Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.Carcinoma, Ductal: Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Papilloma, Intraductal: A small, often impalpable benign papilloma arising in a lactiferous duct and frequently causing bleeding from the nipple. (Stedman, 25th ed)Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A premalignant change arising in the prostatic epithelium, regarded as the most important and most likely precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The neoplasia takes the form of an intra-acinar or ductal proliferation of secretory cells with unequivocal nuclear anaplasia, which corresponds to nuclear grade 2 and 3 invasive prostate cancer.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Hepatocellular: A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Carcinoma, Basal Cell: A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Nipples: The conic organs which usually give outlet to milk from the mammary glands.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Carcinoma, Transitional Cell: A malignant neoplasm derived from TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIAL CELLS, occurring chiefly in the URINARY BLADDER; URETERS; or RENAL PELVIS.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Carcinoma, Bronchogenic: Malignant neoplasm arising from the epithelium of the BRONCHI. It represents a large group of epithelial lung malignancies which can be divided into two clinical groups: SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER and NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CARCINOMA.Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Pancreatic Cyst: A true cyst of the PANCREAS, distinguished from the much more common PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYST by possessing a lining of mucous EPITHELIUM. Pancreatic cysts are categorized as congenital, retention, neoplastic, parasitic, enterogenous, or dermoid. Congenital cysts occur more frequently as solitary cysts but may be multiple. Retention cysts are gross enlargements of PANCREATIC DUCTS secondary to ductal obstruction. (From Bockus Gastroenterology, 4th ed, p4145)Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic: Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)Carcinoma, Medullary: A carcinoma composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma. Medullary carcinomas of the breast constitute 5%-7% of all mammary carcinomas; medullary carcinomas of the thyroid comprise 3%-10% of all thyroid malignancies. (From Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1141; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Carcinoma, Small Cell: An anaplastic, highly malignant, and usually bronchogenic carcinoma composed of small ovoid cells with scanty neoplasm. It is characterized by a dominant, deeply basophilic nucleus, and absent or indistinct nucleoli. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1286-7)Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine: A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Carcinoma, Adenosquamous: A mixed adenocarcinoma and squamous cell or epidermoid carcinoma.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid: A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic: Passages within the liver for the conveyance of bile. Includes right and left hepatic ducts even though these may join outside the liver to form the common hepatic duct.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance: Non-invasive diagnostic technique for visualizing the PANCREATIC DUCTS and BILE DUCTS without the use of injected CONTRAST MEDIA or x-ray. MRI scans provide excellent sensitivity for duct dilatation, biliary stricture, and intraductal abnormalities.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Carcinoma, Endometrioid: An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of cells resembling the glandular cells of the ENDOMETRIUM. It is a common histological type of ovarian CARCINOMA and ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA. There is a high frequency of co-occurrence of this form of adenocarcinoma in both tissues.Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Cystadenoma, Papillary: A benign neoplasm of the ovary.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Carcinoma, Embryonal: A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)Cyst Fluid: Liquid material found in epithelial-lined closed cavities or sacs.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Carcinoma, Merkel Cell: A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Salivary Ducts: Any of the ducts which transport saliva. Salivary ducts include the parotid duct, the major and minor sublingual ducts, and the submandibular duct.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic: Passages external to the liver for the conveyance of bile. These include the COMMON BILE DUCT and the common hepatic duct (HEPATIC DUCT, COMMON).Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. Adrenocortical carcinomas are unencapsulated anaplastic (ANAPLASIA) masses sometimes exceeding 20 cm or 200 g. They are more likely to be functional than nonfunctional, and produce ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES that may result in hypercortisolism (CUSHING SYNDROME); HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and/or VIRILISM.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Carcinoma, Verrucous: A variant of well-differentiated epidermoid carcinoma that is most common in the oral cavity, but also occurs in the larynx, nasal cavity, esophagus, penis, anorectal region, vulva, vagina, uterine cervix, and skin, especially on the sole of the foot. Most intraoral cases occur in elderly male abusers of smokeless tobacco. The treatment is surgical resection. Radiotherapy is not indicated, as up to 30% treated with radiation become highly aggressive within six months. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Breast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Carcinoma, Signet Ring Cell: A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in which the nucleus is pressed to one side by a cytoplasmic droplet of mucus. It usually arises in the gastrointestinal system.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Pancreatic Juice: The fluid containing digestive enzymes secreted by the pancreas in response to food in the duodenum.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Cystadenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Common Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Mucin-2: A gel-forming mucin found predominantly in SMALL INTESTINE and variety of mucous membrane-containing organs. It provides a protective, lubricating barrier against particles and infectious agents.Carcinoma, Large Cell: A tumor of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size. It is usually bronchogenic. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Laryngeal Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.Mastectomy, Segmental: Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Carcinoma, Acinar Cell: A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Ampulla of Vater: A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Mammary Glands, Animal: MAMMARY GLANDS in the non-human MAMMALS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Fibroadenoma: An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Embryonal Carcinoma Stem Cells: The malignant stem cells of TERATOCARCINOMAS, which resemble pluripotent stem cells of the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS. The EC cells can be grown in vitro, and experimentally induced to differentiate. They are used as a model system for studying early embryonic cell differentiation.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Cholangiocarcinoma: A malignant tumor arising from the epithelium of the BILE DUCTS.Gallbladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.Carcinoma, Papillary, Follicular: A thyroid neoplasm of mixed papillary and follicular arrangement. Its biological behavior and prognosis is the same as that of a papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1271)Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Glycodeoxycholic Acid: A bile salt formed in the liver by conjugation of deoxycholate with glycine, usually as the sodium salt. It acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for absorption and is itself absorbed. It is used as a cholagogue and choleretic.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Mucin-1: Carbohydrate antigen elevated in patients with tumors of the breast, ovary, lung, and prostate as well as other disorders. The mucin is expressed normally by most glandular epithelia but shows particularly increased expression in the breast at lactation and in malignancy. It is thus an established serum marker for breast cancer.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of varying combinations of clear and hobnail-shaped tumor cells. There are three predominant patterns described as tubulocystic, solid, and papillary. These tumors, usually located in the female reproductive organs, have been seen more frequently in young women since 1970 as a result of the association with intrauterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed)Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Fibrocystic Breast Disease: A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.Pancreatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Mammary Glands, Human: Glandular tissue in the BREAST of human that is under the influence of hormones such as ESTROGENS; PROGESTINS; and PROLACTIN. In WOMEN, after PARTURITION, the mammary glands secrete milk (MILK, HUMAN) for the nourishment of the young.alpha-Fetoproteins: The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.Papilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous: A malignant cystic or semicystic neoplasm. It often occurs in the ovary and usually bilaterally. The external surface is usually covered with papillary excrescences. Microscopically, the papillary patterns are predominantly epithelial overgrowths with differentiated and undifferentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma cells. Psammoma bodies may be present. The tumor generally adheres to surrounding structures and produces ascites. (From Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p185)Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Smad4 Protein: A signal transducing adaptor protein and tumor suppressor protein. It forms a complex with activated RECEPTOR-REGULATED SMAD PROTEINS. The complex then translocates to the CELL NUCLEUS and regulates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Cytodiagnosis: Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Mixed Tumor, Malignant: A malignant tumor composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mucin-6: A gel-forming mucin that is predominantly associated with the gastric epithelium.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Bronchial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Methylnitrosourea: A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Genes, p53: Tumor suppressor genes located on the short arm of human chromosome 17 and coding for the phosphoprotein p53.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Common Bile Duct: The largest bile duct. It is formed by the junction of the CYSTIC DUCT and the COMMON HEPATIC DUCT.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Bile Ducts: The channels that collect and transport the bile secretion from the BILE CANALICULI, the smallest branch of the BILIARY TRACT in the LIVER, through the bile ductules, the bile ducts out the liver, and to the GALLBLADDER for storage.Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16: A product of the p16 tumor suppressor gene (GENES, P16). It is also called INK4 or INK4A because it is the prototype member of the INK4 CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS. This protein is produced from the alpha mRNA transcript of the p16 gene. The other gene product, produced from the alternatively spliced beta transcript, is TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P14ARF. Both p16 gene products have tumor suppressor functions.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Lithiasis: A condition characterized by the formation of CALCULI and concretions in the hollow organs or ducts of the body. They occur most often in the gallbladder, kidney, and lower urinary tract.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Chemoembolization, Therapeutic: Administration of antineoplastic agents together with an embolizing vehicle. This allows slow release of the agent as well as obstruction of the blood supply to the neoplasm.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Ultrasonography, Mammary: Use of ultrasound for imaging the breast. The most frequent application is the diagnosis of neoplasms of the female breast.Medical Device Recalls: Removal of a MEDICAL DEVICE from the market due to a problem occurring in the manufacture or distribution of the product.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
It is usually a type of ductal carcinoma in situ. Comedo carcinomas are usually non-infiltrating and intraductal tumors. ... "Infiltrating ductal carcinoma breast with central necrosis closely mimicking ductal carcinoma in situ (comedo type): a case ... Bonnier P, Body G, Bessenay F, Charpin C, Fétissof F, Beedassy B, Lejeune C, Piana L. "Prognostic factors in ductal carcinoma ... ductal carcinoma. Recurrence and survival rates differ for invasive breast cancer which has originated as comedocarcinoma ...
