Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
Blocking of a blood vessel by fat deposits in the circulation. It is often seen after fractures of large bones or after administration of CORTICOSTEROIDS.
Blockage of an artery due to passage of a clot (THROMBUS) from a systemic vein to a systemic artery without its passing through the lung which acts as a filter to remove blood clots from entering the arterial circulation. Paradoxical embolism occurs when there is a defect that allows a clot to cross directly from the right to the left side of the heart as in the cases of ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECTS or open FORAMEN OVALE. Once in the arterial circulation, a clot can travel to the brain, block an artery, and cause a STROKE.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
Agents that prevent clotting.
Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.
Blocking of maternal circulation by AMNIOTIC FLUID that is forced into uterine VEINS by strong UTERINE CONTRACTION near the end of pregnancy. It is characterized by the sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and HYPOTENSION that can lead to maternal DEATH.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Blocking of a blood vessel by CHOLESTEROL-rich atheromatous deposits, generally occurring in the flow from a large artery to small arterial branches. It is also called arterial-arterial embolization or atheroembolism which may be spontaneous or iatrogenic. Patients with spontaneous atheroembolism often have painful, cyanotic digits of acute onset.
Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
Mechanical devices inserted in the inferior vena cava that prevent the migration of blood clots from deep venous thrombosis of the leg.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.
A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
The ratio of alveolar ventilation to simultaneous alveolar capillary blood flow in any part of the lung. (Stedman, 25th ed)
DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS of an upper extremity vein (e.g., AXILLARY VEIN; SUBCLAVIAN VEIN; and JUGULAR VEINS). It is associated with mechanical factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Primary) secondary to other anatomic factors (Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis, Secondary). Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness, and swelling in the arm.
Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.
Obstruction of a vein or VEINS (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
Veins draining the cerebrum.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.
A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.
The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).
Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.
The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CAVERNOUS SINUS of the brain. Infections of the paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, and THROMBOPHILIA are associated conditions. Clinical manifestations include dysfunction of cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI, marked periorbital swelling, chemosis, fever, and visual loss. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p711)
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the LATERAL SINUSES. This condition is often associated with ear infections (OTITIS MEDIA or MASTOIDITIS) without antibiotic treatment. In developed nations, lateral sinus thrombosis can result from CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; THROMBOPHILIA; and other conditions. Clinical features include HEADACHE; VERTIGO; and increased intracranial pressure.
Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.
Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.
A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.
A collective term for pathological conditions which are caused by the formation of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel, or by blocking of a blood vessel with an EMBOLUS, undissolved materials in the blood stream.
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.
The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.
A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.
An autosomal dominant disorder showing decreased levels of plasma protein S antigen or activity, associated with venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. PROTEIN S is a vitamin K-dependent plasma protein that inhibits blood clotting by serving as a cofactor for activated PROTEIN C (also a vitamin K-dependent protein), and the clinical manifestations of its deficiency are virtually identical to those of protein C deficiency. Treatment with heparin for acute thrombotic processes is usually followed by maintenance administration of coumarin drugs for the prevention of recurrent thrombosis. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1511; Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p1523)
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.
Autoantibodies directed against phospholipids. These antibodies are characteristically found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; related autoimmune diseases, some non-autoimmune diseases, and also in healthy individuals.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
An absence or deficiency in PROTEIN C which leads to impaired regulation of blood coagulation. It is associated with an increased risk of severe or premature thrombosis. (Stedman's Med. Dict., 26th ed.)
Obstruction of the flow in the SPLANCHNIC CIRCULATION by ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; THROMBOSIS; STENOSIS; TRAUMA; and compression or intrinsic pressure from adjacent tumors. Rare causes are drugs, intestinal parasites, and vascular immunoinflammatory diseases such as PERIARTERITIS NODOSA and THROMBOANGIITIS OBLITERANS. (From Juergens et al., Peripheral Vascular Diseases, 5th ed, pp295-6)
Low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, having a 4-enopyranosuronate sodium structure at the non-reducing end of the chain. It is prepared by depolymerization of the benzylic ester of porcine mucosal heparin. Therapeutically, it is used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
An antiphospholipid antibody found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. In vitro, the antibody interferes with the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin and prolongs the partial thromboplastin time. In vivo, it exerts a procoagulant effect resulting in thrombosis mainly in the larger veins and arteries. It further causes obstetrical complications, including fetal death and spontaneous abortion, as well as a variety of hematologic and neurologic complications.
The venous trunk of the upper limb; a continuation of the basilar and brachial veins running from the lower border of the teres major muscle to the outer border of the first rib where it becomes the subclavian vein.
Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.
A condition caused by one or more episodes of DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS, usually the blood clots are lodged in the legs. Clinical features include EDEMA; PAIN; aching; heaviness; and MUSCLE CRAMP in the leg. When severe leg swelling leads to skin breakdown, it is called venous STASIS ULCER.
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).
A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.
An absence or reduced level of Antithrombin III leading to an increased risk for thrombosis.
Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.
A hemostatic disorder characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC). The activated form of Factor V (Factor Va) is more slowly degraded by activated protein C. Factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q) is the most common cause of APC resistance.
A condition characterized by a chronically swollen limb, often a leg with stasis dermatitis and ulcerations. This syndrome can appear soon after phlebitis or years later. Postphlebitic syndrome is the result of damaged or incompetent venous valves in the limbs. Distended, tortuous VARICOSE VEINS are usually present. Leg pain may occur after long period of standing.
A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.
Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
Tight coverings for the foot and leg that are worn to aid circulation in the legs, and prevent the formation of EDEMA and DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS. PNEUMATIC COMPRESSION STOCKINGS serve a similar purpose especially for bedridden patients, and following surgery.
Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.
Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.
Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.
Recording changes in electrical impedance between electrodes placed on opposite sides of a part of the body, as a measure of volume changes in the path of the current. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.
Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
Streptococcal fibrinolysin . An enzyme produced by hemolytic streptococci. It hydrolyzes amide linkages and serves as an activator of plasminogen. It is used in thrombolytic therapy and is used also in mixtures with streptodornase (STREPTODORNASE AND STREPTOKINASE). EC 3.4.-.
The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.
An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
Instruments that generate intermittent forces, uniformed or graduated, to facilitate the emptying of VEINS. These devices are used to reduce limb EDEMA and prevent venous THROMBOEMBOLISM, such as deep vein thrombosis in the legs.
Postmortem examination of the body.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.
Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.
Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
System established by the World Health Organization and the International Committee on Thrombosis and Hemostasis for monitoring and reporting blood coagulation tests. Under this system, results are standardized using the International Sensitivity Index for the particular test reagent/instrument combination used.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.
A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.
Antiphospholipid antibodies found in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; and in a variety of other diseases as well as in healthy individuals. The antibodies are detected by solid-phase IMMUNOASSAY employing the purified phospholipid antigen CARDIOLIPIN.
Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.
Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.
A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in cardiovascular and cerebral circulation.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.
Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.
A coumarin that is used as an anticoagulant. Its actions and uses are similar to those of WARFARIN. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p233)
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.
Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.
An indandione that has been used as an anticoagulant. Phenindione has actions similar to WARFARIN, but it is now rarely employed because of its higher incidence of severe adverse effects. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p234)
Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: VITAMIN K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, VITAMIN K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, VITAMIN K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.
A plasma alpha 2 glycoprotein that accounts for the major antithrombin activity of normal plasma and also inhibits several other enzymes. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.
The long large endothelium-lined venous channel on the top outer surface of the brain. It receives blood from a vein in the nasal cavity, runs backwards, and gradually increases in size as blood drains from veins of the brain and the DURA MATER. Near the lower back of the CRANIUM, the superior sagittal sinus deviates to one side (usually the right) and continues on as one of the TRANSVERSE SINUSES.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
The vitamin K-dependent cofactor of activated PROTEIN C. Together with protein C, it inhibits the action of factors VIIIa and Va. A deficiency in protein S; (PROTEIN S DEFICIENCY); can lead to recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.
A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.
The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
A low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, prepared by nitrous acid depolymerization of porcine mucosal heparin. The mean molecular weight is 4000-6000 daltons. It is used therapeutically as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood flow reaches by following the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Activated form of factor X that participates in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation. It catalyzes the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in conjunction with other cofactors.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Compounds, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. The hormones are generally estrogen or progesterone or both.
The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
A heparin fraction with a mean molecular weight of 4500 daltons. It is isolated from porcine mucosal heparin and used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes that convert PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. They are concentrated in the lysosomes of most cells and in the vascular endothelium, particularly in the vessels of the microcirculation.
Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.
Rare chronic inflammatory disease involving the small blood vessels. It is of unknown etiology and characterized by mucocutaneous ulceration in the mouth and genital region and uveitis with hypopyon. The neuro-ocular form may cause blindness and death. SYNOVITIS; THROMBOPHLEBITIS; gastrointestinal ulcerations; RETINAL VASCULITIS; and OPTIC ATROPHY may occur as well.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
NECROSIS of lung tissue that is cause by the lack of OXYGEN or blood supply. The most common cause of pulmonary infarction is a blood clot in the lung.
Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.
A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.
An endogenous family of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily that neutralizes the action of thrombin. Six naturally occurring antithrombins have been identified and are designated by Roman numerals I to VI. Of these, Antithrombin I (see FIBRIN) and ANTITHROMBIN III appear to be of major importance.

