Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Frozen Sections: Thinly cut sections of frozen tissue specimens prepared with a cryostat or freezing microtome.Neuronavigation: Intraoperative computer-assisted 3D navigation and guidance system generally used in neurosurgery for tracking surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy. The pre-operative diagnostic scan is used as a reference and is transferred onto the operative field during surgery.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Intraoperative Awareness: Occurence of a patient becoming conscious during a procedure performed under GENERAL ANESTHESIA and subsequently having recall of these events. (From Anesthesiology 2006, 104(4): 847-64.)Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring: The systematic checking of the condition and function of a patient's CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM during the course of a surgical operation.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Parathyroidectomy: Excision of one or more of the parathyroid glands.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Cholangiography: An imaging test of the BILIARY TRACT in which a contrast dye (RADIOPAQUE MEDIA) is injected into the BILE DUCT and x-ray pictures are taken.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Indocyanine Green: A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Diagnostic Techniques, Surgical: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of disease or dysfunction by examination of the pathological site or operative field during surgical intervention.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Operative Blood Salvage: Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Phacoemulsification: A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Gamma Cameras: Electronic instruments that produce photographs or cathode-ray tube images of the gamma-ray emissions from organs containing radionuclide tracers.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Pathology, Surgical: A field of anatomical pathology in which living tissue is surgically removed for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by stimulation along AFFERENT PATHWAYS from PERIPHERAL NERVES to CEREBRUM.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Infrared Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum usually sensed as heat. Infrared wavelengths are longer than those of visible light, extending into the microwave frequencies. They are used therapeutically as heat, and also to warm food in restaurants.Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Cytodiagnosis: Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Consciousness Monitors: Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared: A noninvasive technique that uses the differential absorption properties of hemoglobin and myoglobin to evaluate tissue oxygenation and indirectly can measure regional hemodynamics and blood flow. Near-infrared light (NIR) can propagate through tissues and at particular wavelengths is differentially absorbed by oxygenated vs. deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin. Illumination of intact tissue with NIR allows qualitative assessment of changes in the tissue concentration of these molecules. The analysis is also used to determine body composition.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Perioperative Period: The time periods immediately before, during and following a surgical operation.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Stereotaxic Techniques: Techniques used mostly during brain surgery which use a system of three-dimensional coordinates to locate the site to be operated on.Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE that may result in vocal cord dysfunction.Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Isotonic Solutions: Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Optical Imaging: The use of light interaction (scattering, absorption, and fluorescence) with biological tissue to obtain morphologically based information. It includes measuring inherent tissue optical properties such as scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence; or optical properties of exogenous targeted fluorescent molecular probes such as those used in optical MOLECULAR IMAGING, or nontargeted optical CONTRAST AGENTS.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Rosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Anesthesia, Conduction: Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Iris Diseases: Diseases, dysfunctions, or disorders of or located in the iris.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Hyperthermia, Induced: Abnormally high temperature intentionally induced in living things regionally or whole body. It is most often induced by radiation (heat waves, infra-red), ultrasound, or drugs.Hyperparathyroidism, Primary: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE due to parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. It is characterized by the combination of HYPERCALCEMIA, phosphaturia, elevated renal 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis, and increased BONE RESORPTION.Parathyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARATHYROID GLANDS.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Gallstones: Solid crystalline precipitates in the BILIARY TRACT, usually formed in the GALLBLADDER, resulting in the condition of CHOLELITHIASIS. Gallstones, derived from the BILE, consist mainly of calcium, cholesterol, or bilirubin.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Glioma: Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Branches of the vagus (tenth cranial) nerve. The recurrent laryngeal nerves originate more caudally than the superior laryngeal nerves and follow different paths on the right and left sides. They carry efferents to all muscles of the larynx except the cricothyroid and carry sensory and autonomic fibers to the laryngeal, pharyngeal, tracheal, and cardiac regions.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Peritoneal Lavage: Washing out of the peritoneal cavity. The procedure is a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic technique following abdominal trauma or inflammation.Sclerostomy: Surgical formation of an external opening in the sclera, primarily in the treatment of glaucoma.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Technetium Tc 99m Aggregated Albumin: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in cardiovascular and cerebral circulation.Antifibrinolytic Agents: Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.Trabeculectomy: Any surgical procedure for treatment of glaucoma by means of puncture or reshaping of the trabecular meshwork. It includes goniotomy, trabeculectomy, and laser perforation.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Tranexamic Acid: Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Methylene Blue: A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Vitrectomy: Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Evoked Potentials, Motor: The electrical response evoked in a muscle or motor nerve by electrical or magnetic stimulation. Common methods of stimulation are by transcranial electrical and TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION. It is often used for monitoring during neurosurgery.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Surgical Staplers: Fastening devices composed of steel-tantalum alloys used to close operative wounds, especially of the skin, which minimizes infection by not introducing a foreign body that would connect external and internal regions of the body. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995)Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.