"An intraductal human-in-mouse transplantation model mimics the subtypes of ductal carcinoma in situ". Breast Cancer Research. ... Inoculating cells through intra ductal transplantations, by cleared mammary fat pad injections or by transplantations into the ... The genetic profiles of primary and metastatic lesions in breast carcinomas show a large extent of clonal pertinence between ... "Metastasis is an early event in mouse mammary carcinomas and is associated with cells bearing stem cell markers". Breast Cancer ...
... intraductal papilloma, and occasionally ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive ductal carcinoma. The standard treatment of ... With galactography, a larger part of the ductal system can be visualized than with the endoscopic investigation of a duct ( ...
As in females, infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most common type. While intraductal cancer, inflammatory carcinoma, and ... Paget's disease of the nipple have been described, lobular carcinoma in situ has not been seen in males. Breast cancer in males ...
... other intraductal papillomas, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), syringomatous adenoma of the nipple and subareolar sclerosing ... Rao P, Shousha S (2010). "Male nipple adenoma with DCIS followed 9 years later by invasive carcinoma". Breast J. 16 (3): 317-8 ... The microscopic appearance of a nipple adenoma can be mistaken for carcinoma. Other conditions that have similar symptoms and ... The microscopic appearance can be quite bizarre, and may be misinterpreted as a carcinoma. Nipple adenomas usually have a ...
... carcinoma, pancreatic ductal MeSH C04.557.470.615.275 --- carcinoma, intraductal, noninfiltrating MeSH C04.557.470.615.275.625 ... carcinoma, ductal MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.232.500 --- carcinoma, ductal, breast MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.232.750 --- carcinoma ... ductal, lobular, and medullary MeSH C04.557.470.615.132 --- carcinoma, ductal MeSH C04.557.470.615.132.500 --- carcinoma, ... pancreatic ductal MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.240 --- carcinoma, endometrioid MeSH C04.557.470.200.025.255 --- carcinoma, ...
... ductal papilloma Intraductal papilloma Sialadenoma papilliferum Cystadenoma Malignant epithelial tumors Acinic cell carcinoma ... not otherwise specified Myoepithelial carcinoma Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma ... grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma Mucinous adenocarcinoma Oncocytic carcinoma Salivary duct carcinoma Salivary duct carcinoma ... Mucoepidermoid carcinoma Adenoid cystic carcinoma Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma ...
... for invasive ductal carcinoma, or for other conditions. DCIS, or intraductal carcinoma, is by definition a breast cancer that ... "Ductal carcinoma in situ". Retrieved 19 March 2013. Additional Sources: Bleicher RJ. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ. Surg Clin N Am ... "Ductal carcinoma in situ". Retrieved 19 March 2013. Desantis C, Siegel R, Bandi P, et al. (2011). "Breast cancer statistics". ... According to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, lumpectomy may be performed for ductal carcinoma in situ ( ...
... most breast cancers arise from the ductal epithelium (see ductal carcinoma in situ) phyllodes tumor and intraductal papilloma ... the milk is moved to the nipple by the action of smooth muscle contractions along the ductal system to the tip of the nipple. ...
... (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, is a pre-cancerous or non-invasive cancerous lesion of ... "Intraductal Carcinoma of the Breast". Retrieved 2010-06-28. "Ductal Carcinoma In Situ". cancer.gov. January 9, 2015. Retrieved ... Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), Johns Hopkins Medicine Goodwin A, Parker S, Ghersi D, Wilcken N (2013). "Post-operative ... "Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Treatment Options for Patients With DCIS". National Cancer Institute at NIH. National Institutes of ...
... ductal carcinoma - ductal carcinoma in situ - ductal lavage - Dukes' classification - dumping syndrome - duodenitis - DX-52-1 ... intraductal carcinoma - intraepithelial - intrahepatic - intrahepatic bile ducts - intrahepatic infusion - intralesional - ... infiltrating ductal carcinoma - inflammatory breast cancer - infliximab - infrared coagulation - inguinal orchiectomy - ... carcinoma - carcinoma in situ - carcinomatosis - carcinosarcoma - carcinosis - carcinostatic - cardin (oncology) - carmustine ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ... Other exocrine cancers include adenosquamous carcinomas, signet ring cell carcinomas, hepatoid carcinomas, colloid carcinomas, ... undifferentiated carcinomas, and undifferentiated carcinomas with osteoclast-like giant cells. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is a ... One type, the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) was first described by Japanese researchers in 1982. It was noted ...
