose into simpler compounds, producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) that serve as a major energy source for ruminants. The animal then regurgitates the partially digested plant material (known as cud), chews it further to mix it with saliva and additional microbes, and swallows it again for further digestion in the rumen. This process of rumination allows ruminants to efficiently extract nutrients from their fibrous diets.

Veterinary drugs, also known as veterinary medicines, are substances or combinations of substances used to treat, prevent, or diagnose diseases in animals, including food-producing species and pets. These drugs can be administered to animals through various routes such as oral, topical, injectable, or inhalation. They contain active ingredients that interact with the animal's biological system to produce a therapeutic effect. Veterinary drugs are subject to regulatory control and must be prescribed or recommended by a licensed veterinarian in many countries to ensure their safe and effective use.

Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) is a chemical compound with the formula (C6H11)2NCO. It is a white to off-white solid that is used as a dehydrating agent in organic synthesis, particularly in the formation of peptide bonds. DCC works by activating carboxylic acids to form an active ester intermediate, which can then react with amines to form amides.

It's important to note that Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide is a hazardous chemical and should be handled with appropriate safety precautions, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves, lab coats, and eye protection. It can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure can lead to respiratory problems. Additionally, it can react violently with water and strong oxidizing agents.

It's also important to note that Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide is not a medical term or a substance used in medical treatment, but rather a chemical reagent used in laboratory settings for research purposes.

Salicylanilides are a group of synthetic compounds that contain a salicylic acid moiety (a phenolic ring with a hydroxyl and a carboxyl group) linked to an aniline part through a carbon chain. They are known for their antimicrobial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Some common representatives of this class include salicylanilide, 2-naphthoxyacetic acid methyl ester, and 3-amino-5-chlorosalicylanilide. These compounds have been used in various medical and veterinary applications, such as topical antimicrobial agents, ovicides (agents that kill the eggs of parasites), and anthelmintics (agents that expel or destroy parasitic worms). However, due to concerns about potential toxicity and environmental persistence, their use has been limited in recent years.

2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP) is a chemical compound with the formula C6H4N2O5. It is an organic compound that contains two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a phenol molecule. DNP is a yellow, crystalline solid that is slightly soluble in water and more soluble in organic solvents.

In the medical field, DNP has been used in the past as a weight loss agent due to its ability to disrupt mitochondrial function and increase metabolic rate. However, its use as a weight loss drug was banned in the United States in the 1930s due to serious side effects, including cataracts, skin lesions, and hyperthermia, which can lead to death.

Exposure to DNP can occur through ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. Acute exposure to high levels of DNP can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, sweating, dizziness, headache, and rapid heartbeat. Chronic exposure to lower levels of DNP can lead to cataracts, skin lesions, and damage to the nervous system, liver, and kidneys.

It is important to note that DNP is not approved for use as a weight loss agent or any other medical purpose in the United States. Its use as a dietary supplement or weight loss aid is illegal and can be dangerous.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

Coccidiostats are a type of medication used to prevent and treat coccidiosis, which is an infection caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Coccidia. These medications work by inhibiting the growth and reproduction of the parasites in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, particularly poultry and livestock.

Coccidiostats are commonly added to animal feed to prevent infection and reduce the spread of coccidiosis within a flock or herd. They can also be used to treat active infections, often in combination with other medications. Common examples of coccidiostats include sulfaquinoxaline, monensin, and lasalocid.

It's important to note that the use of coccidiostats in food-producing animals is regulated by government agencies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to ensure their safe use and to minimize the risk of residues in animal products.

Membrane potential is the electrical potential difference across a cell membrane, typically for excitable cells such as nerve and muscle cells. It is the difference in electric charge between the inside and outside of a cell, created by the selective permeability of the cell membrane to different ions. The resting membrane potential of a typical animal cell is around -70 mV, with the interior being negative relative to the exterior. This potential is generated and maintained by the active transport of ions across the membrane, primarily through the action of the sodium-potassium pump. Membrane potentials play a crucial role in many physiological processes, including the transmission of nerve impulses and the contraction of muscle cells.

In the context of medicine, particularly in relation to cancer treatment, protons refer to positively charged subatomic particles found in the nucleus of an atom. Proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy, uses a beam of protons to target and destroy cancer cells with high precision, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The concentrated dose of radiation is delivered directly to the tumor site, reducing side effects and improving quality of life during treatment.

Calcium ionophores are chemical compounds that increase the permeability of cell membranes to calcium ions. They function by forming a complex with calcium and facilitating its transport across the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane, thereby raising the intracellular concentration of calcium ions (Ca²+).

These ionophores are often used in research and medical settings to study calcium signaling pathways and calcium-mediated cellular processes. They have been utilized in various experimental models to investigate cell proliferation, differentiation, secretion, and muscle contraction. In clinical contexts, calcium ionophores like A23187 are sometimes employed in the diagnosis of certain disorders affecting immune cells, such as detecting T-lymphocyte function in patients with suspected immunodeficiency.

However, it is essential to note that calcium ionophores can induce cytotoxicity at higher concentrations and may trigger uncontrolled calcium signaling, which could lead to cell damage or death. Therefore, their usage should be carefully controlled and monitored in both research and clinical applications.

Arsenazo III is a chemical compound that is used as a complexometric reagent in analytical chemistry, particularly for the determination of metal ions such as calcium and magnesium. It forms stable, brightly colored chelates with these metals, allowing for their quantitative analysis through spectrophotometry or other techniques. Arsenazo III is also used in some medical tests, such as the arsenazo III calcium test, to measure serum calcium levels.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Potassium Cyanide (C6H5KN) is defined as a white, water-soluble, crystalline salt that is highly toxic. It is used in fumigation, electroplating, and metal cleaning. When combined with acids, it releases the deadly gas hydrogen cyanide. It can cause immediate death by inhibiting cellular respiration. It is also known as Cyanide of Potassium or Potassium Salt of Hydrocyanic Acid.

Ammonium chloride is an inorganic compound with the formula NH4Cl. It is a white crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and can be produced by combining ammonia (NH3) with hydrochloric acid (HCl). Ammonium chloride is commonly used as a source of hydrogen ions in chemical reactions, and it has a variety of industrial and medical applications.

In the medical field, ammonium chloride is sometimes used as a expectorant to help thin and loosen mucus in the respiratory tract, making it easier to cough up and clear from the lungs. It may also be used to treat conditions such as metabolic alkalosis, a condition characterized by an excess of base in the body that can lead to symptoms such as confusion, muscle twitching, and irregular heartbeat.

However, it is important to note that ammonium chloride can have side effects, including stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional and should not be taken in large amounts or for extended periods of time without medical supervision.

Clioquinol is an antimicrobial drug that contains a combination of clioquinal and hydrocortisone acetate. It is used topically to treat various skin infections and inflammatory conditions. Clioquinol has antibacterial and antifungal properties, while hydrocortisone acetate is a corticosteroid that reduces inflammation and suppresses the immune response.

Clioquinol was first synthesized in the 1930s and was widely used as an antidiarrheal medication until it was banned in many countries due to its association with a neurological disorder called subacute myelooptic neuropathy (SMON). However, topical clioquinol is still available in some countries for the treatment of skin conditions.

It's important to note that topical clioquinol should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause skin irritation and sensitization in some individuals. Additionally, prolonged or excessive use of corticosteroids like hydrocortisone acetate can lead to thinning of the skin, increased susceptibility to infection, and other adverse effects.

The rumen is the largest compartment of the stomach in ruminant animals, such as cows, goats, and sheep. It is a specialized fermentation chamber where microbes break down tough plant material into nutrients that the animal can absorb and use for energy and growth. The rumen contains billions of microorganisms, including bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which help to break down cellulose and other complex carbohydrates in the plant material through fermentation.

The rumen is characterized by its large size, muscular walls, and the presence of a thick mat of partially digested food and microbes called the rumen mat or cud. The animal regurgitates the rumen contents periodically to chew it again, which helps to break down the plant material further and mix it with saliva, creating a more favorable environment for fermentation.

The rumen plays an essential role in the digestion and nutrition of ruminant animals, allowing them to thrive on a diet of low-quality plant material that would be difficult for other animals to digest.

"Pyrans" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a chemical term that refers to a class of heterocyclic compounds containing a six-membered ring with one oxygen atom and five carbon atoms. The name "pyran" comes from the fact that it contains a pyroline unit (two double-bonded carbons) and a ketone group (a carbon double-bonded to an oxygen).

