A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.
Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.
Endoscopes for examining the interior of the larynx.
The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.
A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.
Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.
Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.
A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.
Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.
A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.
The small thick cartilage that forms the lower and posterior parts of the laryngeal wall.
Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)
Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.
A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.
Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.
An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A tubular duct that conveys TEARS from the LACRIMAL GLAND to the nose.
Tracheal stenosis is a narrowing or obstruction of the trachea, the airway that carries air from the mouth and nose to the lungs.
Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.
Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)
The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).
The vocal apparatus of the larynx, situated in the middle section of the larynx. Glottis consists of the VOCAL FOLDS and an opening (rima glottidis) between the folds.
A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.
Specially designed endoscopes for visualizing the interior surface of the colon.
A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.
The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.
A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)
Hospital units equipped for childbirth.
A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
Endoscopes for the visualization of the interior of the bronchi.
The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.
A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.
Tracheal diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the trachea, or windpipe, including infections, inflammation, strictures, and tumors.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.
An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.
Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
Bleeding from the nose.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.
Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)
Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.
The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.
One of a pair of small pyramidal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the CRICOID CARTILAGE. The corresponding VOCAL LIGAMENT and several muscles are attached to it.
Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.
A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.
Surgical incision of the trachea.
A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)
Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.
Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.
Imidazole derivative anesthetic and hypnotic with little effect on blood gases, ventilation, or the cardiovascular system. It has been proposed as an induction anesthetic.
A family of hexahydropyridines.
The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.
Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.
Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
The upper or most anterior segment of the STERNUM which articulates with the CLAVICLE and first two pairs of RIBS.
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)
The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.
A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Diseases of the lacrimal apparatus.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.
The hospital unit in which patients with respiratory conditions requiring special attention receive intensive medical care and surveillance.
Surgical fistulization of the LACRIMAL SAC for external drainage of an obstructed nasolacrimal duct.
Monoquaternary homolog of PANCURONIUM. A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with shorter duration of action than pancuronium. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination as well as its short duration of action and easy reversibility provide advantages over, or alternatives to, other established neuromuscular blocking agents.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LARYNX which coordinates many functions such as voice production, breathing, swallowing, and coughing.
A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with short duration of action. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and its lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination provide clinical advantage over alternate non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents.
Fixed-wing aircraft or helicopters equipped for air transport of patients.
Developmental or acquired stricture or narrowing of the LARYNX. Symptoms of respiratory difficulty depend on the degree of laryngeal narrowing.
Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.
A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.
A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
A sudden intense and continuous aggravation of a state of asthma, marked by dyspnea to the point of exhaustion and collapse and not responding to the usual therapeutic efforts.
The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.
A pair of cone-shaped elastic mucous membrane projecting from the laryngeal wall and forming a narrow slit between them. Each contains a thickened free edge (vocal ligament) extending from the THYROID CARTILAGE to the ARYTENOID CARTILAGE, and a VOCAL MUSCLE that shortens or relaxes the vocal cord to control sound production.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.
A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.
An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.
Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.
Inflammation of the throat (PHARYNX).
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.
Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.
Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.
General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).
Cyclic GLUCANS consisting of eight (8) glucopyranose units linked by 1,4-glycosidic bonds.
The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.
Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.
A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.
A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.
The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.
A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)
Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.
An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.
Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-1 RECEPTORS.
The act of dilating.
A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.
A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in some disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and to reduce salivation with some anesthetics.
First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.
An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.
Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.
A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
A tumor-like nodule or mass of inflammatory granulation tissue projecting into the lumen of the LARYNX.
Ethers are a class of organic compounds containing an oxygen atom bonded to two alkyl or aryl groups, with medical applications including anesthesia and as solvents for drugs.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.
Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.
Facilities equipped for performing surgery.
Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).
Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.
A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A condition of abnormally low AMNIOTIC FLUID volume. Principal causes include malformations of fetal URINARY TRACT; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION; nicotine poisoning; and PROLONGED PREGNANCY.
The planning and managing of programs, services, and resources.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.
Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)
Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.
A form of analgesia accompanied by general quiescence and psychic indifference to environmental stimuli, without loss of consciousness, and produced by the combined administration of a major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) and a narcotic.
Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
The use of sophisticated methods and equipment to treat cardiopulmonary arrest. Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) includes the use of specialized equipment to maintain the airway, early defibrillation and pharmacological therapy.
Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Burns of the respiratory tract caused by heat or inhaled chemicals.
Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.
Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.

Pharyngeal mucosal pressures, airway sealing pressures, and fiberoptic position with the intubating versus the standard laryngeal mask airway. (1/190)

BACKGROUND: The tube of the intubating laryngeal mask (ILM) is more rigid than the standard laryngeal mask airway (LMA), and the authors have tested the hypothesis that pharyngeal mucosal pressures, airway sealing pressures, and fiberoptic position are different when the two devices are compared. METHODS: Twenty anesthetized, paralyzed adults were randomly allocated to receive either the LMA or ILM for airway management. Microchip sensors were attached to the size 5 LMA or ILM at locations corresponding to the pyriform fossa, hypopharynx, base of tongue, posterior pharynx, and distal and proximal oropharynx. Mucosal pressures, airway sealing pressures, and fiberoptic positioning were recorded during inflation of the cuff from 0 to 40 ml in 10-ml increments. RESULTS: Airway sealing pressures were higher for the ILM (30 vs. 23 cm H2O), but epiglottic downfolding was more common (56% vs. 26%). Pharyngeal mucosal pressures were much higher for the ILM at five of six locations. Mean mucosal pressures in the distal oropharynx for the ILM were always greater than 157 cm H2O, regardless of cuff volume. There was no correlation between mucosal pressures and airway sealing pressures at any location for the LMA, but there was a correlation at three of six locations for the ILM. CONCLUSIONS: The ILM provides a more effective seal than the LMA, but pharyngeal mucosal pressures are higher and always exceed capillary perfusion pressure. The ILM is unsuitable for use as a routine airway and should be removed after its use as an airway intubator.  (+info)

Palliation of dysphagia from inoperable oesophageal carcinoma using Atkinson tubes or self-expanding metal stents. (2/190)

Until recently, intubation for the palliation of malignant dysphagia has relied upon the insertion of a variety of plastic tubes. Self-expanding metal stents are reported to have a lower complication rate. We have compared the results of Atkinson tube insertion with self-expanding metal stents in patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma. From 1990 to 1994 Atkinson tubes were inserted for the palliation of dysphagia from oesophageal cancer, from 1994 onwards self-expanding metal stents were used. Complications, mortality and hospital stay were compared in both groups of patients. In all, 87 patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma were treated, 46 with an Atkinson tube and 41 with metal stents. Complications occurred at similar rates in both groups (56% Atkinson tubes, 44% metal stents). There was a significantly higher perforation rate associated with Atkinson tube insertion (8 patients, 17%) compared with metal stents (1 patient, 2.4%, P = 0.02, chi 2). The length of stay was also significantly higher in the Atkinson tube group (median 10 days) compared with the metal stent group (3 days, P < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U test). Mortality rates were similar in both groups. The use of metal stents for the palliation of dysphagia in inoperable oesophageal carcinoma results in a lower perforation rate and a reduced length of stay and they represent a significant advantage over Atkinson tubes.  (+info)

Modified nasopharyngeal tube for upper airway obstruction. (3/190)

A modified nasopharyngeal tube is described that does not add airway dead space and resistance, is well tolerated, highly successful, and allows simultaneous use of oxygen prongs. This potentially reduces the need for surgical intervention to relieve high upper airway obstruction from Pierre-Robin syndrome and other causes.  (+info)

Sensorineural hearing loss and prematurity. (4/190)

OBJECTIVE: To elucidate clinical antecedents of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in very preterm infants. DESIGN: Case-control study. SUBJECTS: Fifteen children < 33 weeks' gestation with significant SNHL born between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 1994, detected within 9 months of birth, and 30 matched control children. METHODOLOGY: Perinatal variables in the two groups were compared using non-parametric tests and conditional logistic regression (EGRET). RESULTS: Median birth weight for the index group was 960 g (range 600-2914 g) compared with 1026 g (range 410-2814 g) for controls. Children with SNHL had longer periods of intubation, ventilation, oxygen treatment, and acidosis, and more frequent treatment with dopamine or frusemide. Neither peak nor trough aminoglycoside levels, nor duration of jaundice or level of bilirubin varied between groups. However, SNHL was more likely if peak bilirubin levels coexisted with netilmicin use (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 14.2 (1.8 to 113.6)) or if acidosis occurred when bilirubin levels were over 200 micromol/l (OR 8.0 (0.9 to 71.6). Frusemide use in the face of high serum creatinine levels (OR 8.9 (1.1 to 74.5)) or netilmicin treatment (OR 5.0 (0.99 to 24.8)) was also associated with SNHL. At 12 months of age, seven of 15 children with SNHL had evidence of cerebral palsy compared with two of 30 controls (OR 12.3 (2.1 to 71)). CONCLUSIONS: Preterm children with SNHL required more intensive care in the perinatal period and developed more neurological complications than controls. Among very preterm babies, the coexistence of risk factors for hearing loss may be more important than the individual factors themselves.  (+info)

Adhesion formation in intubated rabbits increases with high insufflation pressure during endoscopic surgery. (5/190)

