A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.
Integrin beta-1 chains which are expressed as heterodimers that are noncovalently associated with specific alpha-chains of the CD49 family (CD49a-f). CD29 is expressed on resting and activated leukocytes and is a marker for all of the very late activation antigens on cells. (from: Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p164)
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
An alpha integrin with a molecular weight of 160-kDa that is found in a variety of cell types. It undergoes posttranslational cleavage into a heavy and a light chain that are connected by disulfide bonds. Integrin alphaV can combine with several different beta subunits to form heterodimers that generally bind to RGD sequence-containing extracellular matrix proteins.
Cell-surface glycoprotein beta-chains that are non-covalently linked to specific alpha-chains of the CD11 family of leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION). A defect in the gene encoding CD18 causes LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME.
Integrin beta chains combine with integrin alpha chains to form heterodimeric cell surface receptors. Integrins have traditionally been classified into functional groups based on the identity of one of three beta chains present in the heterodimer. The beta chain is necessary and sufficient for integrin-dependent signaling. Its short cytoplasmic tail contains sequences critical for inside-out signaling.
Receptors such as INTEGRIN ALPHAVBETA3 that bind VITRONECTIN with high affinity and play a role in cell migration. They also bind FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; osteopontin; and THROMBOSPONDINS.
An integrin beta subunit of approximately 85-kDa in size which has been found in INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB-containing and INTEGRIN ALPHAV-containing heterodimers. Integrin beta3 occurs as three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated beta3A-C.
An integrin alpha subunit that is unique in that it does not contain an I domain, and its proteolytic cleavage site is near the middle of the extracellular portion of the polypeptide rather than close to the membrane as in other integrin alpha subunits.
An integrin that binds to a variety of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins containing the conserved RGD amino acid sequence and modulates cell adhesion. Integrin alphavbeta3 is highly expressed in OSTEOCLASTS where it may play role in BONE RESORPTION. It is also abundant in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and in some tumor cells, where it is involved in angiogenesis and cell migration. Although often referred to as the vitronectin receptor there is more than one receptor for vitronectin (RECEPTORS, VITRONECTIN).
Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.
Cell surface receptor for LAMININ, epiligrin, FIBRONECTINS, entactin, and COLLAGEN. Integrin alpha3beta1 is the major integrin present in EPITHELIAL CELLS, where it plays a role in the assembly of BASEMENT MEMBRANE as well as in cell migration, and may regulate the functions of other integrins. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of the alpha subunit (INTEGRIN ALPHA3), are differentially expressed in different cell types.
A cell surface receptor mediating cell adhesion to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX and to other cells via binding to LAMININ. It is involved in cell migration, embryonic development, leukocyte activation and tumor cell invasiveness. Integrin alpha6beta1 is the major laminin receptor on PLATELETS; LEUKOCYTES; and many EPITHELIAL CELLS, and ligand binding may activate a number of signal transduction pathways. Alternative splicing of the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha6 subunit (INTEGRIN ALPHA6) results in the formation of A and B isoforms of the heterodimer, which are expressed in a tissue-specific manner.
Integrin alpha4beta1 is a FIBRONECTIN and VCAM-1 receptor present on LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; NK CELLS and thymocytes. It is involved in both cell-cell and cell- EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX adhesion and plays a role in INFLAMMATION, hematopoietic cell homing and immune function, and has been implicated in skeletal MYOGENESIS; NEURAL CREST migration and proliferation, lymphocyte maturation and morphogenesis of the PLACENTA and HEART.
Specific cell surface receptors which bind to FIBRONECTINS. Studies have shown that these receptors function in certain types of adhesive contact as well as playing a major role in matrix assembly. These receptors include the traditional fibronectin receptor, also called INTEGRIN ALPHA5BETA1 and several other integrins.
An integrin found in FIBROBLASTS; PLATELETS; MONOCYTES, and LYMPHOCYTES. Integrin alpha5beta1 is the classical receptor for FIBRONECTIN, but it also functions as a receptor for LAMININ and several other EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.
The alpha subunits of integrin heterodimers (INTEGRINS), which mediate ligand specificity. There are approximately 18 different alpha chains, exhibiting great sequence diversity; several chains are also spliced into alternative isoforms. They possess a long extracellular portion (1200 amino acids) containing a MIDAS (metal ion-dependent adhesion site) motif, and seven 60-amino acid tandem repeats, the last 4 of which form EF HAND MOTIFS. The intracellular portion is short with the exception of INTEGRIN ALPHA4.
This integrin alpha subunit combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form a receptor (INTEGRIN ALPHA5BETA1) that binds FIBRONECTIN and LAMININ. It undergoes posttranslational cleavage into a heavy and a light chain that are connected by disulfide bonds.
A blood plasma glycoprotein that mediates cell adhesion and interacts with proteins of the complement, coagulation, and fibrinolytic cascade. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
An integrin alpha subunit that occurs as alternatively spliced isoforms. The isoforms are differentially expressed in specific cell types and at specific developmental stages. Integrin alpha3 combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form INTEGRIN ALPHA3BETA1 which is a heterodimer found primarily in epithelial cells.
Large, noncollagenous glycoprotein with antigenic properties. It is localized in the basement membrane lamina lucida and functions to bind epithelial cells to the basement membrane. Evidence suggests that the protein plays a role in tumor invasion.
A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.
Integrin alpha1beta1 functions as a receptor for LAMININ and COLLAGEN. It is widely expressed during development, but in the adult is the predominant laminin receptor (RECEPTORS, LAMININ) in mature SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, where it is important for maintenance of the differentiated phenotype of these cells. Integrin alpha1beta1 is also found in LYMPHOCYTES and microvascular endothelial cells, and may play a role in angiogenesis. In SCHWANN CELLS and neural crest cells, it is involved in cell migration. Integrin alpha1beta1 is also known as VLA-1 and CD49a-CD29.
An integrin alpha subunit that primarily associates with INTEGRIN BETA1 or INTEGRIN BETA4 to form laminin-binding heterodimers. Integrin alpha6 has two alternatively spliced isoforms: integrin alpha6A and integrin alpha6B, which differ in their cytoplasmic domains and are regulated in a tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific manner.
A 235-kDa cytoplasmic protein that is also found in platelets. It has been localized to regions of cell-substrate adhesion. It binds to INTEGRINS; VINCULIN; and ACTINS and appears to participate in generating a transmembrane connection between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
Collagen receptors are cell surface receptors that modulate signal transduction between cells and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. They are found in many cell types and are involved in the maintenance and regulation of cell shape and behavior, including PLATELET ACTIVATION and aggregation, through many different signaling pathways and differences in their affinities for collagen isoforms. Collagen receptors include discoidin domain receptors, INTEGRINS, and glycoprotein VI.
An integrin heterodimer widely expressed on cells of hematopoietic origin. CD11A ANTIGEN comprises the alpha chain and the CD18 antigen (ANTIGENS, CD18) the beta chain. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 is a major receptor of T-CELLS; B-CELLS; and GRANULOCYTES. It mediates the leukocyte adhesion reactions underlying cytolytic conjugate formation, helper T-cell interactions, and antibody-dependent killing by NATURAL KILLER CELLS and granulocytes. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 has been defined as a ligand for lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.
An adhesion-promoting leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer. The alpha subunit consists of the CD11b ANTIGEN and the beta subunit the CD18 ANTIGEN. The antigen, which is an integrin, functions both as a receptor for complement 3 and in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesive interactions.
An integrin found on fibroblasts, platelets, endothelial and epithelial cells, and lymphocytes where it functions as a receptor for COLLAGEN and LAMININ. Although originally referred to as the collagen receptor, it is one of several receptors for collagen. Ligand binding to integrin alpha2beta1 triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling, including activation of p38 MAP kinase.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
An integrin alpha subunit that primarily combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form the INTEGRIN ALPHA2BETA1 heterodimer. It contains a domain which has homology to collagen-binding domains found in von Willebrand factor.
A group of three different alpha chains (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c) that are associated with an invariant CD18 beta chain (ANTIGENS, CD18). The three resulting leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION) are LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; and ANTIGEN, P150,95.
Cell surface glycoproteins on lymphocytes and other leukocytes that mediate adhesion to specialized blood vessels called high endothelial venules. Several different classes of lymphocyte homing receptors have been identified, and they appear to target different surface molecules (addressins) on high endothelial venules in different tissues. The adhesion plays a crucial role in the trafficking of lymphocytes.
Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).
A family of non-receptor, PROLINE-rich protein-tyrosine kinases.
Tetraspanin proteins found associated with LAMININ-binding INTEGRINS. The CD151 antigens may play a role in the regulation of CELL MOTILITY.
This intrgrin is a key component of HEMIDESMOSOMES and is required for their formation and maintenance in epithelial cells. Integrin alpha6beta4 is also found on thymocytes, fibroblasts, and Schwann cells, where it functions as a laminin receptor (RECEPTORS, LAMININ) and is involved in wound healing, cell migration, and tumor invasiveness.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
A group of INTEGRINS that includes the platelet outer membrane glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX) and the vitronectin receptor (RECEPTORS, VITRONECTIN). They play a major role in cell adhesion and serve as receptors for fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and vitronectin.
A non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase that is localized to FOCAL ADHESIONS and is a central component of integrin-mediated SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. Focal adhesion kinase 1 interacts with PAXILLIN and undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION in response to adhesion of cell surface integrins to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. Phosphorylated p125FAK protein binds to a variety of SH2 DOMAIN and SH3 DOMAIN containing proteins and helps regulate CELL ADHESION and CELL MIGRATION.
An anchoring junction of the cell to a non-cellular substrate. It is composed of a specialized area of the plasma membrane where bundles of the ACTIN CYTOSKELETON terminate and attach to the transmembrane linkers, INTEGRINS, which in turn attach through their extracellular domains to EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
An alpha-integrin subunit found on lymphocytes, granulocytes, macrophages and monocytes. It combines with the integrin beta2 subunit (CD18 ANTIGEN) to form LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1.
Also known as CD104 antigen, this protein is distinguished from other beta integrins by its relatively long cytoplasmic domain (approximately 1000 amino acids vs. approximately 50). Five alternatively spliced isoforms have been described.
Members of the integrin family appearing late after T-cell activation. They are a family of proteins initially identified at the surface of stimulated T-cells, but now identified on a variety of cell types. At least six VLA antigens have been identified as heterodimeric adhesion receptors consisting of a single common beta-subunit and different alpha-subunits.
The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
Glycoprotein molecules on the surface of cells that react with or bind to laminin whose function allows the binding of epithelial cells to the basement membrane. The molecular weight of this high-affinity receptor is 67 kD.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Paxillin is a signal transducing adaptor protein that localizes to FOCAL ADHESIONS via its four LIM domains. It undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION in response to integrin-mediated CELL ADHESION, and interacts with a variety of proteins including VINCULIN; FOCAL ADHESION KINASE; PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(C-SRC); and PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN C-CRK.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A major adhesion-associated heterodimer molecule expressed by MONOCYTES; GRANULOCYTES; NK CELLS; and some LYMPHOCYTES. The alpha subunit is the CD11C ANTIGEN, a surface antigen expressed on some myeloid cells. The beta subunit is the CD18 ANTIGEN.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Family of proteins associated with the capacity of LEUKOCYTES to adhere to each other and to certain substrata, e.g., the C3bi component of complement. Members of this family are the LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; (LFA-1), the MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; (Mac-1), and the INTEGRIN ALPHAXBETA2 or p150,95 leukocyte adhesion protein. They all share a common beta-subunit which is the CD18 antigen. All three of the above antigens are absent in inherited LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, impaired pus formation, and wound healing as well as abnormalities in a wide spectrum of adherence-dependent functions of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphoid cells.
CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.
Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.
Rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the beta 2 integrin receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION) comprising the CD11/CD18 family of glycoproteins. The syndrome is characterized by abnormal adhesion-dependent functions, especially defective tissue emigration of neutrophils, leading to recurrent infection.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
Cytokine-induced cell adhesion molecule present on activated endothelial cells, tissue macrophages, dendritic cells, bone marrow fibroblasts, myoblasts, and myotubes. It is important for the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. (From Pigott & Power, The Adhesion Molecule FactsBook, 1993, p154)
A subtype of tetraspanin proteins that play a role in cell adhesion, cell motility, and tumor metastasis. CD9 antigens take part in the process of platelet activation and aggregation, the formation of paranodal junctions in neuronal tissue, and the fusion of sperm with egg.
A family of polypeptides purified from snake venoms, which contain the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence. The RGD tripeptide binds to integrin receptors and thus competitively inhibits normal integrin-ligand interactions. Disintegrins thus block adhesive functions and act as platelet aggregation inhibitors.
Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.
Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
A cytoskeletal protein associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The amino acid sequence of human vinculin has been determined. The protein consists of 1066 amino acid residues and its gene has been assigned to chromosome 10.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Specialized areas at the CELL MEMBRANE where a cell attaches to the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX or other substratum.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
A darkly stained mat-like EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM) that separates cell layers, such as EPITHELIUM from ENDOTHELIUM or a layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. The ECM layer that supports an overlying EPITHELIUM or ENDOTHELIUM is called basal lamina. Basement membrane (BM) can be formed by the fusion of either two adjacent basal laminae or a basal lamina with an adjacent reticular lamina of connective tissue. BM, composed mainly of TYPE IV COLLAGEN; glycoprotein LAMININ; and PROTEOGLYCAN, provides barriers as well as channels between interacting cell layers.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.
A genetically related subfamily of RAP GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that share homology with RAS PROTEINS. They bind to Ras effectors but do not activate them, therefore they may antagonize the effects of RAS PROTEINS. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction.
Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.
The process in which the neutrophil is stimulated by diverse substances, resulting in degranulation and/or generation of reactive oxygen products, and culminating in the destruction of invading pathogens. The stimulatory substances, including opsonized particles, immune complexes, and chemotactic factors, bind to specific cell-surface receptors on the neutrophil.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.
A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.
Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.
Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.
Serologic tests in which a positive reaction manifested by visible CHEMICAL PRECIPITATION occurs when a soluble ANTIGEN reacts with its precipitins, i.e., ANTIBODIES that can form a precipitate.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Hexameric extracellular matrix glycoprotein transiently expressed in many developing organs and often re-expressed in tumors. It is present in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as in smooth muscle and tendons. (From Kreis & Vale, Guidebook to the Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Proteins, 1993, p93)
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
A PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE family that was originally identified by homology to the Rous sarcoma virus ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(V-SRC). They interact with a variety of cell-surface receptors and participate in intracellular signal transduction pathways. Oncogenic forms of src-family kinases can occur through altered regulation or expression of the endogenous protein and by virally encoded src (v-src) genes.
An extracellular receptor specific for UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. It is attached to the cell membrane via a GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL LINKAGE and plays a role in the co-localization of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with PLASMINOGEN.
The process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. It can occur in both cells specialized for sensing mechanical cues such as MECHANORECEPTORS, and in parenchymal cells whose primary function is not mechanosensory.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Antibodies that inhibit the reaction between ANTIGEN and other antibodies or sensitized T-LYMPHOCYTES (e.g., antibodies of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN G class that compete with IGE antibodies for antigen, thereby blocking an allergic response). Blocking antibodies that bind tumors and prevent destruction of tumor cells by CYTOTOXIC T-LYMPHOCYTES have also been called enhancing antibodies. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)
Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.
The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.
A non-fibrillar collagen found in the structure of BASEMENT MEMBRANE. Collagen type IV molecules assemble to form a sheet-like network which is involved in maintaining the structural integrity of basement membranes. The predominant form of the protein is comprised of two alpha1(IV) subunits and one alpha2(IV) subunit, however, at least six different alpha subunits can be incorporated into the heterotrimer.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
An ERYTHROLEUKEMIA cell line derived from a CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA patient in BLAST CRISIS.
Chemically stimulated aggregation of cell surface receptors, which potentiates the action of the effector cell.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is an integrin alpha subunit that heterodimerizes with INTEGRIN BETA3 to form PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX. It is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain which is then postranslationally cleaved and processed into two disulfide-linked subunits of approximately 18 and 110 kDa in size.
A negatively-charged extracellular matrix protein that plays a role in the regulation of BONE metabolism and a variety of other biological functions. Cell signaling by osteopontin may occur through a cell adhesion sequence that recognizes INTEGRIN ALPHA-V BETA-3.
A heterodimeric protein that is a cell surface antigen associated with lymphocyte activation. The initial characterization of this protein revealed one identifiable heavy chain (ANTIGENS, CD98 HEAVY CHAIN) and an indeterminate smaller light chain. It is now known that a variety of light chain subunits (ANTIGENS, CD98 LIGHT CHAINS) can dimerize with the heavy chain. Depending upon its light chain composition a diverse array of functions can be found for this protein. Functions include: type L amino acid transport, type y+L amino acid transport and regulation of cellular fusion.
Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
A ubiquitously expressed membrane glycoprotein. It interacts with a variety of INTEGRINS and mediates responses to EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.
A fungal metabolite that blocks cytoplasmic cleavage by blocking formation of contractile microfilament structures resulting in multinucleated cell formation, reversible inhibition of cell movement, and the induction of cellular extrusion. Additional reported effects include the inhibition of actin polymerization, DNA synthesis, sperm motility, glucose transport, thyroid secretion, and growth hormone release.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.
Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
A formylated tripeptide originally isolated from bacterial filtrates that is positively chemotactic to polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and causes them to release lysosomal enzymes and become metabolically activated.
The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.
A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.
A RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEIN involved in regulating signal transduction pathways that control assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.
A ubiquitously expressed syndecan that is found in all stages of embryonic development and in most adult tissues. Syndecan-4 is found localized to focal adhesion sites in fibronectin-adherent cells and may play a role the process of CELL MIGRATION and CELL PROLIFERATION.
A genus of the family Muridae consisting of eleven species. C. migratorius, the grey or Armenian hamster, and C. griseus, the Chinese hamster, are the two species used in biomedical research.
The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.
A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.
A CD antigen that contains a conserved I domain which is involved in ligand binding. When combined with CD18 the two subunits form MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
A CELL LINE derived from human T-CELL LEUKEMIA and used to determine the mechanism of differential susceptibility to anti-cancer drugs and radiation.
A protein factor that regulates the length of R-actin. It is chemically similar, but immunochemically distinguishable from actin.
A family of crosslinking filament proteins encoded by distinct FLN genes. Filamins are involved in cell adhesion, spreading, and migration, acting as scaffolds for over 90 binding partners including channels, receptors, intracellular signaling molecules and transcription factors. Due to the range of molecular interactions, mutations in FLN genes result in anomalies with moderate to lethal consequences.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.
A non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is expressed primarily in the BRAIN; OSTEOBLASTS; and LYMPHOID CELLS. In the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM focal adhesion kinase 2 modulates ION CHANNEL function and MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES activity.
An Ig superfamily transmembrane protein that localizes to junctional complexes that occur between ENDOTHELIAL CELLS and EPTHELIAL CELLS. The protein may play a role in cell-cell adhesion and is the primary site for the attachment of ADENOVIRUSES during infection.
Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
Microscopy in which television cameras are used to brighten magnified images that are otherwise too dark to be seen with the naked eye. It is used frequently in TELEPATHOLOGY.
Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.
Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the addition of a phosphate group, usually on serine, threonine or tyrosine residues, which can play a role in their regulation, function, interaction with other molecules, and localization within the cell.
Movement of tethered, spherical LEUKOCYTES along the endothelial surface of the microvasculature. The tethering and rolling involves interaction with SELECTINS and other adhesion molecules in both the ENDOTHELIUM and leukocyte. The rolling leukocyte then becomes activated by CHEMOKINES, flattens out, and firmly adheres to the endothelial surface in preparation for transmigration through the interendothelial cell junction. (From Abbas, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 3rd ed)
The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Fibers composed of MICROFILAMENT PROTEINS, which are predominately ACTIN. They are the smallest of the cytoskeletal filaments.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Solutions or mixtures of toxic and nontoxic substances elaborated by snake (Ophidia) salivary glands for the purpose of killing prey or disabling predators and delivered by grooved or hollow fangs. They usually contain enzymes, toxins, and other factors.
A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are involved in regulation of actin organization, gene expression and cell cycle progression. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
A transmembrane glycoprotein subunit that can dimerize with a variety of light chain subunits (ANTIGENS, CD98 LIGHT CHAINS). This protein subunit serves a diverse array of functions including amino acid transport and cell fusion. Its function is altered depending which of the light chain subunits it interacts with.
Conjugated proteins in which mucopolysaccharides are combined with proteins. The mucopolysaccharide moiety is the predominant group with the protein making up only a small percentage of the total weight.
Venoms from SNAKES of the viperid family. They tend to be less toxic than elapid or hydrophid venoms and act mainly on the vascular system, interfering with coagulation and capillary membrane integrity and are highly cytotoxic. They contain large amounts of several enzymes, other factors, and some toxins.