While pyrans are not directly related to medical definitions, some of their derivatives have been studied for potential medicinal applications. For example, certain pyran derivatives have shown anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer activities in laboratory experiments. However, more research is needed before these compounds can be considered as potential therapeutic agents.

Lanthanum is not a medical term itself, but it is a chemical element with the symbol "La" and atomic number 57. It is a soft, ductile, silvery-white metal that belongs to the lanthanide series in the periodic table.

However, in medical contexts, lanthanum may be mentioned as a component of certain medications or medical devices. For example, lanthanum carbonate (trade name Fosrenol) is a medication used to treat hyperphosphatemia (elevated levels of phosphate in the blood) in patients with chronic kidney disease. Lanthanum carbonate works by binding to phosphate in the gastrointestinal tract, preventing its absorption into the bloodstream.

It is important to note that lanthanum compounds are not biologically active and do not have any specific medical effects on their own. Any medical uses of lanthanum are related to its physical or chemical properties, rather than its biological activity.

Uncoupling agents are chemicals that interfere with the normal process of oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this process, the energy from food is converted into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the main source of energy for cellular functions. Uncouplers disrupt this process by preventing the transfer of high-energy electrons to oxygen, which normally drives the production of ATP.

Instead, the energy from these electrons is released as heat, leading to an increase in body temperature. This effect is similar to what happens during shivering or exercise, when the body generates heat to maintain its core temperature. Uncoupling agents are therefore also known as "mitochondrial protonophores" because they allow protons to leak across the inner mitochondrial membrane, bypassing the ATP synthase enzyme that would normally use the energy from this proton gradient to produce ATP.

Uncoupling agents have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in weight loss and the treatment of metabolic disorders. However, they can also be toxic at high doses, and their long-term effects on health are not well understood.

Liposomes are artificially prepared, small, spherical vesicles composed of one or more lipid bilayers that enclose an aqueous compartment. They can encapsulate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, making them useful for drug delivery applications in the medical field. The lipid bilayer structure of liposomes is similar to that of biological membranes, which allows them to merge with and deliver their contents into cells. This property makes liposomes a valuable tool in delivering drugs directly to targeted sites within the body, improving drug efficacy while minimizing side effects.

Artificial membranes are synthetic or man-made materials that possess properties similar to natural biological membranes, such as selective permeability and barrier functions. These membranes can be designed to control the movement of molecules, ions, or cells across them, making them useful in various medical and biotechnological applications.

Examples of artificial membranes include:

1. Dialysis membranes: Used in hemodialysis for patients with renal failure, these semi-permeable membranes filter waste products and excess fluids from the blood while retaining essential proteins and cells.
2. Hemofiltration membranes: Utilized in extracorporeal circuits to remove larger molecules, such as cytokines or inflammatory mediators, from the blood during critical illnesses or sepsis.
3. Drug delivery systems: Artificial membranes can be used to encapsulate drugs, allowing for controlled release and targeted drug delivery in specific tissues or cells.
4. Tissue engineering: Synthetic membranes serve as scaffolds for cell growth and tissue regeneration, guiding the formation of new functional tissues.
5. Biosensors: Artificial membranes can be integrated into biosensing devices to selectively detect and quantify biomolecules, such as proteins or nucleic acids, in diagnostic applications.
6. Microfluidics: Artificial membranes are used in microfluidic systems for lab-on-a-chip applications, enabling the manipulation and analysis of small volumes of fluids for various medical and biological purposes.

Carboxylic acids are organic compounds that contain a carboxyl group, which is a functional group made up of a carbon atom doubly bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group. The general formula for a carboxylic acid is R-COOH, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Carboxylic acids can be found in various natural sources such as in fruits, vegetables, and animal products. Some common examples of carboxylic acids include formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), propionic acid (C2H5COOH), and butyric acid (C3H7COOH).

Carboxylic acids have a variety of uses in industry, including as food additives, pharmaceuticals, and industrial chemicals. They are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds. In the body, carboxylic acids play important roles in metabolism and energy production.

I apologize, but I am not able to provide a medical definition for "Egtazic Acid" because it is not a term that is recognized in the field of medicine or pharmacology. It is possible that you may have meant "Egтарic Acid," which also does not have a specific medical meaning, or "Ethylene Glycol Tetraacetic Acid (EGTA)," which is a chemical compound used in research and medicine for its ability to bind calcium ions. If you have any other questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Arsenates are salts or esters of arsenic acid (AsO4). They contain the anion AsO4(3-), which consists of an arsenic atom bonded to four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement. Arsenates can be found in various minerals, and they have been used in pesticides, wood preservatives, and other industrial applications. However, arsenic is highly toxic to humans and animals, so exposure to arsenates should be limited. Long-term exposure to arsenic can cause skin lesions, cancer, and damage to the nervous system, among other health problems.

Divalent cations are ions that carry a positive charge of +2. They are called divalent because they have two positive charges. Common examples of divalent cations include calcium (Ca²+), magnesium (Mg²+), and iron (Fe²+). These ions play important roles in various biological processes, such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and bone metabolism. They can also interact with certain drugs and affect their absorption, distribution, and elimination in the body.

A cation is a type of ion, which is a charged particle, that has a positive charge. In chemistry and biology, cations are formed when a neutral atom loses one or more electrons during chemical reactions. The removal of electrons results in the atom having more protons than electrons, giving it a net positive charge.

Cations are important in many biological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and enzyme function. For example, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), and magnesium (Mg2+) are all essential cations that play critical roles in various physiological functions.

In medical contexts, cations can also be relevant in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions. For instance, abnormal levels of certain cations, such as potassium or calcium, can indicate specific diseases or disorders. Additionally, medications used to treat various conditions may work by altering cation concentrations or activity within the body.

Dinitrophenols (DNP) are a class of chemical compounds that contain two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a phenol group. Dinitrophenols have been used in the past as industrial dyes, wood preservatives, and pesticides. However, they have also been misused as weight loss supplements due to their ability to increase metabolic rate and cause weight loss.

The use of DNP for weight loss is dangerous and has been linked to several fatalities. DNP works by disrupting the normal functioning of the mitochondria in cells, which are responsible for producing energy. This disruption causes an increase in metabolic rate, leading to a rapid breakdown of fat and carbohydrates, and ultimately weight loss. However, this increased metabolism can also produce excessive heat, leading to hyperthermia, dehydration, and damage to organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys.

Due to their potential for serious harm, DNP-containing products are banned in many countries, including the United States. Medical professionals should be aware of the dangers associated with DNP use and advise patients accordingly.

Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds produced by a variety of plants, including cannabis. They are responsible for the distinctive aromas and flavors found in different strains of cannabis. Terpenes have been found to have various therapeutic benefits, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antimicrobial properties. Some terpenes may also enhance the psychoactive effects of THC, the main psychoactive compound in cannabis. It's important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the potential medical benefits and risks associated with terpenes.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

"Eubacterium" is a genus of Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic, non-sporeforming bacteria that are commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria are typically rod-shaped and can be either straight or curved. They play an important role in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and the production of short-chain fatty acids in the gut, which are beneficial for host health. Some species of Eubacterium have also been shown to have probiotic properties and may provide health benefits when consumed in appropriate quantities. However, other species can be opportunistic pathogens and cause infections under certain circumstances.

Animal feed refers to any substance or mixture of substances, whether processed, unprocessed, or partially processed, which is intended to be used as food for animals, including fish, without further processing. It includes ingredients such as grains, hay, straw, oilseed meals, and by-products from the milling, processing, and manufacturing industries. Animal feed can be in the form of pellets, crumbles, mash, or other forms, and is used to provide nutrients such as energy, protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals to support the growth, reproduction, and maintenance of animals. It's important to note that animal feed must be safe, nutritious, and properly labeled to ensure the health and well-being of the animals that consume it.

Aminoquinolines are a class of drugs that contain a quinoline chemical structure and an amino group. They are primarily used as antimalarial agents, with the most well-known members of this class being chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. These drugs work by inhibiting the parasite's ability to digest hemoglobin in the red blood cells, which is necessary for its survival and reproduction.

In addition to their antimalarial properties, aminoquinolines have also been studied for their potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They have been investigated as a treatment for various autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, although their use in these conditions is not yet widely accepted.

It's important to note that aminoquinolines can have significant side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms, retinopathy, and cardiac toxicity. They should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider, and their use may be contraindicated in certain populations, such as pregnant women or individuals with preexisting heart conditions.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Gastrointestinal (GI) contents refer to the physical substances within the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. These contents can vary depending on the time since the last meal and the digestive process that is underway. Generally, GI contents include food, fluids, digestive enzymes, secretions, bacteria, and other waste products.

