Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Health Systems Plans: Statements of goals for the delivery of health services pertaining to the Health Systems Agency service area, established under PL 93-641, and consistent with national guidelines for health planning.Insurance: Coverage by contract whereby one part indemnifies or guarantees another against loss by a specified contingency.TaiwanHealth Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Insurance, Long-Term Care: Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.United StatesInsurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Republic of Korea: The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Insurance, Major Medical: Insurance providing a broad range of medical services and supplies, when prescribed by a physician, whether or not the patient is hospitalized. It frequently is an extension of a basic policy and benefits will not begin until the basic policy is exhausted.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.National Health Insurance, United StatesLogistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Insurance, Psychiatric: Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Health Insurance Exchanges: State-provided health insurance marketplaces established under the PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.

Patterns of anti-inflammatory therapy in the post-guidelines era: a retrospective claims analysis of managed care members. (1/676)

Published and widely disseminated guidelines for the care and management of asthma characterize asthma as a chronic, inflammatory disease and propose specific recommendations for therapy with inhaled anti-inflammatory medications. In a retrospective analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data of approximately 28,000 asthmatic members from five managed care settings, the dominant pattern of pharmacologic therapy that emerged was the use of bronchodilators without inhaled anti-inflammatory drug therapy. In addition, a significant proportion of asthmatic patients received no prescription drug therapy for asthma. Less than one third of asthmatic patients received any anti-inflammatory therapy and the majority of these received one or two prescriptions per year. Specialist physicians were two to three times more likely than non-specialists during a study period of 1 year to prescribe an anti-inflammatory medication, and were half as likely to have their asthmatic patients experience an emergency department or hospital event. This database analysis suggests that greater conformity with guidelines and/or access to specialist physician care for asthmatic members will lead to improved patient outcomes.  (+info)

Implications of managed care denials for pediatric inpatient care. (2/676)

With the growing penetration of managed care into the healthcare market, providers continue to experience increasing cost constraints. In this environment, it is important to track reimbursement denials and understand the managed care organization's rationale for refusal of payment. This is especially critical for providers of pediatric care, as children justifiably have unique healthcare needs and utilization patterns. We developed a system for tracking and documenting denials in our institution and found that health maintenance organizations denied claims primarily for one of three reasons: medically unnecessary care, care provided as a response to social (rather than medical) need, and provider inefficiencies. Health maintenance organization denials are also growing annually at our institutions. This knowledge can not only help providers of pediatric care more effectively negotiate future contracts, but provides an opportunity to differentiate the health needs of the pediatric patient from those of the adult. This information can be used as a basis for education, pediatric outcome studies, and guideline development--all tools that can help providers receive reasonable reimbursement for pediatric services and enable them to meet the complex health needs of children. Recommendations for action are discussed.  (+info)

Course of antidepressant treatment with tricyclic versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor agents: a comparison in managed care and fee-for-service environments. (3/676)

We compared course of treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCADs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to assess interactive effects of antidepressant type with payer type and patient characteristics. A nationwide sampling of adults (n = 4,252) from approximately equal numbers of health maintenance organization (HMO) and indemnity enrollees were prescribed no antidepressants for 9 months, and thereafter prescribed a TCAD or SSRI. Using a retrospective analysis of prescription claims, these cohorts of TCAD and SSRI utilizers were followed for 13 to 16 months after their initial antidepressant prescription. Outcome measures included (1) termination of antidepressant treatment before 1 month; and (2) failure to receive at least one therapeutic dose during treatment lasting 3 months or more. Rates of premature termination and subtherapeutic dosing were significantly higher for TCAD-treated than SSRI-treated patients, and for HMO than indemnity enrollees. The interaction of HMO enrollment and TCAD use was associated with particularly high rates. Excluding patients terminating in the first month, the proportions of TCAD and SSRI utilizers remaining in treatment over time were not significantly different. We conclude that SSRIs may provide advantages in treatment adherence and therapeutic dosing, particularly in environments with limited prescriber time. The first month of treatment may be especially critical in determining compliance.  (+info)

Differences in costs of treatment for foot problems between podiatrists and orthopedic surgeons. (4/676)

