Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Abdominal Muscles: Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Urethra: A tube that transports URINE from the URINARY BLADDER to the outside of the body in both the sexes. It also has a reproductive function in the male by providing a passage for SPERM.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Hernia, Hiatal: STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.Hernia, Femoral: A groin hernia occurring inferior to the inguinal ligament and medial to the FEMORAL VEIN and FEMORAL ARTERY. The femoral hernia sac has a small neck but may enlarge considerably when it enters the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh. It is caused by defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Hernia, Umbilical: A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.Umbilical Arteries: Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Superficial Back Muscles: The top layer of the back muscles whose function is to move the SCAPULA. This group of muscles consists of the trapezius, latissimus dorsi, rhomboid major, rhomboid minor and levator scapulae.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Hydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Hernia, Obturator: A pelvic hernia through the obturator foramen, a large aperture in the hip bone normally covered by a membrane. Obturator hernia can lead to intestinal incarceration and INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Blood Pressure Determination: Techniques for measuring blood pressure.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Endothelial cells that line venous vessels of the UMBILICAL CORD.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Intracranial Pressure: Pressure within the cranial cavity. It is influenced by brain mass, the circulatory system, CSF dynamics, and skull rigidity.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory: Method in which repeated blood pressure readings are made while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It allows quantitative analysis of the high blood pressure load over time, can help distinguish between types of HYPERTENSION, and can assess the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy.Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Lenses, Intraocular: Artificial implanted lenses.Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the VEINS. It is usually measured to assess the filling PRESSURE to the HEART VENTRICLE.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Arterial Pressure: The blood pressure in the ARTERIES. It is commonly measured with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER on the upper arm which represents the arterial pressure in the BRACHIAL ARTERY.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Central Venous Pressure: The blood pressure in the central large VEINS of the body. It is distinguished from peripheral venous pressure which occurs in an extremity.BrazilEndothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Pulmonary Wedge Pressure: The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Vascular Resistance: The force that opposes the flow of BLOOD through a vascular bed. It is equal to the difference in BLOOD PRESSURE across the vascular bed divided by the CARDIAC OUTPUT.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.IndiaSystole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Pulsatile Flow: Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Single Umbilical Artery: Congenital abnormality where one, instead of the usual two, UMBILICAL ARTERY connects the fetus to the placenta.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Placental Circulation: The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Round Ligament: A fibromuscular band that attaches to the UTERUS and then passes along the BROAD LIGAMENT, out through the INGUINAL RING, and into the labium majus.Pulse: The rhythmical expansion and contraction of an ARTERY produced by waves of pressure caused by the ejection of BLOOD from the left ventricle of the HEART as it contracts.Phenyl Ethers: Ethers that are linked to a benzene ring structure.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Fundoplication: Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Portal Pressure: The venous pressure measured in the PORTAL VEIN.Testicular Hydrocele: Accumulation of serous fluid between the layers of membrane (tunica vaginalis) covering the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Urachal Cyst: Cyst occurring in a persistent portion of the urachus, presenting as an extraperitoneal mass in the umbilical region. It is characterized by abdominal pain, and fever if infected. It may rupture, leading to peritonitis, or it may drain through the umbilicus.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Esophagogastric Junction: The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Renin: A highly specific (Leu-Leu) endopeptidase that generates ANGIOTENSIN I from its precursor ANGIOTENSINOGEN, leading to a cascade of reactions which elevate BLOOD PRESSURE and increase sodium retention by the kidney in the RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.99.19.Fetal Hypoxia: Deficient oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD.Rats, Inbred SHR: A strain of Rattus norvegicus with elevated blood pressure used as a model for studying hypertension and stroke.Constriction: The act of constricting.