In a more specific context, GI contents may also refer to the stomach contents, which are often analyzed during autopsies or in cases of suspected poisoning or overdose. Stomach contents can provide valuable information about the type and amount of substances that have been ingested within a few hours prior to the analysis.

It is important to note that GI contents should not be confused with gastrointestinal fluids, which specifically refer to the secretions produced by the gastrointestinal tract, such as gastric juice in the stomach or bile in the small intestine.

Methane is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that is often mentioned in the context of medicine and health. Medically, methane is significant because it is one of the gases produced by anaerobic microorganisms during the breakdown of organic matter in the gut, leading to conditions such as bloating, cramping, and diarrhea. Excessive production of methane can also be a symptom of certain digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

In broader terms, methane is a colorless, odorless gas that is the primary component of natural gas. It is produced naturally by the decomposition of organic matter in anaerobic conditions, such as in landfills, wetlands, and the digestive tracts of animals like cows and humans. Methane is also a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time frame.

Electrochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the interconversion of electrical energy and chemical energy. It involves the study of chemical processes that cause electrons to move, resulting in the transfer of electrical charge, and the reverse processes by which electrical energy can be used to drive chemical reactions. This field encompasses various phenomena such as the generation of electricity from chemical sources (as in batteries), the electrolysis of substances, and corrosion. Electrochemical reactions are fundamental to many technologies, including energy storage and conversion, environmental protection, and medical diagnostics.

Cell membrane permeability refers to the ability of various substances, such as molecules and ions, to pass through the cell membrane. The cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin, flexible barrier that surrounds all cells, controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Its primary function is to protect the cell's internal environment and maintain homeostasis.

The permeability of the cell membrane depends on its structure, which consists of a phospholipid bilayer interspersed with proteins. The hydrophilic (water-loving) heads of the phospholipids face outward, while the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails face inward, creating a barrier that is generally impermeable to large, polar, or charged molecules.

However, specific proteins within the membrane, called channels and transporters, allow certain substances to cross the membrane. Channels are protein structures that span the membrane and provide a pore for ions or small uncharged molecules to pass through. Transporters, on the other hand, are proteins that bind to specific molecules and facilitate their movement across the membrane, often using energy in the form of ATP.

The permeability of the cell membrane can be influenced by various factors, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain chemicals or drugs. Changes in permeability can have significant consequences for the cell's function and survival, as they can disrupt ion balances, nutrient uptake, waste removal, and signal transduction.

Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They are responsible for breaking down and recycling various materials, such as waste products, foreign substances, and damaged cellular components, through a process called autophagy or phagocytosis. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes that can break down biomolecules like proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates into their basic building blocks, which can then be reused by the cell. They play a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and are often referred to as the "garbage disposal system" of the cell.

Macrolides are a class of antibiotics derived from natural products obtained from various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They have a large ring structure consisting of 12, 14, or 15 atoms, to which one or more sugar molecules are attached. Macrolides inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit, thereby preventing peptide bond formation. Common examples of macrolides include erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. They are primarily used to treat respiratory, skin, and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker medication that is primarily used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure), angina (chest pain), and certain types of cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heart rhyats). It works by relaxing the smooth muscle cells in the walls of blood vessels, which causes them to dilate or widen, reducing the resistance to blood flow and thereby lowering blood pressure. Verapamil also slows down the conduction of electrical signals within the heart, which can help to regulate the heart rate and rhythm.

In addition to its cardiovascular effects, verapamil is sometimes used off-label for the treatment of other conditions such as migraine headaches, Raynaud's phenomenon, and certain types of tremors. It is available in various forms, including immediate-release tablets, extended-release capsules, and intravenous (IV) injection.

It is important to note that verapamil can interact with other medications, so it is essential to inform your healthcare provider about all the drugs you are taking before starting this medication. Additionally, verapamil should be used with caution in people with certain medical conditions, such as heart failure, liver disease, and low blood pressure.

Thapsigargin is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that has been studied in the field of medicine and biology. Thapsigargin is a substance that is derived from the plant Thapsia garganica, also known as the "deadly carrot." It is a powerful inhibitor of the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump, which is responsible for maintaining calcium homeostasis within cells.

Thapsigargin has been studied for its potential use in cancer therapy due to its ability to induce cell death in certain types of cancer cells. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is still being investigated and is not yet approved for medical use. It should be noted that thapsigargin can also have toxic effects on normal cells, so its therapeutic use must be carefully studied and optimized to minimize harm to healthy tissues.

Eukaryota is a domain that consists of organisms whose cells have a true nucleus and complex organelles. This domain includes animals, plants, fungi, and protists. The term "eukaryote" comes from the Greek words "eu," meaning true or good, and "karyon," meaning nut or kernel. In eukaryotic cells, the genetic material is housed within a membrane-bound nucleus, and the DNA is organized into chromosomes. This is in contrast to prokaryotic cells, which do not have a true nucleus and have their genetic material dispersed throughout the cytoplasm.

Eukaryotic cells are generally larger and more complex than prokaryotic cells. They have many different organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, that perform specific functions to support the cell's metabolism and survival. Eukaryotic cells also have a cytoskeleton made up of microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments, which provide structure and shape to the cell and allow for movement of organelles and other cellular components.

Eukaryotes are diverse and can be found in many different environments, ranging from single-celled organisms that live in water or soil to multicellular organisms that live on land or in aquatic habitats. Some eukaryotes are unicellular, meaning they consist of a single cell, while others are multicellular, meaning they consist of many cells that work together to form tissues and organs.

In summary, Eukaryota is a domain of organisms whose cells have a true nucleus and complex organelles. This domain includes animals, plants, fungi, and protists, and the eukaryotic cells are generally larger and more complex than prokaryotic cells.

Edetic acid, also known as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound with various applications in medicine. EDTA is a synthetic amino acid that acts as a chelating agent, which means it can bind to metallic ions and form stable complexes.

In medicine, EDTA is primarily used in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning, such as lead or mercury toxicity. It works by binding to the toxic metal ions in the body, forming a stable compound that can be excreted through urine. This helps reduce the levels of harmful metals in the body and alleviate their toxic effects.

EDTA is also used in some diagnostic tests, such as the determination of calcium levels in blood. Additionally, it has been explored as a potential therapy for conditions like atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, although its efficacy in these areas remains controversial and unproven.

It is important to note that EDTA should only be administered under medical supervision due to its potential side effects and the need for careful monitoring of its use.

An ion is an atom or molecule that has gained or lost one or more electrons, resulting in a net electric charge. Cations are positively charged ions, which have lost electrons, while anions are negatively charged ions, which have gained electrons. Ions can play a significant role in various physiological processes within the human body, including enzyme function, nerve impulse transmission, and maintenance of acid-base balance. They also contribute to the formation of salts and buffer systems that help regulate fluid composition and pH levels in different bodily fluids.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Intracellular membranes refer to the membrane structures that exist within a eukaryotic cell (excluding bacteria and archaea, which are prokaryotic and do not have intracellular membranes). These membranes compartmentalize the cell, creating distinct organelles or functional regions with specific roles in various cellular processes.

Major types of intracellular membranes include:

1. Nuclear membrane (nuclear envelope): A double-membraned structure that surrounds and protects the genetic material within the nucleus. It consists of an outer and inner membrane, perforated by nuclear pores that regulate the transport of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm.
2. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): An extensive network of interconnected tubules and sacs that serve as a major site for protein folding, modification, and lipid synthesis. The ER has two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on its surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
3. Golgi apparatus/Golgi complex: A series of stacked membrane-bound compartments that process, sort, and modify proteins and lipids before they are transported to their final destinations within the cell or secreted out of the cell.
4. Lysosomes: Membrane-bound organelles containing hydrolytic enzymes for breaking down various biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids) in the process called autophagy or from outside the cell via endocytosis.
5. Peroxisomes: Single-membrane organelles involved in various metabolic processes, such as fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of harmful substances like hydrogen peroxide.
6. Vacuoles: Membrane-bound compartments that store and transport various molecules, including nutrients, waste products, and enzymes. Plant cells have a large central vacuole for maintaining turgor pressure and storing metabolites.
7. Mitochondria: Double-membraned organelles responsible for generating energy (ATP) through oxidative phosphorylation and other metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle and fatty acid synthesis.
8. Chloroplasts: Double-membraned organelles found in plant cells that convert light energy into chemical energy during photosynthesis, producing oxygen and organic compounds (glucose) from carbon dioxide and water.
9. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): A network of interconnected membrane-bound tubules involved in protein folding, modification, and transport; it is divided into two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on the surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
10. Nucleus: Double-membraned organelle containing genetic material (DNA) and associated proteins involved in replication, transcription, RNA processing, and DNA repair. The nuclear membrane separates the nucleoplasm from the cytoplasm and contains nuclear pores for transporting molecules between the two compartments.

