Spouse Abuse: Deliberate severe and repeated injury to one domestic partner by the other.Battered Women: Women who are physically and mentally abused over an extended period, usually by a husband or other dominant male figure. Characteristics of the battered woman syndrome are helplessness, constant fear, and a perceived inability to escape. (From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 3d ed)Domestic Violence: Deliberate, often repetitive physical, verbal, and/or other types of abuse by one or more members against others of a household.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Sex Offenses: Any violation of established legal or moral codes in respect to sexual behavior.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Rape: Unlawful sexual intercourse without consent of the victim.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.Couples Therapy: Psychotherapy used specifically for unmarried couples, of mixed or same sex. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Men: Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Maternal-Child Nursing: The nursing specialty that deals with the care of women throughout their pregnancy and childbirth and the care of their newborn children.Power (Psychology): The exertion of a strong influence or control over others in a variety of settings--administrative, social, academic, etc.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Women: Human females as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Mandatory Reporting: A legal requirement that designated types of information acquired by professionals or institutions in the course of their work be reported to appropriate authorities.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Marriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Adult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Child Reactive Disorders: Reactions to an event or set of events which are considered to be of pathological degree, that have not developed into a neurosis, psychosis, or personality disorder with fixed patterns.Jealousy: An irrational reaction compounded of grief, loss of self-esteem, enmity against the rival and self criticism.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Pregnancy, Unwanted: Pregnancy, usually accidental, that is not desired by the parent or parents.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Police: Agents of the law charged with the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing law and order among the citizenry.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.United StatesSocial Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.BaltimoreFocus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Heterosexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of the opposite SEX.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Marital Therapy: A form of psychotherapy involving the husband and wife and directed to improving the marital relationship.OklahomaStress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Homosexuality, Male: Sexual attraction or relationship between males.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.BostonNicaraguaAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Pregnancy, Unplanned: Unintended accidental pregnancy, including pregnancy resulting from failed contraceptive measures.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.South CarolinaLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Masculinity: Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.Elder Abuse: Emotional, nutritional, financial, or physical maltreatment, exploitation, or abandonment of the older person generally by family members or by institutional personnel.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)West VirginiaHouse Calls: Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Uganda: A republic in eastern Africa, south of SUDAN and west of KENYA. Its capital is Kampala.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Intergenerational Relations: The interactions between individuals of different generations. These interactions include communication, caring, accountability, loyalty, and even conflict between related or non-related individuals.Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Nursing Evaluation Research: Research carried out by nurses that uses interviews, data collection, observation, surveys, etc., to evaluate nursing, health, clinical, and nursing education programs and curricula, and which also demonstrates the value of such evaluation.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)CaliforniaModels, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.New YorkObsessive Behavior: Persistent, unwanted idea or impulse which is considered normal when it does not markedly interfere with mental processes or emotional adjustment.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.IraqChild Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.FloridaRural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.IndiaEthiopia: An independent state in eastern Africa. Ethiopia is located in the Horn of Africa and is bordered on the north and northeast by Eritrea, on the east by Djibouti and Somalia, on the south by Kenya, and on the west and southwest by Sudan. Its capital is Addis Ababa.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Hostility: Tendency to feel anger toward and to seek to inflict harm upon a person or group.Organizations: Administration and functional structures for the purpose of collectively systematizing activities for a particular goal.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.OregonLos AngelesNew York CityNursing Methodology Research: Research carried out by nurses concerning techniques and methods to implement projects and to document information, including methods of interviewing patients, collecting data, and forming inferences. The concept includes exploration of methodological issues such as human subjectivity and human experience.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Prostitution: The practice of indulging in sexual relations for money.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.WashingtonPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Victoria: A state in southeastern Australia, the southernmost state. Its capital is Melbourne. It was discovered in 1770 by Captain Cook and first settled by immigrants from Tasmania. In 1851 it was separated from New South Wales as a separate colony. Self-government was introduced in 1851; it became a state in 1901. It was named for Queen Victoria in 1851. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1295 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p574)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Tanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.ColombiaFamily Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Intervention Studies: Epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause-effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Contact Tracing: Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Physicians, Primary Care: Providers of initial care for patients. These PHYSICIANS refer patients when appropriate for secondary or specialist care.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Nursing Assessment: Evaluation of the nature and extent of nursing problems presented by a patient for the purpose of patient care planning.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Abortion, Induced: Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)BoliviaTwo-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)PennsylvaniaNeeds Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.IowaRegression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
ISBN 0345471733 Intimate Partners: Patterns in Love and Marriage, Random House, 1987, ISBN 039455485X Intimate Worlds: How ... and Intimate Partners: Patterns in Love and Marriage (Random House, 1987). She is a former Visiting Fellow at the Whitney ... Intimate Partners , Scarf". The Atlantic. 2003-02-14. Retrieved 2014-05-28. "Maggie Scarf". Psychology Today. Retrieved 2014-05 ...