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Diaphragmatic Eventration: A congenital abnormality characterized by the elevation of the DIAPHRAGM dome. It is the result of a thinned diaphragmatic muscle and injured PHRENIC NERVE, allowing the intra-abdominal viscera to push the diaphragm upward against the LUNG.Lower Body Negative Pressure: External decompression applied to the lower body. It is used to study orthostatic intolerance and the effects of gravitation and acceleration, to produce simulated hemorrhage in physiologic research, to assess cardiovascular function, and to reduce abdominal stress during childbirth.Pregnancy Trimester, Third: The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Fetal Distress: A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.Abnormalities, MultipleOrchiopexy: A surgical procedure in which an undescended testicle is sutured inside the SCROTUM in male infants or children to correct CRYPTORCHIDISM. Orchiopexy is also performed to treat TESTICULAR TORSION in adults and adolescents.Spermatic Cord: Either of a pair of tubular structures formed by DUCTUS DEFERENS; ARTERIES; VEINS; LYMPHATIC VESSELS; and nerves. The spermatic cord extends from the deep inguinal ring through the INGUINAL CANAL to the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Baroreflex: A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.Blood Banks: Centers for collecting, characterizing and storing human blood.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Hydrocephalus, Normal Pressure: A form of compensated hydrocephalus characterized clinically by a slowly progressive gait disorder (see GAIT DISORDERS, NEUROLOGIC), progressive intellectual decline, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. Spinal fluid pressure tends to be in the high normal range. This condition may result from processes which interfere with the absorption of CSF including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, chronic MENINGITIS, and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp631-3)Wharton Jelly: Jelly-like connective tissue of the UMBILICAL CORD that contains MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS.Gastropexy: Surgical fixation of the stomach to the abdominal wall.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
An acquired umbilical hernia directly results from increased intra-abdominal pressure caused by obesity, heavy lifting, a long ... Symptoms may develop when the contracting abdominal wall causes pressure on the hernia contents. This results in abdominal pain ... MedlinePlus Encyclopedia Umbilical hernia repair Mayo Clinic staff. "Umbilical hernia: Causes - MayoClinic.com". Retrieved 2010 ... An umbilical hernia can be fixed in two different ways. The surgeon can opt to stitch the walls of the abdominal or he/she can ...
Femoral hernias are more common in multiparous females which results from elevated intra-abdominal pressure that dilates the ... This weakness may be inherent, as in the case of inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias. On the other hand, the weakness may ... A hernia is caused by the protrusion of a viscus (in the case of groin hernias, an intraabdominal organ) through a weakness in ... Femoral hernias are a relatively uncommon type, accounting for only 3% of all hernias. While femoral hernias can occur in both ...
The hernias of the anterior abdominal wall include: epigastric hernias, umbilical hernias, spigelian hernias and incisional ... this points to an intra-abdominal cause of the pain. This test was first described by John B. Carnett in 1926. The first clear ... minor subluxation of vertebral bodies and pressure on the peripheral portions of the intercostal nerves, he was able to employ ... femoral hernia and sports hernia. Those of the pelvic wall include: sciatic hernia, obturator hernia and perineal hernia. The ...
... protrusion of intraabdominal contents through a weakness at the site of passage of the umbilical cord through the abdominal ... Furthermore, conditions that increase the pressure of the abdominal cavity may also cause hernias or worsen the existing ones. ... Abdominal wall hernias: Umbilical hernia Epigastric hernia: a hernia through the linea alba above the umbilicus. Spigelian ... Paraumbilical hernia: a type of umbilical hernia occurring in adults Perineal hernia: a perineal hernia protrudes through the ...
Injuries include abdominal wall hematoma, umbilical hernias, umbilical wound infection, and penetration of blood vessels or ... Intra-abdominal adhesion formation is a risk associated with both laparoscopic and open surgery and remains a significant, ... the muscle that separates the abdominal from the thoracic cavities and facilitates breathing), and can exert pressure on the ... and intra-abdominal adhesions during prolonged laparoscopic insufflations". The Journal of Surgical Research. 151 (1): 40-7. ...
Injuries include abdominal wall hematoma, umbilical hernias, umbilical wound infection, and penetration of blood vessels or ... Intra-abdominal adhesion formation is a risk associated with both laparoscopic and open surgery and remains a significant, ... the muscle that separates the abdominal from the thoracic cavities and facilitates breathing), and can exert pressure on the ... 2 prevents hypothermia, peritoneal injury, and intra-abdominal adhesions during prolonged laparoscopic insufflations". J. Surg ...
Repair of hernia hernia repair (54) Other operations on abdominal region (54.1) Laparotomy (54.9) Other operations of abdominal ... Intra-abdominal venous shunt transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) (39.2) Other shunt or vascular bypass (39.3) ... Replacement of prolapsed umbilical cord (73.93) Incision of cervix to assist delivery (73.94) Pubiotomy to assist delivery ... pressure, and attention to wound (93.52) Application of neck support Application of cervical collar Application of Minerva ...