Inherited prothrombotic risk factors and cerebral venous thrombosis. (1/698)

Fifteen patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were ascertained retrospectively. Their case notes were reviewed, and stored or new blood was assayed for factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, prothrombin gene mutation 20201A, and 5,10 methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation. A clinical risk factor was identified in 13 patients--the oral contraceptive pill (5), puerperium (1), HRT (1), mastoiditis (1), dehydration (1), lumbar puncture and myelography (1), carcinoma (1), lupus anticoagulant (2). In addition, two patients had the FVL mutation and five (one of whom also had the FVL mutation) were homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. The latter showed a higher than expected frequency compared to 300 healthy controls from South Wales (OR 3.15.95% Cl 1.01-9.83). No patient had the prothrombin 20201A mutation. Two patients died and three had a monocular visual deficit following anticoagulation (13) or thrombolytic (2) treatment, but there was no association between the presence of a primary prothrombotic risk factor and outcome. These results confirm the importance of investigating patients for both clinical predisposing factors and primary prothrombotic states.  (+info)

Computerised axial tomography in patients with severe migraine: a preliminary report. (2/698)

Patients suffering from severe migraine, usually for many years, have been examined by the EMI scanner between attacks. Judged by criteria validated originally by comparison with pneumoencephalography, about half of the patients showed evidence of cerebral atrophy. Perhaps of more significance than generalised atrophy was the frequency of areas of focal atrophy and of evidence of infarction.  (+info)

Rupture mechanism of a thrombosed slow-growing giant aneurysm of the vertebral artery--case report. (3/698)

A 76-year-old male developed left hemiparesis in July 1991. The diagnosis was thrombosed giant vertebral artery aneurysm. He showed progressive symptoms and signs of brainstem compression, but refused surgery and was followed up without treatment. He died of rupture of the aneurysm and underwent autopsy in March 1995. Histological examination of the aneurysm revealed fresh clot in the aneurysmal lumen, old thrombus surrounding the aneurysmal lumen, and more recent hemorrhage between the old thrombus and the inner aneurysmal wall. The most important histological feature was the many clefts containing fresh blood clots in the old thrombus near the wall of the distal neck. These clefts were not lined with endothelial cells, and seemed to connect the lumen of the parent artery with the most peripheral fresh hemorrhage. However, the diameter of each of these clefts is apparently not large enough to transmit the blood pressure of the parent artery. Simple dissection of the aneurysmal wall by blood flow in the lumen through many clefts in the old thrombus of the distal neck may be involved in the growth and rupture of thrombosed giant aneurysms of the vertebral artery.  (+info)

Cerebral venous thrombosis: combined intrathrombus rtPA and intravenous heparin. (4/698)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We chose to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined intrathrombus rtPA and intravenous heparin in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). METHODS: We treated 12 patients with symptoms of 1 to 40 days' duration (eg, headache, somnolence, focal deficits, seizures, and nausea and vomiting). Pretreatment MRI disclosed subtle hemorrhagic venous infarction in 4 patients, obvious hemorrhagic infarction in 2, small parenchymal hemorrhage from recent pallidotomy in 1, and no focal lesion in 5. Magnetic resonance venography and contrast venography identified thrombi in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in 3 patients; transverse/sigmoid sinus (TS/SS) in 2; SSS and both TS/SS in 1; SSS and 1 TS/SS in 5; and SSS, 1 TS/SS, and straight sinus in 1 patient. A loading dose of rtPA was instilled throughout the clot at 1 mg/cm, followed by continuous intrathrombus infusion at 1 to 2 mg/h. Intravenous heparin was infused concomitantly. RESULTS: Flow was restored completely in 6 patients and partially in 3, with a mean rtPA dose of 46 mg (range, 23 to 128 mg) at a mean time of 29 hours (range, 13 to 77 hours). Symptoms improved in these 9 patients concomitantly with flow restoration. Flow could not be restored in 3 patients. In 1 of them, treatment was stopped when little progress had been made, and fibrinogen level dropped to 118 mg/dL. In the other 2 patients, hemorrhagic worsening occurred, and treatment was abbreviated after initial rtPA dosing. In 1 of these, the hematoma was evacuated. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience with intrathrombus rtPA in conjunction with intravenous heparin in patients with CVT is encouraging. This therapy should probably be regarded as unsafe in patients with obvious hemorrhage. Time to restore flow may be faster than with urokinase (an average of 71 hours has been reported for 29 documented patients). Further evaluation of rtPA with heparin in CVT is warranted.  (+info)

Cerebral injury after cardiac surgery: identification of a group at extraordinary risk. Multicenter Study of Perioperative Ischemia Research Group (McSPI) and the Ischemia Research Education Foundation (IREF) Investigators. (5/698)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral injury after cardiac surgery is now recognized as a serious and costly healthcare problem mandating immediate attention. To effect solution, those subgroups of patients at greatest risk must be identified, thereby allowing efficient implementation of new clinical strategies. No such subgroup has been identified; however, patients undergoing intracardiac surgery are thought to be at high risk, but comprehensive data regarding specific risk, impact on cost, and discharge disposition are not available. METHODS: We prospectively studied 273 patients enrolled from 24 diverse US medical centers, who were undergoing intracardiac and coronary artery surgery. Patient data were collected using standardized methods and included clinical, historical, specialized testing, neurological outcome and autopsy data, and measures of resource utilization. Adverse outcomes were defined a priori and determined after database closure by a blinded independent panel. Stepwise logistic regression models were developed to estimate the relative risks associated with clinical history and intraoperative and postoperative events. RESULTS: Adverse cerebral outcomes occurred in 16% of patients (43/273), being nearly equally divided between type I outcomes (8.4%; 5 cerebral deaths, 16 nonfatal strokes, and 2 new TIAs) and type II outcomes (7.3%; 17 new intellectual deterioration persisting at hospital discharge and 3 newly diagnosed seizures). Associated resource utilization was significantly increased--prolonging median intensive care unit stay from 3 days (no adverse cerebral outcome) to 8 days (type I; P<0.001) and from 3 to 6 days (type II; P<0.001), and increasing hospitalization by 50% (type II, P=0.04) to 100% (type I, P<0.001). Furthermore, specialized care after hospital discharge was frequently necessary in those with type I outcomes, in that only 31% returned home compared with 85% of patients without cerebral complications (P<0.001). Significant risk factors for type I outcomes related primarily to embolic phenomena, including proximal aortic atherosclerosis, intracardiac thrombus, and intermittent clamping of the aorta during surgery. For type II outcomes, risk factors again included proximal aortic atherosclerosis, as well as a preoperative history of endocarditis, alcohol abuse, perioperative dysrhythmia or poorly controlled hypertension, and the development of a low-output state after cardiopulmonary bypass. CONCLUSIONS: These prospective multicenter findings demonstrate that patients undergoing intracardiac surgery combined with coronary revascularization are at formidable risk, in that 1 in 6 will develop cerebral complications that are frequently costly and devastating. Thus, new strategies for perioperative management--including technical and pharmacological interventions--are now mandated for this subgroup of cardiac surgery patients.  (+info)

Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator alters adhesion molecule expression in the ischemic rat brain. (6/698)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that treatment of embolic stroke with recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (rhtPA) alters cerebral expression of adhesion molecules. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion by a single fibrin-rich clot. P-selectin, E-selectin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) immunoreactivity was measured at 6 or 24 hours after embolic stroke in control rats and in rats treated with rhtPA at 1 or 4 hours after stroke. To examine the therapeutic efficacy of combined rhtPA and anti-ICAM-1 antibody treatment at 4 hours after embolization, ischemic lesion volumes were measured in rats treated with rhtPA alone, rats treated with rhtPA and anti-ICAM-1 antibody, and nontreated rats. RESULTS: Administration of rhtPA at 1 hour after embolization resulted in a significant reduction of adhesion molecule vascular immunoreactivity after embolization in the ipsilateral hemisphere compared with corresponding control rats. However, when rhtPA was administered to rats at 4 hours after embolization, significant increases of adhesion molecule immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere were detected. A significant increase of ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was also detected in the contralateral hemisphere at 24 hours after ischemia. A significant reduction in lesion volume was found in rats treated with the combination of rhtPA and anti-ICAM-1 antibody compared with rats treated only with rhtPA. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that the time of initiation of thrombolytic therapy alters vascular immunoreactivity of inflammatory adhesion molecules in the ischemic brain and that therapeutic benefit can be obtained by combining rhtPA and anti-ICAM-1 antibody treatment 4 hours after stroke.  (+info)

EEG surveillance as a means of extending operability in high risk carotid endarterectomy. (7/698)

Some patients who have transient ischemic attacks are denied operation because severe occlusive lesions in other extra-cranial arteries may be inappropriately interpreted as constituting an unacceptable surgical risk, or because the lesion is so distal as to make its removal hazardous. Failure of endarterectomy is usually due to incomplete removal of the lesion or to thrombosis upon the frayed intima. Such lesions require excellent visualization and meticulous surgical technique -- not always possible with a shunt. Among 130 consecutive carotid endarterectomies performed under general anesthesia, EEG changes consistent with cerebral ischemia appeared in only nine (7%). These patients required a shunt. In 11 patients normal EEG tracings were obtained during endarterectomy despite contralateral carotid occlusion. None of these patients had a neurological deficit. Continuous EEG monitoring is a reliable method of detecting changes in cerebral perfusion, permits a more meticulous endarterectomy in high-lying lesions without a shunt, and extends operability in high risk patients. Angiographical findings may be an unreliable predictor concerning risk of endarterectomy.  (+info)

A prospective study of cerebrovascular disease in Japanese rural communities, Akabane and Asahi. Part 1: evaluation of risk factors in the occurrence of cerebral hemorrhage and thrombosis. (8/698)

An epidemiological study of cerebrovascular disease in Akabane and Asahi, Japan, was made. (These cities are located near Nagoy, Japan.) The study population included 4,737 men and women aged 40 to 79 at the time of entry into the study. There were 4,186 persons who were examined and, of these, 264 cases of cerebrovascular attacks were observed between 1964 and 1970. The incidence rate of stroke in those persons not responding to the survey was 15.9 times higher than in those persons examined according to person-year observation in Akabane. The risk factors for cerebral hemorrhage and thrombosis were evaluated by age-adjusted and sex-adjusted relative risks. The predisposing factors to cerebral hemorrhage appeared to be high blood pressure, high left R wave, ST depression, T abnormality, capillary fragility counts, previous medical history of stroke and albuminuria. For cerebral thrombosis, the predisposing factors appeared to be high blood pressure, ST depression and funduscopic sclerotic findings, and those factors assumed to be significant were glycosuria and smoking habits. Ocular funduscopic abnormality was the most prominent risk factor for cerebral thrombosis, while high blood pressure and ECG abnormalities were highly related to cerebral hemorrhage. It was suggested that those subjects with a relatively higher blood pressure may have a higher relative risk of cerebral hemorrhage than those with a lower (normal range) blood pressure. A previous or family history of stroke also appeared significantly related to cerebral hemorrhage.  (+info)

Cerebral infarction and cerebral thrombosis in younger men Chinese mainland doctors have noticed that cerebral infarction and cerebral thrombosis are occurring more frequently in younger men. They used to occur mostly among older men. They can lead to microstrokes or cerebrovascular accidents and partial physical paralyses. In general, cerebral hemorrhage accounts for only 15% while…
Cerebral Thrombosis - Days of Fear - Days of Joy - Dedicated to my wife and family. Cerebral Thrombosis: A blood clot, a semisolid mass of coagulated red and white blood cells in a cerebral artery or vein.
Cerebral Thrombosis, Poor Outcome, Weakness Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Stroke, Intracranial Sinus Thrombosis. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
What is Transient Cerebral Thrombosis? By transient ischemic attack (TIA) refers to a short time (less than 24 hours) the loss of parts of the brain function caused by a transient occlusion of an artery in the brain or in brain afferent arteries. Symptoms The most common symptoms are transient (under 24 hours)
Thrombosis of a cerebral artery. The cerebral thrombosis (obstruction of a cerebral artery by thrombus) or cerebral embolism (obstruction of a cerebral artery by an element coming from another part of the body) leads to an ischemia (reduction of the blood intake), verily a cerebral infarction (death or necrosis of the unirrigated region of the brain). - Stock Image C006/3975
58-year-old Xue Guangliang, a villager of Zhangying (Zhao Lin village) in Wugang city, developed cerebral thrombosis five years ago. He always exercises in the village with a chair. There are more than ten cerebral thrombosis patients in the village, located along the polluted river Hong.
This study was undertaken in order to examine for ourselves the question whether intracranial pressure gradients occur in the course of experimental cerebral ischemia, and if they did occur, to...
To evaluate the occurrence and extent of cerebral embolization (total new lesion volume) in patients before TAVR versus 3 months after TAVR by cerebral MRI
Ischemic stroke occurs when a blood clot or other particle blocks an artery in the brain or an artery leading to the brain. This causes brain cells to die or be injured. Cerebral thrombosis and cerebral embolism are ischemic strokes.. ...
Cerebral Thrombosis - blood clot in brain (possibly leading to stroke) Arteria Sclerosis - hardening of the arteries Carcinoma of stomach - Gastric cancer; Attached To Birth, ...
vii. Register of Births Marriages & Deaths9; Page Death/Nottingham/Nottingham North/1948/31; Text 31 Twelfth January 1948 City Hospital Frederick BLACKNELL Male 80 years of 19 Acton Avenue Old Basford formerly a Farm Labourer I(a) Cerebral Thrombosis I(b) Arteria Sclerosis II Carcinoma of stomach E Owen Daughter of 19 Acton Avenue Old Basford Nottingham Thirteenth January 1948 J Toft Registrar; [Source Record]; Certainty Unknown (4 ...