Primary haemostasis: sticky fingers cement the relationship. (1/5403)

Platelet aggregation to form a haemostatic plug, or thrombus, plays a key role in preventing bleeding from a wound. Recent studies have provided new insights into how platelet receptors are deployed during the interactions with the vascular subendothelial matrix that lead to haemostatic plug formation.  (+info)

The LIM-only protein PINCH directly interacts with integrin-linked kinase and is recruited to integrin-rich sites in spreading cells. (2/5403)

PINCH is a widely expressed and evolutionarily conserved protein comprising primarily five LIM domains, which are cysteine-rich consensus sequences implicated in mediating protein-protein interactions. We report here that PINCH is a binding protein for integrin-linked kinase (ILK), an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase that plays important roles in the cell adhesion, growth factor, and Wnt signaling pathways. The interaction between ILK and PINCH has been consistently observed under a variety of experimental conditions. They have interacted in yeast two-hybrid assays, in solution, and in solid-phase-based binding assays. Furthermore, ILK, but not vinculin or focal adhesion kinase, has been coisolated with PINCH from mammalian cells by immunoaffinity chromatography, indicating that PINCH and ILK associate with each other in vivo. The PINCH-ILK interaction is mediated by the N-terminal-most LIM domain (LIM1, residues 1 to 70) of PINCH and multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats located within the N-terminal domain (residues 1 to 163) of ILK. Additionally, biochemical studies indicate that ILK, through the interaction with PINCH, is capable of forming a ternary complex with Nck-2, an SH2/SH3-containing adapter protein implicated in growth factor receptor kinase and small GTPase signaling pathways. Finally, we have found that PINCH is concentrated in peripheral ruffles of cells spreading on fibronectin and have detected clusters of PINCH that are colocalized with the alpha5beta1 integrins. These results demonstrate a specific protein recognition mechanism utilizing a specific LIM domain and multiple ANK repeats and suggest that PINCH functions as an adapter protein connecting ILK and the integrins with components of growth factor receptor kinase and small GTPase signaling pathways.  (+info)

Blocking very late antigen-4 integrin decreases leukocyte entry and fatty streak formation in mice fed an atherogenic diet. (3/5403)

Atherosclerotic lesion development is characterized by the recruitment of leukocytes, principally monocytes, to the vessel wall. Considerable interest has been focused on the adhesion molecule(s) involved in leukocyte/endothelial interactions. The goal of the present study was to determine the role of the very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin/ligand interaction in fatty streak development using murine models. Because alpha4 null mice are not viable, a peptidomimetic was used to block VLA-4-mediated leukocyte binding. The ability of a synthetic peptidomimetic of connecting segment-1 (CS-1 peptide) to block the recruitment of leukocytes and the accumulation of lipid in the aortic sinus of either wild-type mice (strain C57BL/6J) or mice with a low-density lipoprotein null mutation (LDLR-/-) maintained on an atherogenic diet was assessed. The active (Ac) CS-1 peptide or scrambled (Sc) CS-1 peptide was delivered subcutaneously into mice using a mini osmotic pump. Mice were exposed to the peptide for 24 to 36 hours before the onset of the atherogenic diet. In C57BL/6J mice, leukocyte entry into the aortic sinus, as assessed by en face preparations, was inhibited by the active peptide (Ac=28+/-4, Sc=54+/-6 monocytes/valve; P=0.004). Additionally, frozen sections stained with Oil Red O were analyzed to assess lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus. C57BL/6J mice that received the (Ac) compound demonstrated significantly reduced lesion areas as compared with mice that received the (Sc) peptide (Ac=4887+/-4438 microm2, Sc=15 009 +/-5619 microm2; P<0.0001). In a separate study, LDLR-/- mice were implanted with pumps containing either the (Ac) or (Sc) peptide before initiation of the atherogenic diet. Because LDLR-/- mice fed a chow diet displayed small lesions at 14 weeks, the effects of the peptide seen in these animals represented a change in early lipid accumulation rather than initiation. By using whole-mount preparations, the (Ac) but not the (Sc) peptide significantly reduced the area of lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus, resulting in an approximate 66% decrease. Plasma analysis from all studies revealed concentrations of peptide to be present at levels previously determined by in vitro analysis to block adhesion. (Ac) CS-1 peptide, which blocks VLA-4 on the leukocyte surface, is effective in reducing leukocyte recruitment and lipid accumulation in the aortic sinus. The present study provides in vivo evidence that the VLA-4 integrin plays an important role in the initiation of the atherosclerotic lesion and lipid accumulation, and it suggests a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease.  (+info)

Integrin subunit gene expression is regionally differentiated in adult brain. (4/5403)

Integrins are a diverse family of heterodimeric (alphabeta) adhesion receptors recently shown to be concentrated within synapses and involved in the consolidation of long-term potentiation. Whether neuronal types or anatomical systems in the adult rat brain are coded by integrin type was studied in the present experiments by mapping the relative densities of mRNAs for nine alpha and four beta subunits. Expression patterns were markedly different and in some regions complementary. General results and areas of notable labeling were as follows: alpha1-limited neuronal expression, neocortical layer V, hippocampal CA3; alpha3 and alpha5-diffuse neuronal and glial labeling, Purkinje cells, hippocampal stratum pyramidale, locus coeruleus (alpha3); alpha4- discrete limbic regions, olfactory cortical layer II, hippocampal CA2; alpha6-most prominently neuronal, neocortical subplate, endopiriform, subiculum; alpha7-discrete, all neocortical layers, hippocampal granule cells and CA3, cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells, all efferent cranial nerve nuclei; alpha8-discrete neuronal, deep cortex, hippocampal CA1, basolateral amygdala, striatum; alphaV-all cortical layers, striatum, Purkinje cells; beta4-dentate gyrus granule cells; beta5-broadly distributed, neocortex, medial amygdala, cerebellar granule and Purkinje cells, efferent cranial nerve nuclei; alpha2, beta2, and beta3-mRNAs not detected. These results establish that brain subfields express different balances of integrin subunits and thus different integrin receptors. Such variations will determine which matrix proteins are recognized by neurons and the types of intraneuronal signaling generated by matrix binding. They also could generate important differences in synaptic plasticity across brain systems.  (+info)

The integrin alpha v beta 6 binds and activates latent TGF beta 1: a mechanism for regulating pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. (5/5403)

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) family members are secreted in inactive complexes with a latency-associated peptide (LAP), a protein derived from the N-terminal region of the TGF beta gene product. Extracellular activation of these complexes is a critical but incompletely understood step in regulation of TGF beta function in vivo. We show that TGF beta 1 LAP is a ligand for the integrin alpha v beta 6 and that alpha v beta 6-expressing cells induce spatially restricted activation of TGF beta 1. This finding explains why mice lacking this integrin develop exaggerated inflammation and, as we show, are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. These data identify a novel mechanism for locally regulating TGF beta 1 function in vivo by regulating expression of the alpha v beta 6 integrin.  (+info)

Cell adhesion regulates the interaction between the docking protein p130(Cas) and the 14-3-3 proteins. (6/5403)

Integrin ligand binding induces a signaling complex formation via the direct association of the docking protein p130(Cas) (Cas) with diverse molecules. We report here that the 14-3-3zeta protein interacts with Cas in the yeast two-hybrid assay. We also found that the two proteins associate in mammalian cells and that this interaction takes place in a phosphoserine-dependent manner, because treatment of Cas with a serine phosphatase greatly reduced its ability to bind 14-3-3zeta. Furthermore, the Cas-14-3-3zeta interaction was found to be regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Thus, when cells are detached from the extracellular matrix, the binding of Cas to 14-3-3zeta is greatly diminished, whereas replating the cells onto fibronectin rapidly induces the association. Consistent with these results, we found that the subcellular localization of Cas and 14-3-3 is also regulated by integrin ligand binding and that the two proteins display a significant co-localization during cell attachment to the extracellular matrix. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins participate in integrin-activated signaling pathways through their interaction with Cas, which, in turn, may contribute to important biological responses regulated by cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.  (+info)

Tyrosine phosphorylation of SLP-76 is downstream of Syk following stimulation of the collagen receptor in platelets. (7/5403)

Collagen-related peptide (CRP), a collagen homologue, induces platelet activation through a tyrosine kinase-dependent pathway, leading to sequential tyrosine phosphorylation of Fc receptor (FcR) gamma-chain, Syk, and phospholipase C-gamma2. Here we report that CRP and the platelet low affinity immune receptor FcgammaRIIA stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the T cell adapter SLP-76, whereas the G protein-coupled receptor agonist thrombin induces only minor tyrosine phosphorylation. This suggests that SLP-76 has a specific role downstream of receptors that signal via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate association of SLP-76 with SLAP-130, Vav, Fyn, Lyn, and the FcR gamma-chain in CRP-stimulated platelets. Several of these proteins, including SLP-76, undergo tyrosine phosphorylation in in vitro kinase assays performed on SLP-76 immunoprecipitates. Tyrosine phosphorylation of all of these proteins in the in vitro kinase assay was abrogated by the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1, suggesting that it is mediated by either Fyn or Lyn. The physiological significance of this is uncertain, however, since tyrosine phosphorylation of SLP-76 in vivo is not altered in either Fyn- or Lyn-deficient platelets. CRP stimulation of Syk-deficient platelets demonstrated that in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation of SLP-76 is downstream of Syk. The absence of Syk in the SLP-76 immunoprecipitates raises the possibility that another protein is responsible for bringing SLP-76 to Syk. Candidates for this include those proteins that co-immunoprecipitate with SLP-76, including the FcR gamma-chain. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma2 and Ca2+ mobilization is markedly attenuated in SLP-76-deficient platelets following CRP stimulation, suggesting that the adapter plays a critical role in the regulation of the phospholipase. The increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of SLAP-130 in response to CRP is also inhibited in SLP-76-deficient platelets, placing it downstream of SLP-76. This work identifies SLP-76 as an important adapter molecule that is regulated by Syk and lies upstream of SLAP-130 and PLC-gamma2 in CRP-stimulated platelets.  (+info)

Expression pattern of integrin adhesion molecules in endometriosis and human endometrium. (8/5403)

Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that undergo cell-specific dynamic changes during the normal menstrual cycle in the human endometrium. Here, using immunohistochemistry, we have investigated the expression pattern of the integrins alphav, alpha2beta1, alpha3beta1, alpha3, alpha6, beta1, beta2 and beta3 in the human ectopic endometrium of 30 patients and in nine cases in the corresponding eutopic endometrium. The biopsies were obtained during the early or late follicular phase (25 cases), during the corpus luteum phase (four cases) and in one case after 6 months' treatment with a gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. The integrin expression was independent of the ovarian steroid situation at the time of biopsy. The integrin alpha6 was expressed in all endometriotic and endometrium samples. The integrin alpha3 was absent in all endometrium tissues of patients with endometriosis. However, the corresponding endometriotic lesions re-expressed this adhesion molecule in 15 cases. No change in integrin beta3 expression pattern could be demonstrated in either endometriotic lesions or endometrium samples, regardless of the menstrual cycle phase. A correlation between serum oestradiol and progesterone concentrations and the expression of the investigated integrins was not observed, thus indicating that these two hormones play a minor role in the regulation of the cell adhesion molecules examined. Our investigation suggests that endometriosis is a dedifferentiated disease as it expressed different integrins in comparison with the eutopic endometrium, and independently of the hormonal situation. The ability of endometriotic tissues to express integrins may explain the high recurrence rates in patients with endometriosis, as these samples retain their adhesion potency after retrograde menstruation and are thus able to establish cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions with the surrounding peritoneum.  (+info)

Integrins are a type of cell-adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. They are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors composed of non-covalently associated α and β subunits, which form more than 24 distinct integrin heterodimers in humans.

Integrins bind to specific ligands, such as ECM proteins (e.g., collagen, fibronectin, laminin), cell surface molecules, and soluble factors, through their extracellular domains. The intracellular domains of integrins interact with the cytoskeleton and various signaling proteins, allowing them to transduce signals from the ECM into the cell (outside-in signaling) and vice versa (inside-out signaling).

These molecular interactions are essential for numerous biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Dysregulation of integrin function has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, and autoimmune diseases.

CD29, also known as integrin β1, is a type of cell surface protein called an integrin that forms heterodimers with various α subunits to form different integrin receptors. These integrin receptors play important roles in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and signaling.

CD29/integrin β1 is widely expressed on many types of cells including leukocytes, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. It can bind to several extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, laminin, and fibronectin, and mediate cell-matrix interactions. CD29/integrin β1 also participates in intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

CD29/integrin β1 can function as an antigen, which is a molecule capable of inducing an immune response. Antibodies against CD29/integrin β1 have been found in some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These antibodies can contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases by activating complement, inducing inflammation, and damaging tissues.

Therefore, CD29/integrin β1 is an important molecule in both physiological and pathological processes, and its functions as an antigen have been implicated in some autoimmune disorders.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

Integrin αV (also known as ITGAV or CD51) is a subunit of a family of heterodimeric transmembrane receptors called integrins, which are involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Integrin αV combines with various β subunits (e.g., β1, β3, β5, β6, and β8) to form distinct integrin heterodimers, such as αVβ1, αVβ3, αVβ5, αVβ6, and αVβ8. These integrins recognize and bind to specific arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequences present in various ECM proteins, such as fibronectin, vitronectin, osteopontin, and collagens. Integrin αV plays crucial roles in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis, and has been implicated in several pathological processes, including cancer, fibrosis, and inflammation.

CD18 is a type of protein called an integrin that is found on the surface of many different types of cells in the human body, including white blood cells (leukocytes). It plays a crucial role in the immune system by helping these cells to migrate through blood vessel walls and into tissues where they can carry out their various functions, such as fighting infection and inflammation.

CD18 forms a complex with another protein called CD11b, and together they are known as Mac-1 or CR3 (complement receptor 3). This complex is involved in the recognition and binding of various molecules, including bacterial proteins and fragments of complement proteins, which help to trigger an immune response.

CD18 has been implicated in a number of diseases, including certain types of cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mutations in the gene that encodes CD18 can lead to a rare disorder called leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) type 1, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and impaired wound healing.

Integrin beta chains are a type of subunit that make up integrin receptors, which are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. These receptors play crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell signaling, migration, proliferation, and differentiation.

Integrin beta chains combine with integrin alpha chains to form functional heterodimeric receptors. In humans, there are 18 different alpha subunits and 8 different beta subunits that can combine to form at least 24 distinct integrin receptors. The beta chain contributes to the cytoplasmic domain of the integrin receptor, which is involved in intracellular signaling and cytoskeletal interactions.

The beta chains are characterized by a conserved cytoplasmic region called the beta-tail domain, which interacts with various adaptor proteins to mediate downstream signaling events. Additionally, some integrin beta chains have a large inserted (I) domain in their extracellular regions that is responsible for ligand binding specificity.

Examples of integrin beta chains include β1, β2, β3, β4, β5, β6, β7, and β8, each with distinct functions and roles in various tissues and cell types. Mutations or dysregulation of integrin beta chains have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, fibrosis, and developmental disorders.

Vitronectin receptors, also known as integrin αvβ3 or integrin avb3, are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to the protein vitronectin. These receptors are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins composed of αv and β3 subunits. They play important roles in various biological processes including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. Vitronectin receptors are widely expressed in many different cell types, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets. In addition to vitronectin, these receptors can also bind to other extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and osteopontin. They are also involved in the regulation of angiogenesis, wound healing, and bone metabolism.

Integrin β3 is a subunit of certain integrin heterodimers, which are transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. Integrin β3 combines with either integrin αv (to form the integrin αvβ3) or integrin αIIb (to form the integrin αIIbβ3). These integrins are involved in various cellular processes, including platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis.

Integrin αIIbβ3 is primarily expressed on platelets and mediates platelet aggregation by binding to fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins in the ECM. Integrin αvβ3 is widely expressed in various cell types and participates in diverse functions such as cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. It binds to a variety of ECM proteins, including fibronectin, vitronectin, and osteopontin, as well as to soluble ligands like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β).

Dysregulation of integrin β3 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, tumor metastasis, and inflammatory diseases.

Integrin α4 (also known as CD49d or ITGA4) is a subunit of integrin proteins, which are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Integrin α4 typically pairs with β1 (CD29 or ITGB1) or β7 (ITGB7) subunits to form integrins α4β1 and α4β7, respectively.

Integrin α4β1, also known as very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), is widely expressed on various hematopoietic cells, including lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. It plays crucial roles in the adhesion, migration, and homing of these cells to secondary lymphoid organs, as well as in the recruitment of immune cells to inflammatory sites. Integrin α4β1 binds to its ligands, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fibronectin, via the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif.

Integrin α4β7, on the other hand, is primarily expressed on gut-homing lymphocytes and interacts with mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), a protein mainly found in the high endothelial venules of intestinal Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. This interaction facilitates the trafficking of immune cells to the gastrointestinal tract, where they participate in immune responses against pathogens and maintain gut homeostasis.

In summary, Integrin α4 is a crucial subunit of integrins that mediates cell adhesion, migration, and homing to specific tissues through its interactions with various ligands. Dysregulation of integrin α4 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer metastasis.

Integrin αVβ3 is a type of integrin, which is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor that mediates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Integrins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Integrin αVβ3 is composed of two subunits, αV and β3, which are non-covalently associated to form a functional receptor. This integrin can bind to various ECM proteins containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, such as vitronectin, fibronectin, fibrinogen, and osteopontin.

Integrin αVβ3 is widely expressed in different cell types, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and various tumor cells. It has been implicated in several physiological and pathological processes, such as angiogenesis, wound healing, bone remodeling, and tumor metastasis.