The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the increase in adhesion formation by CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is caused by mesothelial hypoxaemia. Therefore the effect of the intra-abdominal pressure together with the flow rate upon adhesion formation was evaluated in rabbits following laser and bipolar lesions during endoscopic surgery using humidified CO(2) at 35 +/- 1 degrees C. The intra-abdominal pressure and flow rate were 5 mmHg and 1 l/min in group 1 (n = 5), 5 mmHg and 10 l/min in group 2 (n = 4), 20 mmHg and 1 l/min in group 3 (n = 5) and 20 mmHg and 10 l/min in group 4 (n = 4) respectively. A rapid and reliable intubation method for rabbits was developed to permit high insufflation pressure. By two-way analysis of variance, total adhesion scores following a laser lesion increased with flow rate (P = 0.0003) and insufflation pressure (P = 0.002). Total adhesion scores of bipolar lesions increased with pressure (P = 0.02) but not with flow rate (P = 0.1). The total adhesion scores of laser and bipolar lesions together increased with flow rate (P = 0.005) and with insufflation pressure (P = 0.004). There was no statistical interaction between flow rate and insufflation pressure. In conclusion, the insufflation pressure in endoscopic surgery with CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is a co-factor in adhesion formation, together with desiccation.  (+info)

Combination therapy for chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory infection associated with biofilm formation. (6/190)

There had been no reports of investigations into biofilms in chronic respiratory infection in vivo. Recently, we established a new murine model of chronic respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the present study, we examined the bacteriological effect of combined clarithromycin and levofloxacin against chronic respiratory infection with P. aeruginosa. Scanning electron micrograph of the surface of the catheter intubated in mouse bronchus for 7 days demonstrated in vivo formation of a biofilm containing blood cells, complex fibrous structures and bacteria. Treatment with either clarithromycin alone or levofloxacin alone had no statistical effect on the number of viable bacteria in lung. The combined use of both drugs resulted in a significant decrease in the number of viable bacteria. The present experiment demonstrates that the newly established murine model was useful to investigate the treatment of biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infection with P. aeruginosa, and combination therapy with clarithromycin and levofloxacin was effective in biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infection.  (+info)

Anesthesia in the Yom Kippur war. (7/190)

The role of the anesthetist in the treatment of battle casualties is discussed in the light of personal experience in a field hospital and in the rear during the Yom Kippur War of October 1973. Resuscitation and intensive care both before and after evacuation play an important part in reducing mortality, and the importance of providing adequate facilities for these functions in the battle area as well as at the base is emphasized.  (+info)

Endoscopic management of biliary leaks after T-tube removal in liver transplant recipients: nasobiliary drainage versus biliary stenting. (8/190)

This study presents the long-term sequelae of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-managed biliary leakage in patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and compares the relative efficacy, safety, and charges of nasobiliary drainage (NBD) versus biliary stenting (BS). We identified all orthotopic liver transplant recipients from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 1997, who had undergone ERCP for biliary leakage. Clinical outcome and charges were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis according to initial endoscopic therapy. Of the 1,166 adult OLTs performed during the study period, 442 patients underwent elective T-tube removal. ERCP was attempted in 69 patients (16%) who developed biliary leakage after T-tube removal. Three patients (5%) in whom initial ERCP was unsuccessful underwent surgery. NBD and BS were used as primary therapy in 45 (68%) and 21 patients (32%), respectively. Three patients initially treated with NBD required reendoscopy or surgery compared with 6 patients initially treated with BS (P <.05). Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward greater expense in the BS group compared with the NBD group. ERCP is a safe and effective method of managing biliary leakage after T-tube removal in orthotopic liver transplant recipients. However, our results suggest NBD is the preferred method because recurrent leaks were more common in patients treated initially with BS. With prompt use of ERCP, surgery is rarely needed for this complication of OLT.  (+info)

Succinylcholine is a muscle relaxant medication that is commonly used during general anesthesia to facilitate tracheal intubation and to maintain muscle relaxation during surgery. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that triggers muscle contractions. Succinylcholine is a depolarizing muscle relaxant, which means that it directly affects the muscle fibers themselves, rather than acting on the nervous system. It is a short-acting drug, with a duration of action of approximately 5-10 minutes, and is typically given intravenously. However, it can cause side effects such as muscle fasciculations, hyperkalemia, and postoperative myalgias.

Androstanols are a group of steroidal compounds that are found in both plants and animals. In the medical field, androstanols are often used as a reference standard for the analysis of other steroids, such as testosterone and estradiol. They are also used as a diagnostic tool for certain medical conditions, such as prostate cancer, and as a treatment for conditions such as erectile dysfunction. Androstanols are also used in the production of certain medications, such as anabolic steroids.

Airway obstruction refers to a blockage or narrowing of the airways that prevents air from flowing freely in and out of the lungs. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including inflammation, swelling, mucus production, foreign objects, or physical compression of the airways. Airway obstruction can be classified as either partial or complete. Partial airway obstruction is when the airway is narrowed but not completely blocked, while complete airway obstruction is when the airway is completely blocked, preventing air from entering or leaving the lungs. Airway obstruction can be a serious medical condition, particularly if it is not treated promptly. It can lead to difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and even respiratory failure if left untreated. Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, or in severe cases, emergency medical intervention such as intubation or surgery.

Laryngeal edema is a medical condition characterized by the swelling of the larynx, which is the voice box located at the back of the throat. This swelling can cause difficulty breathing, speaking, and swallowing, and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. There are several causes of laryngeal edema, including infections, allergies, trauma, and certain medical conditions such as vocal cord dysfunction or vocal cord paralysis. Treatment for laryngeal edema depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, or in severe cases, emergency medical intervention such as intubation or tracheostomy. In summary, laryngeal edema is a medical emergency that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent serious complications.

Thiopental is a barbiturate medication that is used in the medical field as an anesthetic and a sedative. It is typically administered intravenously to induce anesthesia and to maintain anesthesia during surgical procedures. Thiopental works by depressing the central nervous system, which results in a loss of consciousness and a lack of response to pain. It is also used to treat certain types of seizures and to control agitation and anxiety in patients with certain neurological disorders. However, thiopental has been largely replaced by newer anesthetic agents due to concerns about its side effects and potential for addiction.

Propofol is a medication that is commonly used in the medical field for anesthesia. It is a short-acting sedative-hypnotic drug that is administered intravenously to induce and maintain general anesthesia. Propofol works by binding to specific receptors in the brain, which leads to a loss of consciousness and muscle relaxation. It is often used in combination with other anesthetic drugs and is also used to manage pain and anxiety in intensive care units and during medical procedures. Propofol is a powerful drug and can cause serious side effects if not administered properly, so it is typically only used by trained medical professionals in a controlled setting.

Respiratory insufficiency is a medical condition in which the body is unable to take in enough oxygen or expel enough carbon dioxide. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including lung disease, heart disease, neurological disorders, or other medical conditions that affect the respiratory system. Symptoms of respiratory insufficiency may include shortness of breath, fatigue, confusion, dizziness, and bluish discoloration of the skin or nails. In severe cases, respiratory insufficiency can lead to respiratory failure, which is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. Treatment for respiratory insufficiency depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, oxygen therapy may be used to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood. In other cases, medications or surgery may be necessary to treat the underlying condition causing the respiratory insufficiency. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation may be required to help the patient breathe.

Tracheal stenosis is a medical condition in which the trachea (windpipe) becomes narrowed or blocked, making it difficult for air to flow in and out of the lungs. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including injury, infection, inflammation, or scarring. Symptoms of tracheal stenosis may include difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Treatment options for tracheal stenosis may include medications, breathing exercises, or surgery, depending on the severity of the condition.

Lacrimal duct obstruction is a medical condition in which the tear ducts become blocked or obstructed, preventing tears from draining properly from the eyes. This can cause a buildup of tears, leading to symptoms such as tearing, redness, swelling, and discharge from the eyes. The tear ducts are responsible for draining tears from the eyes into the nasal cavity, where they are absorbed. When the ducts become obstructed, tears can accumulate in the eye, leading to discomfort and other symptoms. There are several possible causes of lacrimal duct obstruction, including inflammation, injury, infection, and congenital abnormalities. Treatment options for lacrimal duct obstruction may include medications, punctual occlusion (plugging the tear ducts), or surgery.

Methyl ethers are organic compounds that contain a methyl group (CH3) attached to an oxygen atom. They are a type of ether, which is a functional group consisting of an oxygen atom bonded to two alkyl or aryl groups. In the medical field, methyl ethers are used as anesthetic agents, particularly for induction of anesthesia. They are also used as solvents and as intermediates in the synthesis of other compounds. Some methyl ethers have been found to have potential medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. One example of a methyl ether used in medicine is methoxyflurane, which was once a common anesthetic but has been largely replaced by other agents due to its potential for toxicity and side effects. Other methyl ethers that have been studied for their potential medicinal properties include diisopropyl ether and tert-butyl methyl ether.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid pain medication that is approximately 100 times more potent than morphine. It is used to treat severe pain, such as that caused by cancer or after surgery. Fentanyl is available in a variety of forms, including tablets, lozenges, patches, and injections. It is also sometimes used in combination with other medications, such as hydromorphone or oxycodone, to increase their effectiveness. Fentanyl can be highly addictive and can cause respiratory depression, which can be life-threatening. It is important to use fentanyl only under the guidance of a healthcare professional and to follow their instructions carefully.

Alfentanil is a synthetic opioid medication that is used for anesthesia during surgery or other medical procedures. It is a strong analgesic, meaning it is highly effective at reducing pain, and is often used in combination with other anesthetic drugs to provide a deeper level of sedation and pain relief. Alfentanil is a short-acting opioid, meaning its effects wear off quickly, which allows for easier recovery and reduced risk of respiratory depression. It is typically administered intravenously, although it can also be given by inhalation or injection. Alfentanil is a controlled substance and is only available by prescription from a qualified healthcare provider.