In March 2017, a 63-year-old woman with no smoking or major medical history was incidentally observed to have a tumor in the left upper lobe on a computed tomography (CT) scan. As a result of a detail...
Cerebral Thrombosis, Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Increased, Poor Outcome Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Cerebral Thrombosis, Stroke. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
Our best tip for anyone looking to purchase a traditional term or whole life insurance policy with a pre-existing medical condition like a Cerebral Embolism and/or Cerebral Thrombosis, is that youre…
TY - JOUR. T1 - Cerebral thrombosis associated with active Crohns disease.. AU - Calderón, R.. AU - Cruz-Correa, M. R.. AU - Torres, E. A.. PY - 1998. Y1 - 1998. N2 - An increased incidence of cerebral thromboembolic events has been reported in young patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It has been suggested that a hypercoagulable state is associated with clinical activity of the disease, with elevation of factors V, VIII, fibrinogen and platelets and a lowering of anti-thrombin III. We present the case of a 35 y/o male with refractory Crohns disease who complained of headaches, blurred vision and tonic-clonic seizures. The studies demonstrated an ischemic stroke of the left cerebral hemisphere, without vascular abnormalities. Elevation of factor VIII, platelets, and antithrombin III were found. The symptoms were relieved with medical treatment and the patient has continued in good health after resection of the diseased terminal ileum.. AB - An increased incidence of cerebral ...
Weihai police emergency rescue roadside old man collapsed elderly suffering from cerebral thrombosis - Beijing newspaper Weihai September 16th news (reporter Tao Xiangyin) 16 morning, in the streets of Weihai, a roadside old man collapsed with heart disease. After the police found on duty, immediately call 120 emergency phone, and the elderly were rescued. Later, the doctor said, two minutes later, the old man lives. As of 18 oclock that day, the old man is still in hospital for treatment. 16 morning, Weihai Traffic Police Brigade police on duty Sun Kai to West road. At 10:15 PM, Sun Kaizheng on the west a few illegal parked vehicles posted a ticket, suddenly heard a whistle behind the vehicle. He turned around and found dozens of meters outside the road on the eastern side of the motor vehicle lane, a man fell to the ground. Sun Kai quickly ran past, found lying on the ground was a more than and 60 year old man, koutubaimo, twitching. Sun Kai hastened to call the 120 emergency phone, and ...
Background Delayed cerebral thrombosis (DCT) is a devastating cerebrovascular complication in patients with excellent initial recovery of pneumococcal meningitis. The aetiology is unknown, but direct...
View details of top cerebral artery thrombosis hospitals in Thane. Get guidance from medical experts to select best cerebral artery thrombosis hospital in Thane
Define Microembolism. Microembolism synonyms, Microembolism pronunciation, Microembolism translation, English dictionary definition of Microembolism. n. 1. Obstruction or occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus. 2. An embolus. em′bo·lis′mic adj. n 1. the occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus 2....
P29 Introduction: Cerebral embolus monitoring systems suitable for routine clinical use must have the ability to automatically recognise and differentiate between artefacts and emboli. This has to date proven to be an extremely difficult problem to solve. Methods: In this study we present a new advancement with regard to the automatic recognition of cerebral emboli and differentiation from artefacts based on a binary decision tree which includes a completely new parameter. This is the 1/4 Doppler shift for the maximum power reflection of an embolic event at 2.5 MHz insonation frequency compared to 2.0 MHz. A new multifrequency transcranial Doppler system together with this software was used in this study of 2000 artefacts and 100 embolic events in one heart valve patient. The level for event recognition was set at 5db above background Doppler power. The artefacts in 2 healthy controls consisted of 200: tapping the probe, 200: tapping the skull, 200: talking (counting), 200: swallowing, 400: ...
Study drug treatment will be initiated 1 hour prior to the induction of anesthesia with a loading dose given over 1 hour in 3 successively increasing, 20-minute step infusions. The ARC1779 treatment group will be dosed to achieve a target ARC1779 steady-state plasma concentration of 3 Ug/mL, using a loading dose infusion sequence of 0.0015 mg/kg/min for 20 minutes, 0.003 mg/kg/min for the next 20 minutes, and then 0.006 mg/kg/min for the final 20 minutes; thereafter, their maintenance infusion rate is to be 0.0006 mg/kg/min ...
In cats air embolism of the brain was produced by injecting 0.6 ml blood foam into the innominate artery proximal to the origin of both common carotid arteries. Air embolism caused transient ischemia of the brain, reaching a maximum within 1 min after injection. Resolution of the air embolism began a few minutes later and was completed within 15 min in the center and within 30 min in the border zone of the main supplying arteries. During this phase tissue perfusion was inhomogenous with reduced flow rates in some areas and reactive hyperemia up to 300% in others. This resulted in venous hyperoxia and a decrease of arteriovenous oxygen difference to as low as 2 ml/100 ml blood. Reactive hyperemia was accompanied by brain swelling and an increase in intracranial pressure from 3.6 +/- 1.2 to 12.3 +/- 2.0 mm Hg. The reason for hyperemia was a decrease of cortical pH which fell from 7.33 +/- 0.03 to 7.03 +/- 0.05, and which caused a dilation of pial arteries up to 260%. Immediately after embolism, ...
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return to top]. carbon monoxide (CO) - a colorless, odorless gas which can be created whenever a fuel (such as wood, gasoline, coal, natural gas, or kerosene) is burning.. cardiac arrest - the stopping of heartbeat.. cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - an emergency method of life-saving. Artificial respirations and chest compressions are used to restart the heart and lungs.. central nervous system - the brain and the spinal cord.. cerebral embolism - a brain attack that occurs when a wandering clot (embolus) or some other particle forms in a blood vessel away from the brain - usually in the heart.. cerebral hemorrhage - a type of stroke occurs when a defective artery in the brain bursts, flooding the surrounding tissue with blood.. cerebral thrombosis - the most common type of brain attack; occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms and blocks blood flow in an artery bringing blood to part of the brain.. cerebrovascular accident - apoplexy or stroke; an impeded blood supply to the ...
The fourth leading cause of death in the United States is a stroke. A person dies from a stroke every four minutes. Someone has a stroke every four seconds. Strokes happen when the blood supply to the brain is altered in some form, either not enough blood or too much blood on the brain. During a stroke, brain cells die due to lack of oxygen and nutrients. The best way to avoid a stroke is to live a healthy lifestyle.. Ischemic strokes account for 87 percent and hemorrhagic strokes account for 13 percent of all cases. An ischemic stroke is caused when a blood clot or a mass blocks the blood flow to the brain. The underlying condition for this obstruction, is the result of fatty deposits along the vessel walls, called plaque. This is called, atherosclerosis. This can cause two different types of obstruction, cerebral thrombosis, is a thrombus, (blood clot), which develops at the clogged part of the vessel. The other type is a cerebral embolism, which is a blood clot that forms in a different part ...
The brain sustains its normal function by taking in a constant stream of oxygen-rich blood from its supply of arteries. If this flow of blood ceases for even short periods of time, the cells in any affected area of the brain will die prematurely and trigger the onset of some form of brain damage. Whatever the underlying nature of the blood flow disruption, doctors refer to this set of circumstances as a stroke. As noted previously, an ischemic stroke involves some sort of blockage in a brain artery. In the general population, a blockage in one of these arteries is typically the result of cholesterol-based fatty deposits that accumulate over time on the interior artery walls; doctors call this buildup process atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis. In some cases, the accumulation of fatty deposits helps form an artery-blocking blood clot directly within the brain by acting as an anchoring point for the abnormal clumping of blood components called platelets; this is known as a cerebral thrombosis. In ...
Blood Clot in The Brain or Brain Haemorrhage What is cerebral thrombosis or a stroke? An ischemic stroke is the most common cause of stroke (stroke). Clot stops the blood and oxygen supply to the brain cells in the blood vessel supply area, and can cause sudden onset, unilateral paralysis and sensory disturbances.
A review was undertaken of the use of alternative immunosuppressive treatment in addition to corticosteroids in a cohort of 429 children with steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) treated between 1980 and 1994. Two hundred and twenty two children (52%) received at least one course of alternative treatment, 98 (23%) two, and 43 (10%) three. Cyclophosphamide was administered to 196 children (46%); in 181 it was the first course of alternative treatment and in 104 (57%) of those it was also the last (final course). Levamisole was given to 56 children (13%) and cyclosporin to 53 (12%). Fifteen children in whom cyclosporin failed were treated with chlorambucil. A few patients received azathioprine or vincristine. Ten children developed secondary steroid resistance, of whom five progressed to chronic renal failure. Acute complications included reversible renal failure, septicaemia, peritonitis, convulsions, and cerebral thrombosis. There were three deaths. It is concluded that half of the ...
Rufus E. Bean of Milton, well-known civic and political leader of Umatilla County, died Saturday afternoon [April 5] at a Walla Walla hospital of cerebral thrombosis. Born January 1, 1876 at Virgil City, Mo., he was the youngest of 13 children. After four years of schooling in a one-room school in Michigan, he learned telegraphy at Janesville, Wis., where his teacher was George Parker, fountain pen inventor. He worked as a telegraph operator at Floodwood, Minn., and at Portland. He became and agent for the O.W.R. & N. Company at Milton, and lived in this community for the rest of his life, with the exception of three years at Tekoa. In 1904 he married Nellie W. Sanderson at Pomeroy. She survives him, as do three children, Mrs. A. W. Priaul of Portland, R. Allan Bean of Richmond, Calif., and Mrs. Robert E. Lee of Forest Grove, and eight grandchildren. He is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Anna Reese of Caro, Mich., and a brother, David E. Beam of Pigeon, Mich. He was widely known throughout the ...
PREFACE. One morning at breakfast, the autumn of 1955, my explorer-anthropologist husband, Vilhjalmur Stefansson, asked me if he might return to the Stone Age Eskimo sort of all-meat diet he had thrived on during the most active part of his arctic work. Two years before, he had suffered a mild cerebral thrombosis, from which he had practically recovered. But he had not yet succeeded in losing the ten pounds of overweight his doctor wanted him to be rid of. By will power and near starvation, he had now and then lost a few of them; but the pounds always came back when his will power broke down. Doubtless partly through these failures, Stef had grown a bit unhappy, at times grouchy.. My first reaction to his Stone Age diet proposal was dismay. I have three jobs. I lecture, in and out of town, and enjoy the innumerable extracurricular activities of our New England college town of Hanover, New Hampshire. Forenoons I write books about the arctic, for teen-agers and uninformed adults, to be able to ...
In an embolic stroke, a piece of material (or embolus) travels from a distant location and lodges in the blood vessel, occluding it. The most common type of embolus is a blood clot. Because the blockage arrives from another location, the onset of embolic strokes is usually quicker than that of thrombotic strokes. As well, because of this, treatment of the stroke must also include determining the source of the embolus so as to prevent further emboli. Because a blood clot is the most common type of embolus, all of the risk factors listed above for thrombotic stroke (Virchow Triad) also apply to embolic strokes ...