We examined charge data for health insurance claims paid in 1992 for persons under age 65 covered by a large California managed care plan. Charge and utilization comparisons between podiatrists and orthopedic surgeons were made for all foot care and for two specific foot problems, acquired toe deformities and bunions. Podiatrists provided over 59% of foot care services for this commercial population of 576,000 people. Podiatrists charged 12% less per individual service than orthopedists. However, podiatrists performed substantially more procedures per episode of care and treated patients for longer time periods, resulting in 43% higher total charges per episode. Hospitalization was infrequent for all providers, although podiatrists had the lowest rates. In a managed care setting in which all providers must adhere to a preestablished fee schedule, regardless of specialty, the higher utilization by podiatrists should lead to higher overall costs. In some cases, strong utilization controls could offset this effect. We do not know if the utilization difference is due to actual treatment or billing differences. Further, we were unable to determine from the claims data if one specialty had better outcomes than the other.  (+info)

The myths of emergency medical care access in the managed care era. (5/676)

In this paper, we examine the perception that emergency care is unusually expensive. We discuss the myths that have fueled the ineffective and sometimes deleterious efforts to limit access to emergency care. We demonstrate the reasons why these efforts are seriously flawed and propose alternate strategies that aim to improve outcomes, including cooperative ventures between hospitals and managed care organizations. We challenge managed care organizations and healthcare providers to collaborate and lead the drive to improve the cost and clinical effectiveness of emergency care.  (+info)

Monitoring patients with diabetes mellitus: an application of the probit model using managed care claims data. (6/676)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the likelihood of the use of either a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test or an eye examination, or both, among a cohort of patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. A secondary objective was to provide a step-by-step discussion of the applicability of an econometric model to managed care organizations. The study used medical and pharmacy claims data from a managed care organization for the calendar year 1995. A probit regression model was specified to estimate the probability of occurrence for either an HbA1c test or an eye examination among patients with insulin-dependent, non-insulin dependent, or atypical/unclassified diabetes. Data were available only for patients under 65 years of age due to data truncation for patients covered by Medicare, resulting in a study sample size of 6,841. Results indicate that age, presence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, multiple cardiovascular comorbidities, ophthalmic disease, and combinations of multiple commonly observed comorbidities were positively correlated with the probability of either HbA1c testing or eye examination. Gender and the type of benefit plan were not statistically significant as predictors of disease monitoring. A total of 1,860 patients with diabetes mellitus were predicted by the model to have undergone one of the two monitoring procedures; but in actuality, these patients were not monitored in 1995. They could be considered as high-risk patients who were not getting recommended monitoring. The probit model shows a predictive power of 64.48%.  (+info)

Issues of medical necessity: a medical director's guide to good faith adjudication. (7/676)

The term medical necessity is difficult to define, a problem for insurers who need to clearly describe what is and is not covered in their contracts with subscribers. An unclear, vague definition of medical necessity leaves insurers vulnerable to litigation by subscribers denied care deemed medically unnecessary. To avoid lawsuits, insurers must make every effort to educate their subscribers about their medical coverage, going beyond merely providing a lengthy subscriber handbook. In decisions on medical necessity, medical directors at insurance companies play a key role. They can bolster the insurer's position in denial-of-care cases in numerous ways, including keeping meticulous records, eliminating unreasonable financial incentives, maintaining a claims denial database, and consulting with other insurers to achieve a consensus on medical necessity.  (+info)

Health-based payment and computerized patient record systems. (8/676)

Health care information technology is changing rapidly and dramatically. A small but growing number of clinicians, especially those in staff and group model HMOs and hospital-affiliated practices, are automating their patient medical records in response to pressure to improve quality and reduce costs. Computerized patient record systems in HMOs track risks, diagnoses, patterns of care, and outcomes across large populations. These systems provide access to large amounts of clinical information; as a result, they are very useful for risk-adjusted or health-based payment. The next stage of evolution in health-based payment is to switch from fee-for-service (claims) to HMO technology in calculating risk coefficients. This will occur when HMOs accumulate data sets containing records on provider-defined disease episodes, with every service linked to its appropriate disease episode for millions of patients. Computerized patient record systems support clinically meaningful risk-assessment models and protect patients and medical groups from the effects of adverse selection. They also offer significant potential for improving quality of care.  (+info)