Tracheal diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the trachea, which is the tube that carries air from the mouth and nose to the lungs. The trachea is a vital part of the respiratory system, and any problems with it can lead to breathing difficulties and other health complications. Some common tracheal diseases include: 1. Tracheitis: Inflammation of the trachea, which can be caused by viral or bacterial infections. 2. Tracheal stenosis: Narrowing of the trachea, which can be caused by injury, scarring, or other factors. 3. Tracheal collapse: Collapse of the trachea, which can be caused by aging, weight gain, or other factors. 4. Tracheomalacia: Softening of the trachea, which can be caused by injury, scarring, or other factors. 5. Tracheobronchomalacia: Softening of the trachea and bronchi, which can be caused by injury, scarring, or other factors. 6. Tracheal cancer: Cancerous growths in the trachea, which can cause blockages and other complications. 7. Tracheal granulomas: Noncancerous growths in the trachea, which can be caused by infections or other factors. Treatment for tracheal diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. In some cases, medications or lifestyle changes may be sufficient to manage symptoms. In more severe cases, surgery or other medical procedures may be necessary to treat the condition.

Hoarseness, also known as dysphonia, is a condition characterized by a change in the quality or pitch of one's voice. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including inflammation or irritation of the vocal cords, injury or damage to the vocal cords, or problems with the nerves or muscles that control the vocal cords. In the medical field, hoarseness is often evaluated by a speech-language pathologist or an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor). Treatment for hoarseness depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, voice therapy, or surgery. In some cases, hoarseness may be a sign of a more serious underlying condition, such as cancer, and prompt medical attention is necessary.

Epistaxis is a medical term that refers to the excessive bleeding from the nasal passages. It is commonly known as a nosebleed. Epistaxis can be caused by a variety of factors, including dry air, nose picking, injury to the nose, high blood pressure, blood thinners, and certain medical conditions such as nasal polyps or nasal cancer. In most cases, epistaxis is not a serious condition and can be treated at home by applying pressure to the nose and holding it in place for several minutes. However, if the bleeding is severe or does not stop, medical attention should be sought immediately.

Pneumonia, aspiration is a type of pneumonia that occurs when bacteria, viruses, or other foreign substances are inhaled into the lungs and cause an infection. Aspiration pneumonia occurs when a person inhales food, liquid, or other substances into their lungs, which can lead to the growth of bacteria or other microorganisms in the lungs. This can cause inflammation and damage to the lung tissue, leading to symptoms such as coughing, fever, chest pain, and difficulty breathing. Aspiration pneumonia is more common in people who have difficulty swallowing or who have conditions that affect their ability to protect their airway, such as stroke or dementia. Treatment for aspiration pneumonia typically involves antibiotics to treat the infection and supportive care to help the person breathe more easily.

Lidocaine is a local anesthetic medication that is commonly used to numb a specific area of the body during medical procedures or surgeries. It works by blocking the transmission of pain signals from the nerves to the brain. Lidocaine is available in various forms, including topical creams, gels, ointments, and injections. It is also used to treat certain types of abnormal heart rhythms, such as atrial fibrillation, and to relieve symptoms of neuropathy, a condition in which the nerves are damaged or diseased. Lidocaine is generally considered safe when used as directed, but it can cause side effects such as dizziness, nausea, and allergic reactions in some people.

Etomidate is a general anesthetic medication that is commonly used to induce anesthesia in adults and children. It works by blocking the transmission of nerve impulses to the brain, which results in a loss of consciousness and a lack of response to pain. Etomidate is often used in emergency situations, such as in the operating room or in the intensive care unit, because it can be given quickly and has a relatively short duration of action. It is also used in patients who are allergic to other anesthetics or who have certain medical conditions that make it difficult to use other anesthetics. Etomidate is available in the form of an injection and is typically given by a healthcare professional.

Piperidines are a class of organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4. They are commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry as a building block for the synthesis of a wide range of drugs, including analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents, and antihistamines. Piperidines are also found in natural products, such as alkaloids, and have been used in traditional medicine for their various therapeutic effects. In the medical field, piperidines are often used as a starting point for the development of new drugs, as they can be easily modified to produce a wide range of pharmacological activities.

Bronchial spasm is a sudden and involuntary contraction of the muscles in the walls of the bronchial tubes, which are the airways that carry air to and from the lungs. This can cause the airways to narrow, making it difficult to breathe. Bronchial spasm is a common symptom of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory conditions. It can also be triggered by environmental factors such as cold air, exercise, or exposure to allergens or irritants. Treatment for bronchial spasm typically involves the use of bronchodilators, which help to relax the muscles in the airways and open them up, allowing for easier breathing.

Intraoperative complications refer to any unexpected events or problems that occur during a surgical procedure. These complications can range from minor issues, such as bleeding or infection, to more serious problems, such as organ damage or death. Intraoperative complications can be caused by a variety of factors, including surgical errors, anesthesia errors, or underlying medical conditions of the patient. It is important for surgeons and other medical professionals to be aware of the potential for intraoperative complications and to take steps to prevent them whenever possible. If a complication does occur, it is important to address it promptly and appropriately to minimize the risk of further harm to the patient.

Lacrimal apparatus diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the tear drainage system of the eye. The tear drainage system, also known as the lacrimal apparatus, includes the lacrimal glands, lacrimal ducts, lacrimal sac, and nasolacrimal duct. These structures work together to produce and drain tears from the eye, keeping it moist and protected. Lacrimal apparatus diseases can be classified into two main categories: lacrimal gland diseases and lacrimal duct diseases. Lacrimal gland diseases include conditions such as dacryoadenitis (inflammation of the lacrimal gland), dacryocystitis (inflammation of the lacrimal sac), and dacryocystocele (protrusion of the lacrimal sac). Lacrimal duct diseases include conditions such as nasolacrimal duct obstruction (blockage of the nasolacrimal duct), which can cause tearing, discharge from the eye, and other symptoms. Lacrimal apparatus diseases can be treated with a variety of methods, including medications, punctal occlusion (plugging of the tear ducts), and surgery. The specific treatment approach depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Vecuronium Bromide is a non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent used in anesthesia to relax muscles and facilitate intubation. It is a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, preventing the release of acetylcholine and thereby blocking muscle contraction. Vecuronium Bromide is commonly used in surgical procedures and is known for its long duration of action, with a duration of up to 60 minutes. It is administered intravenously and is metabolized by the liver, with elimination half-life ranging from 6 to 12 hours.

Laryngeal diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the larynx, which is the voice box located at the top of the throat. The larynx contains the vocal cords, which are responsible for producing sound when air passes through them. Laryngeal diseases can affect the vocal cords, the surrounding tissues, or the nerves that control the muscles of the larynx. Some common laryngeal diseases include: 1. Laryngitis: Inflammation of the larynx, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection. 2. Laryngeal cancer: A type of cancer that develops in the tissues of the larynx. 3. Laryngomalacia: A condition in which the vocal cords are floppy and collapse when the child inhales, causing difficulty breathing. 4. Vocal cord polyps: Non-cancerous growths on the vocal cords that can cause hoarseness or difficulty speaking. 5. Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR): A condition in which stomach acid flows back up into the larynx and throat, causing irritation and inflammation. 6. Laryngotracheobronchitis (croup): A viral infection that causes inflammation of the larynx, trachea, and bronchi, often resulting in a barking cough and difficulty breathing. Laryngeal diseases can be treated with medications, surgery, or other interventions, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. Early detection and treatment are important to prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Atracurium is a muscle relaxant medication that is commonly used during general anesthesia to relax the muscles of the body and allow for surgery or other medical procedures to be performed. It is a non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent, which means that it works by blocking the transmission of signals from the nerves to the muscles, causing the muscles to relax. Atracurium is usually administered intravenously and its effects typically last for about 20-30 minutes. It is often used in combination with other anesthetic medications to provide a complete state of anesthesia.

Laryngostenosis is a medical condition in which the airway of the larynx (voice box) becomes narrowed or blocked. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including congenital abnormalities, injury, or inflammation. Symptoms of laryngostenosis may include difficulty breathing, stridor (a high-pitched whistling sound), and hoarseness. Treatment options for laryngostenosis may include medications, surgery, or the use of a breathing tube. It is important to seek medical attention if you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of laryngostenosis, as it can be a serious condition that requires prompt treatment.

Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, is a colorless, odorless gas that is commonly used in the medical field as an anesthetic and analgesic. It is a potent analgesic, meaning it can help to reduce pain and discomfort during medical procedures, and it is also a sedative, meaning it can help to calm and relax patients. In medical settings, nitrous oxide is typically administered through a mask that covers the patient's nose and mouth. The gas is mixed with oxygen and inhaled by the patient, which helps to produce a feeling of relaxation and euphoria. Nitrous oxide is often used in combination with other anesthetics, such as local anesthetics or general anesthesia, to provide a more complete and effective anesthetic. Nitrous oxide is considered to be a relatively safe anesthetic, with few side effects. However, it can cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and nausea in some patients, and it can also cause a temporary decrease in blood pressure. As with any anesthetic, it is important for patients to follow their doctor's instructions carefully and to report any side effects or concerns to their healthcare provider.