Intraoperative monitoring[edit]. Somatosensory evoked potentials provide monitoring for the dorsal columns of the spinal cord. ... When used in intraoperative monitoring, the latency and amplitude of the peak relative to the patient's post-intubation ... Transcranial electrical MEP (TCeMEP) has been in widespread use for several years for intraoperative monitoring of pyramidal ... The two modalities are thus complementary, electrical stimulation being the choice for intraoperative monitoring, and magnetic ...
Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring can also be used. Examples of commonly used biomarkers are adrenalin, cortisol, ... Moreover they can be performed both in the intraoperative or postoperative period. If there is a choice between different ... Höglund, OV; Hagman, R; Olsson, K; Olsson, U; Lagerstedt, AS (Aug 8, 2014). "Intraoperative Changes in Blood Pressure, Heart ... Tallant, A; Ambros, B; Freire, C; Sakals, S (July 2016). "Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative pain during canine ...
Aatif M. Husain (2008). A practical approach to neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring. Demos Medical Publishing. p. 23. ...
This test modality is used in intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring to verify function of sensory and motor sacral roots as ... "Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring of the Sacral Nervous System". Neurophysiology in Neurosurgery, a Modern ... The test involves monitoring internal/external anal sphincter contraction in response to squeezing the glans penis or clitoris ... Intraoperative Approach. Academic Press: 153-165. Jiang XZ; Zhou CK; Guo LH; Chen J; Wang HQ; Zhang DQ; Shi BK; Xu ZS. (2009 ...
Bashein G, Russell AH, Momii ST (1986). "Anesthesia and remote monitoring for intraoperative radiation therapy". Journal of ... typically related to anesthesia and patient monitoring. Inspiratory Force Meter Boehringer Inspiratory Force Meters with memory ...
Husain, A. M. (2015). A practical approach to neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring (2nd ed.). New York: Demos. p. 166. ...
1988). "Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials with a spiral scalp electrode. Technical note". Neurosurgery Service, ... Additionally, he has multiple patents including a device for spine stabilization and an electrode for monitoring of brain ... "Device and method for monitoring evoked potentials and electroencephalograms". Retrieved 7 September 2013. Doty, J. R., Mahla, ...
"Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring during Spine Surgery: A Review". Bindal, Rajesh K.; Ghosh, Subrata (2007-02-01). " ... "Intraoperative electromyography monitoring in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion". Journal of ... Monitoring of the compressed nerves and associated pathways is indicated due to the proximity of surgical manipulations that ... The camera emits pictures and/or video of the operating field to a monitor, while the surgeon uses special surgical instruments ...
"Monitoring of cerebrospinal fluid flow by intraoperative ultrasound in patients with Chiari I malformation". Clinical Neurology ...
Use of the BIS monitor could reduce the incidence of intraoperative awareness during anaesthesia. The exact details of the ... A monitor of the Autonomic Nervous System (the first commercial monitor was the ANEMON-I monitor developed by former Swiss ... However, a monitor of the central nervous system may be more appropriate for monitoring consciousness. After the publication of ... Bispectral index (BIS) is one of several technologies used to monitor depth of anesthesia. BIS monitors are used to supplement ...
Magstim Company Limited of Whitland, Carmarthenshire for neural stimulators and intraoperative nerve monitors. ...