Thrombotic strokes are strokes caused by a thrombus (blood clot) that develops in the arteries supplying blood to the brain. This type of stroke is usually seen in older persons, especially those with high-cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis (a build-up of fat and lipids inside the walls of blood vessels).. Sometimes, symptoms of a thrombotic stroke can occur suddenly and often during sleep or in the early morning. At other times, it may occur gradually over a period of hours or even days. This is called a stroke-in-evolution.. Thrombotic strokes may be preceded by one or more mini-strokes, called transient ischemic attacks, or TIAs. TIAs may last for a few minutes or up to 24 hours, and are often a warning sign that a stroke may occur. Although usually mild and transient, the symptoms caused by a TIA are similar to those caused by a stroke.. Another type of stroke that occurs in the small blood vessels in the brain is called a lacunar infarct. The word lacunar comes from the Latin word ...
Thrombotic strokes are strokes caused by a thrombus (blood clot) that develops in the arteries supplying blood to the brain. This type of stroke is usually seen in older persons, especially those with high cholesterol and atherosclerosis (a buildup of fat and lipids inside the walls of blood vessels) or diabetes. Sometimes, symptoms of a thrombotic stroke can occur suddenly and often during sleep or in the early morning. At other times, it may occur gradually over a period of hours or even days.. Thrombotic strokes may be preceded by one or more mini-strokes, called transient ischemic attacks, or TIAs. TIAs may last for a few minutes or up to 24 hours, and are often a warning sign that a stroke may occur. Although usually mild and transient, the symptoms caused by a TIA are similar to those caused by a stroke.. Another type of stroke that occurs in the small blood vessels in the brain is called a lacunar infarct. The word lacunar comes from the Latin word meaning hole or cavity. Lacunar ...
Thrombotic strokes are strokes caused by a blood clot (thrombus) that develops in the arteries supplying blood to the brain. This type of stroke is usually seen in older people, especially those with high cholesterol and a buildup of fat and lipids inside the walls of blood vessels (atherosclerosis) or diabetes. Sometimes, symptoms of a thrombotic stroke can occur suddenly. They can happen during sleep or in the early morning. At other times, it may occur gradually over a period of hours or even days.. Mini-strokes are also called transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) One of more of these may happen before a thrombotic stroke. TIAs may last for a few minutes or up to 24 hours. They are often a warning sign that a stroke may occur. Symptoms of a TIA are often mild and temporary, but they are similar to those caused by a stroke.. Another type of stroke that occurs in the small blood vessels in the brain is called a lacunar infarct. The word lacunar comes from the Latin word meaning hole or cavity. ...
As for Wandas appearance, I rather imagine that Wanda is exploring not only Croakamancy but the other magical disciplines. As a result, she is slowly being wasted because she isnt tuned to handle the other disciplines on a regular basis (I imagine something similar to what happened to Drool Rockworm w/ the Staff of Law in the first Covenant trilogy). What were seeing is Wanda being used up or twisted by other magical disiplines as she tries to understand magic, Fate, and her own powers as a Croakamancer. Perhaps this is why she tells Parson in Book 1 that other magic is hard ...
Background: Transcranial doppler-monitoring (TCM) has been used to identify patients at risk for embolic stroke and aids in identification of stroke mechanism. Limited data exists on the occurrence of microembolic signals (MES) on TCM and the presence of right-to-left shunting (RLS), most commonly through a patent foramen ovale. Our objective was to determine if a relationship exists between the presence of a RLS on transcranial doppler-bubble (TCB) and MES on TCM, and if the degree of shunting correlated with increased number of MES.. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 113 inpatients that underwent both TCB for the detection of a RLS and TCM during their admission for ischemic stroke at the Cleveland Clinic between 2011 and 2012. TCM was performed for 20 minutes in all patients. Both TCM and TCB used standardized protocols and machines. Data collected included demographics, presence of a shunt, and stroke mechanism.. Results: Mean age of the study cohort was 57.9 years and ...
Nicergoline (INN, marketed under the trade name Sermion) is an ergot derivative used to treat senile dementia and other disorders with vascular origins. It decreases vascular resistance and increases arterial blood flow in the brain, improving the utilization of oxygen and glucose by brain cells. It has similar vasoactive properties in other areas of the body, particularly the lungs. It is used for vascular disorders such as cerebral thrombosis and atherosclerosis, arterial blockages in the limbs, Raynauds disease, vascular migraines, and retinopathy. Nicergoline has been registered in over fifty countries and has been used for more than three decades for the treatment of cognitive, affective, and behavioral disorders of older people. Nicerogline is used in the following cases: Acute and chronic cerebral metabolic-vascular disorders (cerebral arteriosclerosis, thrombosis and cerebral embolism, transitory cerebral ischaemia). Acute and chronic peripheral metabolic-vascular disorders (organic and ...
Flavonoids have been reported to possess strong antioxidant activities that moderate endothelial dysfunction and demonstrate protective effects on cardiovascular disease. Our previous studies confirmed that flavonoids, including hesperidin, naringin and nobiletin, inhibited thrombogenesis and hypertension in stroke prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) by protecting the endothelium from the adverse effects of free radical formation. We have now further investigated the protective effects of myricetin and hesperidin on cerebral thrombosis and atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E (apoE) and lowdensity lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficient (Apoe-/- and Ldlr-/- double knockout) mice. Three groups of mice were fed high fat diet alone and high fat diet mixed with myricetin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) or glucosyl hesperidin (G-hesperidin; 250 mg/kg/day and 500 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. There were no differences in body weight related to administration of the flavonoids. Thrombotic
Cipro has very serious side effects. A brochitis infection should never have been treated with Cipro. And Cipro should never be taken as any sort of get me better antibiotic. It is really only for uses like combatting a life threatening deadly poison - such as anthrax. Unfortunately Cipro pays the reps well so you find Cipro being used where it should not be used.. My suggestion to Pat is to get more diagnosis before any long course of antibiotics, especially Cipro. It may have been the Cipro that damaged his heart in the first place:. CARDIOVASCULAR: palpitation, atrial flutter, ventricular ectopy, syncope, hypertension, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, cardiopulmonary arrest, cerebral thrombosis, phlebitis, tachycardia, migraine, hypotension. And the general list of side effects:. SIDE EFFECTS. During clinical investigations with oral and parenteral ciprofloxacin, 49,038 patients received courses of the drug. Most of the adverse events reported were described as only mild or moderate ...
Frank E. BUCHANAN - Yavapai County Arizona - b. Aug. 28, 1870, Titusville, Pa. d. Jan. 27, 1956, Prescott, Az. COD: Cerebral thrombosis Widower s/o William & Artinisia (Titus) Buchanan Occ: Mining Note: Resided in Az. 54 years
We, members of the Anticoagulation in Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy Consensus Report (APPCR) Panel, would like to respond to the article by Ginsberg et al in
Welcome to the Pathology Education Informational Resource (PEIR) Digital Library, a multidisciplinary public access image database for use in medical education. ...
1. Blocked Artery (causes an ischaemic stroke). A stroke that is caused by a blood clot is called an ischaemic stroke. In everyday life, blood clotting is beneficial. When you are bleeding from a wound, blood clots work to slow and eventually stop the bleeding. In the case of stroke, however, blood clots are dangerous because they can block arteries and cut off blood flow.. There are two ways an ischaemic stroke can occur.. 1.1 Embolic Stroke. If a blood clot forms somewhere in the body (usually the heart) it can travel through the bloodstream to your brain. Once in your brain, the clot travels to a blood vessel thats too small for it to pass through. It gets stuck there and stops blood from getting through. These kinds of strokes are called embolic strokes.. 1.2 Thrombotic Stroke. As the blood flows through the arteries, it may leave behind cholesterol-laden plaques that stick to the inner wall of the artery. Over time, these plaques can increase in size and narrow or block the artery and ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Venoarterial cerebral perfusion for treatment of massive arterial air embolism. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Peter Medawar was a great biologist whose research helped to make possible the transplantation of human organs. He also thought profoundly about the methods, the meaning, and the values of scientific research, and he published his thoughts in books and essays that are models of clarity, style, and wit. Born in 1915 in Brazil of a Lebanese father and an English mother, he received his education in England and made his career there. He became a full professor at thirty-two, a Fellow of the Royal Society at thirty-four, a Nobel Laureate at forty-five, and head of Britains largest medical research laboratory at forty-seven. At fifty-four, when his intellectual powers and capacity for work seemed inexhaustible, a cerebral hemorrhage destroyed the right half of his brain, but it did not impair his determination, his vitality and optimism. Three years later he was back at his research and literary work, and he lectured around the globe. In 1980 a cerebral thrombosis set him back severely. Again he ...
Sherman, Mary Belle (1862-1935)American clubwoman who lobbied on behalf of the national-parks movement. Born Mary Belle King on December 11, 1862, in Albion, New York; died of cerebral thrombosis on January 15, 1935; daughter of Rufus King and Sarah Electa (Whitney) King; educated at St. Source for information on Sherman, Mary Belle (1862-1935): Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia dictionary.
Transient ischemic attack (TIA). Sometimes, the blood supply to the brain is temporarily interrupted by a blood clot. This results in a mini-stroke, technically called transient ischemic attack. While TIA exhibits symptoms of a full stroke, these symptoms typically disappear within a few minutes to hours.. More often than not, a full stroke is usually preceded by TIA. Unfortunately, statistics by the CDC show that more than one-third of people who experience TIA and fail to receive medical attention end up having a full stroke within a year.. Ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke is caused by the narrowing or blocking of arteries that take blood to the brain. While this blockage is primarily caused by a blood clot, it can also be caused by atherosclerosis breaking off and blocking the blood vessel.. There are two main types of ischemic stroke: embolic and thrombotic stroke. In a thrombotic stroke, a blood clot forms right in the arteries supplying the brain with blood. On the other hand, in an ...
Medical definition of microembolism: a small embolus (as one consisting of an aggregation of platelets) that blocks an arteriole or the terminal part…
We present the case of a 41-year-old man with sudden development of left hemiparesis due to infarction of the right middle cerebral artery that was successfully treated with intravenous (IV) thrombolysis with alteplase. Transthoracic echocardiography
Whether there are differences in pathogenesis among different types and subtypes of cerebral watershed infarction (WSI) is controversial since they have been combined into a single group in most previous studies. We prospectively identified 340 supratentorial WSI patients at Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, China and classified them based on diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) templates. Baseline characteristics, clinical courses and neuroradiological features were compared among patients with different types and subtypes of WSI. We identified 92 patients with cortical watershed infarction (CWI), 112 with internal watershed infarction (IWI) and 136 with mixed-type infarction. Compared with CWI patients, more IWI patients had critical stenosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) (P < 0.001). For the CWI group, patients with anterior watershed infarction (AWI) were more prone to critical ICA stenosis than those with posterior watershed infarction (PWI) (P = 0.011). For the IWI group,
Yetino, M., Ozeke, O., Deveci, B., Timur Selcuk, M. and Aras, D. (2006) Multichamber intracardiac thrombi associated with activated protein C resistance in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging, 22, 59-61.
Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1] Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Aysha Anwar, M.B.B.S[2] Synonyms and Keywords: Cerebrovascular accident; cerebrovascular event; CVA; cerebral emboli; brain attack; ischemic stroke ...
Patent foramen ovale (PFO): Deep vein thrombosis may result in paradoxical embolism in patients with PFO. About 40% of patients ... by CT or MRI that is not lacunar No major-risk cardioembolic source of embolism Absence of extracranial or intracranial ... Varicella zoster virus), thrombophilia, cancer-related thrombosis, migraine, Fabry disease and other genetic, autoimmune or ...
Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. "Management of massive and submassive pulmonary embolism, iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, ... June 2014). "Thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism and risk of all-cause mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage: ... Wells criteria for pulmonary embolism Media related to Pulmonary embolism at Wikimedia Commons "Pulmonary Embolism". ... Thomson AJ, Greer IA (April 2015). "Thrombosis and Embolism during Pregnancy and the Puerperium, the Acute Management of (Green ...
Between 5% and 10% of all in hospital deaths are due to pulmonary embolism (as a consequence of thrombosis). Estimates of the ... abortion ectopic pregnancy molar pregnancy pregnancy childbirth and the puerperium coronary portal vein thrombosis intracranial ... "Deep Vein Thrombosis & Pulmonary Embolism, Chapter 2, Travelers' Health". CDC. Retrieved 2016-12-25. This article incorporates ... Hospital admissions in the US for pulmonary embolism are 200,000 to 300,000 yearly. Thrombosis that develops into DVT will ...
... intracranial embolism and thrombosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.525.400 - intracranial embolism MeSH C10.228.140.300.525.425 - ... intracranial thrombosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.525.669 - sinus thrombosis, intracranial MeSH C10.228.140.300.525.669.375 - ... lateral sinus thrombosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.525.669.750 - sagittal sinus thrombosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.535 - intracranial ... intracranial aneurysm MeSH C10.228.140.300.510.200.475 - intracranial arteriosclerosis MeSH C10.228.140.300.510.200.475.500 - ...
... carotid artery thrombosis MeSH C14.907.253.378.300 - intracranial embolism MeSH C14.907.253.378.350 - intracranial thrombosis ... intracranial embolism and thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213.206 - carotid artery thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213. ... intracranial embolism and thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.830.850.213.206 - carotid artery thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.830.850.213. ... 300 - intracranial embolism MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213.350 - intracranial thrombosis MeSH C14.907.355.350.850.213.669 - sinus ...
... or intracranial hemorrhage), hypovolemic shock, overdose, drowning, and pulmonary embolism. Cardiac arrest can also be caused ... A collapsed lung Thrombosis (Myocardial infarction) - Heart attack Thromboembolism (Pulmonary embolism) - A blood clot in the ... Thrombolytics when used generally may cause harm but may be of benefit in those with a confirmed pulmonary embolism as the ...
... which may travel to the arteries within the brain and cause an embolism. The embolism prevents blood flow to the brain, which ... Intracranial aneurysms are a leading cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage, or bleeding around the brain within the subarachnoid ... Dissections within the carotid arteries or vertebral arteries may compromise blood flow to the brain due to thrombosis, and ... Edema, or swelling, of the brain may occur which increases intracranial pressure and may result in brain herniation. A stroke ...
The terms septic aneurysm and septic embolism and septic arteritis are also commonly used. However, the word septic refers to ... Other common sources include cavernous sinus thrombosis, bacterial meningitis, poor dental hygiene and intravenous drug use. ... An infectious intracranial aneurysm (IIA, also called mycotic aneurysm) is a cerebral aneurysm that is caused by infection of ... At the same time, we prefer the use of a more specific and accurate heading, namely, infected intracranial aneurysm, to include ...
Intracranial hemorrhage is the accumulation of blood anywhere within the skull vault. A distinction is made between intra-axial ... There are four reasons why this might happen: Thrombosis (obstruction of a blood vessel by a blood clot forming locally) ... Embolism (obstruction due to an embolus from elsewhere in the body, see below), Systemic hypoperfusion (general decrease in ... Stam J (April 2005). "Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses" (PDF). The New England Journal of Medicine. 352 (17): 1791- ...
Central cyanosis may be due to the following causes: Central nervous system (impairing normal ventilation): Intracranial ... deep vein thrombosis) Differential cyanosis is the bluish coloration of the lower but not the upper extremity and the head. ... Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary embolism Hypoventilation Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD (emphysema) ...
... in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis". Thrombosis Research. 133 (3): 357-63. doi ... Adverse effects of alteplase include symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and fatal intracranial hemorrhage. Angioedema is ... As of 2019, alteplase is the most commonly used medication to treat pulmonary embolism (PE). Alteplase has a short infusion ... Alteplase has also been used off-label for deep vein thrombosis, peripheral artery disease, pleural effusion in children, ...
... central retinal and branch vein thrombosis; priapism; pulmonary hypertension of embolic origin; embolism after insertion of ... Ancrod showed modest benefits but a trend toward increased intracranial haemorrhage. A clinical trial published in 2006 found ... and thrombosis. A small study compared to ancrod to heparin in preventing thrombosis when given to people undergoing arterial ... It is also indicated for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis after repair of the fractured neck of a femur. For the ...
There are two major types of VTE: deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. DVT is often found in the calf, ... Common types of aneurysm include abdominal aortic aneurysm, thoracic aortic aneurysm and intracranial aneurysm. Most types of ... Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. 23 (12): 2155-2163. doi:10.1161/01.ATV.0000097770.66965.2A. PMID 14512371. Flather, Marcus D ... "Venous thrombosis". Nature Reviews Disease Primers. 1 (1): 15006. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2015.6. PMID 27189130. S2CID 24689285. Furie ...
... for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in people ... It has similar efficacy to warfarin and is associated with a lower risk of intracranial bleeding, but unlike warfarin there is ... 2013). "Different combined oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis: systematic review and network meta-analysis ... but lower the risk of intracranial bleeding: insights from a meta-analysis and indirect treatment comparisons". PLOS ONE. 8 (10 ...
452 Portal vein thrombosis 453 Other venous embolism and thrombosis 453.4 Deep vein thrombosis, unspec. 453.41 Deep vein ... Cerebral aneurysm nonruptured 437.4 Cerebral arteritis 437.5 Moyamoya disease 437.6 Nonpyogenic thrombosis of intracranial ... thrombosis, proximal 453.42 Deep vein thrombosis, distal 453.9 Venous embolism, unspec. site 454 Varicose veins of lower ... Cerebral thrombosis without cerebral infarction 434.01 Cerebral thrombosis with cerebral infarction 434.1 Cerebral embolism ...
Thrombosis of the sinuses is the main mechanism behind the increase in intracranial pressure due to decreased resorption of ... Diaz JM, Schiffman JS, Urban ES, Maccario M (1992). "Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a syndrome ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis or cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), is the ... "Intracranial venous thrombosis - Patient UK". UCH Institute for Child Health. "Clinical guideline Cerebral Venous Sinus ...
The risk of deep vein thrombosis may be the most pressing medical complication.[citation needed] Deep vein thrombosis can be ... They have also rewarmed patients at too fast a rate, leading to spikes in intracranial pressure. Some of the new models have ... This condition may become potentially fatal if the clot travels to the lungs and causes a pulmonary embolism. Another potential ... The use of hypothermia to control intracranial pressure (ICP) after an ischemic stroke was found to be both safe and practical ...
Decreased activity leads to hypofibrinolysis, which can result in thrombosis or embolism. In ischemic stroke patients, ... However a significant mortality rate was noted, mostly from intracranial haemorrhage at 7 days, but later mortality was not ... If pulmonary embolism causes severe instability due to high pressure on the heart ("massive PE") and leads to low blood ... Pulmonary embolism (blood clots that have moved to the lung arteries) is usually treated with heparin generally followed by ...
Intracranial aneurysms are rare in childhood, with over 95% of all aneurysms occurring in adults. Incidence rates are two to ... Blood clots can dislodge from the aneurysm, which can then lead to an embolism when the clot gets stuck and disrupts blood flow ... Aneurysms can also be a nidus (starting point) for clot formation (thrombosis) and embolization. The word is from Greek: ... Intracranial hemorrhages are 1.6 times more likely to be due to aneurysms than cerebral arteriovenous malformations in whites, ...
Other symptoms include those that indicate a rise in intracranial pressure caused by a large mass putting pressure on the brain ... A very small proportion is due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.[citation needed] Risk factors for ICH include: Hypertension ... and cerebral embolism (30%). Intracerebral hemorrhage was first distinguished from strokes due to insufficient blood flow, so ... It accounts for 20% of all cases of cerebrovascular disease in the United States, behind cerebral thrombosis (40%) ...
... thrombosis or embolism due to atherosclerosis of a large artery, (2) an embolism originating in the heart, (3) complete ... and vomiting usually occur more often in hemorrhagic stroke than in thrombosis because of the increased intracranial pressure ... In paradoxical embolism, a deep vein thrombosis embolizes through an atrial or ventricular septal defect in the heart into the ... Two types of thrombosis can cause stroke: Large vessel disease involves the common and internal carotid arteries, the vertebral ...
... massive pulmonary embolism or extensive deep vein thrombosis). The main complication is bleeding (which can be dangerous), and ... known intracranial arteriovenous malformation or previously known intracranial neoplasm Suspected recent (within 30 days) ... Massive pulmonary embolism. For the treatment of a massive pulmonary embolism, catheter-directed therapy is a safer and more ... Severe deep vein thrombosis (DVT), such as phlegmasia cerulea dolens, which threatens limb loss, or iliofemoral DVT, where ...
In-situ thrombosis, an obstruction that forms directly in the cerebral vasculature unlike the remote embolism previously ... CT, however, is more widely available and can be used particularly to rule out intracranial hemorrhage. Diffusion sequences can ... Embolisms can originate from multiple parts of the body. Common mechanisms of stroke and TIA: The initial clinical evaluation ... There are three major mechanisms of ischemia in the brain: embolism traveling to the brain, in situ thrombotic occlusion in the ...
... and to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in some circumstances. It appears to be as effective as warfarin in ... including intracranial bleeds, but the rate of gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly higher. Dabigatran capsules contain ... as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in persons who have been treated for 5-10 days with parenteral ... valve thrombosis, stroke, and myocardial infarction) and major bleeding associated with dabigatran in this population. The most ...
Infections within the intracranial cavity are a dangerous complication of TBI. They may occur outside of the dura mater, below ... Being unconscious and lying still for long periods can cause blood clots to form (deep venous thrombosis), which can cause ... pulmonary embolism. Other serious complications for patients who are unconscious, in a coma, or in a vegetative state include ... This in turn can create the following potential life-threatening symptoms: increased intra-cranial pressure (ICP), tachycardia ...
... intracranial to intracranial). Surgeons create these bypasses mainly as a step in the treatment of patients with unclippable ... General risks of surgery: Hemorrhage (bleeding) Infection Embolism Immediately following coronary artery or neurosurgical ... and thrombosis. It is rare, but almost always requires reoperation. ... Bypasses created with the help of the ELANA can be to major arteries in the brain, including extracranial to intracranial ...
Approximately 36.6% of ischaemic strokes are caused by an embolism. Embolisms are an obstruction of a blood vessel in the brain ... In 21.4% of cases, ischaemic strokes are caused by thrombosis. A thrombus is a blood clot which forms in a cerebral blood ... In a similar manner to Streptokinase, Alteplase increases the risk of intracranial haemorrhage, however, mortality rate is not ... Stam, J. (2005-04-28). "Thrombosis of the Cerebral Veins and Sinuses". New England Journal of Medicine. 352 (17): 1791-1798. ...
CPA has been associated rarely with retinal vascular disorder, retinal vein thrombosis, and optic neuritis. A case report of ... Deipolyi AR, Han SJ, Parsa AT (October 2010). "Development of a symptomatic intracranial meningioma in a male-to-female ... "Venous thrombo-embolism as a complication of cross-sex hormone treatment of male-to-female transsexual subjects: a review". ... In addition, progestogens by themselves at physiological doses normally do not increase the risk of thrombosis. The Women's ...