Up to 75% have benign breast conditions such as ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papillomatosis, adenosis, lobular atrophy, ... there is a predisposition to breast carcinoma, follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, and endometrial carcinoma. People with ...
The rate at which breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive mammary carcinoma (all breast cancer except DCIS and LCIS ... Dec 2006). "Discrepancies in the diagnosis of intraductal proliferative lesions of the breast and its management implications: ... Ductal carcinoma in situ Breast cancer Collagenous spherulosis Low mag. High mag. "Understanding Breast Changes - National ... ADH, cytologically, architecturally and on a molecular basis, is identical to a low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS); ...
The term carcinoma in situ may be used interchangeably with high-grade SIL. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast is the most ... Other forms require major surgery, the best known being intraductal carcinoma of the breast (also treated with radiotherapy). ... ductal carcinoma in situ or lobular carcinoma in situ). Many forms of CIS have a high probability of progression into cancer, ... CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Allred, DC (2010). "Ductal carcinoma in situ: terminology, classification, and ...
Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). *Intraductal papilloma. Lobular. *Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) ... Ductal, lobular, and medullary. Ductal. *Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS): Paget's disease of the breast ...
Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). *Intraductal papilloma. Lobular. *Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) ... Stage 0 is a pre-cancerous or marker condition, either ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). ... and these cancers are classified as ductal or lobular carcinoma. Carcinoma in situ is growth of low-grade cancerous or ... Breast changes like atypical ductal hyperplasia[63] and lobular carcinoma in situ,[64][65][66] found in benign breast ...
... duct and lobular carcinoma in situ Intraductal and lobular carcinoma Infiltrating lobular carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in ... NOS Intraductal carcinoma, NOS Ductal carcinoma in situ, NOS (C50._) DCIS, NOS Ductal intraepithelial neoplasia 3 DIN 3 M8500/3 ... NOS Intraductal papillary carcinoma, NOS Ductal carcinoma in situ, papillary DCIS, papillary M8503/3 Intraductal papillary ... Ductal carcinoma in situ, micropapillary Intraductal carcinoma, clinging M8508/3 Cystic hypersecretory carcinoma (C50._) M8510/ ...
These are designated either "mucinous cystadenocarcinoma" or "mucinous cystic neoplasm with an associated invasive carcinoma." ... Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm Pancreatic serous cystadenoma Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm Theruvath TP, Morgan KA, ... do not communicate with the pancreatic ductal system and which are composed of columnar, mucin-producing epithelium, supported ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ... uterine serous carcinoma, Fallopian tube serous carcinoma, cervical serous carcinoma, and primary peritoneal serous carcinoma ... Primary peritoneal cancer or carcinoma is also known as serous surface papillary carcinoma, primary peritoneal carcinoma, extra ... serous carcinoma, primary serous papillary carcinoma, psammomacarcinoma. It was historically classified under "carcinoma of ...
... use of fulvestrant administered through a microcatheter into the lactiferous duct as neoadjuvant treatment for ductal carcinoma ... "PK Study of Pre-Surgical Intramuscular and Intraductal Fulvestrant in Women With Invasive Breast Cancer or DCIS Undergoing ...
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma. *cystic neoplasms: Serous microcystic adenoma. *Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm ... Ductal, lobular,. and medullary (8500-8549). Ductal carcinoma. *Mammary ductal carcinoma. *Pancreatic ductal carcinoma ...
... (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, is a pre-cancerous or non-invasive cancerous lesion of the breast. DCIS is classified as Stage 0. It rarely produces symptoms or a breast lump one can feel, and is usually detected through screening mammography. In DCIS, abnormal cells are found in the lining of one or more milk ducts in the breast. In situ means "in place" and refers to the fact that the abnormal cells have not moved out of the mammary duct and into any of the surrounding tissues in the breast ("pre-cancerous" refers to the fact that it has not yet become an invasive cancer). In some cases, DCIS may become invasive and spread to other tissues, but there is no way of determining which lesions will remain stable without treatment, and which will go on to become invasive. DCIS encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from low-grade lesions that are not life-threatening to high-grade (i.e. potentially highly aggressive) ...