... detailed monitoring standards with universal applicability in the dental setting Guidelines for Intraoperative Monitoring of ... Rosenberg, MB; Campbell, RL (1991). "Guidelines for intraoperative monitoring of dental patients undergoing conscious sedation ... and General Anesthesia The promulgation and adoption of intraoperative monitoring standards in medicine for anesthesia has ... The American Dental Society of Anesthesiology has devised specific, detailed monitoring standards with universal applicability ...
These properties allow for cancer propagation to be monitored and potentially enables intraoperative cancer removal. However, ... making it difficult to monitor certain processes if optical absorption is weak. On the other hand, exogenous agents can be ... while studying lipid concentrations within blood vessels is important for monitoring the progression of atherosclerosis. It is ...
Invasive and concomitant noninvasive intraoperative blood pressure monitoring: observed differences in measurements and ... As a result, this technology can be found in the Task Force Monitor and CNAP Monitor 500 (CNSystems) as well as in the CNAP ... VERIFI is implemented in the Task Force Monitor, CNAP Monitor 500, CNAP Smart Pod and in the LiDCOrapid. PhysioCal is used in ... monitor with an invasive arterial blood pressure monitor in the cardiac surgical ICU. Annals of cardiac anaesthesia, 15(3), 180 ...
Audiologist gave training in cochlear implants, intraoperative monitoring, hearing aids, as well as vestibular and balance ...
For example, clinical neurophysiologists specialize in the use of EEG and intraoperative monitoring to diagnose certain ... and intraoperative monitoring. The American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine certifies US physicians in electrodiagnostic ... the field responsible for EEG and intraoperative monitoring, or in electrodiagnostic medicine nerve conduction studies, EMG and ...
Epilepsy Monitoring, and Neurologic Intraoperative Monitoring (NIOM). In the US physicians typically specialize in EEG or EDX ... Clinical neurophysiology, is a broader field that includes EEG, intraoperative monitoring, nerve conduction studies, EMG and ...
The latter allows for direct monitoring of neurological status by intra-operative verbal contact and testing of grip strength. ... transcranial doppler analysis and carotid artery stump pressure monitoring. At present there is no good evidence to show any ...
During surgery, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring of the facial, acoustic and lower cranial nerves can reduce the ... About 25% of all acoustic neuromas are treated with medical management consisting of a periodic monitoring of the patient's ... the use of facial nerve monitoring has become a standard practice in the United States to reduce the risk of facial paralysis. ...
... also be used to limit the extent of surgical exploration when used in conjunction with intraoperative PTH hormone monitoring. ... The PTH level is back to normal within 10-15 minutes, and is confirmed by intraoperative rapid assessment during the operation ...
A Randomized Phase 3 Study Of Intraoperative Cavernous Nerve Stimulation with Penile Tumescence Monitoring to Improve Nerve ... An intraoperative electrical stimulation penile plethysmograph may be applied to assist the surgeon in identifying the ... Erectile dysfunction outcomes can be predicted by intraoperative cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with a penile ...
Epilepsy Monitoring, and Neurologic Intraoperative Monitoring (NIOM). In the US physicians typically specialize in EEG or EDX ... intraoperative monitoring (IOM), evoked potentials, polysomnography, and ultrasound. AANEM collaborator members are ... AANEM monitors private sector market trends and critical practice issues and provides members with updates, practice management ...
Epilepsy Monitoring, and Neurologic Intraoperative Monitoring (NIOM). In the US physicians typically specialize in EEG or EDX ... Whereas a clinical neurophysiologist is trained to perform all the following studies EEG, intraoperative monitoring, nerve ... Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring: The pathway to becoming a clinical neurophysiologist in the U.S. includes ... A type of sleep study employed to diagnose disorders associated with abnormal sleep behavior Intraoperative monitoring, ...
In the recent decade, the clinical usefulness of SEPs entered the operating room, allowing the intraoperative monitoring of the ... Posterior tibial nerve SEP monitoring is widely used for monitoring the spinal cord during scoliosis procedures and other ... Continuous SEP monitoring can warn a surgeon and prompt intervention before impairment becomes permanent. Testing with median ... Continuous SEP monitoring can warn a surgeon about potential spinal cord damage, which can prompt intervention before ...