Dexmedetomidine is a medication that is used in the medical field as a sedative and an anesthetic. It is a type of medication called a sedative-hypnotic, which is used to help people feel calm and relaxed. Dexmedetomidine is often used in medical procedures that require sedation, such as surgery or during mechanical ventilation. It is also sometimes used to help people who are experiencing difficulty sleeping or who have anxiety or agitation. Dexmedetomidine works by binding to specific receptors in the brain, which helps to reduce feelings of anxiety and sedate the body. It is usually given as an injection, but it can also be given as a nasal spray or inhaled through a mask.

Status asthmaticus is a severe and potentially life-threatening exacerbation of asthma that does not respond to standard asthma treatment. It is characterized by persistent, severe shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing, and can lead to respiratory failure if not treated promptly and effectively. In status asthmaticus, the airways become severely inflamed and narrowed, making it difficult for air to flow in and out of the lungs. This can lead to a drop in oxygen levels in the blood and an increase in carbon dioxide levels, which can cause confusion, drowsiness, and even loss of consciousness. Treatment for status asthmaticus typically involves the use of high-dose corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and oxygen therapy. In some cases, hospitalization and mechanical ventilation may be necessary to support breathing and prevent respiratory failure. Early recognition and prompt treatment are crucial for preventing complications and improving outcomes in patients with status asthmaticus.

In the medical field, an emergency is a situation that requires immediate medical attention and intervention to prevent serious harm or death. Emergencies can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, trauma, illness, or medical conditions that suddenly worsen. Examples of medical emergencies include heart attacks, strokes, severe allergic reactions, respiratory distress, severe bleeding, and traumatic injuries such as broken bones or severe lacerations. In these situations, medical professionals must act quickly to stabilize the patient and provide life-saving treatment. The response to medical emergencies typically involves a team of healthcare providers, including emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and doctors, who work together to assess the patient's condition, provide necessary medical interventions, and transport the patient to a hospital for further treatment if necessary.

A pneumothorax is a medical condition in which air or gas accumulates in the space between the chest wall and the lung. This can cause the lung to collapse, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly. Pneumothorax can occur suddenly as a result of trauma, such as a puncture wound to the chest, or it can develop gradually over time due to underlying medical conditions, such as emphysema or cystic fibrosis. Symptoms of a pneumothorax may include chest pain, shortness of breath, and a rapid heartbeat. Treatment typically involves draining the air or gas from the chest cavity and providing supportive care to help the lung re-expand. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair any damage to the lung or chest wall.

Vocal cord paralysis is a medical condition in which one or both of the vocal cords do not move properly. This can result in a hoarse or weak voice, difficulty speaking, and in severe cases, difficulty breathing. There are several causes of vocal cord paralysis, including injury to the nerves that control the vocal cords, surgery, radiation therapy, and certain medical conditions such as thyroid disease or a tumor. Treatment for vocal cord paralysis depends on the underlying cause and may include speech therapy, medication, or surgery.

Pharyngitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the pharynx, which is the back of the throat. It can be caused by a viral or bacterial infection, allergies, irritants, or other factors. Symptoms of pharyngitis may include sore throat, difficulty swallowing, fever, cough, and headache. In some cases, pharyngitis may be accompanied by tonsillitis, which is inflammation of the tonsils located at the back of the throat. Treatment for pharyngitis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications such as antibiotics, antiviral drugs, or over-the-counter pain relievers. In some cases, rest and hydration may be sufficient to help the body fight off the infection.

Lacerations are cuts or tears in the skin that are typically caused by a sharp object or forceful trauma. They can range in severity from minor scrapes to deep, gaping wounds that require surgical repair. Lacerations can occur on any part of the body and can be accompanied by bleeding, bruising, and swelling. In some cases, they may also result in nerve or tissue damage. Treatment for lacerations depends on the severity of the injury and may include cleaning and suturing the wound, administering antibiotics to prevent infection, and providing pain medication as needed.

Maxillofacial injuries refer to injuries that affect the bones, muscles, and soft tissues of the face and jaw. These injuries can be caused by a variety of factors, including trauma from accidents, sports injuries, or violence. Maxillofacial injuries can range from minor cuts and bruises to more severe fractures, dislocations, and lacerations that can affect the function and appearance of the face. Treatment for maxillofacial injuries may involve surgery, rehabilitation, and other medical interventions to restore function and appearance to the affected area.

Gamma-cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) are a type of cyclic oligosaccharide composed of seven glucose units linked by α-1,4-glycosidic bonds. They are commonly used in the medical field as a drug delivery system, as they have the ability to form inclusion complexes with a variety of hydrophobic drugs, improving their solubility and bioavailability. In addition to their use as drug delivery agents, γ-CDs have also been studied for their potential use in the treatment of various medical conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. They have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects, and have been used in preclinical studies to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy drugs. γ-CDs are also used as a stabilizing agent in various medical products, such as ophthalmic solutions, nasal sprays, and topical creams. They can help to prevent the aggregation and precipitation of active ingredients, improving the stability and efficacy of these products. Overall, γ-CDs have a wide range of potential applications in the medical field, and ongoing research is exploring their use in new and innovative ways.

Isoflurane is a volatile anesthetic gas that is commonly used in medical procedures to induce and maintain general anesthesia. It is a colorless, odorless gas that is similar in structure to halothane, another anesthetic gas. When inhaled, isoflurane produces a state of unconsciousness and a lack of response to pain, allowing medical procedures to be performed without the patient feeling any discomfort. It also has a relatively low risk of causing side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, or respiratory depression. Isoflurane is often used in combination with other anesthetics, such as opioids or muscle relaxants, to provide a more complete anesthetic effect. It is also used in veterinary medicine and in research settings to induce anesthesia in animals.

Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is a condition in which stomach contents flow back up into the larynx and pharynx, causing irritation and inflammation. It is a type of acid reflux that affects the throat and voice box, rather than the esophagus. Symptoms of LPR may include hoarseness, throat clearing, coughing, and difficulty swallowing. LPR can be diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as endoscopy or pH monitoring. Treatment for LPR may include lifestyle changes, medications, and in some cases, surgery.

Silicones are a group of synthetic polymers that are widely used in various medical applications due to their unique properties, such as biocompatibility, chemical stability, and thermal stability. They are typically composed of silicon, oxygen, and carbon atoms, and can be further modified to include other elements such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and fluorine. In the medical field, silicones are used in a variety of applications, including: 1. Implants: Silicones are commonly used in medical implants such as breast implants, artificial joints, and heart valves due to their biocompatibility and durability. 2. Wound dressings: Silicones are used in wound dressings due to their ability to prevent bacterial growth and promote healing. 3. Drug delivery systems: Silicones are used in drug delivery systems such as microspheres and nanoparticles to improve the delivery of drugs to specific areas of the body. 4. Medical devices: Silicones are used in medical devices such as catheters, syringes, and endoscopes due to their non-stick properties and ability to reduce friction. 5. Cosmetics: Silicones are used in cosmetics such as lotions, creams, and shampoos due to their ability to provide a smooth and silky texture. Overall, silicones are a versatile and important material in the medical field due to their unique properties and wide range of applications.

Pulmonary atelectasis is a medical condition in which the lung tissue collapses or becomes partially or completely deflated. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including inflammation, injury, or obstruction of the airways. Symptoms of pulmonary atelectasis may include shortness of breath, coughing, chest pain, and fever. Treatment for pulmonary atelectasis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, or surgery. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary.

In the medical field, a foreign body refers to any object that is not normally present in the body and has been introduced into it accidentally or intentionally. Foreign bodies can be found in various parts of the body, including the respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract, and other organs. Foreign bodies can be classified into different types based on their size, shape, and composition. Some common examples of foreign bodies include coins, buttons, toys, bones, glass fragments, metal objects, and food particles. Foreign bodies can cause a range of symptoms, depending on their location and size. In some cases, they may cause no symptoms at all, while in others, they can lead to pain, swelling, infection, bleeding, or other complications. Diagnosis of a foreign body usually involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI), and sometimes endoscopy or surgery. Treatment of a foreign body depends on its location, size, and composition, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history. In some cases, the foreign body may be removed using minimally invasive techniques, while in others, surgery may be necessary.

Methohexital is a general anesthetic that is used to induce and maintain anesthesia during surgical procedures. It is a barbiturate, which means that it works by slowing down the activity of the central nervous system, leading to a loss of consciousness and a lack of sensation. Methohexital is typically administered intravenously, and its effects can be rapidly reversed if necessary. It is often used in combination with other anesthetics, such as opioids, to provide a more complete and effective anesthetic. Methohexital is a short-acting anesthetic, meaning that its effects wear off relatively quickly after administration. This can make it useful for procedures that are expected to be short in duration, such as minor surgeries or dental procedures. However, methohexital can also have side effects, including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and respiratory depression. It can also be habit-forming if used for prolonged periods of time, and it may cause liver damage if used in high doses. As with all anesthetics, methohexital should only be used under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.

Midazolam is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. It is primarily used as a sedative, anxiolytic (anti-anxiety), and muscle relaxant. It is also used to treat seizures, including those that occur as part of a procedure to control bleeding in the brain. Midazolam is available in both oral and injectable forms, and it can be given as a single dose or as part of a continuous infusion. It works by enhancing the effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which helps to calm the brain and reduce anxiety and muscle tension. Midazolam is commonly used in medical settings for a variety of procedures, including dental procedures, endoscopy, and surgery. It is also used to treat agitation and aggression in people with certain mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, midazolam can be habit-forming and can cause side effects, including drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, and memory impairment. It can also cause respiratory depression, which can be life-threatening if not properly monitored. Therefore, it is typically only used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Glycopyrrolate is a medication that is used to treat certain conditions related to the muscles of the eyes, such as spasms or overactivity. It is also used to treat certain types of muscle spasms in the body, such as those that occur in the urinary tract or the intestines. Glycopyrrolate works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a chemical that is involved in muscle contraction. This helps to relax the muscles and reduce spasms or overactivity. It is available in both oral and injectable forms and is typically used on an as-needed basis.