... (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, is a pre-cancerous or non-invasive cancerous lesion of the breast. DCIS is classified as Stage 0. It rarely produces symptoms or a breast lump one can feel, and is usually detected through screening mammography. In DCIS, abnormal cells are found in the lining of one or more milk ducts in the breast. In situ means "in place" and refers to the fact that the abnormal cells have not moved out of the mammary duct and into any of the surrounding tissues in the breast ("pre-cancerous" refers to the fact that it has not yet become an invasive cancer). In some cases, DCIS may become invasive and spread to other tissues, but there is no way of determining which lesions will remain stable without treatment, and which will go on to become invasive. DCIS encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from low-grade lesions that are not life-threatening to high-grade (i.e. potentially highly aggressive) ...
Većina hormona inicira ćelijske response inicijalnim vezivanjem bilo za membranske proteine ili intraćelijske receptore. Ćelija može da ima nekoliko različitih tipova receptora koji prepoznaju isti hormon, a aktiviraju različite puteve prenosa signala, ili može da ima nekoliko različitih receptora koji prepoznaju različite hormone, a aktiviraju isti biohemijski put.[5][6][7] Receptori većine peptidnih, kao i mnogih eikosanoidnih hormona, su smešteni u ćelijskoj membrani na površini ćelije i većina tih receptora pripada klasi G protein spregnutih receptora (GPCR),[8][9][10][11] proteina sa sedam transmembranskih alfa heliksa.[12] Interakcija hormona i receptora tipično inicira kaskadu sekundarnih efekata u ćelijskoj citoplazimi, što obično obuhvata fosforilaciju ili defosforilaciju raznih drugih citoplazmatičnih proteina, promene propustljivosti jonskih kanala, ili povećane koncentracije intracelularnih molekula koji mogu da deluju kao sekundarni glasnici[13][14] (e.g., ...
Valerenska kiselina je seskviterpenoidni konstituent esencajalnog ulja odoljena. Odoljen se koristi kao biljni sedativ, koji može da bude koristan u tretmanu insomnije. Precizan mehanizam dejstava nije poznat. Moguće je da nekoliko različitih komponenti biljke doprinosi njenom dejstvu. Valerenska kiseline jedna od komponenti odgovornih za sedativno dejstvo.[3] Jedna studija iz 2004. je pokazala da valerenska kiselina deluje kao selektivni agonist GABAA receptora u neonatalnim preparatima kičmene moždine pacova.[3] ...
... is a malignant, invasive growth in the vulva, or the outer portion of the female genitals. The disease accounts for only 0.6% of cancer diagnoses but 5% of gynecologic cancers in the United States. The labia majora are the most common site involved representing about 50% of all cases, followed by the labia minora. The clitoris and Bartholin glands may rarely be involved. Vulvar cancer is separate from vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), a superficial lesion of the epithelium that has not invaded the basement membrane-or a pre-cancer. VIN may progress to carcinoma-in-situ and, eventually, squamous cell cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2014, there were about 4,850 new cases of vulvar cancer and 1,030 deaths from the disease. In the United States, five-year survival rates for vulvar cancer are around 70%. Most vulvar cancer (approximately 90%) is squamous cell carcinoma, which originates from epidermal squamous ...
... (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, is a pre-cancerous or non-invasive cancerous lesion of the breast. DCIS is classified as Stage 0. It rarely produces symptoms or a breast lump one can feel, and is usually detected through screening mammography. In DCIS, abnormal cells are found in the lining of one or more milk ducts in the breast. In situ means "in place" and refers to the fact that the abnormal cells have not moved out of the mammary duct and into any of the surrounding tissues in the breast ("pre-cancerous" refers to the fact that it has not yet become an invasive cancer). In some cases, DCIS may become invasive and spread to other tissues, but there is no way of determining which lesions will remain stable without treatment, and which will go on to become invasive. DCIS encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from low-grade lesions that are not life-threatening to high-grade (i.e. potentially highly aggressive) ...
Staging of carcinoma refers to the process of combining physical/clinical examination, pathological review of cells and tissues, surgical techniques, laboratory tests, and imaging studies in a logical fashion to obtain information about the size of the neoplasm and the extent of its invasion and metastasis. Carcinomas are usually staged with Roman numerals. In most classifications, Stage I and Stage II carcinomas are confirmed when the tumor has been found to be small and/or to have spread to local structures only. Stage III carcinomas typically have been found to have spread to regional lymph nodes, tissues, and/or organ structures, while Stage IV tumors have already metastasized through the blood to distant sites, tissues, or organs. In some types of carcinomas, Stage 0 carcinoma has been used to describe ...