Intimate Partners, The Atlantic, Nov 1986, accessed 04 October 2016 "peverse triangle (definition)". behavenet.com. Behavenet. ... or an emotionally abusive partner attempting to control communication between the other partner and the other partner's friends ... Scarf, Maggie (November 1986). "Intimate partners". The Atlantic. Atlantic Media. Retrieved 30 August 2015. Gottlieb, Linda J. ...
"Intimate Partner Violence and Women's Physical and Mental Health in the WHO Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic ... Domestic violence, or intimate partner violence (IPV) as it is sometimes called, is a worldwide problem. Domestic abuse ... Intimate Partner Violence. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Feb. 2012. Web. 17 Mar. 2013. Vizcarra, B. ... These reported rates are significantly smaller than the reported intimate partner domestic violence rates in many countries, ...
McOrmond-Plummer, Louise, Patricia Easteal and Jennifer Levy-Peck (eds), Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: A Multidisciplinary ... "Intimate Partner Sexual Violence". "LexisNexis Australia - Women and the Law in Australia - Human Rights - LexisNexis Australia ... Easteal, Patricia and Louise McOrmond-Plummer, Real Rape, Real Pain: Help for Women Sexually Assaulted by Male Partners, 2006, ... Easteal, Patricia, Killing the Beloved: Homicide between Adult Sexual Intimates, 1993, Canberra: Australian Institute of ...
The Intimate Partner Violence Intervention (IPVI) employs the National Network's approach to identify and deter the most ... "Strategy: Intimate Partner Violence Intervention". National Network for Safe Communities. Retrieved 2017-06-12. "Strategy: ... intimate partner violence, prison violence, and individual gun violence. In 2014 the U.S. Department of Justice awarded a three ... The NNSC works alongside Yale Law School, the Center for Policing Equity, and the Urban Institute as principal partners. ...
Intimate partner violence "Wood, Julia , SAGE Publications Inc". us.sagepub.com. Retrieved 2017-02-22. Wood, Julia. "Julia T. ... She is currently studying intimate partner violence and gendered dynamics in culture. In these recent studies both men and ... Wood, J. T. (2004). Monsters and victims: Male felons' accounts of intimate partner violence. Journal of Social and Personal ... Wood, Julia T. (2004-10-01). "Monsters and victims: Male felons' accounts of intimate partner violence". Journal of Social and ...
... intimate partner and domestic violence; elder abuse or neglect; parenting and anger management; marital, caregiver, or family- ... VA has embarked on a unique campaign to repair their crumbling intimate relationships." The VHA has expanded its outreach ... VA has embarked on a unique campaign to repair their crumbling intimate relationships." The VHA has also adopted Boston ...
"National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Summary Report" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ... Miller, Susan L.; Lilley, Terry G.; Renzetti, Claire M.; Edleson, Jeffrey L. (2008). "Female perpetrators of intimate partner ... Brotman, Barbara (October 30, 1992). "Sex Contract Shares Intimate Knowledge". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 1 November 2012. ... argue that judicial systems too easily accept false allegations of domestic violence by women against their male partners. ...