... and deep venous thrombosis, which can cause pulmonary embolism. Infections that can follow skull fractures and penetrating ... and raised intracranial pressure (the pressure within the skull). Intracranial pressure may rise due to swelling or a mass ... For intracranial hematomas, the collected blood may be removed using suction or forceps or it may be floated off with water. ... A traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as an intracranial injury, is an injury to the brain caused by an external force. ...
Venous thrombosis /. Thrombophlebitis. *primarily lower limb *Deep vein thrombosis. *abdomen *Hepatic veno-occlusive disease ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
... thrombosis. These changes create an exaggerated layered appearance (onion skinning).[11] ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
Hal ini dapat terjadi karena iskemia (berkurangnya aliran darah) dikarenakan oleh penyumbatan (thrombosis, arterial embolism), ... Intra-cranial stenting yang diterapkan pada gejala penyumbatan intracranial arterial stenosis, boleh dikatakan sukses ... "Autopsy prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis in patients with fatal stroke". Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris; ... cerebral embolism, intracerebral hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage dari malformasi aneurysm atau arteriovenous.[14] ...
... causing increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, with increased risk of intracranial bleeding. ... Venous thrombosis /. Thrombophlebitis. *primarily lower limb *Deep vein thrombosis. *abdomen *Hepatic veno-occlusive disease ... CT scan depicting intracranial hemorrhage, a possible complication of hypertensive emergency. Patients with spontaneous ... and intracranial bleeding. Cardiovascular system damage can include myocardial ischemia/infarction, acute left ventricular ...
Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein can be displayed with sonography. Thrombi that have developed recently have low ... rather than the macroembolic clot burden more typical of acute pulmonary embolism, are responsible for the pulmonary findings ... intracranial abscesses, meningitis).[4] ... a sure sign of thrombosis. Also color or power Doppler ...
"Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 101 (2): 271-78. doi:10.1160/th08-09-0575. PMID 19190809. Retrieved 19 June 2009.. ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
... and embolism (migration) of these clots of the brain. From various lines of evidence, it appears that thrombosis and embolism ... and intracranial (the part inside the skull).[1] ... the vessel wall and turbulence increase the risk of thrombosis ...
Cholesterol embolism. *Paradoxical embolism. *Thrombosis. *Vasculitis. Blood pressure. Hypertension. *Hypertensive heart ... Intracranial aneurysm, also known as brain aneurysm, is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral ... Once suspected, intracranial aneurysms can be diagnosed radiologically using magnetic resonance or CT angiography.[16] But ... Intracranial aneurysms may result from diseases acquired during life, or from genetic conditions. Lifestyle diseases including ...
a b c d e f g h eMedicine Specialties , Neurology , Neurological Emergencies , Intracranial Haemorrhage: Treatment & Medication ... It accounts for 20% of all cases of cerebrovascular disease in the United States, behind cerebral thrombosis (40%) and cerebral ... embolism (30%).[31] Research[edit]. The inflammatory response triggered by stroke has been viewed as harmful in the early stage ... Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), also known as cerebral bleed, is a type of intracranial bleed that occurs within the brain ...
Embolism *Pulmonary embolism. *Cholesterol embolism. *Paradoxical embolism. *Thrombosis. *Hepatic artery thrombosis. * ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Family history, pulmonary embolism, HIV/AIDS, sickle cell disease, cocaine use, COPD, sleep apnea, living at high altitudes[5][ ... This delivery system can cause sepsis and thrombosis. Prostacyclin is unstable, and therefore has to be kept on ice during ...
... for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in people ... It has similar efficacy to warfarin and is associated with a lower risk of intracranial bleeding, but unlike warfarin there is ... but lower the risk of intracranial bleeding: insights from a meta-analysis and indirect treatment comparisons". PLoS ONE. 8 (10 ... "Different combined oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis: systematic review and network meta-analysis". BMJ ...
Renal vein thrombosis (thrombosis of the veins of the kidneys. Parodoxical embolism[edit]. Systemic embolism of venous origin ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, cavernous sinus thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis: thrombosis of the veins of the brain ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... A venous thrombosis is a thrombosis in a vein, caused by a thrombus (blood clot). A common type of venous thrombosis is a deep ...
... resulting in a pulmonary embolism. Arterial thrombosis resulting from hypertension or atherosclerosis can become mobile and the ... North American Thrombosis Forum - NATF is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting thrombosis research, prevention and ... "Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis. 43 (2): 154-168. doi:10.1055/s-0036-1586229. PMC 5848490. PMID 27677179.. ... Blood clot prevention and treatment reduce the risk of stroke, heart attack and pulmonary embolism. Heparin and warfarin are ...
Vascular disorders of the brain include thrombosis, embolisms, angiomas, aneurysms, and cerebral arteriosclerosis.[25] ... Brain tumors can increase intracranial pressure, causing brain damage.. Chemotherapy can cause brain damage to the neural stem ...
"A clinical trial of vena caval filters in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with proximal deep-vein thrombosis. ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... "Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 6 (5): 772-780. doi:10.1111/j.1538-7836.2008.02944.x. PMID 18318689.. More than one of , ... Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. 2 (8): 1247-1255. doi:10.1111/j.1538-7836.2004.00790.x. PMID 15304025.. More than one of ...
Venous thrombosis can lead to pulmonary embolism when the migrated embolus becomes lodged in the lung. In people with a "shunt ... Thrombosis may occur in veins (venous thrombosis) or in arteries (arterial thrombosis). Venous thrombosis leads to congestion ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Renal vein thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Renal vein thrombosis. Renal vein thrombosis is the obstruction of the renal vein by ...
I82.3) Embolism and thrombosis of renal vein. *(I82.8) Embolism and thrombosis of other specified veins *Paget-Schroetter ... I60.6) Subarachnoid haemorrhage from other intracranial arteries. *(I60.7) Subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial artery, ... I74) Arterial embolism and thrombosis. *(I77) Other disorders of arteries and arterioles *(I77.0) Arteriovenous fistula, ... I63.3) Cerebral infarction due to thrombosis of cerebral arteries. *(I63.4) Cerebral infarction due to embolism of cerebral ...
Pulmonary embolism[8]. Acute lung injury may also cause pulmonary edema through injury to the vasculature and parenchyma of the ...
Intracranial hemorrhage - bleeding in the skull.. *Cerebral hemorrhage - a type of intracranial hemorrhage, bleeding within the ... Pulmonary embolism. *Renal vein thrombosis. Bleeding. By cause. Thrombocytopenia. *Thrombocytopenic purpura: ITP *Evans ... "18F-positron-emitting/fluorescent labeled erythrocytes allow imaging of internal hemorrhage in a murine intracranial ...
... and may lead to pulmonary embolism.[7] ... Venous thrombosis /. Thrombophlebitis. *primarily lower limb * ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism[55]. Dermatology *stretch marks[56]. *acanthosis nigricans[56] ... Wall M (March 2008). "Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri)". Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports ( ... Darvall KA, Sam RC, Silverman SH, Bradbury AW, Adam DJ (February 2007). "Obesity and thrombosis". European Journal of Vascular ... Dentali F, Squizzato A, Ageno W (July 2009). "The metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for venous and arterial thrombosis". ...
Not to be confused with ebullism or embolism.. An aneurysm is a localized, blood-filled balloon-like bulge in the wall of a ... Aneurysms can also be a nidus for clot formation (thrombosis) and embolization. The word is from Greek: ἀνεύρυσμα, aneurysma, " ... Intracranial aneurysmsEdit. Main article: Cerebral aneurysm treatment. There are currently two treatment options for brain ... Cerebral aneurysms, also known as intracranial or brain aneurysms, occur most commonly in the anterior cerebral artery, which ...
Venous thrombosis (Talk:Venous thrombosis), Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Von Willebrand disease, Weissenbacher-Zweymüller ... Cholesterol embolism (got onto DYK), Chronic granulomatous disease, Chronic kidney disease (T), Combined hyperlipidemia, ... Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (T / good article since 18 November 2008), Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (T), Imerslund- ... Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (T / good article since 17 April 2008), Chronic fatigue syndrome (T, Chronic myelogenous ...
Venous thrombosis /. Thrombophlebitis. *primarily lower limb *Deep vein thrombosis. *abdomen *Hepatic veno-occlusive disease ... pulmonary embolism (McConnell's sign). *radial artery sufficiency (Allen's test). *pseudohypertension (Osler's sign) ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ...
An embolism that lodges in the lungs is a pulmonary embolism (PE). A pulmonary embolism is a very serious condition that can be ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Thrombosis is a term for a blood clot occurring inside a blood vessel. A common type of venous thrombosis is a deep vein ... Superficial venous thromboses cause discomfort but generally not serious consequences, as do the deep venous thromboses (DVTs) ...
Venous thrombosis can lead to pulmonary embolism when the migrated embolus becomes lodged in the lung. In people with a "shunt ... Intracranial aneurysm. *Intracranial berry aneurysm. *Carotid artery dissection. *Vertebral artery dissection. *Familial aortic ... Renal vein thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Renal vein thrombosis. Renal vein thrombosis is the obstruction of the renal vein by ... Deep vein thrombosis[edit]. Main article: Deep vein thrombosis. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot ...
Neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiologists surgically manage diseases of the vessels in the brain (e.g., intracranial ... Pulmonary embolism. Inferior vena cava filter Suction thrombectomy. Renovascular hypertension. Surgical revascularization. ... Deep vein thrombosis. Inferior vena cava filter Thrombectomy. Endoleak. Fibromuscular dysplasia. angioplasty. ...
Lanska D J, Kryscio R J (2000) Risk factors for peripartum and postpartum stroke and intracranial venous thrombosis. Stroke 31 ... Arterial occlusion may be due to thrombi, amniotic fragments or air embolism. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy is a transitory ... Kalbag R M, Woolf A L (1967) Cerebral Venous Thrombosis, with Special Reference to Primary Aseptic Thrombosis. Oxford, Oxford ... Puerperal women are liable to thrombosis, especially thrombophlebitis of the leg and pelvic veins; aseptic thrombi can also ...
"Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Intracranial Embolism and ... "Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis" by people in Profiles.. * Sedlaczek O, Caplan L, Hennerici M. Impaired washout--embolism ... "Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, ... Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis*Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis. Cerebral Embolism and Thrombosis*Cerebral Embolism ...
Intracranial Embolism. *Thrombosis. Intervention ICMJE Procedure: transcranial ultrasound in patients treated with iv t-PA. ... Asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage 24-48 hours after t-PA infusion. *Early clinical recovery by 10 or more NIHSS points or ... history of intracranial hemorrhage, arteriovenous malformation or aneurysm. *severe cranio-cerebral trauma within the last 3 ... septic embolism, endocarditis, pericarditis after myocardial infarction. *pregnancy or childbirth within the last 30 days or ...
Embolism. Aortic Valve Stenosis. Intracranial Embolism. Embolism and Thrombosis. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. ... Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis. Cerebrovascular Disorders. Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous ... Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Versus Oral Anticoagulation for a Short Time to Prevent Cerebral Embolism After TAVI (AUREA). The ... PHASE IV Study of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Versus Oral Anticoagulation for a Short Time to Prevent Cerebral Embolism After ...
Embolism. Intracranial Embolism. Embolism and Thrombosis. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Cerebrovascular Disorders ... Intracranial Embolism Cerebral Thromboembolism Carotid Stenosis Drug: ARC1779 Injection Drug: Placebo (normal saline) Phase 2 ...