Histamine release is the process by which mast cells and basophils (types of white blood cells) release histamine, a type of chemical messenger or mediator, into the surrounding tissue fluid in response to an antigen-antibody reaction. This process is a key part of the body's immune response to foreign substances, such as allergens, and helps to initiate local inflammation, increase blood flow, and recruit other immune cells to the site of the reaction.

Histamine release can also occur in response to certain medications, physical trauma, or other stimuli. When histamine is released in large amounts, it can cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and hives. In severe cases, it can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

Cytosol refers to the liquid portion of the cytoplasm found within a eukaryotic cell, excluding the organelles and structures suspended in it. It is the site of various metabolic activities and contains a variety of ions, small molecules, and enzymes. The cytosol is where many biochemical reactions take place, including glycolysis, protein synthesis, and the regulation of cellular pH. It is also where some organelles, such as ribosomes and vesicles, are located. In contrast to the cytosol, the term "cytoplasm" refers to the entire contents of a cell, including both the cytosol and the organelles suspended within it.

Digestion is the complex process of breaking down food into smaller molecules that can be absorbed and utilized by the body for energy, growth, and cell repair. This process involves both mechanical and chemical actions that occur in the digestive system, which includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and accessory organs such as the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder.

The different stages of digestion are:

1. Ingestion: This is the first step in digestion, where food is taken into the mouth.
2. Mechanical digestion: This involves physically breaking down food into smaller pieces through chewing, churning, and mixing with digestive enzymes.
3. Chemical digestion: This involves breaking down food molecules into simpler forms using various enzymes and chemicals produced by the digestive system.
4. Absorption: Once the food is broken down into simple molecules, they are absorbed through the walls of the small intestine into the bloodstream and transported to different parts of the body.
5. Elimination: The undigested material that remains after absorption is moved through the large intestine and eliminated from the body as feces.

The process of digestion is essential for maintaining good health, as it provides the necessary nutrients and energy required for various bodily functions.

Fluorescent dyes are substances that emit light upon excitation by absorbing light of a shorter wavelength. In a medical context, these dyes are often used in various diagnostic tests and procedures to highlight or mark certain structures or substances within the body. For example, fluorescent dyes may be used in imaging techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence angiography to help visualize cells, tissues, or blood vessels. These dyes can also be used in flow cytometry to identify and sort specific types of cells. The choice of fluorescent dye depends on the specific application and the desired properties, such as excitation and emission spectra, quantum yield, and photostability.

Chloroquine is an antimalarial and autoimmune disease drug. It works by increasing the pH or making the environment less acidic in the digestive vacuoles of malaria parasites, which inhibits the polymerization of heme and the formation of hemozoin. This results in the accumulation of toxic levels of heme that are harmful to the parasite. Chloroquine is also used as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, discoid or systemic lupus erythematosus, and photodermatitis.

The chemical name for chloroquine is 7-chloro-4-(4-diethylamino-1-methylbutylamino)quinoline, and it has a molecular formula of C18H26ClN3. It is available in the form of phosphate or sulfate salts for oral administration as tablets or solution.

Chloroquine was first synthesized in 1934 by Bayer scientists, and it has been widely used since the 1940s as a safe and effective antimalarial drug. However, the emergence of chloroquine-resistant strains of malaria parasites has limited its use in some areas. Chloroquine is also being investigated for its potential therapeutic effects on various viral infections, including COVID-19.

Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This reaction releases energy, which is used to drive various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, transport of ions across membranes, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.

ATPases are classified into several types based on their structure, function, and mechanism of action. Some examples include:

1. P-type ATPases: These ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate during the reaction cycle and are involved in the transport of ions across membranes, such as the sodium-potassium pump and calcium pumps.
2. F-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria, and are responsible for generating a proton gradient across the membrane, which is used to synthesize ATP.
3. V-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in vacuolar membranes and endomembranes, and are involved in acidification of intracellular compartments.
4. A-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in the plasma membrane and are involved in various functions such as cell signaling and ion transport.

Overall, ATPases play a crucial role in maintaining the energy balance of cells and regulating various physiological processes.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

In medical terms, gases refer to the state of matter that has no fixed shape or volume and expands to fill any container it is placed in. Gases in the body can be normal, such as the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen that are present in the lungs and blood, or abnormal, such as gas that accumulates in the digestive tract due to conditions like bloating or swallowing air.

Gases can also be used medically for therapeutic purposes, such as in the administration of anesthesia or in the treatment of certain respiratory conditions with oxygen therapy. Additionally, measuring the amount of gas in the body, such as through imaging studies like X-rays or CT scans, can help diagnose various medical conditions.

Oligomycins are a group of antibiotics produced by various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They are characterized by their ability to inhibit the function of ATP synthase, an enzyme that plays a crucial role in energy production within cells. By binding to the F1 component of ATP synthase, oligomycins prevent the synthesis of ATP, which is a key source of energy for cellular processes.

These antibiotics have been used in research to study the mechanisms of ATP synthase and mitochondrial function. However, their therapeutic use as antibiotics is limited due to their toxicity to mammalian cells. Oligomycin A is one of the most well-known and studied members of this group of antibiotics.

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a key secondary messenger in many biological processes, including the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cellular excitability. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase and is degraded by the enzyme phosphodiesterase.

In the body, cAMP plays a crucial role in mediating the effects of hormones and neurotransmitters on target cells. For example, when a hormone binds to its receptor on the surface of a cell, it can activate a G protein, which in turn activates adenylyl cyclase to produce cAMP. The increased levels of cAMP then activate various effector proteins, such as protein kinases, which go on to regulate various cellular processes.

Overall, the regulation of cAMP levels is critical for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and abnormalities in cAMP signaling have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Proteolipids are a type of complex lipid-containing proteins that are insoluble in water and have a high content of hydrophobic amino acids. They are primarily found in the plasma membrane of cells, where they play important roles in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the membrane. Proteolipids are also found in various organelles, including mitochondria, lysosomes, and peroxisomes.

Proteolipids are composed of a hydrophobic protein core that is tightly associated with a lipid bilayer through non-covalent interactions. The protein component of proteolipids typically contains several transmembrane domains that span the lipid bilayer, as well as hydrophilic regions that face the cytoplasm or the lumen of organelles.

Proteolipids have been implicated in various cellular processes, including signal transduction, membrane trafficking, and ion transport. They are also associated with several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. The study of proteolipids is an active area of research in biochemistry and cell biology, with potential implications for the development of new therapies for neurological disorders.

Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism converts carbohydrates into alcohol or organic acids using enzymes. In the absence of oxygen, certain bacteria, yeasts, and fungi convert sugars into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and various end products, such as alcohol, lactic acid, or acetic acid. This process is commonly used in food production, such as in making bread, wine, and beer, as well as in industrial applications for the production of biofuels and chemicals.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is vital for the functioning of over 300 enzymes and involved in various biological processes in the human body, including protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, immune function, wound healing, and cell division. It is a component of many proteins and participates in the maintenance of structural integrity and functionality of proteins. Zinc also plays a crucial role in maintaining the sense of taste and smell.

The recommended daily intake of zinc varies depending on age, sex, and life stage. Good dietary sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, nuts, dairy products, and fortified cereals. Zinc deficiency can lead to various health problems, including impaired immune function, growth retardation, and developmental delays in children. On the other hand, excessive intake of zinc can also have adverse effects on health, such as nausea, vomiting, and impaired immune function.

A chemical stimulation in a medical context refers to the process of activating or enhancing physiological or psychological responses in the body using chemical substances. These chemicals can interact with receptors on cells to trigger specific reactions, such as neurotransmitters and hormones that transmit signals within the nervous system and endocrine system.

Examples of chemical stimulation include the use of medications, drugs, or supplements that affect mood, alertness, pain perception, or other bodily functions. For instance, caffeine can chemically stimulate the central nervous system to increase alertness and decrease feelings of fatigue. Similarly, certain painkillers can chemically stimulate opioid receptors in the brain to reduce the perception of pain.