In the context of cancer, integrin αVβ3 has been shown to promote tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis by enhancing cell migration, survival, and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, targeting integrin αVβ3 with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

Fibronectin is a high molecular weight glycoprotein that is found in many tissues and body fluids, including plasma, connective tissue, and the extracellular matrix. It is composed of two similar subunits that are held together by disulfide bonds. Fibronectin plays an important role in cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation by binding to various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, and other extracellular matrix components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

Fibronectin has several isoforms that are produced by alternative splicing of a single gene transcript. These isoforms differ in their biological activities and can be found in different tissues and developmental stages. Fibronectin is involved in various physiological processes, such as wound healing, tissue repair, and embryonic development, and has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis, tumor metastasis, and thrombosis.

Integrin α3β1 is a type of cell surface receptor that is widely expressed in various tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. It is composed of two subunits, α3 and β1, which form a heterodimeric complex that plays a crucial role in cell-matrix adhesion and signaling.

Integrin α3β1 binds to several extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, fibronectin, and collagen IV, and mediates various cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. It also participates in intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell behavior and tissue homeostasis.

Mutations in the genes encoding integrin α3β1 have been associated with several human diseases, including blistering skin disorders, kidney disease, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of integrin α3β1 is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Integrin α6β1, also known as CD49f/CD29, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of α6 and β1 subunits. It is widely expressed in various tissues, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and hematopoietic cells. Integrin α6β1 plays a crucial role in cell-matrix adhesion, particularly to the laminin component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This receptor is involved in various biological processes such as cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Additionally, integrin α6β1 has been implicated in tumor progression, metastasis, and drug resistance in certain cancers.

Integrin α4β1, also known as Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4), is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of two subunits, α4 and β1. It is involved in various cellular activities such as adhesion, migration, and signaling. This integrin plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. The activation of Integrin α4β1 allows leukocytes to roll along and then firmly adhere to the endothelium, followed by their migration into surrounding tissues, particularly during inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, Integrin α4β1 also interacts with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and helps regulate cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation in various cell types.

Fibronectin receptors are a type of cell surface adhesion molecule that bind to the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. These receptors are composed of transmembrane glycoproteins called integrins, which consist of non-covalently associated α and β subunits. The binding of fibronectin to its receptor triggers a range of intracellular signaling events that regulate various cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Fibronectin receptors play critical roles in many physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue repair, and hemostasis. They also contribute to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. In cancer, for example, increased expression of fibronectin receptors has been associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Therefore, targeting fibronectin receptors has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for treating various diseases.

Integrin α5β1, also known as very late antigen-5 (VLA-5) or fibronectin receptor, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of two subunits: α5 and β1. This integrin is widely expressed in various cell types, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts.

Integrin α5β1 plays a crucial role in mediating cell-matrix adhesion by binding to the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present in the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. The interaction between integrin α5β1 and fibronectin is essential for various biological processes, such as cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Additionally, this integrin has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including tumor progression, angiogenesis, and fibrosis.

Integrins are a family of cell-surface receptors that play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling. Integrin alpha chains are one of the two subunits that make up an integrin heterodimer, with the other subunit being an integrin beta chain.

Integrin alpha chains are transmembrane glycoproteins consisting of a large extracellular domain, a single transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic tail. The extracellular domain contains several domains that mediate ligand binding, while the cytoplasmic tail interacts with various cytoskeletal proteins and signaling molecules to regulate intracellular signaling pathways.

There are 18 different integrin alpha chains known in humans, each of which can pair with one or more beta chains to form distinct integrin heterodimers. These heterodimers exhibit unique ligand specificities and functions, allowing them to mediate diverse cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

In summary, integrin alpha chains are essential subunits of integrin receptors that play crucial roles in regulating cell adhesion, migration, and signaling by mediating interactions between cells and their extracellular environment.

Integrin α5 (also known as CD49e) is a subunit of the heterodimeric integrin receptor called very late antigen-5 (VLA-5). Integrins are transmembrane adhesion receptors that play crucial roles in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. The α5β1 integrin, formed by the association of α5 and β1 subunits, specifically recognizes and binds to fibronectin, a major extracellular matrix protein. This binding event is essential for various biological processes such as cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

In summary, Integrin alpha5 (α5) is an essential subunit of the α5β1 integrin receptor that mediates cell-fibronectin interactions and contributes to several vital cellular functions.

Vitronectin is a glycoprotein found in various biological fluids, including blood plasma. It has multiple functions in the body, such as participating in blood clotting (as a cofactor for the protease thrombin), inhibiting the complement system, and binding to cell surfaces and the extracellular matrix. Vitronectin can also interact with several other molecules, including heparin, collagen, and the cytoskeleton. It is involved in various biological processes, such as cell adhesion, migration, and protection against apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Integrin α3 (also known as ITGA3) is a subunit of a type of cell-surface receptor called an integrin. Integrins are involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, and play important roles in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

Integrin α3 combines with the β1 subunit to form the integrin heterodimer α3β1, which is widely expressed in many tissues including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Integrin α3β1 binds to various ECM proteins such as laminin-5, fibronectin, and collagen IV, and mediates cell adhesion and migration on these substrates.

Mutations in the ITGA3 gene have been associated with several human genetic disorders, including epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA), a severe form of inherited skin fragility disorder, and Adams-Oliver syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by scalp defects and limb abnormalities.

Laminin is a family of proteins that are an essential component of the basement membrane, which is a specialized type of extracellular matrix. Laminins are large trimeric molecules composed of three different chains: α, β, and γ. There are five different α chains, three different β chains, and three different γ chains that can combine to form at least 15 different laminin isoforms.

Laminins play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and integrity of basement membranes by interacting with other components of the extracellular matrix, such as collagen IV, and cell surface receptors, such as integrins. They are involved in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, and survival.

Laminin dysfunction has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and muscular dystrophy.

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of biomolecules that provides structural and biochemical support to cells in tissues and organs. It is composed of various proteins, glycoproteins, and polysaccharides, such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, and proteoglycans. The ECM plays crucial roles in maintaining tissue architecture, regulating cell behavior, and facilitating communication between cells. It provides a scaffold for cell attachment, migration, and differentiation, and helps to maintain the structural integrity of tissues by resisting mechanical stresses. Additionally, the ECM contains various growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines that can influence cellular processes such as proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Overall, the extracellular matrix is essential for the normal functioning of tissues and organs, and its dysregulation can contribute to various pathological conditions, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative diseases.

Integrin α1β1, also known as Very Late Antigen-1 (VLA-1) or CD49a/CD29, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of α1 and β1 subunits. It belongs to the integrin family of adhesion molecules that play crucial roles in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions.

Integrin α1β1 is primarily expressed on various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and some immune cells. This integrin binds to several ECM proteins, such as collagens (type I, II, III, IV), laminin, and fibronectin, mediating cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Additionally, α1β1 integrin has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, such as tissue repair, fibrosis, and tumor progression.

Integrin α6 (also known as CD49f) is a type of integrin, which is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor that mediates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Integrins play crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Integrin α6 is a 130 kDa glycoprotein that pairs with integrin β1, β4 or β5 to form three distinct heterodimeric complexes: α6β1, α6β4, and α6β5. Among these, the α6β4 integrin is the most extensively studied. It specifically binds to laminins in the basement membrane and plays essential roles in maintaining epithelial tissue architecture and function.

The α6β4 integrin has a unique structure with an extended cytoplasmic domain of β4 that can interact with intracellular signaling molecules, cytoskeletal proteins, and other adhesion receptors. This interaction allows the formation of stable adhesion complexes called hemidesmosomes, which anchor epithelial cells to the basement membrane and provide mechanical stability to tissues.

Mutations in integrin α6 or its partners can lead to various human diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa, a group of inherited skin disorders characterized by fragile skin and mucous membranes that blister and tear easily.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Talin" is not a medical term that I am aware of. Talin is actually a protein involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, acting as a crucial component in connecting the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. It might be used in scientific or biology research contexts, but it's not a term typically found in medical textbooks or patient-related medical definitions. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help with those!

Oligopeptides are defined in medicine and biochemistry as short chains of amino acids, typically containing fewer than 20 amino acid residues. These small peptides are important components in various biological processes, such as serving as signaling molecules, enzyme inhibitors, or structural elements in some proteins. They can be found naturally in foods and may also be synthesized for use in medical research and therapeutic applications.

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are a type of protein found on the surface of cells that mediate the attachment or adhesion of cells to either other cells or to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells.

CAMs play crucial roles in various biological processes, including tissue development, differentiation, repair, and maintenance of tissue architecture and function. They are also involved in cell signaling, migration, and regulation of the immune response.

There are several types of CAMs, classified based on their structure and function, such as immunoglobulin-like CAMs (IgCAMs), cadherins, integrins, and selectins. Dysregulation of CAMs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Collagen receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to collagen molecules, which are the most abundant proteins in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues. These receptors play important roles in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, differentiation, and survival.

Collagen receptors can be classified into two major groups: integrins and discoidin domain receptors (DDRs). Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that consist of an alpha and a beta subunit. They bind to collagens via their arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, which is located in the triple-helical domain of collagen molecules. Integrins mediate cell-collagen interactions by clustering and forming focal adhesions, which are large protein complexes that connect the ECM to the cytoskeleton.

DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that contain a discoidin domain in their extracellular region, which is responsible for collagen binding. DDRs bind to collagens via their non-RGD motifs and induce intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell behavior.

Abnormalities in collagen receptor function have been implicated in various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and inflammation. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of collagen receptors is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a type of integrin, which is a family of cell surface proteins that are important for cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction. LFA-1 is composed of two subunits, called alpha-L (CD11a) and beta-2 (CD18), and it is widely expressed on various leukocytes, including T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells.

LFA-1 plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the adhesion of leukocytes to other cells, such as endothelial cells that line blood vessels, and extracellular matrix components. This adhesion is necessary for leukocyte migration from the bloodstream into tissues during inflammation or immune responses. LFA-1 also contributes to the activation of T cells and their interaction with antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages.

The binding of LFA-1 to its ligands, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and ICAM-2, triggers intracellular signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions, such as cytoskeletal reorganization, gene expression, and cell survival. Dysregulation of LFA-1 function has been implicated in several immune-related diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancer.

The Macrophage-1 Antigen (also known as Macrophage Antigen-1 or CD14) is a glycoprotein found on the surface of various cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and some dendritic cells. It functions as a receptor for complexes formed by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and LPS-binding protein (LBP), which are involved in the immune response to gram-negative bacteria. CD14 plays a crucial role in activating immune cells and initiating the release of proinflammatory cytokines upon recognizing bacterial components.

In summary, Macrophage-1 Antigen is a cell surface receptor that contributes to the recognition and response against gram-negative bacteria by interacting with LPS-LBP complexes.

Integrin α2β1, also known as very late antigen-2 (VLA-2) or laminin receptor, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of α2 and β1 subunits. It belongs to the integrin family of adhesion molecules that play crucial roles in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions.

Integrin α2β1 is widely expressed on various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and some hematopoietic cells. It functions as a receptor for several ECM proteins, such as collagens (type I, II, III, and V), laminin, and fibronectin. The binding of integrin α2β1 to these ECM components mediates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival, thereby regulating various physiological and pathological processes, such as tissue repair, angiogenesis, inflammation, and tumor progression.

In addition, integrin α2β1 has been implicated in several diseases, including fibrosis, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, targeting this integrin with therapeutic strategies may provide potential benefits for treating these conditions.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Integrin alpha2, also known as CD49b or ITGA2, is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that forms a heterodimer with integrin beta1 to create the collagen receptor very late antigen-2 (VLA-2) or α2β1 integrin. This integrin plays crucial roles in various cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, and signaling during embryonic development, hemostasis, and tissue repair. It specifically binds to collagen types I, II, and IV, contributing to the regulation of cell-matrix interactions in several tissues, including bone, cartilage, and vascular systems. Integrin alpha2 also participates in immune responses by mediating lymphocyte adhesion and activation.

CD11 is a group of integrin proteins that are present on the surface of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. They play a crucial role in the adhesion and migration of these cells to sites of inflammation or injury. CD11 includes three distinct subunits: CD11a (also known as LFA-1), CD11b (also known as Mac-1 or Mo1), and CD11c (also known as p150,95).

Antigens are substances that can stimulate an immune response in the body. In the context of CD11, antigens may refer to specific molecules or structures on pathogens such as bacteria or viruses that can be recognized by CD11-expressing immune cells. These antigens bind to CD11 and trigger a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to the activation and migration of the immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

Therefore, the medical definition of 'antigens, CD11' may refer to specific molecules or structures on pathogens that can bind to CD11 proteins on immune cells and trigger an immune response.

Lymphocyte homing receptors are specialized molecules found on the surface of lymphocytes (white blood cells that include T-cells and B-cells), which play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and disease. These receptors facilitate the targeted migration and trafficking of lymphocytes from the bloodstream to specific secondary lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes, spleen, and Peyer's patches in the intestines, where they can encounter antigens and mount an immune response.

The homing receptors consist of two main components: adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors. Adhesion molecules, such as selectins and integrins, mediate the initial attachment and rolling of lymphocytes along the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels in lymphoid organs. Chemokine receptors, on the other hand, interact with chemokines (a type of cytokine) that are secreted by the endothelial cells and stromal cells within the lymphoid organs. This interaction triggers a signaling cascade that activates integrins, leading to their firm adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transmigration into the lymphoid tissue.

The specificity of this homing process is determined by the unique combination of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors expressed on different subsets of lymphocytes, which allows them to home to distinct anatomical locations in response to various chemokine gradients. This targeted migration ensures that the immune system can effectively mount a rapid and localized response against pathogens while minimizing unnecessary inflammation in other parts of the body.

Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a group of structural and functional molecules that provide support, organization, and regulation to the cells in tissues and organs. The ECM is composed of a complex network of proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates that are secreted by the cells and deposited outside of them.

ECM proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, including:

1. Collagens: These are the most abundant ECM proteins and provide strength and stability to tissues. They form fibrils that can withstand high tensile forces.
2. Proteoglycans: These are complex molecules made up of a core protein and one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. The GAG chains attract water, making proteoglycans important for maintaining tissue hydration and resilience.
3. Elastin: This is an elastic protein that allows tissues to stretch and recoil, such as in the lungs and blood vessels.
4. Fibronectins: These are large glycoproteins that bind to cells and ECM components, providing adhesion, migration, and signaling functions.
5. Laminins: These are large proteins found in basement membranes, which provide structural support for epithelial and endothelial cells.
6. Tenascins: These are large glycoproteins that modulate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate ECM assembly and remodeling.

Together, these ECM proteins create a microenvironment that influences cell behavior, differentiation, and function. Dysregulation of ECM proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative disorders.

Focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases (FAKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play crucial roles in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. They are primarily localized at focal adhesions, which are specialized structures formed at the sites of integrin-mediated attachment of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM).

FAKs consist of two major domains: an N-terminal FERM (4.1 protein, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. The FERM domain is responsible for the interaction with various proteins, including integrins, growth factor receptors, and cytoskeletal components, while the kinase domain possesses enzymatic activity that phosphorylates tyrosine residues on target proteins.

FAKs are activated in response to various extracellular signals, such as ECM stiffness, growth factors, and integrin engagement. Once activated, FAKs initiate a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately regulate cell behavior. Dysregulation of FAK signaling has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases.

In summary, focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinases are essential regulators of cellular processes that localize to focal adhesions and modulate intracellular signaling pathways in response to extracellular cues.

CD151 is a type of protein that is found on the surface of some cells in the body. It is a member of the tetraspanin family of proteins, which are involved in various cellular processes including cell adhesion, motility, and activation. CD151 has been found to be expressed on various cell types, including red blood cells, platelets, and some cancer cells.

As an antigen, CD151 is a molecule that can stimulate an immune response in the body. It can be recognized by certain immune cells, such as T-cells and B-cells, which can then mount a defense against cells or organisms that express this protein. In the context of cancer, CD151 has been found to be overexpressed in some tumor types, and may play a role in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. As such, it is being investigated as a potential target for cancer immunotherapy.

Integrin α6β4 is a type of cell surface receptor that is composed of two subunits, α6 and β4. It is also known as CD49f/CD104. This integrin is primarily expressed in epithelial cells and plays important roles in cell adhesion, migration, and signal transduction.

Integrin α6β4 specifically binds to laminin-332 (also known as laminin-5), a component of the basement membrane, and forms a stable anchorage complex that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. This interaction is critical for maintaining the integrity of epithelial tissues and regulating cell behavior during processes such as wound healing and tissue regeneration.

Mutations in the genes encoding integrin α6β4 have been associated with various human diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa, a group of inherited skin disorders characterized by fragile skin and blistering. Additionally, integrin α6β4 has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis, as its expression is often upregulated in tumor cells and contributes to their invasive behavior.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Cytoadhesins are a type of receptor found on the surface of cells, particularly in the immune system and in certain pathogenic organisms. They are involved in the adhesion of cells to each other or to the extracellular matrix, which is crucial for various biological processes such as inflammation, immune response, and the invasion of host tissues by pathogens.

In the context of receptors, cytoadhesins refer to a specific group of proteins that mediate cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions through the recognition and binding of specific ligands. These receptors are often involved in the adhesion of immune cells to other cells or to the extracellular matrix, which is important for their migration, activation, and effector functions.

Examples of cytoadhesin receptors include selectins, integrins, and immunoglobulin superfamily members such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Selectins are involved in the initial tethering and rolling of leukocytes on endothelial cells, while integrins mediate firm adhesion and subsequent transmigration of leukocytes into inflamed tissues. ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are important ligands for integrins and play a crucial role in the recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection or injury.

In pathogenic organisms such as bacteria and parasites, cytoadhesin receptors are often involved in the adhesion and invasion of host tissues. For example, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum expresses a family of cytoadhesins called PfEMP1 on the surface of infected red blood cells, which mediate their adhesion to endothelial cells in various organs, leading to the severe complications of malaria such as cerebral malaria and placental malaria.

Focal Adhesion Kinase 1 (FAK1), also known as Protein Tyrosine Kinase 2 (PTK2), is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, and survival. It is recruited to focal adhesions, which are specialized structures that form at the sites of integrin-mediated attachment of the cell to the extracellular matrix (ECM).

FAK1 becomes activated through autophosphorylation upon integrin clustering and ECM binding. Once activated, FAK1 can phosphorylate various downstream substrates, leading to the activation of several signaling pathways that regulate cell behavior. These pathways include the Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, and JNK signaling cascades, which are involved in cell proliferation, survival, and motility.

FAK1 has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of FAK1 signaling has been associated with several diseases, such as cancer, fibrosis, and neurological disorders. Therefore, FAK1 is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these conditions.

Focal adhesions are specialized structures found in cells that act as points of attachment between the intracellular cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM). They are composed of a complex network of proteins, including integrins, talin, vinculin, paxillin, and various others.

Focal adhesions play a crucial role in cellular processes such as adhesion, migration, differentiation, and signal transduction. They form when integrin receptors in the cell membrane bind to specific ligands within the ECM, leading to the clustering of these receptors and the recruitment of various adaptor and structural proteins. This results in the formation of a stable linkage between the cytoskeleton and the ECM, which helps maintain cell shape, provide mechanical stability, and facilitate communication between the intracellular and extracellular environments.

Focal adhesions are highly dynamic structures that can undergo rapid assembly and disassembly in response to various stimuli, allowing cells to adapt and respond to changes in their microenvironment. Dysregulation of focal adhesion dynamics has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis, fibrosis, and impaired wound healing.