Sufentanil is a synthetic opioid analgesic that is used in medicine for the relief of severe pain. It is a potent and short-acting opioid, with a rapid onset and a relatively brief duration of action. Sufentanil is often used in anesthesia and intensive care medicine, as well as for the management of acute pain in the emergency department. It is available in a variety of forms, including intravenous injection, intramuscular injection, and transdermal patch. Sufentanil is a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse and dependence.

Apnea is a medical term that refers to a temporary cessation of breathing. It can occur in both children and adults and can be caused by a variety of factors, including sleep disorders, respiratory problems, and neurological conditions. In medical settings, apnea is typically diagnosed through a sleep study, which involves monitoring a person's breathing patterns while they sleep. There are different types of apnea, including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and mixed sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airway becomes blocked during sleep, preventing air from flowing in and out of the lungs. Central sleep apnea occurs when the brain fails to send signals to the muscles that control breathing, leading to pauses in breathing. Mixed sleep apnea is a combination of both obstructive and central sleep apnea. Untreated sleep apnea can lead to a range of health problems, including high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. Treatment options for sleep apnea may include lifestyle changes, such as weight loss and quitting smoking, as well as the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines or other medical devices to help keep the airway open during sleep.

Postoperative complications are adverse events that occur after a surgical procedure. They can range from minor issues, such as bruising or discomfort, to more serious problems, such as infection, bleeding, or organ damage. Postoperative complications can occur for a variety of reasons, including surgical errors, anesthesia errors, infections, allergic reactions to medications, and underlying medical conditions. They can also be caused by factors such as poor nutrition, dehydration, and smoking. Postoperative complications can have serious consequences for patients, including prolonged hospital stays, additional surgeries, and even death. Therefore, it is important for healthcare providers to take steps to prevent postoperative complications and to promptly recognize and treat them if they do occur.

A granuloma is a type of inflammatory response that occurs when the body's immune system reacts to a foreign substance, such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi. In the larynx, a granuloma is a growth or mass that forms in response to an infection or injury. It is typically composed of immune cells, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, and can be either benign or malignant. Laryngeal granulomas can cause symptoms such as hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, and breathing difficulties. They are usually treated with antibiotics or anti-inflammatory medications, and in some cases, surgery may be necessary.

In the medical field, ethers are a class of organic compounds that contain an oxygen atom bonded to two carbon atoms. They are commonly used as anesthetic agents, meaning they are used to induce a state of unconsciousness and analgesia (pain relief) during medical procedures. There are several different types of ethers, including diethyl ether, chloroform, and halothane. These compounds work by disrupting the normal functioning of the brain, leading to a loss of consciousness and pain relief. Ethers have been used as anesthetics for many years, but their use has declined in recent decades due to concerns about their potential side effects, including respiratory depression, nausea, and vomiting. However, they are still used in certain medical situations, such as in the treatment of certain types of cancer.

In the medical field, oxygen is a gas that is essential for the survival of most living organisms. It is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including respiratory disorders, heart disease, and anemia. Oxygen is typically administered through a mask, nasal cannula, or oxygen tank, and is used to increase the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream. This can help to improve oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs, which is important for maintaining normal bodily functions. In medical settings, oxygen is often used to treat patients who are experiencing difficulty breathing due to conditions such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or asthma. It may also be used to treat patients who have suffered from a heart attack or stroke, as well as those who are recovering from surgery or other medical procedures. Overall, oxygen is a critical component of modern medical treatment, and is used in a wide range of clinical settings to help patients recover from illness and maintain their health.

Deglutition disorders refer to difficulties or problems with swallowing. This can include difficulty starting or stopping the swallowing process, difficulty swallowing solid or liquid foods, or difficulty feeling full after eating. Deglutition disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including neurological disorders, structural abnormalities of the esophagus or mouth, and certain medications. Treatment for deglutition disorders depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, dietary changes, physical therapy, or surgery.

Respiratory aspiration is a medical condition that occurs when a person inhales foreign material into their lungs. This can happen when a person is unconscious, has difficulty swallowing, or has a weakened cough reflex, among other reasons. Aspiration can lead to a variety of complications, including pneumonia, lung abscesses, and respiratory failure. Treatment for respiratory aspiration typically involves removing the foreign material from the lungs and providing supportive care to manage any complications that may arise.

In the medical field, tooth injuries refer to any damage or trauma that affects the structure, function, or appearance of the teeth. Tooth injuries can occur as a result of accidents, sports injuries, falls, or other types of physical trauma. There are several types of tooth injuries, including: 1. Fractures: A fracture is a crack or break in the tooth that can occur anywhere along the tooth's length. 2. Chips: A chip is a small piece of tooth that has been broken off. 3. Cracks: A crack is a long, narrow break in the tooth that can extend from the surface to the root. 4. Luxation: Luxation occurs when the tooth becomes dislodged from its socket. 5. Avulsion: Avulsion is a severe type of tooth injury in which the tooth is completely knocked out of the socket. Tooth injuries can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty chewing or speaking. In some cases, they may also lead to infection or other complications if left untreated. Treatment for tooth injuries may include restorative procedures such as fillings, crowns, or root canal therapy, as well as surgery in severe cases.

Oligohydramnios is a medical condition characterized by a decrease in the amount of amniotic fluid present in the uterus during pregnancy. The normal amount of amniotic fluid is around 500-2,000 milliliters, and oligohydramnios is defined as having less than 500 milliliters of amniotic fluid present. Oligohydramnios can be caused by a variety of factors, including placental insufficiency, fetal abnormalities, and maternal medical conditions such as diabetes or hypertension. It can also be a complication of certain medications or procedures, such as the use of diuretics or amniocentesis. Oligohydramnios can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus. In some cases, it can lead to premature birth, low birth weight, and other complications. It can also increase the risk of fetal distress, which can lead to respiratory distress, brain damage, or even death. Treatment for oligohydramnios depends on the underlying cause and the severity of the condition. In some cases, it may be necessary to monitor the pregnancy closely and deliver the baby early. In other cases, treatment may involve medications or procedures to increase the amount of amniotic fluid, such as intravenous fluids or amniotic fluid replacement.

In the medical field, "wounds and injuries" refer to any type of damage or harm that is inflicted on the body, typically as a result of an external force or trauma. This can include cuts, scrapes, bruises, burns, fractures, and other types of physical trauma. Wounds can be classified based on their depth and severity. Superficial wounds only penetrate the outer layer of skin (epidermis) and are typically easy to treat. Deeper wounds, such as lacerations or punctures, can penetrate the dermis or subcutaneous tissue and may require more extensive medical attention. Injuries can also be classified based on their cause. For example, a fall may result in both a wound (such as a cut or bruise) and an injury (such as a broken bone or concussion). Injuries can be further classified based on their location, severity, and potential long-term effects. The treatment of wounds and injuries typically involves cleaning and dressing the affected area, administering pain medication if necessary, and monitoring for signs of infection or other complications. In some cases, more extensive medical treatment may be required, such as surgery or physical therapy.

Pulmonary edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of excess fluid in the lungs. This can occur due to a variety of factors, including heart failure, kidney failure, severe dehydration, and certain medications. Pulmonary edema can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and difficulty breathing, and can be life-threatening if left untreated. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the edema and providing supportive care to help the body eliminate the excess fluid.

In the medical field, a contracture is a condition in which a muscle or joint becomes shortened or tightened, leading to a limitation of movement or range of motion. Contractures can occur due to a variety of factors, including injury, disease, or surgery. They can be classified as either primary or secondary. Primary contractures occur as a result of the normal healing process after an injury or surgery, while secondary contractures develop as a complication of a disease or condition, such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, or stroke. Contractures can be treated with physical therapy, stretching exercises, or surgery, depending on the severity and underlying cause.

In the medical field, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a gas that is produced as a byproduct of cellular respiration and is exhaled by the body. It is also used in medical applications such as carbon dioxide insufflation during colonoscopy and laparoscopic surgery, and as a component of medical gases used in anesthesia and respiratory therapy. High levels of CO2 in the blood (hypercapnia) can be a sign of respiratory or metabolic disorders, while low levels (hypocapnia) can be caused by respiratory failure or metabolic alkalosis.

Inhalation burns, also known as thermal burns of the airways or smoke inhalation injuries, occur when a person breathes in hot, toxic gases or particles that can damage the delicate tissues of the respiratory system. Inhalation burns can be caused by a variety of sources, including fires, explosions, and chemical spills. The severity of inhalation burns can vary depending on the duration and intensity of exposure, as well as the individual's age, health status, and pre-existing respiratory conditions. Symptoms of inhalation burns may include coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, inhalation burns can lead to respiratory failure and death. Treatment for inhalation burns typically involves supportive care, such as oxygen therapy, bronchodilators, and antibiotics to prevent infection. In some cases, more aggressive interventions may be necessary, such as mechanical ventilation or surgery to repair damaged airways. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if you suspect that you or someone else has suffered from inhalation burns.