The abdominal wall becomes very sensitive to gentle pressure (palpation). There is severe pain on sudden release of deep ... However, the occurrence of intra-abdominal abscess is almost three times more prevalent in laparoscopic appendectomy than open ... the start of pain in the umbilical region with a subsequent shift to the right iliac region. Massouh sign: Developed in and ... hernia of the incision, thrombophlebitis, bleeding or adhesions. Recent evidence indicates that a delay in obtaining surgery ...
Wheat bran has been shown to reduce intra colonic pressure.[21][22] ... Clinical features of acute diverticulitis include constant abdominal pain, localized abdominal tenderness in the left lower ... Plain abdominal X-ray may show signs of a thickened wall, ileus, constipation, small bowel obstruction or free air in the case ... The increased pressure within the segmented section of bowel over years gave rise to herniation at the vulnerable point where ...
Intra-abdominal sepsis. *Pneumonia or other systemic illness[citation needed].. Treatment[edit]. Some causes of bowel ... Adhesions, hernias, volvulus, endometriosis, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis, tumors, diverticulitis, ischemic bowel, ... respiratory compromise from pressure on the diaphragm by a distended abdomen, or aspiration of vomitus; bowel ischemia or ... Depending on the level of obstruction, bowel obstruction can present with abdominal pain, swollen abdomen, abdominal distension ...
The abdominal wall becomes very sensitive to gentle pressure (palpation). There is severe pain on sudden release of deep ... However, the occurrence of intra-abdominal abscess is almost three times more prevalent in laparoscopic appendectomy than open ... Kocher's (Kosher's) sign: From the person's medical history, the start of pain in the umbilical region with a subsequent shift ... hernia of the incision, thrombophlebitis, bleeding or adhesions. Recent evidence indicates that a delay in obtaining surgery ...
Femoral hernias are more common in multiparous females which results from elevated intra-abdominal pressure that dilates the ... This weakness may be inherent, as in the case of inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias. On the other hand, the weakness may ... A hernia is caused by the protrusion of a viscus (in the case of groin hernias, an intraabdominal organ) through a weakness in ... Femoral hernias are a relatively uncommon type, accounting for only 3% of all hernias. While femoral hernias can occur in both ...
Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Umbilical hernia. ... List of 121 disease causes of Umbilical hernia, patient stories, diagnostic guides. ... Intra-abdominal pressure *Paraumbilical hernia *more symptoms...ยป Misdiagnosis and Umbilical hernia. Rare type of breast cancer ... Umbilical hernia and Abdominal symptoms (116 causes) *Umbilical hernia and Umbilical symptoms (116 causes) *Umbilical hernia ...
Umbilical Hernia: May occur in people with chronic increased intraabdominal pressure: Multiparous women and COPD. ... Neuromas, Herpes Zoster, Hernias.. *Tightening of abdominal wall should aggravate symptoms, indicating abdominal-wall pain. If ... Inguinal Hernias: Most common hernia.. *Direct Inguinal Hernia: Hernia directly penetrates the inguinal triangle. It creates a ... Upper Abdominal: Ipsilateral contraction of abdominal muscles on the stroked side.. *Lower Abdominal: Ipsilateral contraction ...
Alternate treatments for umbilical hernia in adults? Operation. Its either an operation or observation. Different techniques ... for operation depend on your symptoms, physical exam, size if hernia defect and sac, obesity, previous operations at that ... That give a very high increase in intra- abdominal pressure . That is something that would B a no no. ...Read more ... Umbilical hernia: In adults, if there is too much pressure on the abdominal wall, fatty tissue or a part of the bowel can poke ...
... increased intra-abdominal pressure from various conditions, and a previous hiatal operation. May be asymptomatic or may present ... incisional, umbilical, or inguinal hernia. *disorder of collagen metabolism. *advanced age. More risk factors ... Hiatal hernia is the protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through an enlarged esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A hiatal ... Risk factors include obesity, increased intra-abdominal pressure from various conditions, and a previous hiatal operation. ...
Hiatal hernia is the protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through an enlarged oesophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A hiatal ... Risk factors include obesity, increased intra-abdominal pressure from various conditions, and a previous hiatal operation. ... incisional, umbilical, or inguinal hernia. *disorder of collagen metabolism. *advanced age. Full details ... Protrusion of intra-abdominal contents through an enlarged oesophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. ...