A ligand, in the context of biochemistry and medicine, is a molecule that binds to a specific site on a protein or a larger biomolecule, such as an enzyme or a receptor. This binding interaction can modify the function or activity of the target protein, either activating it or inhibiting it. Ligands can be small molecules, like hormones or neurotransmitters, or larger structures, like antibodies. The study of ligand-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes and developing drugs, as many therapeutic compounds function by binding to specific targets within the body.

CD11a is a type of protein known as an integrin, which is found on the surface of certain cells in the human body, including white blood cells called leukocytes. It plays a crucial role in the immune system by helping these cells to migrate and adhere to other cells or surfaces, particularly during inflammation and immune responses.

CD11a combines with another protein called CD18 to form a larger complex known as LFA-1 (Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen 1). This complex is involved in various immune functions, such as the activation of T cells, the adhesion of white blood cells to endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and the transmigration of these cells across the vessel wall to sites of infection or injury.

As an antigen, CD11a can be targeted by the immune system, and antibodies against it have been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In these cases, the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells expressing CD11a, leading to inflammation and tissue damage.

Integrin beta4, also known as ITGB4 or CD104, is a type of integrin subunit that forms part of the integrin receptor along with an alpha subunit. Integrins are transmembrane proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion, signal transduction, and regulation of various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Integrin beta4 is unique among the integrin subunits because it has a large cytoplasmic domain that can interact with several intracellular signaling molecules, making it an important regulator of cell behavior. Integrin beta4 is widely expressed in various tissues, including epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and hematopoietic cells.

Integrin beta4 forms heterodimers with integrin alpha6 to form the receptor for laminins, which are major components of the basement membrane. This receptor is involved in maintaining the integrity of epithelial tissues and regulating cell migration during development, tissue repair, and cancer progression. Mutations in ITGB4 have been associated with several human diseases, including epidermolysis bullosa, a group of inherited skin disorders characterized by fragile skin and blistering.

Very late antigens (VLAs) are a group of integrin receptors found on the surface of leukocytes (white blood cells) that play a role in various cellular functions, including adhesion, migration, and signaling. Specifically, VLA-4 is a heterodimeric integrin receptor composed of two subunits, alpha-4 (CD49d) and beta-1 (CD29).

The term "very late" refers to the time course of their expression during lymphocyte activation and differentiation. VLA-4 is expressed at low levels on resting leukocytes but is upregulated upon activation, making it a useful marker for activated immune cells.

VLA-4 mediates adhesion to various counter-receptors, including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fibronectin, which are expressed on endothelial cells, facilitating the extravasation of leukocytes from the bloodstream into tissues during inflammation or immune responses.

Therefore, VLA-4 has been a target for therapeutic interventions in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

The cytoskeleton is a complex network of various protein filaments that provides structural support, shape, and stability to the cell. It plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular integrity, intracellular organization, and enabling cell movement. The cytoskeleton is composed of three major types of protein fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. These filaments work together to provide mechanical support, participate in cell division, intracellular transport, and help maintain the cell's architecture. The dynamic nature of the cytoskeleton allows cells to adapt to changing environmental conditions and respond to various stimuli.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Laminin receptors are a type of cell-surface receptor that bind to laminins, which are extracellular matrix proteins. These receptors play a crucial role in the attachment, migration, and differentiation of cells during development, tissue repair, and disease processes. Laminin receptors include integrins, dystroglycans, and non-integrin receptors such as syndecans and Lutheran proteins. These receptors interact with laminins through specific binding sites, which activate intracellular signaling pathways that regulate various cellular functions, including gene expression, cell survival, and cytoskeletal organization. Abnormalities in laminin receptor function have been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, muscular dystrophy, and neurodegenerative disorders.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Paxillin is a adaptor protein that plays a crucial role in the organization of signaling complexes at focal adhesions, which are specialized structures formed at sites of integrin-mediated cell attachment to the extracellular matrix. It contains multiple binding sites for various proteins involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, and cell adhesion. Paxillin has been implicated in several biological processes such as cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival, and its dysregulation has been associated with the development of various diseases including cancer.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Integrin αXβ2, also known as CD11c/CD18 or complement receptor 4 (CR4), is a heterodimeric integrin that is widely expressed on the surface of various leukocytes, including dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, and some subsets of T cells and NK cells. This integrin plays crucial roles in cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, and signaling transduction during immune responses.

Integrin αXβ2 recognizes several ligands, including the complement component iC3b, fibrinogen, and factor X. The binding of these ligands to αXβ2 triggers various intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions.

In summary, Integrin αXβ2 is a vital integrin involved in the regulation of immune responses by mediating leukocyte adhesion, migration, and activation.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Leukocyte adhesion receptors are a type of cell surface molecules found on the white blood cells (leukocytes), which play a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and inflammation. These receptors mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, allowing them to migrate out of the bloodstream and into the surrounding tissues where they can carry out their immune functions.

There are several types of leukocyte adhesion receptors, including selectins, integrins, and immunoglobulin-like receptors. Selectins are involved in the initial capture and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium, while integrins mediate their firm adhesion and subsequent transmigration into the tissues. Immunoglobulin-like receptors can either enhance or inhibit leukocyte activation and function.

Dysregulation of leukocyte adhesion receptors has been implicated in various inflammatory and immune-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and cancer metastasis. Therefore, targeting these receptors with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of these conditions.

CHO cells, or Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, are a type of immortalized cell line that are commonly used in scientific research and biotechnology. They were originally derived from the ovaries of a female Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) in the 1950s.

CHO cells have several characteristics that make them useful for laboratory experiments. They can grow and divide indefinitely under appropriate conditions, which allows researchers to culture large quantities of them for study. Additionally, CHO cells are capable of expressing high levels of recombinant proteins, making them a popular choice for the production of therapeutic drugs, vaccines, and other biologics.

In particular, CHO cells have become a workhorse in the field of biotherapeutics, with many approved monoclonal antibody-based therapies being produced using these cells. The ability to genetically modify CHO cells through various methods has further expanded their utility in research and industrial applications.

It is important to note that while CHO cells are widely used in scientific research, they may not always accurately represent human cell behavior or respond to drugs and other compounds in the same way as human cells do. Therefore, results obtained using CHO cells should be validated in more relevant systems when possible.

The platelet glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa complex, also known as integrin αIIbβ3 or CD41/CD61, is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor found on the surface of platelets and megakaryocytes. It plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation and thrombus formation during hemostasis and pathological conditions such as arterial thrombosis.

The GPIIb-IIIa complex is composed of two non-covalently associated subunits, GPIIb (αIIb or CD41) and IIIa (β3 or CD61). Upon platelet activation by various agonists like ADP, thrombin, or collagen, the GPIIb-IIIa complex undergoes a conformational change that allows it to bind fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. This binding event leads to platelet aggregation and the formation of a hemostatic plug or pathological thrombus.

Inhibition of the GPIIb-IIIa complex has been a target for antiplatelet therapy in the prevention and treatment of arterial thrombosis, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Several pharmacological agents, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule antagonists, have been developed to block this complex and reduce platelet aggregation.

Platelet membrane glycoproteins are specialized proteins found on the surface of platelets, which are small blood cells responsible for clotting. These glycoproteins play crucial roles in various processes related to hemostasis and thrombosis, including platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation.

There are several key platelet membrane glycoproteins, such as:

1. Glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa (also known as integrin α2β1): This glycoprotein mediates the binding of platelets to collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix, facilitating platelet adhesion and activation.
2. GP IIb/IIIa (also known as integrin αIIbβ3): This is the most abundant glycoprotein on the platelet surface and functions as a receptor for fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Upon activation, GP IIb/IIIa undergoes conformational changes that enable it to bind these ligands, leading to platelet aggregation and clot formation.
3. GPIb-IX-V: This glycoprotein complex is involved in the initial tethering and adhesion of platelets to von Willebrand factor (vWF) in damaged blood vessels. It consists of four subunits: GPIbα, GPIbβ, GPIX, and GPV.
4. GPVI: This glycoprotein is essential for platelet activation upon contact with collagen. It associates with the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ) to form a signaling complex that triggers intracellular signaling pathways, leading to platelet activation and aggregation.

Abnormalities in these platelet membrane glycoproteins can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions. For example, mutations in GPIIb/IIIa can result in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a severe bleeding disorder characterized by impaired platelet aggregation. On the other hand, increased expression or activation of these glycoproteins may contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases.

Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome (LAD) is a group of rare inherited disorders that affect the ability of white blood cells, specifically neutrophils, to adhere to and migrate into tissues, particularly those involved in immune responses. This results in recurrent bacterial and fungal infections starting in infancy.

There are three types of LAD, each caused by different genetic mutations:

1. LAD I: This is the most common and severe form, caused by a deficiency in the CD18 protein which is crucial for neutrophil adhesion. Symptoms include delayed separation of the umbilical cord, severe periodontal disease, and recurrent skin, lung and gastrointestinal infections.

2. LAD II: Also known as congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Ib, it is caused by a deficiency in the enzyme glucosyltransferase, leading to abnormal sugar chains on cell surfaces. Symptoms are similar to LAD I but less severe, and also include mental retardation and impaired growth.

3. LAD III: This is the least common form, caused by a defect in the integrin-linked kinase (ILK) gene. It results in a more complex phenotype with muscular and cardiac abnormalities, in addition to immune dysfunction.

Treatment typically involves prophylactic antibiotics, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to increase neutrophil counts, and sometimes bone marrow transplantation.

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream where they circulate and are able to move quickly to sites of infection or inflammation in the body. Neutrophils are capable of engulfing and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances through a process called phagocytosis. They are also involved in the release of inflammatory mediators, which can contribute to tissue damage in some cases. Neutrophils are characterized by the presence of granules in their cytoplasm, which contain enzymes and other proteins that help them carry out their immune functions.

Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of endothelial cells that plays a crucial role in the inflammatory response. It is involved in the recruitment and adhesion of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. VCAM-1 interacts with integrins on the surface of leukocytes, particularly very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), to facilitate this adhesion process. This interaction leads to the activation of signaling pathways that promote the migration of leukocytes across the endothelial barrier and into the surrounding tissue, where they can contribute to the immune response and resolution of inflammation. Increased expression of VCAM-1 has been associated with various inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

CD9 is a type of protein found on the surface of certain cells in the human body. It is part of a group of proteins known as tetraspanins, which are involved in various cellular processes such as cell adhesion, motility, and activation. CD9 has been found to be expressed on the surface of immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and platelets.

As an antigen, CD9 is a molecule that can stimulate an immune response when it is recognized by the immune system as foreign or different from normal self-tissue. However, CD9 is not typically considered a foreign substance, so it does not usually elicit an immune response in healthy individuals.

In some cases, CD9 may be targeted by autoantibodies in certain medical conditions such as autoimmune diseases. For example, anti-CD9 antibodies have been found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune disorders. These autoantibodies can contribute to the development of tissue damage and inflammation in these conditions.

It's worth noting that while CD9 is an important protein involved in various cellular functions, its role as an antigen is not well-studied or well-understood, particularly in the context of autoimmune diseases.

Disintegrins are a group of small, cysteine-rich proteins that are derived from the venom of certain snakes, such as vipers and pit vipers. They are named for their ability to disrupt the integrin-mediated adhesion of cells, which is an important process in many physiological and pathological processes, including hemostasis, inflammation, and cancer metastasis.

Disintegrins contain a conserved RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) or KTS (Lys-Thr-Ser) sequence that allows them to bind specifically to integrin receptors on the surface of cells. This binding can cause various effects, such as inhibiting cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, or promoting apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Due to their potent biological activities, disintegrins have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications in various diseases, including thrombosis, cancer, and inflammation. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and safety profiles before they can be used clinically.

The endothelium is a thin layer of simple squamous epithelial cells that lines the interior surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. The vascular endothelium, specifically, refers to the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. These cells play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by regulating vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, inflammation, and permeability of the vessel wall. They also contribute to the growth and repair of the vascular system and are involved in various pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and diabetes.

Actin is a type of protein that forms part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells, and is also found in various other cell types. It is a globular protein that polymerizes to form long filaments, which are important for many cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, and the maintenance of cell shape. In muscle cells, actin filaments interact with another type of protein called myosin to enable muscle contraction. Actins can be further divided into different subtypes, including alpha-actin, beta-actin, and gamma-actin, which have distinct functions and expression patterns in the body.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1), also known as CD54, is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells. ICAM-1 plays a crucial role in the inflammatory response and the immune system by mediating the adhesion of leukocytes (white blood cells) to the endothelium, allowing them to migrate into surrounding tissues during an immune response or inflammation.

ICAM-1 contains five immunoglobulin-like domains in its extracellular region and binds to several integrins present on leukocytes, such as LFA-1 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1) and Mac-1 (macrophage-1 antigen). This interaction facilitates the firm adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium, which is a critical step in the extravasation process.

In addition to its role in inflammation and immunity, ICAM-1 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Increased expression of ICAM-1 on endothelial cells is associated with the recruitment of immune cells to sites of injury or infection, making it an important target for therapeutic interventions in various inflammatory disorders.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Vinculin is a protein found in many types of cells, including muscle and endothelial cells. It is primarily located at the sites of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, where it plays important roles in cell adhesion, mechanotransduction, and cytoskeletal organization. Vinculin interacts with several other proteins, including actin, talin, and integrins, to form a complex network that helps regulate the connection between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular cytoskeleton. Mutations in the vinculin gene have been associated with certain inherited diseases, such as muscular dystrophy-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Cell-matrix junctions, also known as focal adhesions, are specialized structures found at the interface between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). These junctions play a critical role in cell adhesion, migration, and signaling. They are formed by the interaction of transmembrane receptors called integrins with ECM proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and laminin.

The intracellular portion of integrins is linked to the cytoskeleton via a complex network of adaptor proteins, including talin, vinculin, paxillin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). This connection allows for the transmission of forces between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, which is essential for cell movement and maintenance of tissue structure.

Cell-matrix junctions also serve as sites of signal transduction, where mechanical signals from the ECM can be converted into biochemical signals that regulate various cellular processes such as gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Dysregulation of cell-matrix junctions has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

Leukocytes, also known as white blood cells (WBCs), are a crucial component of the human immune system. They are responsible for protecting the body against infections and foreign substances. Leukocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

There are several types of leukocytes, including:

1. Neutrophils - These are the most abundant type of leukocyte and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. They contain enzymes that can destroy bacteria.
2. Lymphocytes - These are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying virus-infected cells, as well as cancer cells. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes.
3. Monocytes - These are the largest type of leukocyte and help to break down and remove dead or damaged tissues, as well as microorganisms.
4. Eosinophils - These play a role in fighting parasitic infections and are also involved in allergic reactions and inflammation.
5. Basophils - These release histamine and other chemicals that cause inflammation in response to allergens or irritants.

An abnormal increase or decrease in the number of leukocytes can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a blood disorder.

The basement membrane is a thin, specialized layer of extracellular matrix that provides structural support and separates epithelial cells (which line the outer surfaces of organs and blood vessels) from connective tissue. It is composed of two main layers: the basal lamina, which is produced by the epithelial cells, and the reticular lamina, which is produced by the connective tissue. The basement membrane plays important roles in cell adhesion, migration, differentiation, and survival.

The basal lamina is composed mainly of type IV collagen, laminins, nidogens, and proteoglycans, while the reticular lamina contains type III collagen, fibronectin, and other matrix proteins. The basement membrane also contains a variety of growth factors and cytokines that can influence cell behavior.

Defects in the composition or organization of the basement membrane can lead to various diseases, including kidney disease, eye disease, and skin blistering disorders.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT) is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory medicine and pathology for the detection and localization of specific antigens or antibodies in tissues, cells, or microorganisms. In this technique, a fluorescein-labeled antibody is used to selectively bind to the target antigen or antibody, forming an immune complex. When excited by light of a specific wavelength, the fluorescein label emits light at a longer wavelength, typically visualized as green fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope.

The FAT is widely used in diagnostic microbiology for the identification and characterization of various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It has also been applied in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases and certain cancers by detecting specific antibodies or antigens in patient samples. The main advantage of FAT is its high sensitivity and specificity, allowing for accurate detection and differentiation of various pathogens and disease markers. However, it requires specialized equipment and trained personnel to perform and interpret the results.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Fibrinogen is a soluble protein present in plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays an essential role in blood coagulation. When an injury occurs, fibrinogen gets converted into insoluble fibrin by the action of thrombin, forming a fibrin clot that helps to stop bleeding from the injured site. Therefore, fibrinogen is crucial for hemostasis, which is the process of stopping bleeding and starting the healing process after an injury.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Cytoskeletal proteins are a type of structural proteins that form the cytoskeleton, which is the internal framework of cells. The cytoskeleton provides shape, support, and structure to the cell, and plays important roles in cell division, intracellular transport, and maintenance of cell shape and integrity.

There are three main types of cytoskeletal proteins: actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Actin filaments are thin, rod-like structures that are involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and cell division. Intermediate filaments are thicker than actin filaments and provide structural support to the cell. Microtubules are hollow tubes that are involved in intracellular transport, cell division, and maintenance of cell shape.

Cytoskeletal proteins are composed of different subunits that polymerize to form filamentous structures. These proteins can be dynamically assembled and disassembled, allowing cells to change their shape and move. Mutations in cytoskeletal proteins have been linked to various human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and muscular dystrophies.

Rap1 GTP-binding proteins are a subfamily of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, which function as molecular switches that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and motility. Rap1 proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, and this cycling is regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that promote the exchange of GDP for GTP, and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) that stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rap1, promoting its return to the inactive state.

Rap1 has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and polarity, as well as cell cycle progression and transcriptional regulation. In particular, Rap1 has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion and signaling, and in the control of endothelial cell barrier function. Dysregulation of Rap1 activity has been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer and inflammatory disorders.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Chemotaxis, Leukocyte is the movement of leukocytes (white blood cells) towards a higher concentration of a particular chemical substance, known as a chemotactic factor. This process plays a crucial role in the immune system's response to infection and injury.

When there is an infection or tissue damage, certain cells release chemotactic factors, which are small molecules or proteins that can attract leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Leukocytes have receptors on their surface that can detect these chemotactic factors and move towards them through a process called chemotaxis.

Once they reach the site of inflammation, leukocytes can help eliminate pathogens or damaged cells by phagocytosis (engulfing and destroying) or releasing toxic substances that kill the invading microorganisms. Chemotaxis is an essential part of the immune system's defense mechanisms and helps to maintain tissue homeostasis and prevent the spread of infection.

Selectins are a type of cell adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in the inflammatory response. They are involved in the initial attachment and rolling of white blood cells (such as neutrophils) along the walls of blood vessels, which is an essential step in the extravasation process that allows these cells to migrate from the bloodstream into surrounding tissues in order to respond to infection or injury.

There are three main types of selectins: E-selectin (expressed on endothelial cells), P-selectin (expressed on both endothelial cells and platelets), and L-selectin (expressed on leukocytes). These proteins recognize specific carbohydrate structures on the surface of white blood cells, allowing them to bind together and initiate the inflammatory cascade. Selectins have been implicated in various inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis, making them potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

Neutrophil activation refers to the process by which neutrophils, a type of white blood cell, become activated in response to a signal or stimulus, such as an infection or inflammation. This activation triggers a series of responses within the neutrophil that enable it to carry out its immune functions, including:

1. Degranulation: The release of granules containing enzymes and other proteins that can destroy microbes.
2. Phagocytosis: The engulfment and destruction of microbes through the use of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other toxic substances.
3. Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs): A process in which neutrophils release DNA and proteins to trap and kill microbes outside the cell.
4. Release of cytokines and chemokines: Signaling molecules that recruit other immune cells to the site of infection or inflammation.