Gill, Gillian (2009). We Two: Victoria and Albert: Rulers, Partners, Rivals. New York: Ballatine Books. ISBN 0-345-52001-7. ... Weintraub, Stanley (1987). Victoria: an intimate biography. Dutton. ISBN 0525244697. Williams, Kate (2010). Becoming Queen ... Netzley, Patricia D. (1996). Victoria: an intimate biography. Lucent Books. ISBN 1560060638. Rappaport, Helen (2003). Queen ...
Articles about intimate partner violence (4.8). Correspondents say the problem is exaggerated, that most reported cases are ...
Gender factors, such as women's status and empowerment (i.e., in education, employment, intimate partner relationships, and ... Campbell, J. C. (2002). "Health consequences of intimate partner violence". The Lancet. 359 (9314): 1331-1336. doi:10.1016/ ... "Prevalence of intimate partner violence: Findings from the WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence". ... most violence against women is perpetrated by either male individuals whom them know or intimate male partners. An eleven- ...
Problem Drinking and Intimate Partner Violence. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 63:205-214. White, H.R., Brick, J. and Hansell, ...
Intimate partner violence and children's memory. Journal of Family Psychology 27(6), 937-944. doi: 10.1037/a0034592 Engel de ...
Columbia Daily Tribune Intimate partner violence "Loreen Olson , Department of Communication Studies". cst.uncg.edu. Retrieved ... Olson, L. N., & Rauscher, E. (in press). "It can't be domestic violence; We're not married!" The many faces of intimate partner ... Her other scholarly interests includes, the dark side of family and close relationships, intimate partner violence, and the ... and intimate partner violence. Other topics that are deemed as less dark are also looked into such as parent child conflict and ...
That it is impossible to rape one's wife or intimate partner. That rape is simply unwanted sex, not a violent crime. That women ... Cocker, Ann (2005). "PTSD Symptoms Among Men and Women Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: The Role of Risk and Protective ... that men cannot rape their intimate partners; that rape is simply unwanted sex and not a violent crime; and that victims are ... "Intimate" Violence Against Women: When Spouses, Partners, Or Lovers Attack. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 59-. ISBN 978-0-275 ...
"Intimate-partner violence--what physicians can do". N Engl J Med. 367: 2071-3. doi:10.1056/NEJMp1204278. PMID 23190220. " ... The New England Journal of Medicine highlighted the R3 app in a February 2013 article called "Intimate-Partner Violence - What ... for Intimate Partner Abuse". The Journal of Workplace Behavioral Health. 29 (3): 224-239. doi:10.1080/15555240.2014.933704. " ... which recommended that doctors screen women older than 12 for signs of intimate partner violence. One study indicated that the ...
subscription required) "Measuring Intimate Partner (Domestic) Violence". National Institute of Justice. May 12, 2010. Retrieved ... "Slapped my partner" (minor); "Kicked my partner" (severe) Sexual Coercion: "Insisted on sex when my partner did not want to ( ... of the CTS in order to minimize data on female perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV), and the National Survey of ... "Repeated reports for child maltreatment among intimate partner violence victims: Findings from the National Survey of Child and ...
Roehl, Janice Ph.D.; O'Sullivan, Chris Ph.D.; Webster, Daniel ScD; and Campbell Jacquelyn, Ph.D. (May 2005). Intimate Partner ...
Ehrensaft, Miriam K. (2009). "Intimate partner violence: Persistence of myths and implications for intervention". Children and ... In the 1998 book Intimate Violence, Gelles and Straus use the Winnie-the-Pooh woozle to illustrate how poor practice in ... doi:10.1007/s10610-007-9060-5. . Richard J. Gelles; Murray Arnold Straus (July 1988). Intimate violence. Simon and Schuster. p ... Richard J. Gelles; Murray Arnold Straus (July 1988). "2". Intimate Violence. Simon and Schuster. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-671-61752-3 ...
In a recent study on the impact of Hurricane Katrina on marital and partner relationships, researchers found that while many ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Miller, Rowland & Perlman, Daniel (2008). Intimate Relationships (5th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ... The verb "intimate" means "to state or make known". The activity of intimating (making known) underpins the meanings of " ... "intimate" when used as a noun and adjective. The noun "intimate" means a person with whom one has a particularly close ...