Future studies may show reduced levels of intraoperative awareness when using this type of monitoring. Future studies may also ... Entropy monitoring is a method of assessing anaesthetic depth. It was commercially developed by Datex-Ohmeda, now part of GE ... The reason for using higher frequency bandpass in response entropy is to allow faster response from the monitor in relation to ... The signal is captured via a forehead mounted sensor, in a similar way employed by bispectral index (BIS). Entropy monitors ...
... , or IORT, is the application of therapeutic levels of radiation to the tumor bed while the area is exposed during surgery. IORT is typically a component in the multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced and recurrent cancer, in combination with external beam radiation, surgery and chemotherapy. As a growing trend in recent years, IORT can also be used in earlier stage cancers such as prostate and breast cancer. IORT was found to be useful and feasible in the multidisciplinary management of many solid tumors but further studies are needed to determine the benefit more precisely. Single-institution experiences have suggested a role of IORT e.g. in brain tumors and cerebral metastases, locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer, skin cancer, retroperitoneal sarcoma, pancreatic cancer and selected gynaecologic and genitourinary malignancies. For local recurrences, irradiation with IORT is, besides brachytherapy, the only radiotherapeutic option if repeated ...
... is a process wherein a person receives their own blood for a transfusion, instead of banked allogenic (separate-donor) blood. There are two main kinds of autotransfusion: Blood can be autologously "pre-donated" (termed so despite "donation" not typically referring to giving to one's self) before a surgery, or alternatively, it can be collected during and after the surgery using an intraoperative blood salvage device (such as a Cell Saver or CATS). The latter form of autotransfusion is utilized in surgeries where there is expected a large volume blood loss - e.g. aneurysm, total joint replacement, and spinal surgeries. The first documented use of "self-donated" blood was in 1818, and interest in the practice continued until the Second World War, at which point blood supply became less of an issue due to the increased number of blood donors. Later, interest in the procedure returned with concerns about allogenic (separate-donor) transfusions. Autotransfusion is used in a ...
The dermatologic subspecialty called Mohs surgery focuses on the excision of skin cancers using a tissue-sparing technique that allows intraoperative assessment of 100% of the peripheral and deep tumor margins developed in the 1930s by Dr. Frederic E. Mohs. The procedure is defined as a type of CCPDMA processing. Physicians trained in this technique must be comfortable with both pathology and surgery, and dermatologists receive extensive training in both during their residency. Physicians who perform Mohs surgery can receive training in this specialized technique during their dermatology residency, but many will seek additional training either through preceptorships to join the American Society for Mohs Surgery[22] or through formal one to two years Mohs surgery fellowship training programs administered by the American College of Mohs Surgery.[23] This technique requires the integration of the same doctor in two different capacities: surgeon as well as pathologist. In case ...
The perioperative period (not to be confused with peroperative period - during the course of the operation) is the time period of a patient's surgical procedure. It commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. Perioperative may refer to the three phases of surgery: preoperative, peroperative, and postoperative, though it is a term most often used for the first and third of these only - a term which is often specifically utilized to imply 'around' the time of the surgery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation (sometimes construed as during operation) and after operation.[1] ...
... , or IORT, is the application of therapeutic levels of radiation to the tumor bed while the area is exposed during surgery. IORT is typically a component in the multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced and recurrent cancer, in combination with external beam radiation, surgery and chemotherapy. As a growing trend in recent years, IORT can also be used in earlier stage cancers such as prostate and breast cancer. IORT was found to be useful and feasible in the multidisciplinary management of many solid tumors but further studies are needed to determine the benefit more precisely. Single-institution experiences have suggested a role of IORT e.g. in brain tumors and cerebral metastases, locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer, skin cancer, retroperitoneal sarcoma, pancreatic cancer and selected gynaecologic and genitourinary malignancies. For local recurrences, irradiation with IORT is, besides brachytherapy, the only radiotherapeutic option if repeated ...