Neutrophil activation is a critical component of the innate immune response, but excessive or uncontrolled activation can contribute to tissue damage and chronic inflammation.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Membrane glycoproteins are proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. They are integral components of biological membranes, spanning the lipid bilayer and playing crucial roles in various cellular processes.

The glycosylation of these proteins occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus during protein folding and trafficking. The attached glycans can vary in structure, length, and composition, which contributes to the diversity of membrane glycoproteins.

Membrane glycoproteins can be classified into two main types based on their orientation within the lipid bilayer:

1. Type I (N-linked): These glycoproteins have a single transmembrane domain and an extracellular N-terminus, where the oligosaccharides are predominantly attached via asparagine residues (Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon).
2. Type II (C-linked): These glycoproteins possess two transmembrane domains and an intracellular C-terminus, with the oligosaccharides linked to tryptophan residues via a mannose moiety.

Membrane glycoproteins are involved in various cellular functions, such as:

* Cell adhesion and recognition
* Receptor-mediated signal transduction
* Enzymatic catalysis
* Transport of molecules across membranes
* Cell-cell communication
* Immunological responses

Some examples of membrane glycoproteins include cell surface receptors (e.g., growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors), adhesion molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherins), and transporters (e.g., ion channels, ABC transporters).

Mechanical stress, in the context of physiology and medicine, refers to any type of force that is applied to body tissues or organs, which can cause deformation or displacement of those structures. Mechanical stress can be either external, such as forces exerted on the body during physical activity or trauma, or internal, such as the pressure changes that occur within blood vessels or other hollow organs.

Mechanical stress can have a variety of effects on the body, depending on the type, duration, and magnitude of the force applied. For example, prolonged exposure to mechanical stress can lead to tissue damage, inflammation, and chronic pain. Additionally, abnormal or excessive mechanical stress can contribute to the development of various musculoskeletal disorders, such as tendinitis, osteoarthritis, and herniated discs.

In order to mitigate the negative effects of mechanical stress, the body has a number of adaptive responses that help to distribute forces more evenly across tissues and maintain structural integrity. These responses include changes in muscle tone, joint positioning, and connective tissue stiffness, as well as the remodeling of bone and other tissues over time. However, when these adaptive mechanisms are overwhelmed or impaired, mechanical stress can become a significant factor in the development of various pathological conditions.

Fluorescence microscopy is a type of microscopy that uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to highlight and visualize specific components within a sample. In this technique, the sample is illuminated with high-energy light, typically ultraviolet (UV) or blue light, which excites the fluorescent molecules causing them to emit lower-energy, longer-wavelength light, usually visible light in the form of various colors. This emitted light is then collected by the microscope and detected to produce an image.

Fluorescence microscopy has several advantages over traditional brightfield microscopy, including the ability to visualize specific structures or molecules within a complex sample, increased sensitivity, and the potential for quantitative analysis. It is widely used in various fields of biology and medicine, such as cell biology, neuroscience, and pathology, to study the structure, function, and interactions of cells and proteins.

There are several types of fluorescence microscopy techniques, including widefield fluorescence microscopy, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, each with its own strengths and limitations. These techniques can provide valuable insights into the behavior of cells and proteins in health and disease.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

A precipitin test is a type of immunodiagnostic test used to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a patient's serum. The test is based on the principle of antigen-antibody interaction, where the addition of an antigen to a solution containing its corresponding antibody results in the formation of an insoluble immune complex known as a precipitin.

In this test, a small amount of the patient's serum is added to a solution containing a known antigen or antibody. If the patient has antibodies or antigens that correspond to the added reagent, they will bind and form a visible precipitate. The size and density of the precipitate can be used to quantify the amount of antibody or antigen present in the sample.

Precipitin tests are commonly used in the diagnosis of various infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergies. They can also be used in forensic science to identify biological samples. However, they have largely been replaced by more modern immunological techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and radioimmunoassays (RIAs).

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Tenascin is a large extracellular matrix protein that is involved in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. It is found in high concentrations during embryonic development, tissue repair, and inflammation. Tenascin has a modular structure, consisting of multiple domains that can interact with various cell surface receptors and other extracellular matrix components. Its expression is regulated by a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and mechanical signals, making it an important player in the dynamic regulation of tissue architecture and function. In pathological conditions, abnormal tenascin expression has been implicated in various diseases, such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune disorders.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

SRC-family kinases (SFKs) are a group of non-receptor tyrosine kinases that play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. They are named after the founding member, SRC, which was first identified as an oncogene in Rous sarcoma virus.

SFKs share a common structure, consisting of an N-terminal unique domain, a SH3 domain, a SH2 domain, a catalytic kinase domain, and a C-terminal regulatory tail with a negative regulatory tyrosine residue (Y527 in human SRC). In their inactive state, SFKs are maintained in a closed conformation through intramolecular interactions between the SH3 domain, SH2 domain, and the phosphorylated C-terminal tyrosine.

Upon activation by various signals, such as growth factors, cytokines, or integrin engagement, SFKs are activated through a series of events that involve dephosphorylation of the regulatory tyrosine residue, recruitment to membrane receptors via their SH2 and SH3 domains, and trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop in the kinase domain.

Once activated, SFKs can phosphorylate a wide range of downstream substrates, including other protein kinases, adaptor proteins, and cytoskeletal components, thereby regulating various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Dysregulation of SFK activity has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptors (uPAR) are a type of cell surface receptor that play a role in several biological processes including cell migration, tissue remodeling, and angiogenesis. They bind to urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a serine protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin, leading to the degradation of extracellular matrix components.

The interaction between uPAR and uPA plays a crucial role in various physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue repair, but it has also been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer, where it contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The regulation of uPAR expression and activity is therefore an important area of research for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Cellular mechanotransduction is the process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals, resulting in changes in cell behavior and function. This complex process involves various molecular components, including transmembrane receptors, ion channels, cytoskeletal proteins, and signaling molecules. Mechanical forces such as tension, compression, or fluid flow can activate these components, leading to alterations in gene expression, protein synthesis, and cell shape or movement. Cellular mechanotransduction plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, as well as in pathological conditions such as fibrosis and cancer progression.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Keratinocytes are the predominant type of cells found in the epidermis, which is the outermost layer of the skin. These cells are responsible for producing keratin, a tough protein that provides structural support and protection to the skin. Keratinocytes undergo constant turnover, with new cells produced in the basal layer of the epidermis and older cells moving upward and eventually becoming flattened and filled with keratin as they reach the surface of the skin, where they are then shed. They also play a role in the immune response and can release cytokines and other signaling molecules to help protect the body from infection and injury.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Blocking antibodies are a type of antibody that binds to a specific antigen but does not cause the immune system to directly attack the antigen. Instead, blocking antibodies prevent the antigen from interacting with other molecules or receptors, effectively "blocking" its activity. This can be useful in therapeutic settings, where blocking antibodies can be used to inhibit the activity of harmful proteins or toxins.

For example, some blocking antibodies have been developed to target and block the activity of specific cytokines, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation and immune responses. By blocking the interaction between the cytokine and its receptor, these antibodies can help to reduce inflammation and alleviate symptoms in certain autoimmune diseases or chronic inflammatory conditions.

It's important to note that while blocking antibodies can be useful for therapeutic purposes, they can also have unintended consequences if they block the activity of essential proteins or molecules. Therefore, careful consideration and testing are required before using blocking antibodies as a treatment.

Cell communication, also known as cell signaling, is the process by which cells exchange and transmit signals between each other and their environment. This complex system allows cells to coordinate their functions and maintain tissue homeostasis. Cell communication can occur through various mechanisms including:

1. Autocrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on the same cell, leading to changes in its behavior or function.
2. Paracrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on nearby cells, influencing their behavior or function.
3. Endocrine signaling: When a cell releases a hormone into the bloodstream, which then travels to distant target cells and binds to specific receptors, triggering a response.
4. Synaptic signaling: In neurons, communication occurs through the release of neurotransmitters that cross the synapse and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, transmitting electrical or chemical signals.
5. Contact-dependent signaling: When cells physically interact with each other, allowing for the direct exchange of signals and information.

Cell communication is essential for various physiological processes such as growth, development, differentiation, metabolism, immune response, and tissue repair. Dysregulation in cell communication can contribute to diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cell aggregation is the process by which individual cells come together and adhere to each other to form a group or cluster. This phenomenon can occur naturally during embryonic development, tissue repair, and wound healing, as well as in the formation of multicellular organisms such as slime molds. In some cases, cell aggregation may also be induced in the laboratory setting through the use of various techniques, including the use of cell culture surfaces that promote cell-to-cell adhesion or the addition of factors that stimulate the expression of adhesion molecules on the cell surface.

Cell aggregation can be influenced by a variety of factors, including the type and properties of the cells involved, as well as environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and nutrient availability. The ability of cells to aggregate is often mediated by the presence of adhesion molecules on the cell surface, such as cadherins, integrins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs). These molecules interact with each other and with extracellular matrix components to promote cell-to-cell adhesion and maintain the stability of the aggregate.

In some contexts, abnormal or excessive cell aggregation can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, and inflammatory disorders. For example, the aggregation of cancer cells can facilitate their invasion and metastasis, while the accumulation of fibrotic cells in tissues can lead to organ dysfunction and failure. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell aggregation is therefore an important area of research with potential implications for the development of new therapies and treatments for a variety of diseases.

Collagen Type IV is a type of collagen that forms the structural basis of basement membranes, which are thin, sheet-like structures that separate and support cells in many types of tissues. It is a major component of the basement membrane's extracellular matrix and provides strength and flexibility to this structure. Collagen Type IV is composed of three chains that form a distinctive, mesh-like structure. Mutations in the genes encoding Collagen Type IV can lead to a variety of inherited disorders affecting the kidneys, eyes, and ears.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

Cytoplasm is the material within a eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) that lies between the nuclear membrane and the cell membrane. It is composed of an aqueous solution called cytosol, in which various organelles such as mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and vacuoles are suspended. Cytoplasm also contains a variety of dissolved nutrients, metabolites, ions, and enzymes that are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and transport. It is where most of the cell's metabolic activities take place, and it plays a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the cell.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

K562 cells are a type of human cancer cell that are commonly used in scientific research. They are derived from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow.

K562 cells are often used as a model system to study various biological processes, including cell signaling, gene expression, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are also commonly used in drug discovery and development, as they can be used to test the effectiveness of potential new therapies against cancer.

K562 cells have several characteristics that make them useful for research purposes. They are easy to grow and maintain in culture, and they can be manipulated genetically to express or knock down specific genes. Additionally, K562 cells are capable of differentiating into various cell types, such as red blood cells and megakaryocytes, which allows researchers to study the mechanisms of cell differentiation.

It's important to note that while K562 cells are a valuable tool for research, they do not fully recapitulate the complexity of human CML or other cancers. Therefore, findings from studies using K562 cells should be validated in more complex model systems or in clinical trials before they can be translated into treatments for patients.

Receptor aggregation, also known as receptor clustering or patching, is a process that occurs when multiple receptor proteins, which are typically found dispersed on the cell membrane, come together and form a cluster or aggregate in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as ligand-induced dimerization, conformational changes, or interactions with intracellular signaling molecules.

Receptor aggregation can lead to changes in receptor function, including increased sensitivity, altered signaling properties, and internalization of the receptors. This process plays an important role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, immune response, and neuronal communication. However, abnormal receptor aggregation has also been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Glycoprotein IIb (also known as integrin αIIbβ3 or CD41/CD61) is a type of protein found on the surface of platelets, which are small cell fragments involved in blood clotting. This glycoprotein plays a crucial role in the final pathway of platelet activation and aggregation, which ultimately leads to the formation of a clot to stop bleeding.

More specifically, Glycoprotein IIb is responsible for binding fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins in the blood, allowing platelets to bind together and form a clot. Mutations or defects in this glycoprotein can lead to bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia, which is characterized by abnormal platelet function and excessive bleeding.

Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is widely distributed in many tissues, including bone, teeth, and mineralized tissues. It plays important roles in various biological processes such as bone remodeling, immune response, wound healing, and tissue repair. In the skeletal system, osteopontin is involved in the regulation of bone formation and resorption by modulating the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. It also plays a role in the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and cancer metastasis to bones. Osteopontin is considered a potential biomarker for various disease states, including bone turnover, cardiovascular disease, and cancer progression.

CD98, also known as 4F2 cell surface antigen or solute carrier family 3 member 2 (SLC3A2), is a heterodimeric amino acid transporter protein. It is composed of two subunits: a heavy chain (CD98hc) and a light chain (4F2hc). CD98 is widely expressed in various tissues, including hematopoietic cells, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells.

As an antigen, CD98 can be recognized by specific antibodies and play a role in immune responses. The protein is involved in several biological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. It also functions as a receptor for certain viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV).

CD98 has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases. In cancer, CD98 overexpression has been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. In autoimmune disorders, CD98 may contribute to the pathogenesis of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In infectious diseases, CD98 can serve as a target for viral entry and replication.

Overall, CD98 is a multifunctional protein that plays important roles in various physiological and pathological processes, making it an attractive target for therapeutic interventions.

Virus receptors are specific molecules (commonly proteins) on the surface of host cells that viruses bind to in order to enter and infect those cells. This interaction between the virus and its receptor is a critical step in the infection process. Different types of viruses have different receptor requirements, and identifying these receptors can provide important insights into the biology of the virus and potential targets for antiviral therapies.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

CD47 is a cell surface protein that acts as a type of "marker" on certain cells in the body, including red blood cells and immune cells. It is sometimes referred to as an "antigen" because it can be recognized by other proteins called receptors, which can trigger various responses in the body.

CD47 plays a role in regulating the immune response and protecting healthy cells from being attacked by the immune system. It does this by binding to a receptor called SIRPα on certain immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. This interaction sends a "don't eat me" signal that helps prevent the immune cells from attacking and destroying the CD47-expressing cells.

CD47 has been studied in the context of various diseases, including cancer, because some cancer cells may overexpress CD47 as a way to evade the immune system. Inhibiting the interaction between CD47 and SIRPα has emerged as a potential strategy for enhancing the body's ability to fight off cancer cells.

L-Selectin, also known as LECAM-1 (Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule 1), is a type of cell adhesion molecule that is found on the surface of leukocytes (white blood cells). It plays an important role in the immune system by mediating the initial attachment and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelial lining of blood vessels, which is a critical step in the process of inflammation and immune response.

L-Selectin recognizes specific sugar structures called sialyl Lewis x (sLeX) and related structures on the surface of endothelial cells, allowing leukocytes to bind to them. This interaction helps to slow down the leukocytes and facilitate their extravasation from the blood vessels into the surrounding tissues, where they can carry out their immune functions.

L-Selectin is involved in a variety of immunological processes, including the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of infection or injury, the homing of lymphocytes to lymphoid organs, and the regulation of immune cell trafficking under homeostatic conditions.

Cytochalasin D is a toxin produced by certain fungi that inhibits the polymerization and elongation of actin filaments, which are crucial components of the cytoskeleton in cells. This results in the disruption of various cellular processes such as cell division, motility, and shape maintenance. It is often used in research to study actin dynamics and cellular structure.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that are part of the immune system. They are large cells with a round or oval shape and a nucleus that is typically indented or horseshoe-shaped. Monocytes are produced in the bone marrow and then circulate in the bloodstream, where they can differentiate into other types of immune cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells.

Monocytes play an important role in the body's defense against infection and tissue damage. They are able to engulf and digest foreign particles, microorganisms, and dead or damaged cells, which helps to clear them from the body. Monocytes also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help to coordinate the immune response.

Elevated levels of monocytes in the bloodstream can be a sign of an ongoing infection, inflammation, or other medical conditions such as cancer or autoimmune disorders.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

The umbilical veins are blood vessels in the umbilical cord that carry oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the developing fetus during pregnancy. There are typically two umbilical veins, one of which usually degenerates and becomes obliterated, leaving a single functional vein. This remaining vein is known as the larger umbilical vein or the venous duct. It enters the fetal abdomen through the umbilicus and passes through the liver, where it branches off to form the portal sinus. Ultimately, the blood from the umbilical vein mixes with the blood from the inferior vena cava and is pumped to the heart through the right atrium.

It's important to note that after birth, the umbilical veins are no longer needed and undergo involution, becoming the ligamentum teres in the adult.

Cell surface receptors, also known as membrane receptors, are proteins located on the cell membrane that bind to specific molecules outside the cell, known as ligands. These receptors play a crucial role in signal transduction, which is the process of converting an extracellular signal into an intracellular response.

Cell surface receptors can be classified into several categories based on their structure and mechanism of action, including:

1. Ion channel receptors: These receptors contain a pore that opens to allow ions to flow across the cell membrane when they bind to their ligands. This ion flux can directly activate or inhibit various cellular processes.
2. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These receptors consist of seven transmembrane domains and are associated with heterotrimeric G proteins that modulate intracellular signaling pathways upon ligand binding.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity or are linked to an enzyme, which becomes activated when the receptor binds to its ligand. This activation can lead to the initiation of various signaling cascades within the cell.
4. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These receptors contain intracellular tyrosine kinase domains that become activated upon ligand binding, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling molecules.
5. Integrins: These receptors are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions by binding to extracellular matrix proteins or counter-receptors on adjacent cells. They play essential roles in cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

Cell surface receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and cell growth and differentiation. Dysregulation of these receptors can contribute to the development of numerous diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Enzyme activation refers to the process by which an enzyme becomes biologically active and capable of carrying out its specific chemical or biological reaction. This is often achieved through various post-translational modifications, such as proteolytic cleavage, phosphorylation, or addition of cofactors or prosthetic groups to the enzyme molecule. These modifications can change the conformation or structure of the enzyme, exposing or creating a binding site for the substrate and allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

For example, in the case of proteolytic cleavage, an inactive precursor enzyme, known as a zymogen, is cleaved into its active form by a specific protease. This is seen in enzymes such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are initially produced in the pancreas as inactive precursors called trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, respectively. Once they reach the small intestine, they are activated by enteropeptidase, a protease that cleaves a specific peptide bond, releasing the active enzyme.

Phosphorylation is another common mechanism of enzyme activation, where a phosphate group is added to a specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residue on the enzyme by a protein kinase. This modification can alter the conformation of the enzyme and create a binding site for the substrate, allowing the enzymatic reaction to occur.

Enzyme activation is a crucial process in many biological pathways, as it allows for precise control over when and where specific reactions take place. It also provides a mechanism for regulating enzyme activity in response to various signals and stimuli, such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or changes in the intracellular environment.

N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine (fMLP) is not a medical condition, but rather a synthetic peptide that is often used in laboratory settings for research purposes. It is a formylated methionine residue linked to a leucine and phenylalanine tripeptide.

fMLP is a potent chemoattractant for certain types of white blood cells, including neutrophils and monocytes. When these cells encounter fMLP, they are stimulated to migrate towards the source of the peptide and release various inflammatory mediators. As such, fMLP is often used in studies of inflammation, immune cell function, and signal transduction pathways.

It's important to note that while fMLP has important research applications, it is not a substance that would be encountered or used in clinical medicine.