Catheterization Nasogastric intubation Tracheal intubation ROTIGS Goodman, RS (1986). "True vocal cord paralysis following ... Intubation (sometimes entubation) is a medical procedure involving the insertion of a tube into the body. Patients are ... Examples include tracheal intubation, and the balloon tamponade with a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (a tube into the ...
... is a medical process involving the insertion of a plastic tube (nasogastric tube or NG tube) through the ... Orogastric intubation is a similar process involving the insertion of a plastic tube (orogastric tube) through the mouth. ... The use of nasogastric intubation is contraindicated in patients with moderate-to-severe neck and facial fractures due to the ... such as an orogastric intubation, should be considered under these circumstances, or if the patient will be incapable of ...
Intubation tube diameter Appropriate intubation tube sizes are defined as those small enough to minimise risks of mucosal ... However, prolonged endotracheal intubation, the use of inappropriate intubation equipment, or improper airway manipulation by ... Tracheal and laryngeal trauma leading to an intubation granuloma are caused by traumas during the intubation processes, ... Persistent sore throat, hoarseness, and vocal fatigue following intubation procedures are common symptoms of intubation ...
Previous experiences with tracheal intubation, especially difficult intubation, intubation for prolonged duration (e.g., ... Tracheal intubation, usually simply referred to as intubation, is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea ( ... ISBN 978-0-19-924016-6. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tracheal intubation. Video of endotracheal intubation using C- ... For infants and young children, orotracheal intubation is easier than the nasotracheal route. Nasotracheal intubation carries a ...
Tracheal intubation (usually simply referred to as intubation), an invasive medical procedure, is the placement of a flexible ... Nasotracheal intubation was not widely practiced until the early 20th century. The 20th century saw the transformation of the ... In November of that year, he published another study, this time on the use of orotracheal intubation to secure the airway of a ... Trousseau, A (1858). "Du tubage de la glotte et de la trachéotomie" [On intubation of the glottis and tracheotomy]. Bulletin de ...
Human errors include repeated attempts at intubation during which the short-acting anesthetic may wear off but the paralyzing ... the patient's muscles may be paralyzed in order to facilitate tracheal intubation or surgical exposure (abdominal and thoracic ... Under-dosing of induction agent during difficult intubation Failure to monitor MAC (minimum alveolar concentration of inhaled ... drug does not; esophageal intubation; inadequate drug dose; a drug given by the wrong route or a wrong drug given; drugs given ...
These devices are widely employed for tracheal intubation, especially in the setting of the difficult intubation (see below). ... Tracheal intubation with the GlideScope can be facilitated by the use of the Verathon Stylet, a rigid stylet that is curved to ... Lee JJ, Lim BG, Lee MK, Kong MH, Kim KJ, Lee JY (March 2012). "Fiberoptic intubation through a laryngeal mask airway as a ... Helps in intubation during the administration of general anaesthesia or for mechanical ventilation. Detects causes of voice ...
Orotracheal intubation. One of the primary differences between emergency medical technicians and paramedics includes the ... Burton, John H (June 2006). "Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation: Half Empty or Half Full?". Annals of Emergency Medicine. ... Arizona Department of Health Services (2015). "Recommendations for Paramedic Performance of Rapid Sequence Intubation (RSI) in ... allowed to use ultrasound as a diagnostic technique and paramedics in Arizona are allowed to perform rapid-sequence intubation ...
... l intubation refers to the insertion of a tube down the trachea. This procedure is commonly performed during surgery, in ... "Definition of INTUBATION". www.merriam-webster.com. Merriam Webster. Retrieved 25 May 2020. Molnar H (11 April 2023). "Types of ... In an emergency, or when tracheal intubation is deemed impossible, a tracheotomy is often performed to insert a tube for ... Scarring from tracheobronchial injury or intubation; or inflammation associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis may also ...
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(02)18593-x. Maxwell, Theodore (September 1890). "Intubation of the Larynx". The Lancet. 136 (3500): 693 ...
Rapid sequence intubation refers to the pharmacologically induced sedation and neuromuscular paralysis prior to intubation of ... also referred to as rapid sequence intubation or as rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSII) or as crash induction - is a ... The typical dose is 1.5 mg/kg IV given three minutes prior to intubation. Atropine may also be used as a premedication agent in ... Rapid Sequence Intubation". In Reichman EF (ed.). Reichman's Emergency Medicine Procedures (3 ed.). McGraw-Hill Education. ISBN ...
Severe cases require intubation. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy is also common, characterised by clotting abnormalities ... Early administration (within 2-6 hours of bite) of antivenom and intubation for respiratory paralysis are keystones of ...
Nickson C (7 August 2013). "Intubation, Hypotension and Shock". Life in the Fastlane (blog). Critical Care Compendium. Archived ... as the sole anesthetic for minor procedures or as an induction agent followed by neuromuscular blocker and tracheal intubation ...
For respiratory abnormalities: intubation, tracheostomy. For hearing loss: cochlear implant, bone-anchored hearing aids. Around ...
Difficult and Impossible Intubation (Chapter) Baskett PJF. Edited Fisher M McD. Clinical Anaesthesiology Series. Published ... Difficult and Impossible Intubation. Bailliere. 1993. Practical Procedures - a Manual for Anaesthesia and Critical Care. Mosby ...
He was given tracheal intubation. He died about 15 to 20 minutes after the attack while being transferred from the airport to ...
Ultimately, intubation may be required. Pupillary light reflexes should be evaluated and blood glucose measured. A decreased ...
"Difficult tracheal intubation in obstetrics". Anaesthesia. 39 (11): 1105-11. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2044.1984.tb08932.x. PMID ...
Tracheal intubation Driscoll, Kevin E.; Costa, Daniel L.; Hatch, Gary; Henderson, Rogene; Oberdorster, Gunter; Salem, Harry; ...
Preterm babies sometimes require intubation. Preterm birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide. About 15 ...
It may also be useful in patients where anatomical abnormalities may make tracheal intubation relatively difficult. In ... Rucklidge M, Hinton C. (2012). "Difficult and failed intubation in obstetrics". Continuing Education in Anaesthesia, Critical ... is the technique of choice for Caesarean section as it avoids a general anaesthetic and the risk of failed intubation (which is ... for patients with severe respiratory disease such as COPD as it avoids the potential respiratory consequences of intubation and ...
The Rapid Oral Tracheal Intubation Guidance System (ROTIGS) is a medical device that facilitates intubation. The device was ... The device functions as a bite block and a mechanical guide for transoral intubation, as it awakens intubations in ways that ... By creating a gag free approach to the larynx, ROTIGS facilitates safe, awake, guided transoral intubation for the infrequent ... The design several medical applications beyond its original intended use as an appliance to allow awake intubation.[citation ...
History of tracheal intubation Sperati, G; Felisati, D (2007). "Bouchut, O'Dwyer and laryngeal intubation in patients with ... Trousseau, A (1858). "Du tubage de la glotte et de la trachéotomie" [On intubation of the glottis and tracheotomy]. Bulletin de ... Undaunted, Bouchut later introduced a set of tubes (Bouchut's tubes) for intubation of the trachea, as an alternative to ... In 1858, Bouchut developed a new technique for non-surgical orotracheal intubation to bypass obstruction of the larynx ...
He developed a valuable system of intubation in diphtheria cases. O'Dwyer is often cited as the "father of laryngeal intubation ... O'Dwyer was among the early practitioners to switch from intubation where appropriate. W.P. Northrup wrote, "Intubation is ... The O'Dwyer Method was first published in the N. Y. Medical Journal in 1888, as "Intubation of the Larynx". O'Dwyer's design ... The use of a tube for intubation had often been attempted but unsuccessfully. After five years of study, working with surgeon ...
Tracheal intubation can also be used. If surgery cannot be performed soon after birth, tracheostomy may have better outcomes. ...
It is an indirect way of assessing how difficult an intubation will be; this is more definitively scored using the Cormack- ... A high Mallampati score (class 3 or 4) is associated with more difficult intubation as well as a higher incidence of sleep ... While Mallampati classes I and II are associated with relatively easy intubation, classes III and IV are associated with ... Samsoon, GL; Young, JR (May 1987). "Difficult tracheal intubation: a retrospective study". Anaesthesia. 42 (5): 487-90. doi: ...
Intubation and ICU admission rates were slowing. Fines for violating social distancing protocols were increased from $500 to $ ...
As it is typically larger and more obstructive than tracheal intubation, it is generally not used for surgery of the mouth and ... A laryngeal mask leaves more anatomical dead space in the trachea than with tracheal intubation. This can decrease the ... Brain, AIJ (1985). "Three cases of difficult intubation overcome by the laryngeal mask airway". Anaesthesia. 40 (4): 353-5. doi ... they are easier to place than tracheal intubation due to the lack of muscle relaxants and laryngoscopy. They are also less ...
Intubation is indicated if unconscious and deteriorating. If a pulse cannot be distinguished, and the person is unresponsive, ...
It is indicated for rapid sequence intubation. IV dose 1-1.5mg/kg or 3 to 5 x ED95 Paralysis occurs in one to two minutes. ... It can help reduce hoarseness in voice as well as injury to the vocal cord during intubation. In addition, it plays an ... Any short or intermediate acting depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents can be applied for endotracheal intubation for long ... Short-acting neuromuscular blocking agents are chosen for endotracheal intubation for short procedures (< 30minutes), and ...
Endotracheal intubation is a medical procedure in which a tube is placed into the windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose ... Endotracheal intubation is a medical procedure in which a tube is placed into the windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose ... Tracheal intubation. In: Fowler GC, ed. Pfenninger and Fowlers Procedures for Primary Care. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Tracheal intubation. In: Roberts JR, Custalow CB, Thomsen TW, eds. Roberts and Hedges Clinical Procedures in Emergency ...
... - Medscape - Mar 17, 2022. ... for recently providing some great tips on achieving cecal intubation in difficult colons. Id like to amplify Dr Rexs insights ...