The dermatologic subspecialty called Mohs surgery focuses on the excision of skin cancers using a tissue-sparing technique that allows intraoperative assessment of 100% of the peripheral and deep tumor margins developed in the 1930s by Dr. Frederic E. Mohs. The procedure is defined as a type of CCPDMA processing. Physicians trained in this technique must be comfortable with both pathology and surgery, and dermatologists receive extensive training in both during their residency. Physicians who perform Mohs surgery can receive training in this specialized technique during their dermatology residency, but many will seek additional training either through preceptorships to join the American Society for Mohs Surgery[22] or through formal one to two years Mohs surgery fellowship training programs administered by the American College of Mohs Surgery.[23] This technique requires the integration of the same doctor in two different capacities: surgeon as well as pathologist. In case ...
The perioperative period (not to be confused with peroperative period - during the course of the operation) is the time period of a patient's surgical procedure. It commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. Perioperative may refer to the three phases of surgery: preoperative, peroperative, and postoperative, though it is a term most often used for the first and third of these only - a term which is often specifically utilized to imply 'around' the time of the surgery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation (sometimes construed as during operation) and after operation.[1] ...
... is the systemic response to surgical injury and is characterized by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, endocrine responses as well as immunological and haematological changes. Measurement of surgical stress is used in anaesthesia, physiology and surgery. Analysis of the surgical stress response can be used for evaluation of surgical techniques and comparisons of different anaesthetic protocols. Moreover they can be performed both in the intraoperative or postoperative period. If there is a choice between different techniques for a surgical procedure, one method to evaluate and compare the surgical techniques is to subject one group of patients to one technique, and the other group of patients to another technique, after which the surgical stress responses triggered by the procedures are compared. The technique with the least surgical stress response is considered the best for the patient. Similarly, a group of patients can be subjected to a surgical procedure ...
In medicine, laryngospasm is an uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction (spasm) of the vocal folds. The condition typically lasts less than 60 seconds, but in some cases can last 20-30 minutes and causes a partial blocking of breathing in, while breathing out remains easier. It may be triggered when the vocal cords or the area of the trachea below the vocal folds detects the entry of water, mucus, blood, or other substance. It is characterized by stridor and/or retractions.[clarification needed] Some people suffer from frequent laryngospasms, whether awake or asleep. In an ear, nose, and throat practice, it is typically seen in people who have silent reflux disease. It is also a well known, infrequent, but serious perioperative complication. It is likely that more than 10% of drownings involve laryngospasm, but the evidence suggests that it is not usually effective at preventing water from entering the trachea. Various stimuli including asthma, allergies, exercise, stress, and irritants ...
The perioperative period (not to be confused with peroperative period - during the course of the operation) is the time period of a patient's surgical procedure. It commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery, and recovery. Perioperative may refer to the three phases of surgery: preoperative, peroperative, and postoperative, though it is a term most often used for the first and third of these only - a term which is often specifically utilized to imply 'around' the time of the surgery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation (sometimes construed as during operation) and after operation.[1] ...
This is a timeline of brain cancer, describing especially major discoveries, advances in treatment and major organizations. Timeline of colorectal cancer Timeline of pancreatic cancer Timeline of kidney cancer Timeline of lung cancer Timeline of liver cancer Timeline of bladder cancer Timeline of cervical cancer "History of brain tumor surgery". Retrieved 29 August 2016. "EEG in Brain Tumors". Retrieved 12 September 2016. "Cancer Progress". Retrieved 30 August 2016. Bloch, O (2015). "Immunotherapy for malignant gliomas". Cancer Treatment and Research. 163: 143-58. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-12048-5_9. PMID 25468230. World Cancer Report 2014. World Health Organization. 2014. pp. Chapter 5.16. ISBN 9283204298. Bondy ML, Scheurer ME, Malmer B, et al. (2008). "Brain Tumor Epidemiology: Consensus from the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)". Cancer. 113 (7 Suppl): 1953-1968. doi:10.1002/cncr.23741. PMC 2861559 . PMID 18798534. "Intraocular Medulloepithelioma". Archives of Pathology & Laboratory ...