Umbilical hernia is a common finding in patients undergoing abdominoplasty, especially those who are post-partum with rectus ... or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias. ... Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA. ... Hernia, Umbilical. A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered ...
... , Ventral Hernia, Incarcerated Hernia, Strangulated Hernia, Irreducible Hernia, Reducible Hernia, Hernia, ... or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias. ... Intra-abdominal hernia, NOS, Hernia of abdominal cavity [Ambiguous], Abdominal Hernias, Hernia, Abdominal, Hernias, Abdominal, ... hernia of abdominal cavity, abdominal hernia (physical finding), abdomen hernia, intra-abdominal hernia, intra-abdominal hernia ...
Umbilical hernia: enlarged umbilical opening, usaually due to obesity or increased intra abdominal pressure,or volume. ...Read ... enlarged umbilical opening, usaually due to obesity or increased intra abdominal pressure,or volume. ...Read more ... Hernia: This is an umbilical hernia, or a weakness in the abdominal wall that allows things on the inside to protrude to the ... Umbilical hernia: Not a problem provided the protruding belly button can easily be pushed in when he is lying down. You can ...
In our patient, umbilical hernia was complicated with rupture because of increased intra-abdominal pressure due to excessive ... Spontaneous evisceration of umbilical hernia in a patient with congenital nephrotic syndrome ... Low levels of albumin in the blood that cause a change in the pressure necessary to prevent fluid exchange (osmotic pressure). ... In portal hypertension there is increased pressure within the sinusoids and hepatic veins. As the pressure increases there is ...
Umbilical Hernia Causes Include Obesity, Multiple Pregnancies, Ascites etc.. Know the Causes, Risk Factors, Signs, Symptoms, ... increase in abdominal pressure may cause an umbilical hernia. The likely causes for the increased intraabdominal pressure are: ... Usually umbilical hernias dont produce pain in children.. *Adults developing umbilical hernias may suffer from abdominal ... Complications of an Umbilical Hernia. Complications of an umbilical hernia are rare. Complications often occur when the hernia ...
A pneumoperitoneum is created in the abdomen and an intra-abdominal pressure is maintained. The repair is then initiated. A ... Often, an inguinal hernia can be pushed back into the abdominal cavity. However, if the inguinal hernia cannot be forced back ... Umbilical trocars and secondary trocars are then inserted into the extraperitoneal space and the space explored. The medial and ... This laxity produces a dome-like ripple in the mesh to compensate for increased intra-abdominal pressure when the patient ...
... of abdominal wall hernias. Conditions that lead to increased intra-abdominal pressure and weakened fascia at the level of the ... umbilicus, such as obesity, ascites, multiple pregnancies, and large abdominal tumors, contribute to the development of ... Umbilical hernias acccount for 10% of abdominal wall hernias. [1] Conditions that lead to increased intra-abdominal pressure ... encoded search term (Umbilical Hernia Repair) and Umbilical Hernia Repair What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and ...
Excessively high pressures mandate immediate conversion to a Silon chimney sutured to the skin or the fascial r... more ... Intra-abdominal pressure measurements help prevent intra-abdominal compartment syndrome. ... Ventralex mesh in umbilical/epigastric hernia repairs: clinical outcomes and complications. Hernia. 2008 Aug. 12(4):379-83. [ ... Abdominal Hernias Q&A Why are intra-abdominal pressure measurements important in neonates with abdominal wall hernias?. Updated ...
An umbilical hernia appears as a bulge of the umbilicus, which is more clearly evident when the intra-abdominal pressure is ... What is an umbilical hernia?. An umbilical hernia is a protrusion of the abdominal contents through the abdominal wall at the ... Risk factors for umbilical hernias in adults includes conditions that increase intra-abdominal pressure like pregnancy, obesity ... Acquired umbilical hernias in adults are not true umbilical hernias but rather paraumbilical hernias. The protrusion is through ...
... a supraumbilical hernia is a type of ventral or abdominal wall hernia. A supraumbilical hernia is less common than umbilical ... The muscle defect combined with increased intra-abdominal pressure causes the hole to increase and allows more of the organ to ... Unlike spontaneous umbilical hernias that may or may not require surgery to close, a supra-umbilical hernia usually always ... which simply means a hernia above the bellybutton. A supraumbilical hernia should not be confused with an umbilical hernia. ...