It's important to note that while chemical stimulation can have therapeutic benefits, it can also have adverse effects if used improperly or in excessive amounts. Therefore, it's essential to follow proper dosing instructions and consult with a healthcare provider before using any chemical substances for stimulation purposes.

An azide is a chemical compound that contains the functional group -N=N+=N-, which consists of three nitrogen atoms joined by covalent bonds. In organic chemistry, azides are often used as reagents in various chemical reactions, such as the azide-alkyne cycloaddition (also known as the "click reaction").

In medical terminology, azides may refer to a class of drugs that contain an azido group and are used for their pharmacological effects. For example, sodium nitroprusside is a vasodilator drug that contains an azido group and is used to treat hypertensive emergencies.

However, it's worth noting that azides can also be toxic and potentially explosive under certain conditions, so they must be handled with care in laboratory settings.

An electrode is a medical device that can conduct electrical currents and is used to transmit or receive electrical signals, often in the context of medical procedures or treatments. In a medical setting, electrodes may be used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Recording electrical activity in the body: Electrodes can be attached to the skin or inserted into body tissues to measure electrical signals produced by the heart, brain, muscles, or nerves. This information can be used to diagnose medical conditions, monitor the effectiveness of treatments, or guide medical procedures.
2. Stimulating nerve or muscle activity: Electrodes can be used to deliver electrical impulses to nerves or muscles, which can help to restore function or alleviate symptoms in people with certain medical conditions. For example, electrodes may be used to stimulate the nerves that control bladder function in people with spinal cord injuries, or to stimulate muscles in people with muscle weakness or paralysis.
3. Administering treatments: Electrodes can also be used to deliver therapeutic treatments, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for depression or deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders like Parkinson's disease. In these procedures, electrodes are implanted in specific areas of the brain and connected to a device that generates electrical impulses, which can help to regulate abnormal brain activity and improve symptoms.

Overall, electrodes play an important role in many medical procedures and treatments, allowing healthcare professionals to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions that affect the body's electrical systems.

"Lactococcus lactis" is a species of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in nature, particularly in environments involving plants and dairy products. It is a catalase-negative, non-spore forming coccus that typically occurs in pairs or short chains.

"Lactococcus lactis" has significant industrial importance as it plays a crucial role in the production of fermented foods such as cheese and buttermilk. The bacterium converts lactose into lactic acid, which contributes to the sour taste and preservative qualities of these products.

In addition to its use in food production, "Lactococcus lactis" has been explored for its potential therapeutic applications. It can be used as a vector for delivering therapeutic proteins or vaccines to the gastrointestinal tract due to its ability to survive and colonize there.

It's worth noting that "Lactococcus lactis" is generally considered safe for human consumption, and it's one of the most commonly used probiotics in food and supplements.

Arachidonic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found naturally in the body and in certain foods. It is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Arachidonic acid is a key component of cell membranes and plays a role in various physiological processes, including inflammation and blood clotting.

In the body, arachidonic acid is released from cell membranes in response to various stimuli, such as injury or infection. Once released, it can be converted into a variety of bioactive compounds, including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes, which mediate various physiological responses, including inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting.

Arachidonic acid is found in high concentrations in animal products such as meat, poultry, fish, and eggs, as well as in some plant sources such as certain nuts and seeds. It is also available as a dietary supplement. However, it is important to note that excessive intake of arachidonic acid can contribute to the development of inflammation and other health problems, so it is recommended to consume this fatty acid in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