Palabras clave : Cerebrovascular accident; Intensive care units; Intracranial embolism and thrombosis; Intracranial hemorrhages ... had a cerebral venous thrombosis and 6% a subarachnoidal hemorrhage. The global mortality was 1%. Seventy percent of patients ...
Intracranial Embolism And Thrombosis. Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. ... Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures. ... Treatment of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in China.. Ruptured intracranial aneurysms is currently a common disease that ... Management of intracranial manifestations vary with lesion site. Intracranial tuberculomas may be associated with SEIZURES, ...
Intracranial Embolism And Thrombosis. Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. ... Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures. ... Management of intracranial manifestations vary with lesion site. Intracranial tuberculomas may be associated with SEIZURES, ... Intracranial tumors originating in the region of the brain inferior to the tentorium cerebelli, which contains the cerebellum, ...
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / diagnostic imaging* * Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / etiology * Mitral Valve / ...
... evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent ... Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations / diagnostic imaging * Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / diagnostic imaging* * ... A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. A case of cavernous ... Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. State of the ...
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / etiology*, surgery. Mitral Valve. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National ...
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis [C14.907.253.566]. *Intracranial Thrombosis [C14.907.253.566.350]. *Embolism and ... "Intracranial Thrombosis" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Intracranial Thrombosis" was a major or ... Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are ... "Intracranial Thrombosis" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ...
... thrombus regression accompanied by anticoagulant therapy in 82 consecutive patients with acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. ... Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis / drug therapy, pathology*, physiopathology. Male. Middle Aged. Prothrombin Time. ... 1718466 - Heparin cofactor ii: an acute phase reactant in patients with deep vein thrombosis.. 8118586 - Recent developments in ... the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pulmonary embolism.. 8074596 - Reevaluation of the sensitivity of impedance ...
Vascular (extracardiac) Disorders: Infrequent: Hemorrhoids, peripheral ischemia, pulmonary embolism, thrombosis, ... thrombophlebitis deep, aneurysm, hemorrhage intracranial.. Vision Disorders: Frequent: Cataract. Infrequent: Conjunctival ...
... deep vein thrombosis (2.81; 2.04-3.87), pulmonary embolism (2.10; 1.53-2.89), intracranial hemorrhage (2.85; 1.35-6.03), acute ...
... deep vein thrombosis (2.81; 2.04-3.87), pulmonary embolism (2.10; 1.53-2.89), intracranial hemorrhage (2.85; 1.35-6.03), acute ... deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation, cerebral ischemia or infarction, intracranial ... deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute hepatitis/liver ... Intracranial hemorrhage. 6 (0.4). 15 (0.8). 2.45 (0.88-6.80). 3 (3.4). 10.36 (2.54-42.31). 3 (0.9). 2.69 (0.64-11.25). 0.02. ...
Categories: Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
AF = atrial fibrillation; DVT = deep venous thrombosis; KQ = key question; ICH = intracranial hemorrhage; PE = pulmonary ... intracranial hemorrhage; PE = pulmonary embolism; TIA = transient ischemic attack. ... Intracranial hemorrhage was evaluated in 3 observational studies, which showed an increased risk for intracranial hemorrhage ... They also had lower rates of intracranial hemorrhage (intracranial HR, 0.42 [CI, 0.30 to 0.58]; intracerebral HR, 0.45 [CI, ...
... deep vein thrombosis†, hemorrhage intracranial†, hypertension, hypertensive crisis, pulmonary embolism†, thrombosis. ... Have deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, now or in the past [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] ... The use of CHCs increases the risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs), such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism ... Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: Pulmonary embolism. *Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Chloasma, ...
... deep vein thrombosis†, hemorrhage intracranial†, hypertension, hypertensive crisis, pulmonary embolism† thrombosist. ... Have deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, now or in the past [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] ... Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders: Pulmonary embolism. *Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: Chloasma, ... Evaluate for retinal vein thrombosis immediately.. If feasible, stop ORTHO EVRA at least 4 weeks before and through 2 weeks ...
13 exp "intracranial embolism and thrombosis"/(95). 14 exp intracranial hemorrhages/(1212) ...
Monoclonal antibody to the ICAM-1 adhesion site reduces neurological damage in a rabbit cerebral embolism stroke model. - M P ... Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis (complications, pathology, physiopathology) *Nervous System (physiopathology) *Rabbits. * ... Monoclonal antibody to the ICAM-1 adhesion site reduces neurological damage in a rabbit cerebral embolism stroke model.. ... When thrombolysis was delayed 3 h following embolism, neither tPA nor the tPA/alpha-ICAM combination reduced neurological ...
Intracranial Embolism And Thrombosis. *Myocardial Infarction. *Pulmonary Embolism. How long have you been taking it?. Choose ... Acute massive pulmonary embolism (blood clot that has traveled to the lungs) ...
Intracranial Embolism And Thrombosis. *Myocardial Infarction. *Pulmonary Embolism. How long have you been taking it?. Choose ... Pulmonary embolism (blood clot that has traveled to the lungs). This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your ... The recommended dose/dose range of Activase (alteplase) for the treatment of pulmonary embolism (blood clot in lung) is 100mg ...
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis. Intracranial Arteriosclerosis. Transient ischaemic attack. TIA. Brain Stem Ischemia ...
Intracranial Embolism And Thrombosis. *Myocardial Infarction. *Pulmonary Embolism. How long have you been taking it?. Choose ...
... deep vein thrombosis†, hemorrhage intracranial†, hypertension, hypertensive crisis, pulmonary embolism†, thrombosis† ... Have deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, now or in the past [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] o Have inherited or ... legs (deep vein thrombosis) • lungs (pulmonary embolus) • eyes (loss of eyesight) • heart (heart attack) • brain (stroke) To ... Evaluate for retinal vein thrombosis immediately. If feasible, stop Xulane at least 4 weeks before and through 2 weeks after ...
"Intracranial Arterial Diseases+") OR (MH "Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis") OR (MH "Intracranial Hemorrhage+") OR (MH " ...
View Pulmonary Embolism Roaccutane side effect risks. Female, 17 years of age, took Roaccutane . Patient was hospitalized. ... Is Pulmonary Embolism a common side effect of Roaccutane? ... Intracranial Venous Sinus Thrombosis, Pulmonary Embolism This ... Roaccutane Pulmonary Embolism Causes and Reviews What is a pulmonary embolism (PE)?. A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a sudden ... Deep Vein Thrombosis, Pulmonary Embolism This is a Roaccutane side effect report of a 15-year-old female patient (weight:NA) ...
The NOACs were also associated with lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and arterial embolism/thrombosis.2 ...
Ischemic disease can be caused by stenosis (extracranial or intracranial), thrombosis, or embolism. ... Other causes of ischemic stroke are stenosis (extracranial or intracranial), thrombosis, and embolism. ... Medications by pill to reduce blood pressure, prevent embolism. *Medication administered intravenously (into your veins) to ...
  • The following Roaccutane Pulmonary Embolism side effect reports were submitted by healthcare professionals and consumers. (patientsville.com)
  • This information will help you understand how side effects, such as Pulmonary Embolism, can occur, and what you can do about them. (patientsville.com)
  • This Pulmonary Embolism side effect was reported by a physician from FRANCE. (patientsville.com)
  • This Pulmonary Embolism Roaccutane side effect was reported by a health professional from UNITED KINGDOM on Nov 12, 2007. (patientsville.com)
  • and developed a serious reaction and a Pulmonary Embolism side effect. (patientsville.com)
  • This side effect report can indicate a possible existence of increased vulnerability to Roaccutane treatment in female patients suffering from acne , resulting in Pulmonary Embolism . (patientsville.com)
  • This finding indicates that some patients can be more vulnerable to developing Roaccutane side effects, such as Pulmonary Embolism . (patientsville.com)
  • This report suggests a potential Roaccutane Pulmonary Embolism side effect(s) that can have serious consequences. (patientsville.com)
  • Although Roaccutane demonstrated significant improvements in a number of clinically relevant cases, troublesome symptoms, such as Pulmonary Embolism , may still occur. (patientsville.com)
  • Location: , 20 years of age, patient began experiencing various side effects, including: Directly after treatment started, patient experienced the unwanted or unexpected Roaccutane side effects: epilepsy, pulmonary embolism, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. (patientsville.com)
  • Complications include pulmonary embolism and intracranial extension of the thrombus. (visualdx.com)
  • This Pulmonary Embolism side effect was reported by a consumer or non-health professional from US. (patientsville.com)
  • This Pulmonary Embolism Aciphex side effect was reported by a health professional from UNITED STATES on May 21, 2012. (patientsville.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism was unprovoked in 65% of patients receiving rivaroxaban and 64% of patients receiving LMWH with a vitamin K antagonist (hereafter referred to as LMWH/VKA). (nice.org.uk)
  • 3.4 The primary efficacy end point for EINSTEIN‑PE was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism, which was a composite end point comprising recurrent deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. (nice.org.uk)
  • This included both fatal and non-fatal pulmonary embolism, and unexplained death for which a pulmonary embolism could not be ruled out. (nice.org.uk)
  • Pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third leading cause of cardiovascular mortality behind acute myocardial infarction and stroke and a leading cause of in-hospital mortality. (acc.org)
  • Importantly, there were no cases of intracranial hemorrhage, access-site major bleeding, device-related cardiac or pulmonary injury, or device-related deaths. (acc.org)
  • Pulmonary prosthetic valve thrombosis is a serious and rare complication with high mortality. (dovepress.com)
  • 1 Thrombosis of pulmonary valve (PV) prosthesis is very rare. (dovepress.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a blockage of an artery in the lungs by a substance that has moved from elsewhere in the body through the bloodstream (embolism). (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms of pulmonary embolism are typically sudden in onset and may include one or many of the following: dyspnea (shortness of breath), tachypnea (rapid breathing), chest pain of a "pleuritic" nature (worsened by breathing), cough and hemoptysis (coughing up blood). (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis are the two most important manifestations of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE), which is the third most common life-threatening cardiovascular disease in the United States. (aafp.org)
  • Most patients with deep venous thrombosis or low-risk pulmonary embolism can be treated in the outpatient setting with low-molecular-weight heparin and a vitamin K antagonist (warfarin) or direct-acting oral anticoagulants. (aafp.org)
  • Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are the two most important manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is the third most common life-threatening cardiovascular disease, after myocardial infarction and stroke, in the United States. (aafp.org)
  • Most patients with deep venous thrombosis and selected patients with pulmonary embolism can be safely treated as outpatients. (aafp.org)
  • The incidence of venous thromboembolism including pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis is increasing in Korea. (ersjournals.com)
  • Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) can be devastating. (hindawi.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and are the leading cause of death in hospitals today. (hindawi.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism is a blood clot which originates in the deep venous system of the lower exterminates and travels to the lungs where it lodges in the main pulmonary artery or surrounding branches. (hindawi.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism or venous thrombosis is a devastating diagnosis and is referred to as a silent killer. (hindawi.com)
  • Chapter 10: Thrombosis and Embolism Pulmonary embolism (PE) is probably the leading cause of death associated with liposuction. (liposuction.com)
  • Pulmonary embolism (PE) is probably the leading cause of death associated with liposuction. (liposuction.com)
  • How is deep venous thrombosis (DVT) detected in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE)? (medscape.com)
  • If a patient is thought to have pulmonary embolism (PE) or has documented PE, the absence of tenderness, erythema, edema, or a palpable cord upon examination of the lower extremities does not rule out thrombophlebitis, nor does it imply a source other than a leg vein. (medscape.com)
  • Systematic lung scans reveal a high frequency of silent pulmonary embolism in patients with proximal deep venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Oral rivaroxaban for the treatment of symptomatic pulmonary embolism. (medscape.com)
  • Management of massive and submassive pulmonary embolism, iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. (medscape.com)