  • As a law clerk/staff attorney, Brent worked on matters ranging from death penalty cases to will contests, business litigation, and property claims. (justia.com)
  • In-house counsel also provide a unique and integral commercial perspective to litigation counsel defending claims that arise against the corporation. (straffordpub.com)
  • Having an understanding of potential litigation risks at the negotiation stage can help counsel facilitate claims resolution and potentially reduce costs. (straffordpub.com)
  • Patients with Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs) that use an out-of-network provider will likely need to file their own claims paperwork. (insurancequotes.org)
  • The Department of Labor (DOL) has submitted the following public information collection requests (ICRs) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. (osha.gov)
  • 1. Review all the paperwork regarding the case immediately, making sure you understand every aspect. (bankrate.com)
  • After verifying with my veterinarian I had a valid claim and filling out all the appropriate paperwork. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • The years that I have paid into the insurance plan has turned out to be a complete waste of money and time. (complaintsboard.com)
  • During 2008-2013, approximately 15% of a convenience sample of reproductive-aged women (aged 15-44 years) with employer-sponsored insurance filled a prescription for antidepressants. (cdc.gov)
  • To understand trends among women of reproductive age, CDC used Truven Health's MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters data* to estimate the number of antidepressant prescriptions filled by women aged 15-44 years with private employer-sponsored insurance. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients (N = 93,604) were health plan members aged 6-56 years with at least 2 years of enrollment between July 1, 2003, and June 30, 2007, an asthma diagnosis, and at least 1 asthma medication claim per study year. (nih.gov)
  • Two years of administrative claims were collected. (nih.gov)
  • mean age at the time of SPI claim submission was 47 years, and the mean duration of BZD treatment was 11.7 years. (nih.gov)
  • Have been paying travel insurance for the reassurance it provided for years of holidays, but never again with Tick. (comparetravelinsurance.com.au)
  • Good2Go Mature Age Travel Insurance is available and valid only for travellers aged 70 years and over at the date of departure. (good2gotravelinsurance.com.au)
  • I had this insurance for the last 2 years for my dog, it was offered as part of my work health plan, so I thought it would be great to have in case anything ever happened. (consumeraffairs.com)
  • Pros who have not received a review in the last three years do not have a rating displayed. (angieslist.com)
  • CDC used Truven Health's 2008-2013 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters databases, a large convenience sample of employed persons and their dependents with private employer-sponsored insurance, to assess outpatient prescription drug claims for antidepressants. (cdc.gov)
  • When denying claims, there is a specific timetable that insurers must stick to. (insurancequotes.org)
  • They're also dogging insurers to treat claims fairly. (kiplinger.com)
  • Fraudulent claims account for a significant portion of all claims received by insurers, and cost billions of dollars annually. (wikipedia.org)
  • The best that can be done is to provide an estimate for the losses that insurers suffer due to insurance fraud. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to some consumer advocates, some insurers have turned the contestable period into a "gotcha period," taking advantage of every possible flaw, error, misstatement or omission to reject a beneficiary's claim to death benefits. (weitzlux.com)
  • Although state laws limit exclusions, life insurers may use specific wording or particular terms ambiguously and then later interpret that language in their favor to deny a claim. (weitzlux.com)
  • However, the sector is negatively affected by the high rate of fraudulent claims.Objectives. (who.int)
  • Our office located in Sugar Land, TX is seeking an Associate Claims Service Representative . (indeed.com)
  • Farmers Insurance Agency in Kingwood/Humble is seeking a Customer Service Representative (CSR)/Agency Producer (AP) to become a part of our growing team. (indeed.com)
  • As an Insurance Customer Service Representative , you will be responsible for auto, home and Life insurance production. (indeed.com)
  • Complete formal training program for consideration of advancement to Customer Service Representative , Claim. (indeed.com)
  • Oakdale Group LLC is looking for an Insurance Customer Service Representative to join our team! (indeed.com)
  • Valuables Plus ® 1 insurance may cover items such as jewelry, watches, antiques and fine art in the event of covered losses, including theft . (nationwide.com)
  • According to the catastrophe modeling firm AIR Worldwide, Tropical Storm Isaac might cost the insurance industry as much as $2 billion in losses without adding in the cost of flooding damage. (dmillerlaw.com)
  • Damage: Without damage (losses which may be pecuniary or emotional), there is no basis for a claim, regardless of whether the medical provider was negligent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The more evidence you can provide to strengthen your claim, the better your chances of being compensated. (forthepeople.com)
  • Provide customer service, such as limited instructions on proceeding with claims or referrals to auto repair facilities or local contractors. (onetonline.org)
  • The bureau provides a number of consumer guides to provide you with information about various kinds of insurance. (maine.gov)
  • Busy SANDY SPRINGS pediatric psychology office has an immediate opening for a full time front office administrative assistant who will also provide insurance. (indeed.com)
  • When you purchase life insurance, you may feel some degree of comfort knowing that you've made a caring, conscientious decision to provide for your family after your death. (weitzlux.com)
  • Motor Insurance World will once again provide a one-stop shop for all things motor. (postonline.co.uk)
  • The Customer Review Rating percentages are based on the total number of positive, neutral, and negative reviews posted. (bbb.org)