... is a subspecialty of neurosurgery; which includes surgical procedures that are related to the nervous system, brain and spinal cord; that treats human children with operable neurological disorders. Medical specialties Pediatric ...
Complication, in medicine, is an unfavorable evolution or consequence of a disease, a health condition or a therapy. The disease can become worse in its severity or show a higher number of signs, symptoms or new pathological changes, become widespread throughout the body or affect other organ systems. A new disease may also appear as a complication to a previous existing disease. A medical treatment, such as drugs or surgery may produce adverse effects or produce new health problem(s) by itself. Therefore, a complication may be iatrogenic (i.e. literally brought forth by the physician).. Medical knowledge about a disease, procedure or treatment usually entails a list of the most common complications, so that they can be foreseen, prevented or recognized more easily and speedily.. Depending on the degree of vulnerability, susceptibility, age, health status, immune system condition, etc. complications may arise more easily. Complications affect adversely the prognosis of a disease. Non-invasive ...
What is Intraoperative awareness? Meaning of Intraoperative awareness as a finance term. What does Intraoperative awareness ... Definition of Intraoperative awareness in the Financial Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... The task force advised the use of on multiple modalities to minimize the incidence of intraoperative awareness.. Monitor brain ... Study Published in the Lancet Reports BIS Monitoring Reduces Risk of Intraoperative Awareness with Recall in High-Risk Patients ...
Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a procedure to continuously monitor the nervous systems functional integrity ... What Is Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring?. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is the continuous ... intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring center /intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring article ... How Is Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Performed?. * Definition *What is intraoperative neurophysiological ...
... Lois J. Barin barin.2 at osu.edu Mon Feb 17 13:56:24 EST 1997 *Previous message: Intraoperative ... I think if you havent had the ,benefit of watching/being supervised by a person doing intraoperative ,monitoring, or if you ... I have mixed ideas about this intraoperative monitoring thing.... ,At the Univ. of Iowa where I work, there is a research ... I wasnt aware there was a separate organization to certify ,the various types of monitoring that can go on in the OR as was , ...
Intraoperative Monitoring of Cochlear and Auditory Nerve Potentials in Operations in the Cerebellopontine Angle: An Aid to ... Intraoperative Monitoring of Evoked Potentials in Microvascular Decompression Operations: Influence on Surgical Strategy ... New Technique for Intraoperative Localization and Monitoring of Cranial Nerves - Preliminary Study ... Monitoring in Operations in the Posterior Fossa. * Front Matter Pages 225-225 ...
Video Tag: Intraoperative Monitoring. Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy Webinar. This webinar was streamed live on September ... intraoperative monitoring, intubation, lap chole, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic surgery, lasers, leak, liver, ...
Some controversy still remains with regard to the use of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. Although strong ... What is the role of intraoperative nerve monitoring in thyroidectomy?) and What is the role of intraoperative nerve monitoring ... the use of intraoperative nerve monitoring allows for an intraoperative assessment of nerve function prior to removing the ... Intraoperative laryngeal nerve monitoring during thyroidectomy. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Dec. 135(12):1196-8. [ ...
Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) or intraoperative neuromonitoring is the use of electrophysiological ... Intraoperative monitoring is used to : to localize neural structures, for example to locate cranial nerves during skull base ... This allows direct monitoring of motor tracts in the spinal cord. EEG electroencephalography is used for monitoring of cerebral ... Audiologists may received board certification in neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring via AABIOM. The exam has 200 ...
Intraoperative Neurophysiology Monitoring Fellowship. The IONM Fellowship is designed to create experts in the field of ... Involved with an Intraoperative Neurophysiology Monitoring (IONM) research project, with the final goal of finalizing and ... Able to determine if changes in the neurophysiological tests seen during monitoring are due to dysfunction of the nervous ... Able to explain the monitoring procedure as well as its risks and benefits to the patient ...
Practice patterns in the intraoperative use of bispectral index monitoring.. Gelfand ME1, Gabriel RA1, Gimlich R1, Beutler SS1 ... We retrospectively collected intraoperative data on 55,210 surgical cases at a tertiary care hospital. Variables collected ... Assessing the depth of anesthesia and reducing intraoperative awareness has become a focus of much technology development and ... BIS use was associated with previously documented risk factors for intraoperative awareness. These factors are also indicators ...