... unlike carrier ionophores. Examples of channel-forming ionophores are gramicidin A and nystatin. Ionophores that transport ... Ionophores can be selective to a particular ion but may not be exclusive to it. Ionophores facilitate the transport of ions ... However, these ionophores become unable to transport ions under very low temperatures. An example of a carrier ionophore is ... Channel forming ionophores are usually large proteins. This type of ionophores can maintain their ability to transfer ions at ...
"Enniatin ionophores. Conformation and ion binding properties". International Journal of Peptide & Protein Research. 6 (6): 465- ... The enniatins act as ionophores that bind ammonium, and they have been proposed as replacements for nonactin in specific ...
Fuoss, Raymond M. (1958). "Conductance of Ionophores". Journal of the American Chemical Society. American Chemical Society (ACS ...
... s are ionophores. Their dimers form ion channel-like pores in cell membranes and cellular organelles of bacteria and ... Dimers are long enough to span cellular lipid bilayers and thus function as ion channel -type of ionophores. Gramicidin mixture ...
Ionophores were originally developed as coccidiostats for poultry, and prevent coccidiosis in cattle as well. Ionophores work ... Prince, Stephen D. (April 11, 2003). Ionophores (PDF) (Student Research Summary). Texas A&M University. Archived from the ... The most common form of antibiotics are called ionophores. ...
Tyson acknowledged using ionophores in chicken feed. Ionophores are used to control coccidiosis, a parasite common in poultry, ... but withdrew their approval after learning that Tyson used ionophores. Tyson and the USDA compromised on rewording Tyson's ...
ISBN 978-3-527-30673-2. Sperelakis, Nicholas; Sperelakis, Nick (January 11, 2012). "Chapter 4: Ionophores in Planar Lipid ...
One example is Fe(S2CNC4H8)3. ionophore Moon, Sung-Kwon; Jung, Sun-Young; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Lee, Young-Choon; Patterson, Cam; ...
As an ionophore, its molecule has an hydrophilic center and a hydrophobic part. The hydrophobic part interacts with biological ... Thujaplicins Tropolone Ionophore Cupressaceae β-Thujaplicin Archived 2011-07-16 at the Wayback Machine at Sigma-Aldrich " ... It is shown that a synergistic effect in some biological activities and settings may occur when ionophores are combined with ... By binding different metal ions and serving as an ionophore, it accelerates the intracellular uptake of those ions and ...
Calcium ionophores are also ideal to induce capacitation. Adding heparin to capacitation inducing medium mimics the secretion ...
Xue J, Moyer A, Peng B, Wu J, Hannafon BN, Ding WQ (1 October 2014). "Chloroquine is a zinc ionophore". PLOS ONE. 9 (10): ... Chloroquine also seems to act as a zinc ionophore that allows extracellular zinc to enter the cell and inhibit viral RNA- ... inhibits coronavirus and arterivirus RNA polymerase activity in vitro and zinc ionophores block the replication of these ...
It is also an ionophore. It was isolated from the bacterium Streptomyces griseus. GRÄFE, U.; SCHADE, W.; ROTH, M.; RADICS, L.; ...
Zinc ionophores show antiviral activity against Equine viral arteritis. The virus causing EVA was first identified following an ... Equine arteritis virus leader TRS hairpin (LTH) Virology Ionophore "Equine Viral Arteritis: Introduction". The Merck Veterinary ... "Zn2+ Inhibits Coronavirus and Arterivirus RNA Polymerase Activity In Vitro and Zinc Ionophores Block the Replication of These ...
She has looked at iron and copper as ionophores; which are important in the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Franz also ...
IP receptors bind with ionophores that induce ADP and serotonin secretion. PGE1 inhibits the secretion of factors that ... Fenstein, MB; Fraser, C (1975). "Human platelet secretion and aggregation induced by calcium ionophores. Inhibition by PGE1 and ...
... is an antibacterial and coccidiostat ionophore therapeutic drug. Salinomycin and its derivatives exhibit high ... "Polyether ionophores-promising bioactive molecules for cancer therapy", Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 2012,22, 7002 ... Ionophores, Carboxylic acids, Alcohols, Ketones, Tetrahydropyrans, Tetrahydrofurans, Polyketides, Spiro compounds). ... "Anticancer Activity of Polyether Ionophore-Salinomycin". Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry. 15 (5): 575-591. doi: ...
Ionophores (monensin, lasalocid), their structures, antibacterial activity and chemical modifications. Ion channels, proton ...
Fluorosurfactant Ionophore Stephen K. Ritter (January 2006). "Crystal Ball On The Environment: Detective work and expertise are ...
... probably because it acts as a zinc ionophore. Ionophore Ghaskadbi S, Vaidya VG (March 1989). "In vivo antimutagenic effect of ... Aggett, P.J.; Delves, H.T.; Harries, J.T.; Bangham, A.D. (March 1979). "The possible role of Diodoquin as a zinc ionophore in ...
... also produces the ionophore valinomycin. Streptomyces microflavus is also known to cause potato common ...
... acts as an H+, K+, Pb2+ ionophore. Most commonly it is an antiporter of H+ and K+. In the past nigericin was used as ... Ionophores, Tetrahydrofurans, Tetrahydropyrans, Primary alcohols, Lactols, Hemiketals, Vicinal diols, Carboxylic acids, Spiro ...
Friedberg I (September 1977). "The effect of ionophores on phosphate and arsenate transport in Micrococcus lysodeikticus". FEBS ...
Calcium ionophore treatment is used to artificially activate the oocyte. This treatment may be necessary as globozoospermic ... Dedkova, E. N.; Sigova, A. A.; Zinchenko, V. P. (2000-01-01). "Mechanism of action of calcium ionophores on intact cells: ... It has been found that treating globozoospermia with ICSI along with oocyte activation by calcium ionophore (an ion carrier ... ionophore-resistant cells". Membrane & Cell Biology. 13 (3): 357-368. ISSN 1023-6597. PMID 10768486. Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, ...
... confirming it acts as an ionophore. Compared to other ionophores, however, bafilomycin has a low affinity for K+. In many ... Bafilomycins have also been found to act as ionophores, transporting potassium K+ across biological membranes and leading to ... Bafilomycin acts as an ionophore, meaning it can transfer K+ ions across biological membranes. Typically, the mitochondrial ...
Saunders, M. J.; P. K. Hepler (1982). "Calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates cytokinin-like mitosis in Funaria". Science. 217 ( ...
Nanotechnology Supramolecular chemistry Macrocycles Amphiphile Ionophore Membrane biophysics Membrane protein Voltage-gated ion ... these corresponds to ionophore, detergent, and ion channel transporters. While synthetic ion channel research attempts to ...
Calcium Ionophore, Antibiotic A23187 and Calcium Ionophore A23187. It is produced at fermentation of Streptomyces ... The ionophore is used in laboratories to increase intracellular Ca2+ levels in intact cells. It also uncouples oxidative ... It also acts as a divalent cation ionophore, allowing these ions to cross cell membranes, which are usually impermeable to them ... In IVF field, Ca Ionophore can be used in case of low fertilization rate after ICSI procedure, particularly with ...
PBT2 QUPIC Ionophore Trace metal detection test Albert, A.; Phillips, J. N. (1956). "264. Ionization Constants of Heterocyclic ...
Catterall, William A. (10 December 1977). "Activation of the action potential Na+ ionophore by neurotoxins. An allosteric model ...
The hop acids act as ionophores against Gram-positive bacteria, inhibiting their growth. This activity results from the ...
... unlike carrier ionophores. Examples of channel-forming ionophores are gramicidin A and nystatin. Ionophores that transport ... Ionophores can be selective to a particular ion but may not be exclusive to it. Ionophores facilitate the transport of ions ... However, these ionophores become unable to transport ions under very low temperatures. An example of a carrier ionophore is ... Channel forming ionophores are usually large proteins. This type of ionophores can maintain their ability to transfer ions at ...
Lithium Ionophore VIII. Biochemicals , Ionophores , Additional Ionophores Substance Name:N,N,N,N"-Hexacyclohexyl-4,4,4"- ... CA 1001 (Calcium Ionophore I). Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:CA 1001; Eth 1001; Calcium ... Biochemicals , Ionophores , Calcium Ionophores Substance Name:4-Bromocalcimycin; 4-bromo-Calcium Ionophore A23187; 6-bromo-5-( ... Biochemicals , Ionophores , Additional Ionophores Substance Name:4-hydroxy-benzoic acid, (3R,3aS,4S,8aR)-1,2,3,3a,4,5,8,8a- ...
Androstane and pregnane steroids with potent allosteric GABA receptor chloride ionophore modulating properties ... Androstane and pregnane steroids with potent allosteric GABA receptor chloride ionophore modulating properties. ... and 3 and their use as allosteric modulators of the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex to alleviate stress, anxiety, mood ... Androstane and pregnane steroids with potent allosteric GABA receptor chloride ionophore modulating properties. (U.S. Patent No ...
"Calcium Ionophores" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in this website by year, and ... Transient exposure to calcium ionophore enables in vitro fertilization in sterile mouse models. Sci Rep. 2016 09 15; 6:33589. ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in Profiles. ...
Ionophores A-23187 and 4-Bromo A-23187. The Ca2+ ionophore A-23187 (A1493, Figure 19.8.7) is commonly used for in situ ... Figure 19.8.7 Chemical structures of the ionophores A-23187 (R = H, A1493) and 4-bromo A-23187 (R = Br).. ... Brominated A-23187 (4-bromo A-23187, Figure 19.8.7), which is essentially nonfluorescent, is the best ionophore for use with ... Ionomycin (I24222) is an effective Ca2+ ionophore that is commonly used both to modify intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and to ...
Ethanol Enhances [3H]Diazepam Binding at the Benzodiazepine-γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor-Ionophore Complex. WILLIAM C. DAVIS ... Ethanol Enhances [3H]Diazepam Binding at the Benzodiazepine-γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor-Ionophore Complex. WILLIAM C. DAVIS ... Ethanol Enhances [3H]Diazepam Binding at the Benzodiazepine-γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor-Ionophore Complex. WILLIAM C. DAVIS ... Ethanol Enhances [3H]Diazepam Binding at the Benzodiazepine-γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor-Ionophore Complex ...
The Development of Ionophore-Selective Based optical chemical sensors for the determination of heavy metal ions in aqueous ... This compound has a potential for the use as selective-ionophore for the development of a Pb2+ selective sensing system. ... Li, Li (2010) The Development of Ionophore-Selective Based optical chemical sensors for the determination of heavy metal ions ...
... are induced to release lysosomal enzymes by the calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence but not the absence of extracel ... 1.1 in ionophore-treated cells and 24.9 +/- 1.5 in cells exposed to ionophore and 1 mM Ca++. Bipolar filaments, 10 nm thick and ... Contrasting effects of local anesthetics and a calcium ionophore. Changes in ionic movements across rabbit polymorphonuclear ... Whereas contractions parallel to the plasma membrane could occur in the absence of enzyme release (ionophore alone) and enzyme ...