Baktearjen (wittenskiplike namme: Bacteria, iental Bacterium) binne (iensellige) mikro-organismen, dy't sa lyts binne dat se allinnich ûnder in mikroskoop te sjen binne. In wichtige eigenskip fan baktearjen is, dat se har hurd fermearderje kinne. In baktearje is in prokaryoat en hat dus gjin selkearn. It erflike materiaal sweeft om yn it sytoplasma. It DNA bestiet meastal út mar ien ringfoarmich gromosoam, faak beselskippe troch ien of mear plasmiden, dy't ek genetyske ynformaasje befetsje. Baktearjen kinne ûnderling plasmiden útwikselje (konjugaasje), wêrtroch't se rekombinearje. Sa ûntsteane allegeduerigen nije bacterievariëteiten. De Bakteria waarden eartiids Eubakteria neamd. Yn it algemiene spraakgebrûk wurdt meastal gjin ûnderskied makke tusken Bacteria ("gewoane" baktearjen) en Archaea (oerbaktearjen), dy't tegearre de groep prokaryoaten foarmje. Yn de taksonomy foarmje de Bakteria lykwols in ôfsûnderlik Ryk of Domein. Blaualgen of blauwieren, dy't gjin echte algen of wieren ...
D'Entropie vun engem System verännert sech duerch Entropie-Produktioun am System an duerch Hëtztiwwergang. Duerch net-Reversibilitéite gëtt am System Entropie produzéiert. Dësen Terme ass ëmmer mei grouss oder gläich null (fir de Grenzfall vun engem reversibele System gëtt keng Entropie produzéiert). Duerch Hëtztiwwergang kann de System Entropie dobäi kréien oder e kann der ewechgeholl kréien, ofhängeg op Wäermt an de System eran- oder erausfléisst. ...
... (LELC) is a medical term referring to a histological variant of malignant tumor arising from the uncontrolled mitosis of transformed cells originating in epithelial tissue (or in cells that display epithelial characteristics) that bear microscopic resemblance to lymphoepithelioma (nasopharyngeal carcinoma). There is considerable variation in the classification of LELC-while it is perhaps most commonly considered a subtype of squamous cell carcinoma, it can also be classified as a form of large cell carcinoma (i.e. when occurring in the lung), and can be considered as a separate, unique entity. In most anatomical sites, many cases are associated with the Epstein-Barr virus. In the breast, the macroscopic, microscopic, epidemiologic, and prognostic features of LELC are very similar to medullary carcinoma; EBV status is one differentiator. Nasopharyngeal ...
Staging of carcinoma refers to the process of combining physical/clinical examination, pathological review of cells and tissues, surgical techniques, laboratory tests, and imaging studies in a logical fashion to obtain information about the size of the neoplasm and the extent of its invasion and metastasis. Carcinomas are usually staged with Roman numerals. In most classifications, Stage I and Stage II carcinomas are confirmed when the tumor has been found to be small and/or to have spread to local structures only. Stage III carcinomas typically have been found to have spread to regional lymph nodes, tissues, and/or organ structures, while Stage IV tumors have already metastasized through the blood to distant sites, tissues, or organs. In some types of carcinomas, Stage 0 carcinoma has been used to describe ...
... is a type of breast cancer. It is relatively circumscribed. It involves infiltration by lymphocytes. Tominaga J, Hama H, Kimura N, Takahashi S (March 2008). "MR imaging of medullary carcinoma of the breast". Eur J Radiol. 70 (3): 525-9. doi:10.1016/j.ejrad.2008.01.044. PMID 18353587. Bacus SS, Zelnick CR, Chin DM, et al. (December 1994). "Medullary carcinoma is associated with expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Implication to its morphology and its clinical behavior". Am. J. Pathol. 145 (6): 1337-48. PMC 1887499 . PMID 7992839. Kuroda H, Tamaru J, Sakamoto G, Ohnisi K, Itoyama S (January 2005). "Immunophenotype of lymphocytic infiltration in medullary carcinoma of the breast". Virchows Arch. 446 (1): 10-4. doi:10.1007/s00428-004-1143-9. PMID 15660281 ...
Micrograph o a lung primary smaa cell carcinoma, a teep o carcinoma. The clustered cancerous cells consist primarily o nucleus (purple); thay hae anly a scant rim o cytoplasm. The surroondin fauch stainin, discoid cells is reid bluid cells. Cytopathology specimen. Field stain ...
Solid ductal carcinoma in situ. Features:. Ductal carcinoma in situ arising within an intraductal papilloma;. A Volume in ... papilloma with atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), papilloma with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and intraductal papillary. ... Intraductal papilloma is a benign, circumscribed, intra- ductal proliferation comprising fibrovascular cores covered by benign ... Intraductal papilloma is a benign, circumscribed, intra- ductal proliferation comprising fibrovascular cores covered by benign ...