... physiatrists and electrophysiologists to monitor nerve pathways and proactively prevent patients from developing neurological ... and was too young to cooperate with an intraoperative wake-up test. During the surgery, intraoperative monitoring triggered a ... Nassr estimates that intraoperative monitoring triggers an alert in about 25 percent of spinal surgeries. "The majority of ... Intraoperative monitoring is particularly important when patients arent able to communicate with surgeons. Dr. Nassr cites a ...
Rice DH, Cone Wesson B (1991) Intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 105:372-375PubMed ... Eisele DW (1996) Intraoperative electrophysiologic monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Laryngoscope 106:442-449 ... Maloney RW, Murcek BW, Steehler KW et al (1994) A new method for intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring. ENT J 73: ... Eltzschig HK, Posner M, Moore FD (2002) The use of readily available equipment in a simple method for intraoperative monitoring ...
Neurophysiological Intraoperative Monitoring During Aortic Surgery (NIMAS). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... satisfied criteria for Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring;. *sign a written informed consent to participate in the ... of peripheral nerve ischemia during TAAA procedure can improve the sensibility of Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring ... aneurysms undergoing surgical repair with intraoperative motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials monitoring ...
... ?. Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring (IONM) is a technique that is ... Professor Aage Moller teaches a two course sequence Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring I (Spring) and Intraoperative ... CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR INTRAOPERATIVE NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL MONITORING. The American Society for Electroneurodiagnostic ... M ller s book (used in ACN coursework) entitled: Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring (Human Press). A copy of this ...
Patient had a parotidectomy done with 3 hours of monitoring .I... ... Who bills the monitoring for the intraoperative cranial nerve ... Who bills the monitoring for the intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring asc or physcian?. Patient had a parotidectomy done ... with 3 hours of monitoring .I think the ASC rents the machine , so would doc bill say 95920 with mod 26 and ASC BILLS 95920 ...
... clinicaltrials.gov The goal of this study is to evaluate the role of intraoperative continous and intermittent neuromonitoring ... Intraoperative Monitoring to Predict Postoperative Complications After Thyroidectomy. 2017-10-19 18:41:10 , BioPortfolio ... More From BioPortfolio on "Intraoperative Monitoring to Predict Postoperative Complications After Thyroidectomy". *Related ... Intraoperative Complications. Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the ...
Intraoperative Monitoring Of SSEPs Is A New Measure To Avoid Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury. by editor ... Currently intraoperative monitoring using somatosensory evoked potentials has been widely recognized to prevent iatrogenic ... Previous studies only reported the monitoring effects of somatosensory evoked potentials after mechanical factors-caused spinal ... unclear whether spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury caused by ischemia and other non-mechanical factors can be monitored by ...
... neurosurgeons use advanced medical imaging techniques such as intraoperative imaging, brain mapping, and stereotactic imaging. ... Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring * What is IONM? * Types of Intraoperative Monitoring * Intraoperative Monitoring ... Home , Neurology and Neurosurgery , Centers & Clinics , Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring , Types of Intraoperative ... Types of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring. In order to preserve brain function during surgery, the neurosurgeon ...
K. F. Kothbauer, "Intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring for intramedullary spinal-cord tumor surgery," Neurophysiologie ... M. R. Nuwer, R. G. Emerson, G. Galloway et al., "Evidence-based guideline update: intraoperative spinal monitoring with ... MEP are used to monitor the integrity of the anterior and lateral part of the spinal cord whereas SSEP are used to monitor the ... the role of intraoperative (neurophysiological) monitoring," European Spine Journal, vol. 16, supplement 2, pp. S130-S139, 2007 ...
... neurosurgeons use advanced medical imaging techniques such as intraoperative imaging, brain mapping, and stereotactic imaging. ... Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring * What is IONM? * Types of Intraoperative Monitoring * Intraoperative Monitoring ... Home , Neurology and Neurosurgery , Centers & Clinics , Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring , Types of Intraoperative ... Types of Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring. In order to preserve brain function during surgery, the neurosurgeon ...