Collagen Type I is the most abundant form of collagen in the human body, found in various connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. It is a structural protein that provides strength and integrity to these tissues. Collagen Type I is composed of three alpha chains, two alpha-1(I) chains, and one alpha-2(I) chain, arranged in a triple helix structure. This type of collagen is often used in medical research and clinical applications, such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, due to its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

Tyrosine is an non-essential amino acid, which means that it can be synthesized by the human body from another amino acid called phenylalanine. Its name is derived from the Greek word "tyros," which means cheese, as it was first isolated from casein, a protein found in cheese.

Tyrosine plays a crucial role in the production of several important substances in the body, including neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, which are involved in various physiological processes, including mood regulation, stress response, and cognitive functions. It also serves as a precursor to melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair, and eye color.

In addition, tyrosine is involved in the structure of proteins and is essential for normal growth and development. Some individuals may require tyrosine supplementation if they have a genetic disorder that affects tyrosine metabolism or if they are phenylketonurics (PKU), who cannot metabolize phenylalanine, which can lead to elevated tyrosine levels in the blood. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any supplementation regimen.

RhoA (Ras Homolog Family Member A) is a small GTPase protein that acts as a molecular switch, cycling between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. It plays a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes such as actin cytoskeleton organization, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and cell migration.

RhoA GTP-binding protein becomes activated when it binds to GTP, and this activation leads to the recruitment of downstream effectors that mediate its functions. The activity of RhoA is tightly regulated by several proteins, including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that promote the exchange of GDP for GTP, GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) that stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of RhoA to hydrolyze GTP to GDP and return it to an inactive state, and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) that sequester RhoA in the cytoplasm and prevent its association with the membrane.

Mutations or dysregulation of RhoA GTP-binding protein have been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.

Cadherins are a type of cell adhesion molecule that play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of intercellular junctions. They are transmembrane proteins that mediate calcium-dependent homophilic binding between adjacent cells, meaning that they bind to identical cadherin molecules on neighboring cells.

There are several types of cadherins, including classical cadherins, desmosomal cadherins, and protocadherins, each with distinct functions and localization in tissues. Classical cadherins, also known as type I cadherins, are the most well-studied and are essential for the formation of adherens junctions, which help to maintain cell-to-cell contact and tissue architecture.

Desmosomal cadherins, on the other hand, are critical for the formation and maintenance of desmosomes, which are specialized intercellular junctions that provide mechanical strength and stability to tissues. Protocadherins are a diverse family of cadherin-related proteins that have been implicated in various developmental processes, including neuronal connectivity and tissue patterning.

Mutations in cadherin genes have been associated with several human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and heart defects. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of cadherins is essential for elucidating their roles in health and disease.

Syndecan-4 is a type of cell surface proteoglycan, which is a type of protein that contains covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). It is a member of the syndecan family, which includes four members (syndecan-1, -2, -3, and -4) that are involved in various cellular functions such as cell adhesion, migration, and growth regulation.

Syndecan-4 is widely expressed in many tissues, including the vascular endothelium, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells. It has a single transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail that interacts with intracellular signaling molecules, making it a key player in signal transduction pathways.

Syndecan-4 is involved in various biological processes such as wound healing, inflammation, and angiogenesis. It has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival, as well as in the modulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and turnover. Dysregulation of syndecan-4 expression or function has been associated with various pathological conditions such as cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular diseases.

"Cricetulus" is a genus of rodents that includes several species of hamsters. These small, burrowing animals are native to Asia and have a body length of about 8-15 centimeters, with a tail that is usually shorter than the body. They are characterized by their large cheek pouches, which they use to store food. Some common species in this genus include the Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) and the Daurian hamster (Cricetulus dauuricus). These animals are often kept as pets or used in laboratory research.

Physiologic neovascularization is the natural and controlled formation of new blood vessels in the body, which occurs as a part of normal growth and development, as well as in response to tissue repair and wound healing. This process involves the activation of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, and their migration, proliferation, and tube formation to create new capillaries. Physiologic neovascularization is tightly regulated by a balance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, ensuring that it occurs only when and where it is needed. It plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.

Confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used in medical and biological research to obtain high-resolution, contrast-rich images of thick samples. This super-resolution technology provides detailed visualization of cellular structures and processes at various depths within a specimen.

In confocal microscopy, a laser beam focused through a pinhole illuminates a small spot within the sample. The emitted fluorescence or reflected light from this spot is then collected by a detector, passing through a second pinhole that ensures only light from the focal plane reaches the detector. This process eliminates out-of-focus light, resulting in sharp images with improved contrast compared to conventional widefield microscopy.

By scanning the laser beam across the sample in a raster pattern and collecting fluorescence at each point, confocal microscopy generates optical sections of the specimen. These sections can be combined to create three-dimensional reconstructions, allowing researchers to study cellular architecture and interactions within complex tissues.

Confocal microscopy has numerous applications in medical research, including studying protein localization, tracking intracellular dynamics, analyzing cell morphology, and investigating disease mechanisms at the cellular level. Additionally, it is widely used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, such as analyzing skin lesions or detecting pathogens in patient samples.

CD11b, also known as integrin αM or Mac-1, is not an antigen itself but a protein that forms part of a family of cell surface receptors called integrins. These integrins play a crucial role in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling.

CD11b combines with CD18 (integrin β2) to form the heterodimeric integrin αMβ2, also known as Mac-1 or CR3 (complement receptor 3). This integrin is primarily expressed on the surface of myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils.

As an integral part of the immune system, CD11b/CD18 recognizes and binds to various ligands, including:

1. Icosahedral bacterial components like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and peptidoglycans
2. Fragments of complement component C3b (iC3b)
3. Fibrinogen and other extracellular matrix proteins
4. Certain immune cell receptors, such as ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1)

The binding of CD11b/CD18 to these ligands triggers various intracellular signaling pathways that regulate the immune response and inflammation. In this context, antigens are substances (usually proteins or polysaccharides) found on the surface of cells, viruses, or bacteria that can be recognized by the immune system. CD11b/CD18 plays a role in recognizing and responding to these antigens during an immune response.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Jurkat cells are a type of human immortalized T lymphocyte (a type of white blood cell) cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. They were originally isolated from the peripheral blood of a patient with acute T-cell leukemia. Jurkat cells are widely used as a model system to study T-cell activation, signal transduction, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are also used in the study of HIV infection and replication, as they can be infected with the virus and used to investigate viral replication and host cell responses.

Actinin is a protein that belongs to the family of actin-binding proteins. It plays an important role in the organization and stability of the cytoskeleton, which is the structural framework of a cell. Specifically, actinin crosslinks actin filaments into bundles or networks, providing strength and rigidity to the cell structure. There are several isoforms of actinin, with alpha-actinin and gamma-actinin being widely studied. Alpha-actinin is found in the Z-discs of sarcomeres in muscle cells, where it helps anchor actin filaments and maintains the structural integrity of the muscle. Gamma-actinin is primarily located at cell-cell junctions and participates in cell adhesion and signaling processes.

Filamins are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the structure and function of the cytoskeleton, which is the internal framework of cells. They belong to a family of proteins known as "cytoskeletal cross-linking proteins." There are three main types of filamins (A, B, and C) in humans, encoded by different genes but sharing similar structures and functions.

Filamins have several domains that allow them to interact with various cellular components, including actin filaments, membrane receptors, signaling molecules, and other structural proteins. One of their primary roles is to connect actin filaments to each other and to other cellular structures, providing stability and organization to the cytoskeleton. This helps maintain cell shape, facilitate cell movement, and enable proper intracellular transport.

Additionally, filamins are involved in various signaling pathways and can regulate cellular processes such as gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Dysregulation of filamin function has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disorders, neurological conditions, and musculoskeletal disorders.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Cell polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of membrane components, cytoskeleton, and organelles in a cell. This asymmetry is crucial for various cellular functions such as directed transport, cell division, and signal transduction. The plasma membrane of polarized cells exhibits distinct domains with unique protein and lipid compositions that define apical, basal, and lateral surfaces of the cell.

In epithelial cells, for example, the apical surface faces the lumen or external environment, while the basolateral surface interacts with other cells or the extracellular matrix. The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity are regulated by various factors including protein complexes, lipids, and small GTPases. Loss of cell polarity has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2), also known as Protein Tyrosine Kinase 2 beta (PTK2B), is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival. FAK2 is structurally similar to Focal Adhesion Kinase 1 (FAK1 or PTK2A) but has distinct functions and expression patterns.

FAK2 contains several functional domains, such as an N-terminal FERM domain, a central kinase domain, a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain, and proline-rich regions that interact with various signaling proteins. FAK2 is activated by autophosphorylation at the Y397 residue upon integrin clustering or growth factor receptor activation, which leads to the recruitment of downstream effectors and the initiation of intracellular signaling cascades.

FAK2 has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disorders. In cancer, FAK2 overexpression or hyperactivation promotes tumor cell survival, invasion, and metastasis, making it an attractive therapeutic target for anticancer therapy. However, the role of FAK2 in physiological processes is still not fully understood and requires further investigation.

The Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a transmembrane protein that serves as a receptor for several viruses, including Coxsackieviruses and certain types of Adenoviruses. The "Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein" likely refers to a membrane protein that shares structural or functional similarities with the CAR protein.

The CAR protein is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and is widely expressed in various tissues, including the heart, lungs, and nervous system. It plays important roles in cell adhesion, tissue development, and repair, as well as serving as an entry point for certain viruses to infect cells.

The CAR-like membrane protein may have similar functions or structures to the CAR protein, but its specific identity and role are not clearly defined in the medical literature. It is possible that it could be a target for viral infection or play a role in cellular processes, but further research is needed to confirm these possibilities.

Amino acid motifs are recurring patterns or sequences of amino acids in a protein molecule. These motifs can be identified through various sequence analysis techniques and often have functional or structural significance. They can be as short as two amino acids in length, but typically contain at least three to five residues.

Some common examples of amino acid motifs include:

1. Active site motifs: These are specific sequences of amino acids that form the active site of an enzyme and participate in catalyzing chemical reactions. For example, the catalytic triad in serine proteases consists of three residues (serine, histidine, and aspartate) that work together to hydrolyze peptide bonds.
2. Signal peptide motifs: These are sequences of amino acids that target proteins for secretion or localization to specific organelles within the cell. For example, a typical signal peptide consists of a positively charged n-region, a hydrophobic h-region, and a polar c-region that directs the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for translocation.
3. Zinc finger motifs: These are structural domains that contain conserved sequences of amino acids that bind zinc ions and play important roles in DNA recognition and regulation of gene expression.
4. Transmembrane motifs: These are sequences of hydrophobic amino acids that span the lipid bilayer of cell membranes and anchor transmembrane proteins in place.
5. Phosphorylation sites: These are specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues that can be phosphorylated by protein kinases to regulate protein function.

Understanding amino acid motifs is important for predicting protein structure and function, as well as for identifying potential drug targets in disease-associated proteins.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Video microscopy is a medical technique that involves the use of a microscope equipped with a video camera to capture and display real-time images of specimens on a monitor. This allows for the observation and documentation of dynamic processes, such as cell movement or chemical reactions, at a level of detail that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with the naked eye. Video microscopy can also be used in conjunction with image analysis software to measure various parameters, such as size, shape, and motion, of individual cells or structures within the specimen.

There are several types of video microscopy, including brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, fluorescence, and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Each type uses different optical techniques to enhance contrast and reveal specific features of the specimen. For example, fluorescence microscopy uses fluorescent dyes or proteins to label specific structures within the specimen, allowing them to be visualized against a dark background.

Video microscopy is used in various fields of medicine, including pathology, microbiology, and neuroscience. It can help researchers and clinicians diagnose diseases, study disease mechanisms, develop new therapies, and understand fundamental biological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

Cell culture is a technique used in scientific research to grow and maintain cells from plants, animals, or humans in a controlled environment outside of their original organism. This environment typically consists of a sterile container called a cell culture flask or plate, and a nutrient-rich liquid medium that provides the necessary components for the cells' growth and survival, such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and hormones.

There are several different types of cell culture techniques used in research, including:

1. Adherent cell culture: In this technique, cells are grown on a flat surface, such as the bottom of a tissue culture dish or flask. The cells attach to the surface and spread out, forming a monolayer that can be observed and manipulated under a microscope.
2. Suspension cell culture: In suspension culture, cells are grown in liquid medium without any attachment to a solid surface. These cells remain suspended in the medium and can be agitated or mixed to ensure even distribution of nutrients.
3. Organoid culture: Organoids are three-dimensional structures that resemble miniature organs and are grown from stem cells or other progenitor cells. They can be used to study organ development, disease processes, and drug responses.
4. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more different types of cells are grown together in the same culture dish or flask. This technique is used to study cell-cell interactions and communication.
5. Conditioned medium culture: In this technique, cells are grown in a medium that has been conditioned by previous cultures of other cells. The conditioned medium contains factors secreted by the previous cells that can influence the growth and behavior of the new cells.

Cell culture techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study cellular processes, develop drugs, test toxicity, and investigate disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that cell cultures may not always accurately represent the behavior of cells in a living organism, and results from cell culture experiments should be validated using other methods.

Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified by the addition of a phosphate group (-PO3H2) onto specific amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. This process is known as phosphorylation and is mediated by enzymes called kinases. Phosphoproteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, metabolism, and gene expression. The addition or removal of a phosphate group can activate or inhibit the function of a protein, thereby serving as a switch to control its activity. Phosphoproteins can be detected and quantified using techniques such as Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunofluorescence.

Leukocyte rolling is a crucial step in the process of leukocytes (white blood cells) migrating from the bloodstream to the site of infection or inflammation, which is known as extravasation. This phenomenon is mediated by the interaction between selectins on the surface of endothelial cells and their ligands on leukocytes.

The multi-step adhesion cascade begins with leukocyte rolling, where leukocytes move along the vessel wall in a slow, rolling motion. This is facilitated by the transient interactions between selectins (P-selectin, E-selectin, and L-selectin) on endothelial cells and their ligands (PSGL-1, CD44, and others) on leukocytes. These interactions are weak and short-lived but sufficient to reduce the leukocyte's velocity and enable it to roll along the vessel wall.

Leukocyte rolling allows the leukocytes to come in close contact with the endothelium, where they can receive further signals that promote their activation and firm adhesion. This process is critical for the immune response to infection and inflammation, as it enables the recruitment of effector cells to the site of injury or infection.

Cell size refers to the volume or spatial dimensions of a cell, which can vary widely depending on the type and function of the cell. In general, eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus) tend to be larger than prokaryotic cells (cells without a true nucleus). The size of a cell is determined by various factors such as genetic makeup, the cell's role in the organism, and its environment.

The study of cell size and its relationship to cell function is an active area of research in biology, with implications for our understanding of cellular processes, evolution, and disease. For example, changes in cell size have been linked to various pathological conditions, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, measuring and analyzing cell size can provide valuable insights into the health and function of cells and tissues.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

The actin cytoskeleton is a complex, dynamic network of filamentous (threadlike) proteins that provides structural support and shape to cells, allows for cell movement and division, and plays a role in intracellular transport. Actin filaments are composed of actin monomers that polymerize to form long, thin fibers. These filaments can be organized into different structures, such as stress fibers, which provide tension and support, or lamellipodia and filopodia, which are involved in cell motility. The actin cytoskeleton is constantly remodeling in response to various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing for changes in cell shape and behavior.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Snake venoms are complex mixtures of bioactive compounds produced by specialized glands in snakes. They primarily consist of proteins and peptides, including enzymes, neurotoxins, hemotoxins, cytotoxins, and cardiotoxins. These toxins can cause a variety of pharmacological effects on the victim's body, such as disruption of the nervous system, blood coagulation, muscle function, and cell membrane integrity, ultimately leading to tissue damage and potentially death. The composition of snake venoms varies widely among different species, making each species' venom unique in its toxicity profile.

Rho GTP-binding proteins are a subfamily of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, which function as molecular switches in various cellular signaling pathways. These proteins play crucial roles in regulating diverse cellular processes such as actin cytoskeleton dynamics, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and cell migration.

Rho GTP-binding proteins cycle between an active GTP-bound state and an inactive GDP-bound state. In the active state, they interact with various downstream effectors to regulate their respective cellular functions. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho GTP-binding proteins by promoting the exchange of GDP for GTP, while GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inactivate them by enhancing their intrinsic GTP hydrolysis activity.

There are several members of the Rho GTP-binding protein family, including RhoA, RhoB, RhoC, Rac1, Rac2, Rac3, Cdc42, and Rnd proteins, each with distinct functions and downstream effectors. Dysregulation of Rho GTP-binding proteins has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

CD98 heavy chain is a type of protein found on the surface of many different types of cells in the human body. It is also known as SLCA1 or 4F2hc. The CD98 heavy chain combines with various other proteins to form transporter proteins, which are involved in the transport of various molecules across the cell membrane.

In the context of immunology and medical terminology, antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. The CD98 heavy chain is not typically referred to as an antigen itself, but it may contribute to the overall antigenic properties of the cell expressing it.

However, it's important to note that the term "CD98 Heavy Chain" refers to a specific protein and not a medical condition or disease. If you have any specific concerns about this protein or its role in health and disease, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or a researcher in the field of immunology.

Mucoproteins are a type of complex protein that contain covalently bound carbohydrate chains, also known as glycoproteins. They are found in various biological tissues and fluids, including mucous secretions, blood, and connective tissue. In mucous secretions, mucoproteins help to form a protective layer over epithelial surfaces, such as the lining of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, by providing lubrication, hydration, and protection against pathogens and environmental insults.

The carbohydrate chains in mucoproteins are composed of various sugars, including hexoses, hexosamines, and sialic acids, which can vary in length and composition depending on the specific protein. These carbohydrate chains play important roles in the structure and function of mucoproteins, such as modulating their solubility, stability, and interactions with other molecules.

Mucoproteins have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and tissue repair. Abnormalities in the structure or function of mucoproteins have been associated with several diseases, such as mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiencies in enzymes that break down glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are long, unbranched carbohydrate chains found in mucoproteins.

"Viper venoms" refer to the toxic secretions produced by members of the Viperidae family of snakes, which include pit vipers (such as rattlesnakes, copperheads, and cottonmouths) and true vipers (like adders, vipers, and gaboon vipers). These venoms are complex mixtures of proteins, enzymes, and other bioactive molecules that can cause a wide range of symptoms in prey or predators, including local tissue damage, pain, swelling, bleeding, and potentially life-threatening systemic effects such as coagulopathy, cardiovascular shock, and respiratory failure.

The composition of viper venoms varies widely between different species and even among individuals within the same species. However, many viper venoms contain a variety of enzymes (such as phospholipases A2, metalloproteinases, and serine proteases) that can cause tissue damage and disrupt vital physiological processes in the victim. Additionally, some viper venoms contain neurotoxins that can affect the nervous system and cause paralysis or other neurological symptoms.

Understanding the composition and mechanisms of action of viper venoms is important for developing effective treatments for venomous snakebites, as well as for gaining insights into the evolution and ecology of these fascinating and diverse creatures.