Tabulated data show the percentage of confirmed COVID-19 inpatient discharges that involved intubation or ventilator use at any ... Intubation or ventilator use is defined by at least one of the following: *Ventilator use is defined by any listed ... Intubation or Ventilator Use in the Hospital by Week From Selected Hospitals. COVID-19 Hospital Data ... Emergency endotracheal intubation is defined by an any listed Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) procedure code. ...
The intubation cannula is used in chronic studies where the animal will be intubated. The outside diameter of the cannula must ... Intubation Cannula for Small Rat, OD 1.5 mm, L 37 mm Please login to add to Quote ... Intubation Cannula for Mouse, OD 1.2 mm, L 30 mm Please login to add to Quote ... Intubation Cannula for Mouse, OD 1.1 mm, L 28 mm Please login to add to Quote ...
Tracheal Intubation - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical ... Drugs to aid intubation Drugs to Aid Intubation Pulseless and apneic or severely obtunded patients can (and should) be ... Alternative Intubation Devices A number of devices and techniques can be used for intubation after failed laryngoscopy or as a ... Insertion Technique for Intubation Successful intubation on the first attempt is important. Repeated laryngoscopy (≥ 3 attempts ...
Keywords: prehospital intubation; videoscopic intubation; continuous quality improvement; critical care transport; air medical ... Over-all intubation success increased from 95% to 99% over the study period, but the trend was not statistically significant (p ... Introduction: Airway management is a critical skill for air medical providers, including the use of rapid sequence intubation ( ... Chi-square test for trend was used to evaluate for improvements in airway management and RSI success (overall intubation ...
The C-MAC videolaryngoscope for prehospital emergency intubation: a prospective, multicentre, observational study ... The C-MAC videolaryngoscope for prehospital emergency intubation: a prospective, multicentre, observational study ... The C-MAC videolaryngoscope for prehospital emergency intubation: a prospective, multicentre, observational study ...
Intubation. In the unconscious patient, the first step usually is orotracheal intubation. [1] Perform this step with the neck ... Nasotracheal intubation may be considered in some circumstances. Nasotracheal intubation is not generally recommended in the ... score was the strongest of seven predictors of intubation. Younger age also predicted intubation, as did a higher Abbreviated ... Attempts at orotracheal intubation in patients with significant laryngeal trauma often are ill advised. Additionally, extensive ...
The submental intubation(ISMOT), intubation becomes a safe and effective procedure for airway management. This paper aims to ... ALCALDE, Luís Fernando Azambuja et al. Orotraqueal submental intubation - Two years retrospective study. Rev. cir. traumatol. ... where oro tracheal intubation and nasotracheal intubation are contraindicated, with low morbidity and complication rate minimum ...
Intubation. 236 (14.0). 234 (11.5). 0.026. Inpatient death†. 255 (15.1). 253 (12.4). 0.019. ...
Progressive mandibular midline deviation after difficult tracheal intubation.. Mareque Bueno, J; Fernández-Barriales, M; Morey- ... We report condylar resorption of the temporomandibular joint after difficult intubation, leading to progressive midline ...
Endotracheal intubation. Rapid sequence intubation should be modified, because depolarizing paralytic agents (eg, ... Mazia CG, De Vito EL, Varela M. BiPAP in acute respiratory failure due to myasthenic crisis may prevent intubation. Neurology. ... Evidence of hypoxemia, poor respiratory effort, or CO2 retention is an indication for intubation and mechanical ventilation. [ ... Following paralysis, intubation is accomplished as usual. ABG sampling guides ventilator settings. ...
Our primary end point was the incidence of intubation. Potential predictors of intubation were determined by the Cox regression ... Cumulative incidence of intubation was 24% (1stwave 26% vs 2nd wave 24%). One-third of intubations were performed on the first ... intubation) Results We included 219 patients (average age of 56.8 ±15.2 years; 75 % men), respectively 37 % in the 1st and 63 ... The Coxs regression model showed that among data from the 1st day of ICU admission, those predicting intubation were age ( ...
Our intubation box allows medical professionals to safely administer care to patients while avoiding potentail hazards. ...
Intubation had become a routine procedure in Europe during the period between World Wars, but in the USA it was not as ... Awake intubation was previously noted to be traumatic for the patient and for the doctor as some of ODwyerss students found ... He advocated intubation by travelling around the USA with his Dunking Dog Show during which he would anaesthetize his pet dog ... This used in combination with volatile hypnotic agents allowed the patient to be sedated and paralysed for intubation and ...
Induction and Intubation. *Application of each prior learning topic to provide safe intubation ... intubation Ventilator Management Basics: How to Set Ventilators and More. Its important for providers of all levels to know ... Categories Blog, Uncategorized Tags clinical basics, intubation, patient management, patient ventilation, ventilator, ...
Blockage of Airway with Attempts at Endotracheal Intubation and Eventual Tracheostomy - Image ...
Because children do not ingest large amounts of corrosive materials, and because of the risk of perforation from NG intubation ... In cases of respiratory compromise secure airway and respiration via endotracheal intubation. If not possible, perform ... In cases of respiratory compromise secure airway and respiration via endotracheal intubation. If not possible, surgically ... Extreme throat swelling may require endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy. Gastric lavage is useful in certain ...
B) Nice intubation…but why is his BP now70?. Post intubation sedation and analgesia infusions are superior to push dosing, but ... Tag Archives: intubation Trauma Reflections - June 2018. Posted on June 15, 2018. by David Lewis ... Posted in Clinical, CPD, CQI, Trauma Reflections , Tagged chest tube, intubation, sedation, trauma reflections ...
airway e-learningfibreoptic intubationFOIintubationPierre-Robinvideo laryngoscopyVL. Post navigation. Previous PostOverview of ... Is fibreoptic intubation a dying art?. 1st April 2016. Ross Hofmeyr Over the past two weeks, I have been involved in three ... In an article on the Airway E-Learning site, Dr Matthew Wiles details why he thinks fibreoptic intubation (FOI) is becoming a ... cases where all means of laryngoscopic intubation failed - including multiple different blades, introducers and highly skilled ...
Intubation. Shiley™ Evac Endotracheal Tube with TaperGuard™ Cuff. McGRATH™ MAC Video Laryngoscope. Shiley™ Oral/Nasal RAE ... Intubation Additional Resources. Mechanical Ventilation. Puritan Bennett™ 980 Ventilator Series. Puritan Bennett™ 840 ...
1. None 6. Wound Care 2. Endotracheal Intubation 7. Eye/ENT Care 3. CPR 8. Orthopedic Care 4. IV fluids 9. Bladder catheter 5. ... Endotracheal intubation 17.3 1 113 CPR 17.4 1 114 IV fluids 17.5 1 115 NG tube/gastric lavage 17.6 1 116 Wound care ...
So weve had several patients arrest at intubation.. So you want to arrange air transport with the ability for pressure ... We also provide oxygen and try to avoid intubation unless its absolutely necessary at the time especially for transfer because ...
Mouse Intubation Platform - User Instructions. For additional details, see Instructions for Use of Mouse Intubation Platform ( ... The Penn-Century Mouse Intubation Platform is designed to make intratracheal aerosol delivery or other intubation procedures in ... For intubation procedures:. *Position the anesthetized mouse so that it is suspended from its front incisors on the nylon wire ... Intratracheal intubation of anesthetized mice can pose challenges due to the animals small size, unique anatomy and the ...
Rapid sequence intubation is commonly performed to prevent aspiration but is not associated with low risk of intubation related ... How common is pneumonia after intubation?. In addition, bacteria form a biofilm on and within the endotracheal tube that ... The highest risk of VAP occurs during the first 10 days after intubation. Ventilator-associated pneumonia occurs in 9 to 27% of ... Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents during tracheal intubation is a life-threatening complication in emergency patients. ...
... but you should expect your gastroenterologist to have a higher cecal intubation rate. A high cecal intubation rate means your ... Cecal Intubation Rate. The percentage of success in which a gastroenterologist advances the colonoscope to the cecum in his or ... Withdrawal Time, Cecal Intubation Rate Matters for Quality Colonoscopy. Colonoscopy is the most effective screening for colon ... Use quality indicators like ADR, withdrawal time and cecal intubation rate as criteria for selecting a gastroenterologist. Its ...
  • Tracheal intubation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • and to ventilate and oxygenate the patient are always indicated before attempting tracheal intubation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The LF-V flexible tracheal intubation laryngovideoscope provides high-resolution images of tracheal anatomy during endotracheal (ET) intubation with standard ET tubes. (olympus.fi)
  • They discuss the PreVent trial, a recent publication in the 2019 issue of the NEJM that assessed the role of bag-mask ventilation from induction to laryngoscopy during tracheal intubation in critically ill adults. (thoracic.org)
  • A prospective cohort study by Gravesteijn et al of tracheal intubation in Europe following traumatic brain injury (TBI) found that a lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was the strongest of seven predictors of intubation. (medscape.com)
  • The ISMOT is a major surgical procedure for patients with severe fractures of the face, where oro tracheal intubation and nasotracheal intubation are contraindicated, with low morbidity and complication rate minimum. (bvsalud.org)
  • Progressive mandibular midline deviation after difficult tracheal intubation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Airway obstruction due to diphtheria pseudomembranous disease was also the stimulus to explore non-surgical tracheal intubation. (paediatricemergencies.com)
  • Endotracheal intubation is a medical procedure in which a tube is placed into the windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Emergency endotracheal intubation is defined by an any listed Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) procedure code. (cdc.gov)
  • Acute severe clinical deterioration of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) may mandate endotracheal intubation. (nih.gov)
  • Outcomes after out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation errors. (ahrq.gov)
  • He outlined this in his paper " An Essay on the Recovery of the Apparently Dead " [4] and is thought to be the first description of an endotracheal intubation. (paediatricemergencies.com)