Device: Intraoperative nerve monitoring, Intraoperative nerve monitoring, via electromyography, enables real-time ... Intraoperative nerve monitoring Patients that undergo robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy with the use intraoperative nerve ... Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring During Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Device: Intraoperative nerve monitoring, Procedure: standard of care robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy Not Applicable ...
PRWEB) February 27, 2015 -- The Global Intraoperative Imaging Market report studies the global intraoperative imaging market ... The product segment is segmented into intraoperative MRI, intraoperative CT, and intraoperative ultrasound. Based on the type, ... intraoperative CT market has been segmented into mobile intraoperative CT products, fully intraoperative suites, O-arms and ... The Global Intraoperative Imaging Market is Estimated to Reach $2,128.8 Million in 2019 - A Report by MicroMarket Monitor. ...
IOM allows a neurotechnologist to monitor the health of the nervous system in real time during surgery. This greatly reduces ... IOM allows a neurotechnologist to monitor the health of the nervous system in real time during surgery. This greatly reduces ...
The number of vital sign variables measured during a typical surgery is beyond the simultaneous surveillance capabilities of most experienced clinicians. M
Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Modalities II Continuing Education Course at The Michener Institute for health ... IONM IONM140 Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Modalities II. Courses. Code. Course Title. Format. Tuition. Date(s) ... Health professionals who are or will be working in an intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring role. ... This course will culminate with a general overview of all the IONM modalities and the practice of multimodality monitoring. ...
Monitoring, Intraoperative / methods. Neurosurgical Procedures / methods*. Partial Pressure. Posture*. Prospective Studies. ...
  • Intraoperative electrophysiological recordings can also help the surgeon in carrying out other surgical procedures. (springer.com)
  • It begins by reviewing basic neurophysiologic and neuroanatomic knowledge and presents detailed technical information on each basic test, providing the foundation necessary for choosing the right test and customizing monitoring and mapping according to the specifics of individual surgical procedures. (mexmat.ru)
  • The in-house segment is anticipated to gain revenues due to growing number of surgical procedures requiring constant monitoring. (medgadget.com)
  • Key players in Global Intraoperative Imaging Market include BrainLAB AG (Germany), IMRIS Inc. (U.S.), Imaging3 Inc., (U.S.), Medtronic Inc., (U.S.), Neurologica Corporation (U.S.), Siemens Healthcare (U.S. (prweb.com)
  • Browse through the TOC of Global Intraoperative Imaging Market for an analysis of industry trends, segments & forecasts. (prweb.com)
  • The global intraoperative imaging market is broadly classified on the basis of product type. (prweb.com)
  • Thus, new product launch by key market players is expected to fuel the growth of this segment in the global intraoperative imaging market. (prweb.com)
  • Thus, the intraoperative MRI segment in the global intraoperative imaging market is expected to witness high growth in the coming years. (prweb.com)
  • In addition, it presents a competitive landscape and company profiles of the key players in the market, including major companies, which are operational in the global intraoperative imaging market. (prweb.com)
  • The Global Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring Market size is touted to expand at an 8.9% CAGR from 2016 to 2027 (forecast period), according to a report by Market Research Future (MRFR). (medgadget.com)
  • Deletis V (1993) Intraoperative monitoring of the functional integrety of the motor pathways, in Advances in Neurology: Electrical and Magnetic Stimulation of the Brain , O Devinsky, A Beric and M Dogali, Editors. (springer.com)
  • Multivariable analysis revealed that the use of intra-operative quantitative NMB monitoring and sugammadex were associated with a lower incidence of RNMB, with calculated odds ratios of 0.04 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.005 to 0.401) and 0.18 (95% CI: 0.046 to 0.727), respectively. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The results of the present study suggest that intra-operative quantitative NMB monitoring and use of sugammadex are associated with a decreased incidence of RNMB in the PACU, reinforcing the contention that the optimal strategy for RNMB avoidance is the use of quantitative NMB monitoring and eventual use of reversal agents, if needed, prior to emergence from anaesthesia. (unboundmedicine.com)