Integrins are found in all animals while integrin-like receptors are found in plant cells. Integrins work alongside other ... The following are 16 of the ~24 integrins found in vertebrates: Beta-1 integrins interact with many alpha integrin chains. Gene ... integrins of the β2 family). This α-I domain is the binding site for ligands of such integrins. Those integrins that don't ... Which ligand in the ECM the integrin can bind to is defined by which α and β subunits the integrin is made of. Among the ...
... (p150,95, CR4) is a complement receptor composed of CD11c and CD18. Integrin+alphaXbeta2 at the U.S. ...
The CD49b protein is an integrin alpha subunit. It makes up half of the α2β1 integrin duplex. Integrins are heterodimeric ... Porter JC, Hogg N (1999). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends Cell ... Integrin alpha-2, or CD49b (cluster of differentiation 49b), is a protein which in humans is encoded by the CD49b gene. ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA2 integrin, alpha 2 (CD49B, alpha 2 subunit of VLA-2 receptor)". Gagliani, Nicola; Magnani, Chiara F.; Huber, ...
... (ITGAM) is one protein subunit that forms heterodimeric integrin alpha-M beta-2 (αMβ2) molecule, also known as ... and integrin αMβ2 thus belongs to the β2 subfamily (or leukocyte) integrins. αMβ2 is expressed on the surface of many ... Integrin+alphaM at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Mouse CD Antigen Chart Human CD ... CD11b, as an integrin molecule on the surface of leukocytes, plays an important role in cell migration, adhesion, and ...
This integrin associates with integrin alpha 1 and integrin alpha 2 to form integrin complexes which function as collagen ... Integrin beta-1 is the most abundant beta-integrin expressed and associates with at least 10 different integrin-alpha subunits ... It also forms dimers with integrin alpha 3 to form integrin receptors for netrin 1 and reelin. These and other integrin beta 1 ... The integrin beta-1B isoform appears to act as a dominant negative in that it inhibits cell adhesion. A second integrin beta-1 ...
Integrin alpha-6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA6 gene. The ITGA6 protein product is the integrin alpha ... For example, alpha 6 may combine with beta 4 in the integrin referred to as TSP180, or with beta 1 in the integrin VLA-6. ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA6 integrin, alpha 6". De Arcangelis A, Hamade H, Alpy F, Normand S, Bruyère E, Lefebvre O, et al. (October ... Tani TT, Mercurio AM (September 2001). "PDZ interaction sites in integrin alpha subunits. T14853, TIP/GIPC binds to a type I ...
Integrin alpha-5 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA5 gene. The product of this gene belongs to the integrin ... Porter JC, Hogg N (1999). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends Cell ... Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane proteins composed of an alpha chain and a beta chain. This gene encodes the ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA5 integrin, alpha 5 (fibronectin receptor, alpha polypeptide)". Tani, T T; Mercurio A M (Sep 2001). "PDZ ...
Integrin beta-8 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB8 gene. This gene is a member of the integrin beta chain ... This protein noncovalently binds to an alpha subunit to form a heterodimeric integrin complex. In general, integrin complexes ... "Entrez Gene: ITGB8 integrin, beta 8". Reyes SB, Narayanan AS, Lee HS, Tchaicha JH, Aldape KD, Lang FF, Tolias KF, McCarty JH ( ... 2002). "The integrin αvβ8 mediates epithelial homeostasis through MT1-MMP-dependent activation of TGF-β1". J. Cell Biol. 157 (3 ...
True homologs of integrins exist in mammals, invertebrates, and some fungi but not in plant cells. Mammalian integrins are ... Integrin-like receptors (ILRs) are found in plants and carry unique functional properties similar to true integrin proteins. ... Integrin-like receptors and integrin-linked kinases together have been implicated in surface adhesion, immune response, and ion ... Most commonly, ILRs resembles the β1 subunit found in integrin proteins. This structural similarity between ILRs and integrins ...
Integrin alpha-V is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGAV gene. ITGAV encodes integrin alpha chain V. Integrins are ... Porter JC, Hogg N (October 1998). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends ... many integrins are known to facilitate signal transduction. In mammals the integrins that include alpha-V are : Overexpression ... that combine with multiple integrin beta chains to form different integrins. Among the known associating beta chains (beta ...
... is found along with the alpha IIb chain in platelets. Integrins are known to participate in cell adhesion as ... The ITGB3 protein product is the integrin beta chain beta 3. Integrins are integral cell-surface proteins composed of an alpha ... "Thrombspondin acts via integrin-associated protein to activate the platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3". J. Biol. Chem. 272 (23): ... Integrin beta-3 (β3) or CD61 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB3 gene. CD61 is a cluster of differentiation ...
... also CD49a is an integrin alpha subunit encoded in humans by the gene ITGA1. It makes up half of the α1β1 ... Gardner, Humphrey (2014). "Integrin α1β1". I Domain Integrins. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. 819: 21-39. doi: ... 1993). "Integrin and Arg-Gly-Asp dependence of cell adhesion to the native and unfolded triple helix of collagen type VI". Exp ... 1990). "Integrin recognition of different cell-binding fragments of laminin (P1, E3, E8) and evidence that alpha 6 beta 1 but ...
Integrin alpha-10 also known as ITGA10 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA10 gene. Integrins are integral ... and sequence analysis of the integrin subunit alpha10, a beta1-associated collagen binding integrin expressed on chondrocytes ... Lehnert K, Ni J, Leung E, Gough S, Morris CM, Liu D, Wang SX, Langley R, Krissansen GW (1999). "The integrin alpha10 subunit: ... The I-domain containing alpha 10 combines with the integrin beta 1 chain (ITGB1) to form a novel collagen type II-binding ...
CD11c is an integrin alpha X chain protein. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane proteins composed of an alpha chain ... "Entrez Gene: ITGAX integrin, alpha X (complement component 3 receptor 4 subunit)". Dyer KD, Garcia-Crespo KE, Killoran KE, ... Overview of all the structural information available in the PDB for UniProt: P20702 (Integrin alpha-X) at the PDBe-KB. This ... CD11c, also known as Integrin, alpha X (complement component 3 receptor 4 subunit) (ITGAX), is a gene that encodes for CD11c . ...
The product of this gene belongs to the integrin alpha chain family of proteins. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane ... Porter JC, Hogg N (1999). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends Cell ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA4 integrin, alpha 4 (antigen CD49D, alpha 4 subunit of VLA-4 receptor)". Hadari YR, Arbel-Goren R, Levy Y, ... Unlike other integrin alpha chains, alpha 4 neither contains an I-domain, nor undergoes disulfide-linked cleavage. Alpha 4 ...
"Entrez Gene: ITGAD integrin, alpha D". Van der Vieren M, Le Trong H, Wood CL, et al. (1996). "A novel leukointegrin, alpha d ... 1999). "The leukocyte integrin alpha D beta 2 binds VCAM-1: evidence for a binding interface between I domain and VCAM-1". J. ... Integrin alpha-D is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGAD gene. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000156886 - ... 1999). "alphadbeta2 integrin is expressed on human eosinophils and functions as an alternative ligand for vascular cell ...
Integrin alpha-IIb is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA2B gene. ITGA2B, also known as CD41, encodes integrin ... Porter JC, Hogg N (1999). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends Cell ... Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane proteins composed of an alpha chain and a beta chain. Alpha chain 2b undergoes ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA2B integrin, alpha 2b (platelet glycoprotein IIb of IIb/IIIa complex, antigen CD41)". Kato, Atsushi; Kawamata ...
Integrin alpha-3 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA3 gene. ITGA3 is an integrin alpha subunit. Together with ... ITGA3 encodes the integrin alpha 3 chain. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane proteins composed of an alpha chain and ... "CD9 is expressed in extravillous trophoblasts in association with integrin alpha3 and integrin alpha5". Mol. Hum. Reprod. 5 (2 ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA3 integrin, alpha 3 (antigen CD49C, alpha 3 subunit of VLA-3 receptor)". Park KR, Inoue T, Ueda M, Hirano T, ...
"Entrez Gene: ITGA8 integrin, alpha 8". Schnapp LM, Hatch N, Ramos DM, et al. (1995). "The human integrin alpha 8 beta 1 ... 1998). "Utilization of a soluble integrin-alkaline phosphatase chimera to characterize integrin alpha 8 beta 1 receptor ... Integrin alpha-8 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA8 gene. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000077943 - ... 2003). "Integrin alpha8beta1 mediates adhesion to LAP-TGFbeta1". J. Cell Sci. 115 (Pt 23): 4641-8. doi:10.1242/jcs.00145. PMID ...
Integrin alpha-11 is a protein that, in humans, is encoded by the ITGA11 gene. This gene encodes an alpha integrin. Integrins ... integrin. A collagen-binding, I domain-containing, beta(1)-associated integrin alpha-chain present in muscle tissues". The ... March 2006). "Integrin alpha 11 is a novel type I interferon stimulated gene". Cytokine. 33 (6): 352-361. doi:10.1016/j.cyto. ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA11 integrin, alpha 11". Byström B, Carracedo S, Behndig A, Gullberg D, Pedrosa-Domellöf F (November 2009). " ...
Integrin beta-6 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB6 gene. It is the β6 subunit of the integrin αvβ6. Integrins ... One α and one β subunit associate non-covalently to form 24 unique integrins found in mammals. While some β integrin subunits ... "Entrez Gene: ITGB6 integrin, beta 6". Hynes RO (September 2002). "Integrins: bidirectional, allosteric signaling machines". ... May 1996). "Inactivation of the integrin beta 6 subunit gene reveals a role of epithelial integrins in regulating inflammation ...
Alpha-7 integrin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGA7 gene. Alpha-7 integrin is critical for modulating cell- ... Alpha-7 integrin is 128.9 kDa in molecular weight and 1181 amino acids in length. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane ... It was shown however that beta-1D integrin appears at embryonic day 11 and alpha-7 integrin does not appear until embryonic day ... The function of alpha-7 integrin, as is the case for most integrins is to mediate cell membrane interactions with extracellular ...
... is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ILK gene involved with integrin-mediated signal ... Integrins lack enzymatic activity and depend on adapters to signal proteins. ILK is linked to beta-1 and beta-3 integrin ... Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of beta-1 integrin. Multiple alternatively spliced ... Dedhar S, Williams B, Hannigan G (1999). "Integrin-linked kinase (ILK): a regulator of integrin and growth-factor signalling". ...
In molecular biology, CD18 (Integrin beta chain-2) is an integrin beta chain protein that is encoded by the ITGB2 gene in ... Integrins are integral cell-surface proteins composed of an alpha chain and a beta chain, and are crucial for cells to be able ... The beta 2 integrins have also been found in a soluble form, meaning they are not anchored into the plasma membrane of the cell ... "ITGB2 integrin subunit beta 2 [ Homo sapiens (human) ]". Verma NK, Kelleher D (August 2017). "Not Just an Adhesion Molecule: ...
Integrin beta-7 is an integrin protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB7 gene. It can pair with ITGA4 (CD49d) to form the ... Like all integrin subunits, β7 is a highly flexible, membrane-bound, extracellular protein that must pair with an α subunit for ... "Entrez Gene: ITGB7 integrin, beta 7". Byron A, Humphries JD, Askari JA, Craig SE, Mould AP, Humphries MJ (Nov 2009). "Anti- ... Yu Y, Zhu J, Mi LZ, Walz T, Sun H, Chen J, Springer TA (Jan 2012). "Structural specializations of α(4)β(7), an integrin that ...
Integrin, beta 4 (ITGB4) also known as CD104 (Cluster of Differentiation 104), is a human gene. Integrins are heterodimers ... Integrins mediate cell-matrix or cell-cell adhesion, and transduced signals that regulate gene expression and cell growth. This ... "Entrez Gene: ITGB4 integrin, beta 4". Aho S, Uitto J (Feb 1998). "Direct interaction between the intracellular domains of ... Suzuki S, Naitoh Y (Mar 1990). "Amino acid sequence of a novel integrin beta 4 subunit and primary expression of the mRNA in ...
Integrin beta-5 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGB5 gene. Integrin, beta 5 has been shown to interact with PTK2 ... 1993). "A novel integrin specificity exemplified by binding of the alpha v beta 5 integrin to the basic domain of the HIV Tat ... ITGB5 encodes a subunit of integrin that can interact with several alpha chains to form a variety of integrin heterodimers. It ... Suzuki S, Huang ZS, Tanihara H (1990). "Cloning of an integrin beta subunit exhibiting high homology with integrin beta 3 ...
This I-domain containing alpha integrin combines with the beta 2 chain (ITGB2) to form the integrin lymphocyte function- ... ITGAL gene encodes the integrin alpha L chain. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane proteins composed of an alpha ... Porter JC, Hogg N (1999). "Integrins take partners: cross-talk between integrins and other membrane receptors". Trends Cell ... Integrin, alpha L (antigen CD11A (p180), lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1; alpha polypeptide), also known as ITGAL, is ...
Høye AM, Couchman JR, Wewer UM, Fukami K, Yoneda A (May 2012). "The newcomer in the integrin family: integrin α9 in biology and ... The α9 subunit forms a heterodimeric complex with a β1 subunit to form the α9β1 integrin. This integrin participates in cell ... Cytogenetic location: 3p22.2 This gene encodes an alpha integrin. Integrins are heterodimeric integral membrane glycoproteins ... "Entrez Gene: ITGA9 integrin, alpha 9". Sulimova G, Kutsenko A, Rakhmanaliev E, Udina I, Kompaniytsev A, Protopopov A, Moisjak E ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ITGBL1 gene. This gene encodes a beta integrin- ... "Entrez Gene: Integrin subunit beta like 1". Retrieved 2018-07-18. Trynka G, Zhernakova A, Romanos J, Franke L, Hunt KA, Turner ... The encoded protein contains integrin-like cysteine-rich repeats. Alternative splicing results in multiple transcript variants ...
Integrins are found in all animals while integrin-like receptors are found in plant cells. Integrins work alongside other ... The following are 16 of the ~24 integrins found in vertebrates: Beta-1 integrins interact with many alpha integrin chains. Gene ... integrins of the β2 family). This α-I domain is the binding site for ligands of such integrins. Those integrins that dont ... Which ligand in the ECM the integrin can bind to is defined by which α and β subunits the integrin is made of. Among the ...
Jonathan Joness lab contains the insert β3-integrin and is published in FASEB J. 2002 Jun . 16(8):866-8. This plasmid is ... Microfilament-dependent movement of the beta3 integrin subunit within focal contacts of endothelial cells. Tsuruta D, Gonzales ... β3-integrin-YFP was a gift from Jonathan Jones (Addgene plasmid # 26653 ; http://n2t.net/addgene:26653 ; RRID:Addgene_26653) ...
The structure of Filamin repeat 21 bound to integrin ... Integrin alpha-IIb. B. 21. Homo sapiens. Mutation(s): 0 Gene ... Binding of talin to the cytoplasmic face of integrin activates the receptor, but how integrin is maintained in a resting state ... Structural mechanism of integrin inactivation by filamin.. Liu, J., Das, M., Yang, J., Ithychanda, S.S., Yakubenko, V.P., Plow ... Here, we report the structure of the cytoplasmic domain of human integrin αIIbβ3 bound to its inhibitor, the immunoglobin ...
The β1 integrins and motor axon outgrowth. In vitro studies with function-blocking antibodies have shown that integrins ... Development of peripheral nerves and motor neurons in the absence of β1 integrins. To examine the role of β1 integrins in the ... In vitro studies have provided evidence thatβ1 integrins in motor neurons promote neurite outgrowth, whereasβ1 integrins in ... The data also suggest that β1 integrins are not essential for agrin-induced postsynaptic differentiation. However, β1 integrins ...
Increased expression of beta7 integrins was noted on synovial T cell lines from SpA compared to RA, with discriminative ... Conclusion: Increased expression of beta7 integrins was noted on synovial T cell lines from SpA compared to RA, with ... Results: In SpA, the beta7 integrin expression was increased, compared to RA. Furthermore, an inverse relation between ... Enrichment of T cells carrying beta7 integrins in inflamed synovial tissue from patients with early spondyloarthropathy, ...
Here we develop a novel flow cytometry approach to analyze integrin αIIbβ3 functioning in ITP in comparison with Glanzmann ... suggested phospholipase C-dependent platelet pre-activation for the HFB subgroup and lower levels of functional integrin ... Our study is the first to our knowledge to evaluate integrin activation in ITP by using the native integrin αIIbβ3 ligand, ... Thus, integrin activation was added as a function of Rap1 binding to GTP, which was assumed to be influenced by activation of ...
Alpha 4 Integrin Inhibitors. Class Summary. Integrin inhibitors are emerging as options for moderate-to-severe active IBD in ... It blocks the interaction of α4β7 integrin with mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1) and inhibits the ... Vedolizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to α4β7 integrin. ...
PF00362 (Integrin_beta) Integrin, beta chain 133 381 0.023/0.023 [mitab][xml] ...
The epithelial integrin αvβ6 is expressed by many malignant carcinoma cell types, including pancreatic cancer, and thus ... Hence, combinations of existing Ga-68- and Lu-177-labeled c(FRGDLAFp(NMe)K) derivatives could be utilized for αvβ6 integrin- ... and good selectivities against other integrins (IC50 for αvβ8 ,43 nM; for α5β1 ,238 nM; and for αvβ3, αvβ5, and αIIbβ3 ,1000 nM ... complexes of these conjugates exhibited comparable αvβ6 integrin affinities (IC50 ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 nM) ...
Integrin binding to bioengineered hydrogel scaffolds is essential for tissue regrowth and regeneration, yet not all integrin ... Li, S., Nih, L. R., Bachman, H., Fei, P., Li, Y., Nam, E., … Segura, T. (2017). Hydrogels with precisely controlled integrin ... Here, we show that through engineering hydrogel materials to promote α3/α5β1 integrin binding, we can promote the formation of ... Hydrogels with precisely controlled integrin activation dictate vascular patterning and permeability. Publication , Journal ...
Stromal integrin α11 regulates PDGFR-β signaling and promotes breast cancer progression. PRIMAC, I; MAQUOI, E; BLACHER, S; ... High stromal integrin α11/PDGFRβ expression was associated with high grades and poorer clinical outcome in human BC patients. ... A clear association between integrin α11 and PDGFRβ was found at both transcriptional and histological levels in BC specimens. ... Mechanistically, the proinvasive activity of integrin α11 relies on its ability to interact with PDGFRβ in a ligand-dependent ...
... we focus on novel proteins/mechanisms that regulate integrin-adhesion mediated mechano-transduction. ... Moreover, we also explored the mechanism that drives the integrin αVβ5 clustering in FCLs, in which cell tension is also ... We characterized the role of integrin α6β4/HD and caskin2 in force generation via FA, investigated the underlying crosstalk ... Mechano-transduction mediated by integrin-based adhesion complexes: integration of cytoskeleton and adhesion dynamics. In this ...
View Human Integrin  alpha L/CD11a (Research Grade Efalizumab Biosimilar) Alexa Fluor® 488-conjugated Antibody ( ... Integrin alpha L; integrin alpha-L; integrin gene promoter; integrin, alpha L (antigen CD11A (p180), lymphocyte function- ... Home / Integrin alpha L/CD11a / Human Integrin alpha L/CD11a (Research Grade Efalizumab Biosimilar) Alexa Fluor® 488-conjugated ... Background: Integrin alpha L/CD11a. Efalizumab is a biosimilar directed against human Integrin alpha L/CD11a. ...
Various beta1 integrins and alphav integrins are present on mouse eggs. Some of these integrins are also reported to be ... Various beta1 integrins and alphav integrins are present on mouse eggs. Some of these integrins are also reported to be ... Various beta1 integrins and alphav integrins are present on mouse eggs. Some of these integrins are also reported to be ... Using alpha3 integrin null eggs, we found that the alpha3beta1 integrin was not essential for sperm-egg binding and fusion. ...
Additional experiments were performed where HBE cells were incubated with antibodies to integrin 6 or to an IgG2a antibody ( ... Additional experiments were performed where HBE cells were incubated with antibodies to integrin 6 or to an IgG2a antibody ( ... the cell surface receptor integrin 6, and the cell junction marker E-cadherin have functional functions in HBE acinar ...