  • Patients unable to speak because of endotracheal intubation, orotracheal trauma, severe dysarthria from any cause, 2 = Answers neither question correctly. (medscape.com)
  • Airway management is a critical skill for air medical providers, including the use of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) medications. (airmethods.com)
  • Chi-square test for trend was used to evaluate for improvements in airway management and RSI success (overall intubation success, first-attempt success, first-attempt success without desaturation) over the 25-month study period following HeART implementation. (airmethods.com)
  • An integrated advanced airway management program was successful in improving RSI intubation performance in a large air medical company. (airmethods.com)
  • The submental intubation(ISMOT), intubation becomes a safe and effective procedure for airway management. (bvsalud.org)
  • I'm the author of Whitten's Step-by-Step Guides, a series of books teaching airway management, intubation, and respiratory care: Anyone Can Intubate, A Step-by-Step Guide to Intubation and Airway Management 5th edition, and Pediatric Airway Management: a Step-by-Step Guide. (airwayjedi.com)
  • My books, as well as my training videos on intubation and airway management, are used in training programs both nationally and internationally. (airwayjedi.com)
  • Anticipated Difficult Intubation: Should I Intubate The Patient Awake? (airwayjedi.com)
  • Reference: Submental intubation in patients with panfacial fractures: a prospective study. (thetraumapro.com)
  • Younger age also predicted intubation, as did a higher Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, particularly for the thorax, chest, and face, while patients with prehospital unreactive pupils had a greater likelihood of prehospital intubation but not of in-hospital intubation. (medscape.com)
  • How To Do Orotracheal Intubation Using Video Laryngoscopy Endotracheal (ET) tubes are flexible tubes with a standard flange for attaching an oxygen source at the proximal end and a beveled tip and inflatable balloon cuff at the distal end. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Orotracheal intubation is preferred in apneic and critically ill patients because it can usually be done faster than nasotracheal intubation, which is reserved for awake, spontaneously breathing patients or for situations in which the mouth must be avoided. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In the unconscious patient, the first step usually is orotracheal intubation . (medscape.com)
  • Attempts at orotracheal intubation in patients with significant laryngeal trauma often are ill advised. (medscape.com)
  • Nasotracheal intubation may be considered in some circumstances. (medscape.com)
  • Nasotracheal intubation is not generally recommended in the patient in acute respiratory distress or in patients with extensive maxillofacial trauma because the procedure requires both time and a stable mid face. (medscape.com)
  • The correct location of the tube, inserted after intubation, may be confirmed by audible respiratory sounds through a stethoscope lateral to the left and right wall of the thorax. (boreal.com)
  • In some cases, intubation is a natural component of surgical procedures involving general anesthesia, which causes paralysis to muscles in the body, including the diaphragm. (biklaw.com)
  • Because intubation requires that a long tube be inserted into the patient's trachea (windpipe), it is necessarily paired with anesthesia, and of course, any time general anesthesia is administered, intubation is required. (biklaw.com)
  • However, in all cases (anesthesia), intubation errors could occur, resulting in serious harm or even death. (biklaw.com)
  • When (anesthesia) intubation errors occur, patients that suffer harm or those who have lost a loved one as a result may have a case for medical malpractice. (biklaw.com)
  • When (anesthesia) intubation errors result in harm or death, patients and their loved ones have the option to pursue a medical malpractice claim, and they may need to in order to cover medical, funerary, and other related expenses. (biklaw.com)
  • have the expertise to help you secure maximum compensation when (anesthesia) intubation errors occur. (biklaw.com)
  • Potential predictors of intubation were determined by the Cox regression analysis . (bvsalud.org)
  • Blood in the airway can obscure the laryngoscopic view and complicate the intubation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Over the past two weeks, I have been involved in three cases where all means of laryngoscopic intubation failed - including multiple different blades, introducers and highly skilled hands - and the airway could only be intubated with a flexible fibreoptic 'scope. (openairway.org)
  • MFI Medical carries a full line of intubation scopes from brands like Olympus and Storz. (mfimedical.com)
  • Out-of-hospital intubation errors were not associated with mortality but were associated with an increased rate of pneumonia. (ahrq.gov)
  • The majority of intubations were performed after the third day of admission and mortality was high. (bvsalud.org)
  • Context and objective In intensive care units (ICU), clinicians have little information to identify COVID-19 patients at high risk of poor prognosis requiring intubation . (bvsalud.org)
  • Thirty patients required intubation on 34 occasions (8 per 1000 admissions). (nih.gov)
  • The aim of the present study was to estimate the preventable proportion of Intubation-Associated Pneumonia (IAP) in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) participating in the Italian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance in ICUs (SPIN-UTI) network, taking into account differences in intrinsic patients' risk factors, and additionally considering the compliance with the European bundle for IAP prevention. (plos.org)
  • The Italian Nosocomial Infections Surveillance in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) (Sorveglianza Prospettica delle Infezioni Nosocomiali nelle Unità di Terapia Intensiva, SPIN-UTI), network reported that pneumonia occurred in 9.8% of patients admitted to the ICU and 96% of these infections were associated with intubation (Intubation-Associated Pneumonia, IAP). (plos.org)
  • Our intubation box allows medical professionals to safely administer care to patients while avoiding potentail hazards. (hbdisplays.com)
  • It presents the usage of the McGRATH™ MAC video laryngoscope as standard of care by educating participants on how to perform an intubation procedure with a variety of patients and complexity of intubation scenarios. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • An opportunity for medical specialists to train, correct, and supervise their colleagues, specialists, and students maximizing safety and the success rate of the intubation process for the real patients. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • If during intubation too much pressure is applied through the laryngoscope to the upper incisors, an acoustic signal is heard. (boreal.com)
  • chest compressions should not be halted for intubation attempts. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Results on this page show the percentage of confirmed COVID-19 inpatient discharges that involved intubation or ventilator use for each week, by sex and age. (cdc.gov)
  • A serious complication of nasopharyngeal intubation is epistaxis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In other instances, intubation is necessary due to illness or an emergency situation. (biklaw.com)
  • However, awake intubation can be a safe and comfortable strategy in many clinical situations. (airwayjedi.com)
  • When facing any intubation, you must decide whether the intubation is safer to be performed asleep or awake. (airwayjedi.com)
  • Many providers are uncomfortable with performing awake intubations and leave it as a last resort. (airwayjedi.com)
  • This article discusses some of the criteria for deciding when to do an awake intubation. (airwayjedi.com)
  • Our primary end point was the incidence of intubation . (bvsalud.org)
  • Intubation involves the insertion of a tube into the airway. (biklaw.com)
  • Intubation ensures that a patient continues to breathe steadily throughout the surgery. (biklaw.com)
  • Basically, intubation occurs any time a patient cannot, or will not be able to, breathe on their own. (biklaw.com)
  • When intubation errors occur, there could be a number of consequences for the patient, from cuts and bruises, to the cessation of breathing due to lack of oxygen flow. (biklaw.com)
  • There are a variety of reasons for this discomfort, including lack of experience and/or the fear that the patient will remember the intubation and think poorly of their care. (airwayjedi.com)
  • A hands-on experience that combines a realistic variety and difficulty of patient scenarios and intubation cases. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • Medtronic McGRATH™ MAC VR Intubation Simulation is an interactive and immersive VR intubation simulation experience created with Medtronic to demonstrate the product and to train practitioners and medical students. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • Medtronic McGRATH™ MAC VR simulation provides an opportunity for OR/ICU medical specialists to remotely train, get evaluated on the performed procedures, while maximizing the safety and success rate of the intubation in real time. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • Intubation delivers 100% oxygen when less-invasive delivery methods do not work or are inappropriate. (medscape.com)
  • Immediate assessment of performed procedure based on a step-by-step intubation tracking and evaluation system. (lucidrealitylabs.com)
  • In some cases, they're related to long-term intubation. (biklaw.com)
  • The benefits of intubation were evaluated by examining which pre-admission parameters were associated with intensive care unit (ICU) outcome and assessing the potential benefits of intubation for survivors in terms of time from ICU discharge to death. (nih.gov)
  • In an article on the Airway E-Learning site, Dr Matthew Wiles details why he thinks fibreoptic intubation (FOI) is becoming a rare beast , and why we should work hard to maintain excellence in this important skill. (openairway.org)
  • There are many potential factors that could contribute to intubation errors. (biklaw.com)
  • Over-all intubation success increased from 95% to 99% over the study period, but the trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.311). (airmethods.com)
  • Paramedic intubation errors: isolated events or symptoms of larger problems? (ahrq.gov)
  • What Are the Most Common Types of Intubation Errors? (biklaw.com)
  • Why Do Intubation Errors Happen? (biklaw.com)
  • There were no significant differences for survivors in reasons for intubation, colonizing organism, frequency of infective exacerbations, severity of illness or pulmonary physiology. (nih.gov)
  • Kudos to Dr Douglas Rex, a master of colonoscopy education for our era, for recently providing some great tips on achieving cecal intubation in difficult colons . (medscape.com)
  • We report condylar resorption of the temporomandibular joint after difficult intubation , leading to progressive midline mandibular deviation, subsequently treated by prosthetic joint replacement . (bvsalud.org)