Histopathological features of intra-ductal carcinoma of prostatic and high grade prostatic intraepithelialneoplasia and ... The main morphologic differential diagnosis of intra-ductal carcinoma of prostate (IDC-P) is high grade prostatic ...
TitleMolecular-size effects of poly(ethylene glycol) doxorubicin nanocarriers on the intraductal treatment of ductal carcinoma ... Molecular-size effects of poly(ethylene glycol) doxorubicin nanocarriers on the intraductal treatment of ductal carcinoma in ... Molecular-size effects of poly(ethylene glycol) doxorubicin nanocarriers on the intraductal treatment of ductal carcinoma in ... The objective of this thesis project is to design, develop, and evaluate breast intraductal drug delivery systems that provide ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor of invasive breast cancer. The current recognition that DCIS ... the reproducible growth of primary DCIS cells derived from patients surgical and biopsy samples by the mouse intraductal (MIND ... Human primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subtype-specific pathology is preserved in a mouse intraductal (MIND) xenograft ... Human primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subtype-specific pathology is preserved in a mouse intraductal (MIND) xenograft ...
Infiltrating ductal carcinoma - male; Ductal carcinoma in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, is a pre-cancerous or non-invasive cancerous lesion of ... "Intraductal Carcinoma of the Breast". Retrieved 2010-06-28. "Ductal Carcinoma In Situ". cancer.gov. January 9, 2015. Retrieved ... Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), Johns Hopkins Medicine Goodwin A, Parker S, Ghersi D, Wilcken N (2013). "Post-operative ... "Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: Treatment Options for Patients With DCIS". National Cancer Institute at NIH. National Institutes of ...
Atypical ductal hyperplasia. *Atypical lobular hyperplasia. *Flat epithelial atypia. *Intraductal papilloma. *Lobular carcinoma ... Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this type ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, which produce milk. ...
Intraductal carcinoma, comedo type. Distended duct with intact basement membrane and central tumor necrosis. ... Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Low-grade carcinoma with well-developed glands invading the fibrous stroma. ... Intraductal carcinoma, noncomedo type. Distended duct with intact basement membrane, micropapillary, and early cribriform ... Which pathological features have prognostic significance in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?. Updated: May 24, 2018 ...
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is noninvasive breast cancer that is limited to the inside of the ducts of the breast. ... Intraductal carcinoma, comedo type. Distended duct with intact basement membrane and central tumor necrosis. ... encoded search term (What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?) and What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? What to Read Next ... Infiltrating ductal carcinoma. Low-grade carcinoma with well-developed glands invading the fibrous stroma. ...
3.1.3 Other Carcinomas of Ductal Origin; 3.1.4 Intraductal Neoplasms; 3.1.4.1 Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms. 3.1.4.2 ... 3.1 Ductal Neoplasms; 3.1.1 Invasive Ductal Adenocarcinoma; 3.1.2 Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PanIN); ... 2.13 Genetic Alterations in Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms; 2.14 Familial Pancreatic Cancer; 2.15 Implication of ... Intraductal Tubulopapillary Neoplasms3.1.5 Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms; 3.1.6 Serous Cystic Tumors; 3.1.7 Pancreatic ...
Carcinoma in Situ. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast. Carcinoma, Ductal. Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating. Breast Carcinoma In ... On histologic examination, the tumor must be ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (patients with mixed DCIS and lobular carcinoma in ... carcinoma in situ of the cervix, carcinoma in situ of the colon, melanoma in situ, and basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma ... Radiation Therapy With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Women With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Who Have Undergone Lumpectomy. ...
Carcinoma. Breast Neoplasms. Carcinoma in Situ. Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast. Breast Carcinoma In Situ. Carcinoma, Intraductal, ... Carcinoma, Ductal. Adenocarcinoma. Neoplasms, Ductal, Lobular, and Medullary. Lapatinib. Antineoplastic Agents. Protein Kinase ... Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ HER2/Neu Positive Other: Laboratory Biomarker Analysis Drug: Lapatinib Ditosylate Other: ...
These lesions can occur anywhere in the ductal system, and may be solitary or multiple. ... intraductal papilloma (IDP) is a benign proliferative lesion that consists of a branching fibrovascular core with overlying ... Pathology of small, peripheral intraductal papillomas. Papillary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (40×). View Media Gallery ... Pathology of small, peripheral intraductal papillomas. Papillary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (40×). View Media Gallery ...