One of the most common forms of sexual violence around the world is that which is perpetrated by an intimate partner, leading ... Women are at increased risk of sexual violence, as they are of physical violence by an intimate partner, when they become more ... Poorer women are also more at risk of intimate partner violence, of which sexual violence is often a manifestation. Female ... Social Science and Medicine (in press). Jewkes R. Intimate partner violence: causes and prevention. Lancet, 2002, 359:1423-1429 ...
Violence by Intimate Partners WHO: World Health Organization. Campbell, JC, Oliver C, Bullock L. "Why battering during ... A. Raj, M.C. Santana and A. La Marche et al., Perpetration of intimate partner violence associated with sexual risk behaviors ... Pregnancy itself can be used a form of coercion and the phenomenon of preventing an intimate partner's reproductive choice is ... Pregnancy when coupled with domestic violence is a form of intimate partner violence (IPV) where health risks may be amplified ...
Intimate, bumping hip to backside, low bending, etc. The Bump" was played by The Commodores on Machine Gun album. KC & the ... There was no need to have a partner. The dance could become more athletic bumping Hip to hip in full knee bend up to a standing ...
Intimate partner violence. See also: Rape trauma syndrome. An individual that has been exposed to domestic violence is ... Wounded Warrior Project partnered with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to create Warrior Care Network, a national health ...
Ross, Lee E. (2013). Religion and Intimate Partner Violence: A Double-Edge Sword. The Catalyst: A Social Justice Forum. 2, 3:3- ...
Including intimate partner violence, child abuse, institutional abuse, torture, warfare, human sacrifice, and structural ...
... major gaps exist in the measurement of intimate partner homicide, with many homicides not being identified as intimate partner ... This article provides an overview of the main issues in the collection and reporting on intimate partner homicide, focusing in ... This is concerning, as strong and reliable data on the incidence and contextual information of intimate partner homicide and ... Intimate partner homicide is an important contributor to homicide rates worldwide, disproportionally affecting women as victims ...
Attachment theory has been advanced to explain male jealousy, anger and assaults against the female partner within intimate ... or hiring a private detective to follow the partner. Jealous individuals may search the partners clothes and possessions, ... The accused partner is assumed to be guilty until evidence of innocence is found, but this cannot materialise. Heroic efforts ... They may be employed by the morbidly jealous partner to spy on a parent. They may even see a homicide or suicide in which a ...
IPV-related deaths were defined as those involving intimate partner homicides (i.e., the victim was an intimate partner [e.g., ... and nearly half of victims are killed by a current or former male intimate partner (2). To inform homicide and intimate partner ... can serve as another preventive measure associated with reduced risk for intimate partner homicide and firearm intimate partner ... Current intimate†† partner. 3,417 (79.2). 1,927 (81.0)§§ 1,007 (76.6)¶¶ 88 (81.5). 94 (81.0). 301 (75.8). ...
Because the effects of childrens exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) carry long lasting consequences for the affected ... and intimate partner violence victimization-national intimate partner and sexual violence survey, United States. 2011. ... Intimate partner violence exposure Domestic violence Economic burden Lifetime costs This is a preview of subscription content, ... 2003). Costs of intimate partner violence against women in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and ...
... of women experiencing physical violence by an intimate partner have also been sexually coerced by that partner. Sexual violence ... Sexual violence by intimate partners deals with the incidence by country of physical abuse, forced sex, or marital rape, ... Forced sex and intimate partner violence: effects on womens risk and womens health. Violence Against Women, 1999, 5:1017-1035 ... Domestic violence Intimate partner violence Marital rape Sexual assault Thordis Elva - Rape victim who collaborated with her ...
Patterns of Intimate Partner Violence. Intimate partner violence encompasses subjection of a partner to physical abuse, ... Intimate Partner Violence. ABSTRACT: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant yet preventable public health problem ... Box 1. Sample Intimate Partner Violence Screening Questions. While providing privacy, screen for intimate partner violence ... Risk factors for intimate partner homicide include having experienced previous acts of violence, estrangement from partner, ...