Ionophore is the project of the Bay Area/London-based multi-instrumentalists Leila Abdul-Rauf, Jan Hendrich, and Ryan Honaker. ...
... ionophores) and are fermentation products of the fungi Streptomyces albus and S. Aureofaciens,... ... EuroProxima Ionophore Intended use:. A competitive enzyme immunoassay for screening and quantitative analysis of Salinomycin ... The Ionophore ELISA is a competitive enzyme immunoassay based on antibodies directed against salinomycin. ... The Ionophore ELISA is a competitive enzyme immunoassay based on antibodies directed against salinomycin. ...
Narasin is an ionophore used in animal production that can enhance weight gain and feed efficiency in growing-finishing swine ... 79 - Impact of ionophores on swine feed efficiency, by Dr. Michael Shields. swine nutrition blackbelt Aug 17, 2023 ... Narasin is an ionophore used in animal production that can enhance weight gain and feed efficiency in growing-finishing swine ...
A 39183A is a rare 9,9-bianthryl antibiotic related to setomimycin and it acts as an ionophore. Factor A is a major component ... A 38183A acts as an ionophore, aiding the partitioning of Mg+ and Ca+ ions into organic solvents and transport of ferric ions ...
Ionizable (this)calix(4)crowns as highly selective 226RA2+ ionophores. F.W.B. van Leeuwen, H. Beijleveld, Cornelis J.H. ... Dive into the research topics of Ionizable (this)calix(4)crowns as highly selective 226RA2+ ionophores. Together they form a ...
... is a zinc ionophore. Zinc ionophores help transport zinc inside the cells COVID-19 attacks - respiratory cells, providing ... Zinc ionophores transport extracellular Zinc (Zn2+) ions across a cell membrane, and have been studied for their antiviral and ... An ionophore transports molecules inside cell membranes. COVID-19 viral entry and replication in cells is inhibited by zinc - ... Zinc Ionophores have broad spectrum antiviral properties against RNA viruses such as COVID-19. The emerging scientific data ...
Categorized as Ionophores Tagged BMN673 enzyme inhibitor, Rabbit polyclonal to ZFP2. Rapid detection of food-borne pathogens is ... Categorized as Ionophores Tagged FLJ22263, T-705 cell signaling. Background: Increased oxidative strain is involved in the ... Categorized as Ionophores Tagged SYN-115 irreversible inhibition, TAN1. Struma ovarii is a rare ovarian teratoma predominantly ... Categorized as Ionophores Tagged Dihydromyricetin ic50, LPL antibody. Kaposis sarcoma (KS) in HIV-infected individuals can ...
An ionophore is a substance that transports ions across a lipid membrane in a cell by combining with the ion, or by increasing ... Ionophores kill coccidia before it can infect the animal. Ionophores form lipid soluble, reversible complexes with cations and ... animals that are not ruminants are not able to use ionophores and can die following low levels of ionophore ingestion. ... An ionophore is a substance that transports ions across a lipid membrane in a cell by combining with the ion, or by increasing ...
In addition to the microvesicles released during the treatment of human erythrocytes with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187, a new ... The isolation and characterization of 60 nm vesicles (nanovesicles) produced during ionophore A23187-induced budding of human ... produced during ionophore A23187-induced budding of human erythrocytes. Biochemical Journal, 188 (3). 881-887. ISSN 0264-6021 ...
Ca2+ ionophores. A23187 (Calcimycin) has an intrinsic fluorescence excitable by UV light, making it less useful with UV- ... Find the best indicator and ionophore for imaging Ca2+ and cell function.. Calcium (Ca2+) is an important ubiquitous second ... Ionomycin an effective Ca2+ ionophore that is commonly used to both calibrate fluorescent Ca2+ indicators and to modify ... Use this guide to find the optimal Ca2+ indicator, chelators, and ionophores for your experiments. ...
Effect of carboxylic ionophores, membrane active and lysosomotropic agents on adriamycin uptake and histamine release in rat ...
Using ionophores to provide long-term control of intestinal integrity ... Using ionophores to provide long-term control of intestinal integrity. This video will discuss how ionophores provide the first ... Using ionophores to provide long-term control of intestinal integrity. Using ionophores to provide long-term control of ... Heres 3 reasons why the discovery of ionophores was so important?. *Ionophores enable the bird to develop immunity while ...
Ionophores. Planning to keep this years spring calf crop over the winter to sell in the spring? If so, you should consider ... Not only will these ionophores improve your rates of gain, they will also help protect your herd from ailments such as ... adding an ionophore, such as Bovatec® or Rumensin®, to your ration. Rumensin (Cattle Ru-Min 1200 Medicated) and Bovatec (Bov-A- ...
... DAlessandro, Sarah; ... The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in ... The ionophores inhibited ookinete development and subsequent oocyst formation in the mosquito midgut, confirming their ... The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in ...
Ionophores / adverse effects* * Kidney / chemistry * Kidney / drug effects * Kidney / pathology * Male * Monensin / adverse ...
Alternative to ionophores. Ionophores have been used for decades as performance enhancers in livestock, and although they are ... The phytogenics contained in Actifor Boost act similarly to monensin, the most commonly used ionophore since they lead to a ... Finally, it has shown similar performance and feed efficiency compared to ionophores in beef and dairy productions, making it a ... is to improve performance by including ionophores in the diet of dairy or beef cattle. Delacon has designed specific phytogenic ...
Effects of ionophore A23187 (IP) on the hydro-osmotic action of vasopressin (ADH). ...
21) reported a fertilization rate of 72.1% with Ca++ ionophore, but only 10.6% without Ca++ ionophore. Additionally, Versieren ... ionophore 7 µl/ml which was extracted from a prepared solution of 10 µl Ca++ ionophore (A23187, Sigma-Aldrich, Istanbul, Turkey ... Keywords: Calcium ionophore, Globozoospermia, Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), Morphologically abnormal sperm. To cite ... Next, calcium ionophore was applied following the ICSI procedure to improve the chances for fertilization. The case report ...
Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye. In: Analytica ... Dive into the research topics of Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a ... Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye. / Hisamoto, ... Flow-through type calcium ion selective optodes based on novel neutral ionophores and a lipophilic anionic dye were developed. ...
  • Human peripheral blood leukocytes (PMN) are induced to release lysosomal enzymes by the calcium ionophore A23187 in the presence but not the absence of extracellular Ca++. (rupress.org)
  • In addition to the microvesicles released during the treatment of human erythrocytes with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187, a new subpopulation of still smaller dense vesicles ('nanovesicles') has now been identified. (uea.ac.uk)
  • Use this guide to find the optimal Ca 2+ indicator, chelators, and ionophores for your experiments. (abcam.com)
  • Ionophores catalyze ion transport across hydrophobic membranes, such as liquid polymeric membranes (carrier-based ion selective electrodes) or lipid bilayers found in the living cells or synthetic vesicles (liposomes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionophores selective for cations and anions have found many applications in analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionophores can be selective to a particular ion but may not be exclusive to it. (wikipedia.org)
  • This compound has a potential for the use as selective-ionophore for the development of a Pb2+ selective sensing system. (dcu.ie)
  • The novel calcium ion selective neutral ionophores designed and synthesized were double-armed diazacrown ether compounds possessing glycolic amides as the binding arms. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Identification of a selective manganese ionophore that enables nonlethal quantification of cellular manganese. (purdue.edu)
  • Calcium Ionophores" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (umassmed.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in this website by year, and whether "Calcium Ionophores" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (umassmed.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Calcium Ionophores" by people in Profiles. (umassmed.edu)
  • The term ionophore (from Greek ion carrier or ion bearer) was proposed by Berton Pressman in 1967 when he and his colleagues were investigating the antibiotic mechanisms of valinomycin and nigericin. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 39183A is a rare 9,9'-bianthryl antibiotic related to setomimycin and it acts as an ionophore. (toku-e.com)
  • Twelve non-pregnant and non-lactating cows (675 ± 63 kg of BW) were randomly assigned to three treatments: control group (non-antibiotic), enramycin-treated group (non-ionophore antibiotic) and monensin-treated group (ionophore antibiotic). (usp.br)
  • His treatment protocol includes oral zinc, chloroquine as a zinc ionophore and an antibiotic (azithromycin). (thenhf.com)
  • Many ionophores are lipid-soluble entities that transport ions across the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structurally, an ionophore contains a hydrophilic center and a hydrophobic portion that interacts with the membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiple synthetic membrane-spanning ionophores have also been synthesized. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionophores that transport hydrogen ions (H+, i.e. protons) across the cell membrane are called protonophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whereas contractions parallel to the plasma membrane could occur in the absence of enzyme release (ionophore alone) and enzyme release could occur in the absence of such contractions (ionophore plus calcium plus cytochalasin B), contraction toward the cytocenter occurred in all experimental conditions in which significant enzyme release was obtained. (rupress.org)
  • Zinc ionophores transport extracellular Zinc (Zn 2+ ) ions across a cell membrane, and have been studied for their antiviral and anti-cancer activities. (ivermektin.online)
  • An ionophore is a substance that transports ions across a lipid membrane in a cell by combining with the ion, or by increasing the absorptivity or sponginess of the membrane. (siouxnationag.com)
  • Ionophores are chemical compounds that reversibly bind and transport ions through biological membranes in the absence of a protein pore. (wikipedia.org)
  • We also provide evidence that ethanol does not enhance [ 3 H]diazepam directly at the benzodiazepine binding site, but, rather, indirectly via the picrotoxinin-sensitive site of the benzodiazepine-GABA receptor-ionophore complex. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Other pesticides, the type-II pyrethroids and several organochlorines interact with the GABA receptor/ionophore complex. (cdc.gov)
  • Interactions of pentamethylenetetrazole and tetrazole analogues with the picrotoxinin site of the benzodiazepine-GABA receptor-ionophore complex. (bvsalud.org)