"Intraductal papillary-mucinous tumor of the pancreas concomitant with ductal carcinoma of the pancreas," Pancreatology, vol. 2 ... Development of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasia. Kazuo Inui, Junji ... In 6 of the 141 patients observed for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (4.2%), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma ... We retrospectively investigated the incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma among patients with intraductal papillary ...
Nearly all women with ductal carcinoma in situ- an early stage of breast cancer- can be successfully treated. Learn about the 2 ... Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS may also be called intraductal carcinoma or non-invasive ductal carcinoma. It is the most ... Invasive ductal carcinoma. Invasive ductal carcinoma is also called infiltrating ductal carcinoma or ductal adenocarcinoma. It ... Ductal carcinoma. Ductal carcinoma starts in gland cells in the breast ducts. It is the most common type of breast cancer. It ...
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / diagnosis * Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast / genetics * Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating / ... Proteomics of breast carcinoma J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci. 2005 Feb 5;815(1-2):215-25. doi: 10.1016/j. ... This review describes proteomics technologies, and their application in the proteomic analysis of breast carcinoma. ... MudPIT and protein arrays have been used to uncover molecular mechanisms associated with breast carcinoma at the global level, ...
Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal* / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Papillary* / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Choristoma* / ... Histopathologic analysis of the surgical specimen revealed mild differentiated papillary renal carcinoma, intraductal papillary ... A case of pancreatic heterotopy of duodenal wall, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor and intraepithelial neoplasm of pancreas ...
The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast has increased significantly in Japanese women. It comprises 14.1 ... Intraductal carcinoma (Ductal carcinoma in situ) of the breast. Analysis of pathologic findings of 85 pure intraductal ... Moriya T, Silverberg SG: Intraductal carcinoma (Ductal carcinoma in situ) of the breast. A comparison of pure noninvasive ... Breast Ductal carcinomain situ Atypical ductal hyperplasia Intraepithelial neoplasia Microinvasive carcinoma ...
... and Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) breast cancers are types that start in the milk ducts. Learn more about how they are ... What is Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)?. Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, accounts for ... How Is Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Treated? What Is Ductal Carcinoma?. Ductal carcinoma is a common type of breast cancer that ... Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) & Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS). In this Article. In this Article In this Article * What Is ...
DCIS - Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (compare to LCIS, below). Dx - diagnosis. EIC - extensive intraductal component. ER/PR - ... IDC - infiltrating ductal carcinoma (most common BC). lat flap - latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction. LCIS - Lobular Carcinoma ... ca - cancer or carcinoma. CA - cytoxan plus adriamycin (treatment regimen). CAF - above with 5-FU (fluourocil) (treatment ...
Male breast cancer is rare.[2] Fewer than 1% of all breast carcinomas occur in men.[3,4] The mean age at diagnosis is between ... Paget disease with intraductal carcinoma. Paget disease with invasive ductal carcinoma. Other. Undifferentiated carcinoma. ... Intraductal cancer, inflammatory carcinoma, and Paget disease of the nipple have also been seen in men, but lobular carcinoma ... Male breast cancer is rare.[2 ] Fewer than 1% of all breast carcinomas occur in men.[3 ,4 ] The mean age at diagnosis is ...
Noninvasive intraductal carcinoma. · abstract in Portuguese · text in English , Portuguese · English ( pdf ) , Portuguese ( pdf ... BADAN, Gustavo Machado et al. Diagnostic underestimation of atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ at ... with histopathological results of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) subsequently submitted ...
Descritores Proteínas inibidoras de apoptose; Carcinoma intraductal não infiltrante; Biomarcadores tumorais; Proteínas de ... formado por mulheres com carcinoma ductal in situ de baixo grau; e Grupo B, por mulheres com carcinoma ductal in situ de alto ... composed of women with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ, and Group B, women with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. ... higher in the group of patients with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ compared to those in the low-grade ductal carcinoma in ...
... carcinoma explanation free. What is carcinoma? Meaning of carcinoma medical term. What does carcinoma mean? ... Looking for online definition of carcinoma in the Medical Dictionary? ... intraductal carcinoma 1. any carcinoma of the epithelium of a duct.. 2. ductal c. in situ. ... In situ carcinoma, Intraductal carcinoma, Intramucosal carcinoma, Juvenile carcinoma, Krebs carcinoma, Large cell carcinoma, ...
... and answers will help you understand medical language you might find in the pathology report from a breast biopsy for ductal ... What does it mean if my in-situ carcinoma is called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), intraductal carcinoma, or in-situ ... ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Intraductal carcinoma is another name for ductal ... Nearly all breast cancers are carcinomas.. What is in-situ carcinoma (or carcinoma in situ) of the breast?. This term is used ...
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