... Californias Domestic Violence Advisory Council defines domestic violence as a ... Domestic violence, also known as intimate partner violence, is a major public health problem in California that affects all age ... intimate partner violence and gun violence. To obtain a copy of the report, visit the CDPH Violence Prevention Initiative Page. ... adults or adolescents against their current or former intimate partners in an attempt to exercise power and authority, which ...
... of women presenting to primary care have been victims of intimate partner violence in the past. ... Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence. Intimate partner violence is exceedingly common in the United States and the world. In ... intimate partner violence and 28% to 66% for lifetime intimate partner violence.[14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21] These studies used ... of all intimate partner violence victims have experienced sexual intimate partner violence. ...
... in Seattle and two commentaries in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examine intimate partner ... The introductory article is "Does a Failure to Count Mean It Fails to Count? Addressing Intimate Partner Violence" by James S. ... The first article, on IPV incidence, is "Intimate Partner Violence-Prevalence, Types, and Chronicity in Adult Women" by Robert ... The paper analyzing health effects is "Intimate Partner Violence and Womens Physical, Mental, and Social Functioning" by Amy E ...
This online course on intimate partner violence (IPV) looks at this important, yet underappreciated, etiology of ocular and ... This online course on intimate partner violence (IPV) looks at this important, yet underappreciated, etiology of ocular and ...
... physical or sexual abuse from their partners are more likely to be depressed - which in turn leads to a greater likelihood of ... married or cohabitating with a partner) who also had experienced intimate partner violence (physical, mental and/or sexual). ... Depression Links Intimate Partner Violence, Food Insecurity. By Traci Pedersen Associate News Editor ... "Our study found that women experiencing intimate partner violence are more likely to be depressed, which impacts their ability ...
Here are facts everyone should know about intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking, according to statistics ... Intimate partner violence can be severe. Nearly one in four women have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate ... Intimate partner violence can be severe.. Nearly one in four women have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate ... Facts about intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking. By Annie Vainshtein on May 3, 2018 11:34 AM ...
Crossman Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one of the most widespread and preventable family problems of our time. While women ... 14Intimate Partner Violence Jennifer L. Hardesty and Kimberly A. ... 14Intimate Partner Violence. Jennifer L. Hardesty and Kimberly ... Intimate partner violence (IPV) is one of the most widespread and preventable family problems of our time. While women are more ... Approximately one in four women experience physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner (IPV) in their lifetime (Black et ...
Letters Intimate partner violence Intimate partner violence affects men as well as women. BMJ 2014; 348 doi: https://doi.org/ ... Intimate partner violence: the role of suspect gender in prosecutorial decision-making. Justice Quarterly2007;24:460-95. ... Intimate partner violence is a serious public health problem that affects men as well as women. Public discussions about ... Intimate partner violence affects men as well as women BMJ 2014; 348 :g3771 ...
intimate partner violence, domestic violence, Pakistan, gender inequality, Subject categories. Public health medicine research ... Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an important public health issue with severe adverse consequences. Population- ... Intimate partner violence in urban Pakistan: prevalence, frequency and risk factors. Journal article ...
INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: DEFINITION AND EPIDEMIOLOGY. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines intimate partner ... Intimate Partner Violence: The Role of the Pediatrician. Jonathan D Thackeray, Roberta Hibbard, M. Denise Dowd, The Committee ... Intimate Partner Violence: The Role of the Pediatrician. Jonathan D Thackeray, Roberta Hibbard, M. Denise Dowd, The Committee ... Screening for intimate partner violence by health care providers: barriers and interventions. Am J Prev Med. 2000;19(4):230-237 ...
Care guide for Intimate Partner Violence (Discharge Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment ... Learn more about Intimate Partner Violence (Discharge Care). Micromedex® Care Notes. *Intimate Partner Abuse In Pregnancy ... Intimate partner violence is also known as domestic violence. The abuser knowingly harms his or her partner. This person tries ... Get counseling: Intimate partner violence may cause you to feel scared, depressed, or anxious. Your healthcare provider may ...