Is this just diastasis recti or the start of a hernia?? ... enough strength to counterbalance the intra-abdominal pressure ... Hernia caused by Diastasis Recti (separation of abdominal muscles after pregnancy). Created by christibt Last post 9 months ago ... Home > Groups > Featured and Popular > Health and Fitness > umbilical hernia or diastasis recti? ... Doesnt look like hernia either...so thats good news.. I think the bulge is due to the fact that your relatively weaker TvA is ...
... intra-abdominal tumors etc).Some untreated congenital umbilical hernias may go on into adulthood. More common in adults are the ... usually in association with conditions causing increased intra-abdominal pressure such as, massive ascitis, obesity, ... You must consult a surgeon to confirm the nature of this hernia. If it happens to be a para-umbilical hernia, it should be ... that this is a new onset para-umbilical hernia (the congenital hernia had presumably healed fully).. ...
... following an acute increase in intra-abdominal pressure, leading to... ... Umbilical hernia is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with ascites. Optimal management in patients with umbilical hernias ... Umbilical hernias are common in patients with cirrhosis of the liver and ascites. However, spontaneous rupture of the hernia is ... and an umbilical hernia. No abdominal pain was reported. The patient had tense ascites but based on his medical history, he had ...
A paraumbilical hernia is an area of weakness around your umbilicus that adults are more likely to develop. An umbilical ... ... This video demonstrates laparoscopic repair of a paraumbilical hernia. ... hernias usually develop later in life and are often caused by acquired abdomen openings linked to intra-abdominal pressure from ... A paraumbilical or umbilical hernia is a common type of abdominal hernia. Paraumbilical ...
... it was suggested to lower the laparoscopic pressure from the standard 12 mmHg to 6-8 mmHg to minimise post-operative pain ... INTRODUCTION: Reducing intra-abdominal pressure from 12 mmHg to 6-8 mmHg during laparoscopy may reduce pain after minor ... Opioid use and pain scores between laparoscopic cholecystectomy, inguinal, or umbilical hernia repair did not differ ... Earlier studies have suggested that lowering the intra-abdominal pressure from 12-14 mmHg to 7-8 mmHg or even to a gasless ...
An acquired umbilical hernia directly results from increased intra-abdominal pressure caused by obesity, heavy lifting, a long ... Symptoms may develop when the contracting abdominal wall causes pressure on the hernia contents. This results in abdominal pain ... MedlinePlus Encyclopedia Umbilical hernia repair Mayo Clinic staff. "Umbilical hernia: Causes - MayoClinic.com". Retrieved 2010 ... An umbilical hernia can be fixed in two different ways. The surgeon can opt to stitch the walls of the abdominal or he/she can ...
... may report the new onset of an inguinal or umbilical hernia. Dyspnea may result from pressure against the diaphragm and the ... When abdominal pain does accompany swelling, it is frequently the result of an intraabdominal infection, peritonitis, or ... Weight gain with an increase in abdominal fat can result in an increase in abdominal girth and can be perceived as abdominal ... ABDOMINAL SWELLING. ++. Abdominal swelling is a manifestation of numerous diseases. Patients may complain of bloating or ...
A hernia occurs when there is a weakness or tear in your abdominal wall as a result of aging, injury, a previous surgical ... A hernia is the protrusion of an organ or part of an organ through the wall of the cavity that normally contains it. ... which is usually the result of a weakness present at birth combined with intra-abdominal pressure along the midline. ... or may require surgical repair for ventral abdominal hernias. One type of ventral hernia, the umbilical hernia, can occur in ...
Furthermore, gender, the concomitant hernias, previous abdominal surgery, number of pregnancies and multiple births, ... Here the length of the rectus diastasis should be classified in terms of the respective subxiphoidal, epigastric, umbilical, ... Furthermore, gender, the concomitant hernias, previous abdominal surgery, number of pregnancies and multiple births, ... A working group of the German Hernia Society (DHG) and the International Endohernia Society (IEHS) set itself the task of ...
  • A hernia can be described as reducible if the contents within the sac can be pushed back through the defect into the peritoneal cavity, whereas with an incarcerated hernia, the contents are stuck in the hernia sac. (wikipedia.org)
  • They typically present when standing erect as a groin lump or bulge, which may differ in size during the day, based on internal pressure variations of the intestine. (wikipedia.org)
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