  • Trends in the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a 25-year population-based study. (medscape.com)
  • Venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is estimated to occur in at least 1 to 2 persons per 1000 population annually, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or in combination. (acc.org)
  • The International Cooperative Pulmonary Embolism Registry (ICOPER) demonstrated 90-day mortality rates of 58.3% in patients with massive PE versus 15.1% in sub-massive PE. (acc.org)
  • For patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolism a new oral treatment regimen has been developed. (escardio.org)
  • Thus, rivaroxaban is a simple oral and effective alternative to enoxaparin/warfarin in the prevention of recurrent thromboembolism in symptomatic patients with pulmonary embolism with an excellent safety profile including intracranial hemorrhage. (escardio.org)
  • Elderly patients treated with CAC had greater odds of perioperative acute renal failure, whereas their CACo counterparts had greater odds of perioperative deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. (thejns.org)
  • Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • 1 VTE affects hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients, is often overlooked, and results in long-term complications including postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) for DVT, postpulmonary embolism syndrome and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension for PE, and death. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • The primary safety endpoint is to determine the rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in both treatment groups. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Sixty three percent of patients had an ischemic stroke, 14% had an hemorrhagic stroke, 15% had a transient ischemic attack, 2% had a cerebral venous thrombosis and 6% a subarachnoidal hemorrhage. (scielo.cl)
  • The NOACs were also associated with lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and arterial embolism/thrombosis. (ajmc.com)
  • A cerebrovascular event producing neurological sequelae lasting more than 30 days and caused by intracranial thrombosis or hemorrhage, or embolism from an extra-cranial source. (manulife.com)
  • As the use of vitamin K antagonists is increased, the risk of anticoagulant-related intracranial hemorrhage(ICH) is emphasized. (ersjournals.com)
  • What are the AHA/ASA treatment guidelines for spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in hemorrhagic stroke? (medscape.com)
  • Intracranial hemorrhage complicating acute stroke: how common is hemorrhagic stroke on initial head CT scan and how often is initial clinical diagnosis of acute stroke eventually confirmed? (medscape.com)
  • Intracranial hemorrhage in the hypertensive patient. (medscape.com)
  • Neonatal intracranial hemorrhage is detected in all its locations by MR imaging. (nih.gov)
  • Complications were identified in national clinical registers for 30 days following warfarin cessation, and defined as all-cause mortality, bleeding (intracranial, gastrointestinal, or other), or thrombosis (ischemic stroke or systemic embolism, venous thromboembolism, or myocardial infarction) that was fatal or required hospital care. (diva-portal.org)
  • Together, deep vein thrombosis and PE are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute middle cerebral artery thrombosis demonstrated by cranial computed tomography: the "dense MCA" sign. (harvard.edu)
  • Enterprise stent in recanalizing non-acute atherosclerotic intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To investigate the safety and effectiveness of recanalization in non-acute occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries using the flexible Enterprise self-expanding stent. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Using two-dimensional echocardiography, we studied the pathophysiology of intracardiac thrombus regression accompanied by anticoagulant therapy in 82 consecutive patients with acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Haeger K. Problems of acute deep venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of symptomatic lower extremity acute deep venous thrombosis: role of mechanical thrombectomy. (medscape.com)
  • However, outcomes of stent retrieval may differ between acute arterial occlusions due to intracranial atherosclerotic disease (IAD) and those due to embolism. (bvsalud.org)
  • METHODS: Among patients who underwent endovascular treatment for acute intracranial large artery occlusion, those in whom stent retrieval was attempted as first-line treatment were included in this review. (bvsalud.org)
  • Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. (harvard.edu)
  • Other causes of ischemic stroke are stenosis (extracranial or intracranial), thrombosis, and embolism . (mountsinai.org)
  • 452 Portal vein thrombosis 453 Other venous embolism and thrombosis 453.4 Deep vein thrombosis, unspec. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sedlaczek O, Caplan L, Hennerici M. Impaired washout--embolism and ischemic stroke: further examples and proof of concept. (harvard.edu)
  • The most frequent cause of ischemic stroke is thrombosis of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patterns of DWI findings that predict recurrent ischemic events after TIA are well-established, but similar assessments of intracranial MRA findings are not available. (ajnr.org)
  • When compared to aspirin routine oral anticoagulation for heart failure in sinus rhythm reduces ischemic stroke but at the cost of increased but not intracranial bleeding, and thus cannot be advised. (escardio.org)
  • Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures. (harvard.edu)
  • Desilles JP, Syvannarath V, Di Meglio L, Ducroux C, Boisseau W, Louedec L, Jandrot-Perrus M, Michel JB, Mazighi M, Ho-Tin-Noé B. Downstream Microvascular Thrombosis in Cortical Venules Is an Early Response to Proximal Cerebral Arterial Occlusion. (harvard.edu)
  • 9 In addition, the effect of lesion location within the intracranial arterial tree has not been evaluated. (ajnr.org)
  • A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. (nih.gov)
  • A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with abnormal CT changes in included. (nih.gov)
  • I also treat the following conditions: amyloid angiopathy, Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD), cerebral vasculitis, carotid and vertebral artery dissections, reversible vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), narrowing of the carotid and vertebral arteries, and cerebral vein and sinus thrombosis. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Monoclonal antibody to the ICAM-1 adhesion site reduces neurological damage in a rabbit cerebral embolism stroke model. (curehunter.com)
  • 50% stenosis or occlusion of symptomatic intracranial arteries for recurrent stroke/TIA at 7 days after TIA. (ajnr.org)
  • 7 The risk of stroke is further enhanced in the presence of intracranial artery occlusion on MRA. (ajnr.org)
  • When obstruction is formed elsewhere and moved to block a cerebral blood vessel (see CEREBRAL EMBOLISM) it is referred to as embolic stroke. (bvsalud.org)
  • Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. (nih.gov)
  • Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. (nih.gov)
  • Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. (harvard.edu)
  • Around 25% of patients in both treatment arms had a concurrent deep vein thrombosis. (nice.org.uk)
  • To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the Cordis Neurovascular Self-Expanding Stent System to facilitate endovascular coil embolization of wide neck saccular intracranial aneurysms. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Treatment of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in China. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Ruptured intracranial aneurysms is currently a common disease that seriously affects human health and quality of life due to its high morbidity,high mortality and high disability. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms using LEO stents: long-term follow-up in 153 patients. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Coiling associated with placement of a self-expandable intracranial stent has improved the treatment of intracranial wide-necked aneurysms. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The Woven EndoBridge (WEB) for endovascular therapy of intracranial aneurysms: Update of a systematic review with meta-analysis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Endovascular treatment of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is challenging, especially in bifurcation location. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Therapeutic effect of enterprise stent-assisted embolization for very small ruptured intracranial aneurysms. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Enterprise stent has been widespread used in wide-necked intracranial aneurysms and good efficacy has been achieved, but there are few reports on its applications in very small ruptured intracranial a. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The LVIS Blue is an FDA-approved stent with 28% metallic coverage that is indicated for use in conjunction with coil embolization for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Intracranial aneurysms in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. (medscape.com)
  • Low porosity stents (flow diverter, FD) play an important role in the effective endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms [ 1 - 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Observation and neurosurgical intervention for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in the elderly population is rapidly increasing. (thejns.org)
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The goal of stent retriever-based thrombectomy is removal of embolic clots in patients with intracranial large artery occlusion. (bvsalud.org)
  • This study shows a small net clinical benefit of using factor Xa inhibitors in AF because of a reduction in strokes and systemic embolic events and also a lower risk of bleeding (including intracranial hemorrhages), compared with using warfarin. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • 0.001), whereas intracranial hemorrhages was not different (7 vs 6) nor was death (268 vs 263 respectively). (escardio.org)
  • We performed this analysis for symptomatic steno-occlusive lesions at any site and symptomatic steno-occlusive lesions on proximal large intracranial arteries (internal carotid artery, vertebral artery, basilar artery, and circle of Willis). (ajnr.org)
  • About 90% of emboli are from proximal leg deep vein thrombosis (DVTs) or pelvic vein thromboses. (wikipedia.org)
  • 453.41 Deep vein thrombosis, proximal 453.42 Deep vein thrombosis, distal 453.9 Venous embolism, unspec. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feasibility study to assess safety of treating patients with self expanding stent in intracranial arteries. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Patent foramen ovale (PFO): Deep vein thrombosis may result in paradoxical embolism in patients with PFO. (wikipedia.org)
  • 7 Reteplase is a recombinant plasminogen activator that is indicated for the thrombolytic treatment of suspected myocardial infarction with persistent ST elevation or recent left bundle-branch block within 12 hours and is used for mechanical valve thrombosis that remains controversial. (dovepress.com)
  • I have additional knowledge in intracranial injury, venous embolism, spinal stenosis, and intervertebral disc degeneration. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Factor Xa inhibitors versus vitamin K antagonists for preventing cerebral or systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • When thrombolysis was delayed 3 h following embolism , neither tPA nor the tPA/alpha-ICAM combination reduced neurological damage. (curehunter.com)
  • The most feared complication of systemic thrombolysis is intracranial or major bleeding. (hindawi.com)
  • What is the most common cause of cardiogenic embolism? (brainscape.com)
  • Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • Cardioembolism (n=11), in situ thrombosis (n=9), large artery to artery embolism (n=7), and intrinsic branch penetrator disease (n=5) were the most common aetiologies. (bmj.com)
  • Splanchnic vein thrombosis in a young patient raises suspicion of myeloproliferative neoplasm. (springer.com)
  • Deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity: direct intraclot injection of alteplase once daily with systemic anticoagulation--results of pilot study. (medscape.com)
  • PHASE IV Study of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Versus Oral Anticoagulation for a Short Time to Prevent Cerebral Embolism After Percutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Symptomatic distal deep venous thrombosis should be treated with anticoagulation, but asymptomatic patients may be monitored with serial imaging for two weeks and treated only if there is extension. (aafp.org)
  • Venous thrombosis prophylaxis by inflammatory inhibition without anticoagulation therapy. (medscape.com)
  • This technique may be useful in retrieving thrombi located at major intracranial bifurcations of the posterior circulation which do not recanalize with standard mechanical thrombectomy procedures. (bvsalud.org)
  • Useche JN, de Castro AM, Galvis GE, Mantilla RA, Ariza A. Use of US in the evaluation of patients with symptoms of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities. (medscape.com)
  • Flow diverters (FDs) are designed for the endovascular treatment of complex intracranial aneurysm configurations. (hindawi.com)
  • The Flow Diversion in Intracranial Aneurysm Treatment (FIAT) [ 7 ] and the Large Aneurysm Randomized Trial: Flow Diversion Versus Traditional GDC Based Endovascular Therapy (LARGE) [ 8 ] are two of the ongoing randomized trials comparing flow diversion with best standard treatment. (hindawi.com)
  • This phase I clinical research trial will test the hypothesis that Bevacizumab can be safely used by direct intracranial superselective intraarterial infusion up to a dose of 10mg/kg to ultimately enhance survival of patients with relapsed/refractory GBM/AA. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Thrombosis is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies related to all aspects of thrombosis. (surplus2profits.com)
  • An evaluation of clinical signs in the diagnosis of venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)