If SCSM αvβ3/5 integrins help capture the NL4.3-GFP VLPs, we should be able to visualize integrin/MFG-E8/NL4.3-GFP VLP ... or integrin αvβ3 (5 μg/ml) on ice for 30 min. Non-label recombinant MFG-E8 and integrin αvβ3 was detected by antibody staining ... and αv integrins (Figure 3B). Colocalization analysis showed that approximately 85% of NL4.3-GFP colocalized on αv integrin ( ... Requirement for αv integrins and MFG-E8 to load NL4.3-GFP VLPs on the FDC network.. (A) LN TP-LSM images from control or from ...
Force-induced destabilization of focal adhesions at defined integrin spacings on nanostructured surfaces. ...
... ... We investigated whether gut-tropic T cells that express the integrin α4β7 and the chemokine receptor CCR9 are required for OT. ... "Gut-tropic T Cells that Express Integrin α4β7 and CCR9 are Required for Induction of Oral Immune Tolerance in Mice" 141, no. 6 ... "Gut-tropic T Cells that Express Integrin α4β7 and CCR9 are Required for Induction of Oral Immune Tolerance in Mice" vol. 141, ...
EphrinA1 inactivates integrin-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell spreading via the Rac/PAK pathway Christophe Deroanne, ... Inhibition of integrin-mediated cell spreading by ephrinA1/Fc. Coated ephrinA1/Fc induced a sustained phosphorylation of the ... While integrin activation is required in various biological processes, such as cell-cycle progression, growth and cell survival ... Surface densities of ephrin-B1 determine EphB1-coupled activation of cell attachment through αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins. EMBO J. ...
Integrin alpha V beta 3 Protein, Human (HEK293, His-Avi), has molecular weight of 85-140 kDa. MedChemExpress offers high purity ... Integrin alpha V beta 3 Protein, Human (HEK293, His-Avi) is a recombinant protein dimer complex containing human-derived ... Integrin alpha V beta 5s integrative nature underscores its pivotal role in diverse cellular responses and signaling cascades ... Integrin alpha V beta 3 Protein, Human (HEK293, His-Avi) with excellent lot-to-lot consistency, superior biological activity ...
This review discusses the structure of integrins as well as the various roles that integrins play in the corneal wound healing ... Integrin profile abnormalities identified in various corneal pathological conditions are also reviewed. ... Integrins are cell adhesion molecules important in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. These interactions are ... This review discusses the structure of integrins as well as the various roles that integrins play in the corneal wound healing ...
A pathologic integrin growth-signaling pathway regulates aberrant IPF fibroblast proliferation on extracellular matrices ...
... is a serine-threonine kinase and scaffold protein with well defined roles in focal adhesions in integrin-mediated cell adhesio ... Integrin-linked kinase localizes to the centrosome and regulates mitotic spindle organization Andrew B. Fielding, Andrew B. ... Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine-threonine kinase and scaffold protein with well defined roles in focal adhesions in ... Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a signaling and scaffold protein localized to focal and fibrillar adhesions (Hannigan et al., ...
Integrin cell surface interactions (Homo sapiens) * Endostatin binds integrin alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5, alpha3beta1, ... Endostatin:Integrins alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5, alpha3beta1, alpha5beta1 [plasma membrane] (Homo sapiens) * Integrins ... Integrins alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5, alpha3beta1, alpha5beta1 [plasma membrane] (Bos taurus) Integrins alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5 ... Integrins alphaVbeta3, alphaVbeta5, alpha3beta1, alpha5beta1 [plasma membrane] (Mus musculus) Integrins alphaVbeta3, ...
Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ... "Integrins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Integrins" by people in this website by year, and whether " ...
We have shown previously that oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro express a limited repertoire of integrins, including α6β1, ... A role in migration for the αvβ1 integrin expressed on oligodendrocyte precursors ... astroglial matrix,differentiation,extracellular matrix,integrin,migration,oligodendrocyte,platelet-derived growth factor, ... that block αv but not α6 integrins) and anti-β1 antibodies block migration on an astrocyte-derived ECM, whereas anti-β3 ...
title = "Integrin binding peptides and uses thereof",. abstract = "The invention relates to integrin binding peptides, ... Integrin binding peptides and uses thereof. / Jai, Prakash (Inventor). Patent No.: IL258863. Jun 28, 2018.. Research output: ... Dive into the research topics of Integrin binding peptides and uses thereof. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ... The invention relates to integrin binding peptides, pharmaceutical compositions comprising the peptides and to uses thereof as ...
The key difference between cadherin and integrin is that cadherin is a cell adhesion molecule that is mainly important in cell ... Integrin is an obligate heterodimer. Integrin is found in all animals cells while integrin-like receptors can be found in ... 3. What is Integrin. 4. Similarities - Cadherin and Integrin. 5. Cadherin vs Integrin in Tabular Form. 6. Summary ... What is Integrin?. Integrin is a cell adhesion molecule that is mainly important in cell to extracellular matrix adhesion. It ...
α5 Integrin regulates hepatic tight junctions through SRC-TET1-mediated DNA hydroxymethylation. Yuejiao Ma et al.. Published:. ...
CCM1-ICAP-1 complex controls beta1 integrin-dependent endothelial contractility and fibronectin remodeling. E. Faurobert, C. ... CCM1-ICAP-1 complex controls beta1 integrin-dependent endothelial contractility and fibronectin remodeling ... CCM1-ICAP-1 complex controls beta1 integrin-dependent endothelial contractility and fibronectin remodeling ...
  • In mammals, integrins are assembled from eighteen α and eight β subunits, in Drosophila five α and two β subunits, and in Caenorhabditis nematodes two α subunits and one β subunit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those integrins that don't carry this inserted domain also have an A-domain in their ligand binding site, but this A-domain is found on the β subunit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Integrin alpha V beta 5 Proteinas, specifically the alpha-V (ITGAV) subunit, is a versatile receptor for ligands like vitronectin, fibronectin, and others , recognizing the R-G-D sequence. (medchemexpress.com)
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD I) is a failure to express CD18, which composes the common ß 2 subunit of LFA1 family (ß2 integrins). (medscape.com)
  • Integrins are transmembrane receptors that help cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Upon ligand binding, integrins activate signal transduction pathways that mediate cellular signals such as regulation of the cell cycle, organization of the intracellular cytoskeleton, and movement of new receptors to the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Integrins are found in all animals while integrin-like receptors are found in plant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of these integrins are also reported to be receptors for ADAMs, which are expressed on sperm. (lu.se)
  • These results indicate that none of the integrins known to be present on mouse eggs or to be ADAM receptors are essential for sperm-egg binding/fusion, and thus, egg integrins may not play the role in gamete fusion previously attributed to them. (lu.se)
  • Integrin is found in all animals cells while integrin-like receptors can be found in plants cells. (differencebetween.com)
  • The integrin β1 subfamily of adhesion receptors consists of 12 members and forms the biggest subfamily among integrins. (imrpress.com)
  • The blocking of integrin adhesion receptors on cells with specific antibodies revealed that the cell adhesion to the preadsorbed Gal-3 was mediated, at least partially, by beta 1 and alpha V integrins-namely alpha 5 beta 1, alpha V beta 3, and alpha V beta 1 integrins. (cas.cz)
  • Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors composed of alpha and beta subunits, which mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix attachments. (ximbio.com)
  • Integrins α-m/β-2 and α-x/β-2 are receptors for the IC3B fragment of the third complement component and for fibrinogen. (lu.se)
  • Binding of talin to the cytoplasmic face of integrin activates the receptor, but how integrin is maintained in a resting state to counterbalance its activation has remained obscure. (rcsb.org)
  • Integrin α-l/β-2 is a receptor for ICAM1, ICAM2, ICAM3 and ICAM4. (lu.se)
  • Integrin α-m/β-2 is also a receptor for Factor X. Integrin α-d/β 2 is a receptor for ICAM3 and VCAM1. (lu.se)
  • Despite many years of effort, discovering the high-resolution structure of integrins proved to be challenging, as membrane proteins are classically difficult to purify, and as integrins are large, complex and highly glycosylated with many sugar 'trees' attached to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • This review discusses the structure of integrins as well as the various roles that integrins play in the corneal wound healing process. (lsu.edu)
  • Furthermore, neither anti-mouse beta3 integrin function-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) nor alphav integrin function-blocking mAb inhibited sperm binding to or fusion with beta1 integrin null eggs. (lu.se)
  • Recombinant monoclonal antibody to Integrin beta-7. (absoluteantibody.com)
  • Immunofluorescence staining of fixed human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) with anti-Integrin beta-7 antibody FIB504 (Ab00626) Immunofluorescence analysis of paraformaldehyde fixed human PBMs on Shi-fix™ coverslips, permeabilized with 0.15% Triton and stained with the chimeric rabbit IgG version of FIB504 (Ab00626-23.0) at 10 µg/ml for 1h followed by Alexa Fluor® 488 secondary antibody (1 µg/ml), showing memrbane staining. (absoluteantibody.com)
  • The kit includes mouse monoclonal anti-Integrin β1 (IM004P) capture antibody and anti-Integrin β1 (IM041D) Isotype IgG2a detection antibody along with anti-Mouse IgG2a specific:HRP (MS3221) secondary reagent. (ecmbio.com)
  • Possible Efficacy of Vedolizumab, an Anti-α4ß7 Integrin Antibody, in Palmoplantar Pustulosis. (bvsalud.org)
  • We report a patient with PPP improved by vedolizumab (anti-α4ß7 integrin antibody) treatment for ulcerative colitis , suggesting the possibility of a new molecular target for PPP therapy . (bvsalud.org)
  • Various beta1 integrins and alphav integrins are present on mouse eggs. (lu.se)
  • Oocyte-specific, beta1 integrin conditional knockout mice allowed us to obtain mature eggs lacking. (lu.se)
  • We found that the beta1 integrin null eggs were fully functional in fertilization both in vivo and in vitro. (lu.se)
  • Thus, function of beta3 or alphav integrins does not seem to be involved in compensating for the absence of beta1 integrins. (lu.se)
  • Representative Standard Curve using mouse monoclonal anti-Integrin β1 (IM004P) for ELISA capture of human recombinant integrin α2/β1 heterodimer. (ecmbio.com)
  • Capture was detected using mouse monoclonal isotype IgG2a anti-Integrin β1 (IM041D) followed by anti-Mouse IgG2a specific:HRP. (ecmbio.com)
  • Ligands for integrins include fibronectin, vitronectin, collagen and laminin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type 1 results from mutations in the integrin beta-2 gene ( ITGB2 ), encoding CD18 beta-2 integrins. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine-threonine kinase and scaffold protein with well defined roles in focal adhesions in integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration, and signaling. (rupress.org)
  • and Temple, 2002), whereas b1 integrin was used to interscience.wiley.com). (lu.se)
  • The X-ray crystal structure obtained for the complete extracellular region of one integrin, αvβ3, shows the molecule to be folded into an inverted V-shape that potentially brings the ligand-binding sites close to the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Integrins are cell adhesion molecules important in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. (lsu.edu)
  • The key difference between cadherin and integrin is that cadherin is a cell adhesion molecule that is mainly important in cell to cell adhesion, while integrin is a cell adhesion molecule that is mainly important in cell to extracellular matrix adhesion. (differencebetween.com)
  • Integrin molecules mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and are involved in lymphocyte homing, leukocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, myogenesis, hemopoiesis, and melanoma metastasis. (absoluteantibody.com)
  • Integrin alpha V beta 3 Protein, Human (HEK293, His-Avi) is a recombinant protein dimer complex containing human-derived Integrin alpha V beta 3 protein, expressed by HEK293 , with C-His, C-Avi labeled tag. (medchemexpress.com)
  • α5 Integrin regulates hepatic tight junctions through SRC-TET1-mediated DNA hydroxymethylation. (mendeley.com)
  • The cations in the β subunits are more interesting: they are directly involved in coordinating at least some of the ligands that integrins bind. (wikipedia.org)
  • This α-I domain is the binding site for ligands of such integrins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using alpha3 integrin null eggs, we found that the alpha3beta1 integrin was not essential for sperm-egg binding and fusion. (lu.se)
  • Integrins are obligate heterodimers composed of α and β subunits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Activation of heterodimeric (αβ) integrin is crucial for regulating cell adhesion. (rcsb.org)
  • Integrins work alongside other proteins such as cadherins, the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules, selectins and syndecans, to mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • An acidic amino acid features in the integrin-interaction site of many ECM proteins, for example as part of the amino acid sequence Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid ("RGD" in the one-letter amino acid code). (wikipedia.org)
  • In this thesis, we focus on novel proteins/mechanisms that regulate integrin-adhesion mediated mechano-transduction. (universiteitleiden.nl)
  • The epithelial integrin αvβ6 is expressed by many malignant carcinoma cell types, including pancreatic cancer, and thus represents a promising target for radionuclide therapy. (cipsm.de)
  • Aberrant integrin expression has been found in many epithelial tumours. (ximbio.com)
  • Integrin subunits span the cell membrane and have short cytoplasmic domains of 40-70 amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through different combinations of the α and β subunits, 24 unique mammalian integrins are generated, excluding splice- and glycosylation variants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though cytoplasmic splice variants do not change the ligand-specificity of a β1 integrin, clustering of these different splice variants triggers signaling pathways that lead to a different cellular response. (imrpress.com)
  • The main focus of this review is on the origin and specific functions of the less abundant human integrin β1 splice variants (B, C-1, C-2, D). (imrpress.com)
  • Twenty-five synovial cell lines were generated by interleukin 2 (IL-2) expansion from synovial biopsies of patients with early SpA and RA, obtained from macroscopically inflamed synovial tissue by needle arthroscopy, and subsequently characterized by flow cytometry for CD3, CD4, CD8, L-selectin, CD11a, CD31, CD44, and alpha4beta7 and alphaEbeta7 integrin. (nih.gov)
  • OPN through interaction with CD44 or several integrins is known to regulate multiple macrophage functions. (cdc.gov)
  • The invention relates to integrin binding peptides, pharmaceutical compositions comprising the peptides and to uses thereof as therapeutic, diagnostic, imaging and targeting agents. (utwente.nl)
  • 28 2018, Integrin binding peptides and uses thereof , Patent No. IL258863. (utwente.nl)
  • Integrin α-m/β-2 recognizes P1 and P2 peptides of fibrinogen gamma chain. (lu.se)
  • In the preclinical MMTV-PyMT mouse model, integrin α11 deficiency led to a drastic reduction of tumor progression and metastasis. (uib.no)
  • Mechanistically, the proinvasive activity of integrin α11 relies on its ability to interact with PDGFRβ in a ligand-dependent manner and to promote its downstream JNK activation, leading to the production of tenascin C, a proinvasive matricellular protein. (uib.no)
  • Approved by the FDA in 2014, vedolizumab works differently: it blocks α4β7 integrin. (medscape.com)
  • The structure reveals an unexpected ternary complex in which FLNa-Ig21 not only binds to the C terminus of the integrin β3 cytoplasmic tail (CT), as previously predicted, but also engages N-terminal helices of αIIb and β3 CTs to stabilize an inter-CT clasp that helps restrain the integrin in a resting state. (rcsb.org)
  • Low-resolution images of detergent extracts of intact integrin GPIIbIIIa, obtained using electron microscopy, and even data from indirect techniques that investigate the solution properties of integrins using ultracentrifugation and light scattering, were combined with fragmentary high-resolution crystallographic or NMR data from single or paired domains of single integrin chains, and molecular models postulated for the rest of the chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Integrin alpha V beta 5's integrative nature underscores its pivotal role in diverse cellular responses and signaling cascades. (medchemexpress.com)
  • Integrin alpha V beta 3 Protein, Human (HEK293, His-Avi), has molecular weight of 85-140 kDa. (medchemexpress.com)
  • Describes the use of FIB504 in defining functional binding regions of alpha-4/beta-7 integrin by epitope mapping. (absoluteantibody.com)
  • Among the known carbapenemases are Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, or KPC, and Verona integrin-encoded metallo-Beta-lactamase, or VIM. (cdc.gov)
  • To compare the expression of adhesion molecules on synovial T cells from patients with early spondyloarthropathy (SpA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with special reference to the beta7 integrins alpha4beta7 and alphaEbeta7 in view of their intimate association with intestinal tissue. (nih.gov)
  • In this study, using rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we investigated the contribution of the small Rho GTPases in ephrinA1-induced integrin inactivation. (biologists.com)
  • Changes in integrin expression have been shown to be important for the growth and early metastatic capacity of melanoma cells. (ximbio.com)
  • Here, we report the structure of the cytoplasmic domain of human integrin αIIbβ3 bound to its inhibitor, the immunoglobin repeat 21 of filamin A (FLNa-Ig21). (rcsb.org)
  • High stromal integrin α11/PDGFRβ expression was associated with high grades and poorer clinical outcome in human BC patients. (uib.no)
  • Functional assays using 5 CAF subpopulations (1 murine, 4 human) revealed that integrin α11 promotes CAF invasion and CAF-induced tumor cell invasion upon PDGF-BB stimulation. (uib.no)
  • The Integrin β1 Paired ELISA kit can be used for capture of human Integrin β1 protein in ELISA sandwich assays of cell lysates, serum, and other liquid biological samples. (ecmbio.com)
  • The presence of integrins allows rapid and flexible responses to events at the cell surface (e.g. signal platelets to initiate an interaction with coagulation factors). (wikipedia.org)
  • In SpA, the beta7 integrin expression was increased, compared to RA. (nih.gov)
  • Increased expression of beta7 integrins was noted on synovial T cell lines from SpA compared to RA, with discriminative correlations between alpha4beta7 and alphaEbeta7. (nih.gov)
  • Integrin α-x/β 2 recognizes the sequence g-p-r in fibrinogen α-chain. (lu.se)
  • Combined with functional data, the structure reveals a new mechanism of filamin-mediated retention of inactive integrin, suggesting a new framework for understanding regulation of integrin activation and adhesion. (rcsb.org)
  • Moreover, we also explored the mechanism that drives the integrin αVβ5 clustering in FCLs, in which cell tension is also involved. (universiteitleiden.nl)
  • We characterized the role of integrin α6β4/HD and caskin2 in force generation via FA, investigated the underlying crosstalk between adhesions and cytoskeletons. (universiteitleiden.nl)
  • The presence of integrins helps rapid and flexible responses to different events on the cell surface. (differencebetween.com)
  • Integrins carrying this domain either bind to collagens (e.g. integrins α1 β1, and α2 β1), or act as cell-cell adhesion molecules (integrins of the β2 family). (wikipedia.org)
  • The following infographic lists the differences between cadherin and integrin in tabular form. (differencebetween.com)
  • Several types of integrins exist, and one cell generally has multiple different types on its surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, cadherin and integrin are two types of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. (differencebetween.com)
  • Herein, we identify an integrin α11/PDGFRβ-positive CAF subset displaying tumor-promoting features in BC. (uib.no)