Objectives This study investigates whether womens attachment to mother might influence Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) ... prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence. World Health Organization.Google ... Adult attachment as a risk factor for intimate partner violence: the "mispairing" of partners attachment styles. Journal of ... Intimate Partner Violence Domestic violence Attachment bonds Romantic attachment Maternal attachment This is a preview of ...
New research suggests that adolescents and young adults who perpetrate or fall victim to intimate partner violence (IPV) are ... Among Young Adults, Intimate Partner Violence Ups Risk of Depression. By Rick Nauert PhD Associate News Editor ... Nauert PhD, R. (2018). Among Young Adults, Intimate Partner Violence Ups Risk of Depression. Psych Central. Retrieved on March ... New research suggests that adolescents and young adults who perpetrate or fall victim to intimate partner violence (IPV) are ...
... , WAST-SF Screen for Intimate Partner Violence, Women Abuse Screening Tool. ... WAST Screen for Intimate Partner Violence. WAST Screen for Intimate Partner Violence Aka: WAST Screen for Intimate Partner ... HITS Screen for Intimate Partner Violence Intimate Partner Violence Screening Life Expectancy Partner Violence Screen SAFE ... Intimate Partner Violence Intimate Partner Violence Screening Preventive Health Care of Women Who Have Sex With Women ...
Nambe Pueblo Man Sentenced for Assaulting Intimate Partner. Defendant Prosecuted as Part of Federal Initiative to Address the ... Nieto was arrested on June 21, 2016, on an indictment charging him with assaulting his intimate partner and causing her to ...
... also found that intimate partner violence was linked to a womens partner not knowing about the termination of pregnancy. ... Intimate partner violence in women (sometimes referred to as domestic violence) is linked to termination of pregnancy, ... the lifetime rate of intimate partner violence was 25%. Furthermore, the authors found some evidence that intimate partner ... Link found between intimate partner violence and termination of pregnancy. PLOS. Journal. PLOS Medicine. Keywords. *LAW ...
The survey assesses intimate partner violence and characteristics among male perpetrators.. "When people think of men who abuse ... "However, our study showed one out of every five men in the U.S. reported physical violence toward an intimate partner. Its ... In the U.S. each year, roughly 320,000 outpatient health visits and 1,200 deaths among women are due to intimate partner ... Intimate partner violence was defined as pushing, grabbing, shoving, throwing something, slapping or hitting, kicking, biting, ...
There is dearth of psychological research on alleged emotional abuse of males by their intimate partners. Methodology: The ... Results: Analysis of data showed that the intimate partner emotional abuse and PTSD were significantly correlated in both ... Conclusion: Men who alleged to be the victims of intimate partner emotional abuse had higher symptoms of PTSD. ... sample comprised of 150 heterosexual males (equal number of married and unmarried) in an intimate relationship aged 18-35 years ...
  • Centro Reina Sofía III Informe Internacional: violencia contra la mujer en las relaciones de pareja: estadísticas y legislación (III International Report: Partner Violence against Women: Statistics and Legislation), Centro Reina Sofía para el Estudio de la Violencia 2010. (francoangeli.it)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Women who reported recent IPV in the Partners PrEP Study were at increased risk of low PrEP adherence. (rti.org)
  • As St. Lucia joins the rest of the world in observance of International Day of Protest Against Violence Against Women and Girls, I wish to take this opportunity to help our St. Lucian society understand what intimate partner abuse is, what the warning signs are, and how to get help to reduce its occurrence. (thevoiceslu.com)
  • In this month's SAMJ two articles address intimate partner violence (IPV), 3,4 a sub-set of interpersonal violence that primarily targets women, is deeply rooted in the gendered nature of human relationships, and is largely perceived as invisible to public scrutiny. (scielo.org.za)
  • In a nationally representative survey conducted in 1996, 29% of African American women and 12% of African American men reported at least one instance of violence from an intimate partner. (blogspot.com)
  • Verbal and physical IPV from partners was assessed with two questions in the questionnaire. (frontiersin.org)
  • Este estudio tuvo como objetivos describir el proceso de traducción y adaptación cultural del instrumento Perceived Stigmatization Questionnaire (PSQ) y analizar la consistencia interna de los ítems en la etapa del pre-test. (scielo.br)