  • Zinc Ionophores have broad spectrum antiviral properties against RNA viruses such as COVID-19. (ivermektin.online)
  • The emerging scientific data from peer reviewed journals and clinical trials show that zinc ionophores, including Quercetin, may have significant effects against COVID-19. (ivermektin.online)
  • Recent data, from peer reviewed studies, scientific data and clinical trials show that synergistic supplement combinations involving zinc and the zinc ionophore quercetin may be effective antiviral prevention and therapeutic agents against COVID-19. (ivermektin.online)
  • Quercetin, a natural anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory compound contained in abundance in various fruits and vegetables, is a zinc ionophore. (ivermektin.online)
  • Zinc ionophores help transport zinc inside the cells COVID-19 attacks - respiratory cells, providing significant antiviral action against COVID-19. (ivermektin.online)
  • Zinc may increase the efficacy of antimalarial agents, since they are zinc ionophores. (frontiersin.org)
  • In 2010 a collaboration of university-based researchers in The Netherlands and the USA reported that the combination of the trace mineral zinc plus a zinc transport molecule (ionophore) that facilitates zinc's entry into cells efficiently impairs the replication of RNA viruses, like the newly mutated COVID-19 coronavirus, to effect a cure. (thenhf.com)
  • This journalist was among the first to make the public aware chloroquine is a zinc ionophore. (thenhf.com)
  • Zinc + ionophore was found to abolish RNA coronaviruses at very low concentration in a lab dish, meaning treatment leading to a cure is achievable in humans. (thenhf.com)
  • This zinc + ionophore approach was successfully tested on the deadly SARS-coronavirus that struck human populations in Asia in 2003-2004 and was also found to be effective against coxsackievirus, foot-and-mouth disease, and rhinoviruses (cold viruses). (thenhf.com)
  • In the present COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic the zinc + ionophore combination could have been employed in a targeted fashion for high-risk groups (elderly, diabetics, smokers, alcohol abusers, immune suppressant and illicit-drug users) as prevention and for curative purposes among patients with severe lung disease. (thenhf.com)
  • In chemistry, an ionophore (from Greek ion and -phore 'ion carrier') is a chemical species that reversibly binds ions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some ionophores are synthesized by microorganisms to import ions into their cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, these ionophores become unable to transport ions under very low temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • This type of ionophores can maintain their ability to transfer ions at low temperatures, unlike carrier ionophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionophores modify the permeability of biological membranes toward certain ions to which they show affinity and selectivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ions are bound to the hydrophilic center and form an ionophore-ion complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 38183A acts as an ionophore, aiding the partitioning of Mg+ and Ca+ ions into organic solvents and transport of ferric ions into mitochondria. (toku-e.com)
  • Nigericin, a H+ and K+ ionophore, possesses unique pharmacological effects. (bvsalud.org)
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the cytotoxic effects of the K+ ionophores, nigericin, nonactin, and valinomycin, on various B-lymphoma cells including PEL. (bvsalud.org)
  • RESULTS: Although the three tested ionophores inhibited the proliferation of several B-lymphoma cell lines, nigericin inhibited the proliferation of PEL cells compared to KSHV-negative cells. (bvsalud.org)
  • Examples of channel-forming ionophores are gramicidin A and nystatin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ionophore ELISA is a competitive enzyme immunoassay based on antibodies directed against salinomycin. (pacificlab.vn)
  • Salinomycin and Naracin belong to the group of polyether antibiotics (ionophores) and are fermentation products of the fungi Streptomyces albus and S. Aureofaciens, respectively. (pacificlab.vn)
  • Polyether antibiotics or carboxyl ionophores disrupt ion concentration gradient (Calcium, Potassium, Sodium). (siouxnationag.com)
  • Another regular use of antibiotics, although not considered as therapeutics, is to improve performance by including ionophores in the diet of dairy or beef cattle. (pigprogress.net)
  • Ionophores have been used for decades as performance enhancers in livestock, and although they are categorised as antibiotics, they are not therapeutic antibiotics. (pigprogress.net)
  • The company claims its received approval for the label from the FDA in May 2007, but had to change it in the fall as USDA officials advised it that some organizations narrowly classify ionophores, the antimicrobials used in Tyson chicken feed to help prevent an intestinal colonization by coccidia, as antibiotics - even though they are not used in human medicine. (foodnavigator.com)
  • Ionophores form lipid soluble, reversible complexes with cations and facilitate ion transport across membranes, as well as a monensin-electroneutral exchange of sodium and protons. (siouxnationag.com)
  • An example of a carrier ionophore is valinomycin, a molecule that transports a single potassium cation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ionophores do not kill 100% of the parasites, so it is normal to observe mild lesions in production systems using ionophores. (poultryworld.net)
  • The monovalent ionophores efficiently killed both asexual parasites and gametocytes with a nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). (unicam.it)
  • The main therapeutic application of ionophores is the prevention and treatment of coccidiosis in poultry. (pacificlab.vn)
  • This video will discuss how ionophores provide the first long-term, consistent control of coccidiosis, maintaining intestinal integrity over the life of the broiler. (poultryworld.net)
  • The ionophores we found have a unique mode of action whereby they allow some subclinical cycling of the coccidia, allowing the broiler to develop immunity, while being protected from clinical coccidiosis by the ionophore. (poultryworld.net)
  • In terms of control of coccidiosis, the ionophores have helped to establish the perfect balance between the coccidia and the broiler. (poultryworld.net)
  • Not only will these ionophores improve your rates of gain, they will also help protect your herd from ailments such as coccidiosis, acidosis and bloat. (southernstates.com)
  • Due to the mechanism of action, animals that are not ruminants are not able to use ionophores and can die following low levels of ionophore ingestion. (siouxnationag.com)
  • Ionophores enable the bird to develop immunity while protecting from the cocci challenge. (poultryworld.net)
  • Our data strongly support the downstream exploration of monovalent ionophores for repositioning as new antimalarial and transmission-blocking leads. (unicam.it)
  • Carrier ionophores may be proteins or other molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Channel forming ionophores are usually large proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transient exposure to calcium ionophore enables in vitro fertilization in sterile mouse models. (umassmed.edu)
  • The structure of the ionophore-ion complex has been verified by X-ray crystallography. (wikipedia.org)
  • The activity of an ionophore-metal complex depends on its geometric configuration and the coordinating sites and atoms which create coordination environment surrounding the metal center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron ionophores and chelating agents are collectively called siderophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many ionophores are produced naturally by a variety of microbes, fungi and plants, and act as a defense against competing or pathogenic species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, it has shown similar performance and feed efficiency compared to ionophores in beef and dairy productions, making it a natural alternative for partial or total replacement of ionophores used as AGP. (pigprogress.net)
  • Because ionophores do not apply high selection pressure the driving force for resistance development is low. (poultryworld.net)
  • Potential toxicity due to hemolysis was excluded, since only infected and not normal erythrocytes were damaged by ionophores. (unicam.it)
  • The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in veterinary medicine and that were recently proposed as human anticancer agents, meets these requirements. (unicam.it)
  • Next, calcium ionophore was applied following the ICSI procedure to improve the chances for fertilization. (jri.ir)
  • It is suggested that assisted oocyte activation with Ca++ ionophore and electrical or mechanical stimulation might increase fertilization rates (9-11). (jri.ir)
  • Ionophores improve the digestive process of the ruminant, reducing waste products including methane. (siouxnationag.com)
  • Ca++ did not appear to regulate microtubule assembly in these cells since resting PMN had a mean of 22.3 +/- 2.0 microtubules in the centriolar region as compared to 22.3 +/- 1.1 in ionophore-treated cells and 24.9 +/- 1.5 in cells exposed to ionophore and 1 mM Ca++. (rupress.org)
  • A slow reacting substance is produced when mixed peritoneal cells from rats are incubated with low concentrations of the calcium ionophore A 23187 in the presence of 0.01 M cysteine. (aai.org)
  • Ionophores can have toxic effects which are generally a result of improper use and/or mixing errors. (siouxnationag.com)
  • This case report detailed the course of treatment and protocol of a patient with type 1 globozoospermia using Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) and oocyte activation by calcium ionophore, which yielded conception and birth of a healthy baby after six previous unsuccessful attempts, using ICSI alone. (jri.ir)
  • Gametocytogenesis of the P. falciparum strain 3D7 was induced in vitro, and gametocytes at stage II and III or stage IV and V of development were treated for different lengths of time with the ionophores and their viability measured with the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. (unicam.it)
  • The ionophores inhibited ookinete development and subsequent oocyst formation in the mosquito midgut, confirming their transmission-blocking activity. (unicam.it)
  • Data shows that including an ionophore will reduce the postpartum interval by an average of 18 days. (hayandforage.com)
  • Conclusion: ICSI with assisted oocyte activation by calcium ionophore may overcome male infertility where there is total globozoospermia. (jri.ir)
  • Karaca N, Akpak YK, Oral S, Durmus T, Yilmaz R. A Successful Healthy Childbirth in a Case of Total Globozoospermia with Oocyte Activation by Calcium Ionophore. (jri.ir)
  • Realizing value from ionophores, implants and genetics can have an additive effect across the list. (thebeefsite.com)
  • The two broad classifications of ionophores synthesized by microorganisms are: Carrier ionophores that bind to a particular ion and shield its charge from the surrounding environment. (wikipedia.org)