Insulin, Long-Acting: Insulin formulations that contain substances that retard absorption thus extending the time period of action.Insulin, Isophane: An intermediate-acting INSULIN preparation with onset time of 2 hours and duration of 24 hours. It is produced by crystallizing ZINC-insulin-PROTAMINES at neutral pH 7. Thus it is called neutral protamine Hagedorn for inventor Hans Christian Hagedorn.Hypoglycemic Agents: Substances which lower blood glucose levels.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Insulin Lispro: Insulin that has been modified so that the B-chain contains a LYSINE at position 28 instead of a PROLINE and a PROLINE at position 29 instead of a LYSINE. It is used to manage BLOOD GLUCOSE levels in patients with TYPE 2 DIABETES.Hypoglycemia: A syndrome of abnormally low BLOOD GLUCOSE level. Clinical hypoglycemia has diverse etiologies. Severe hypoglycemia eventually lead to glucose deprivation of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM resulting in HUNGER; SWEATING; PARESTHESIA; impaired mental function; SEIZURES; COMA; and even DEATH.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Venoms: Poisonous animal secretions forming fluid mixtures of many different enzymes, toxins, and other substances. These substances are produced in specialized glands and secreted through specialized delivery systems (nematocysts, spines, fangs, etc.) for disabling prey or predator.Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated: Minor hemoglobin components of human erythrocytes designated A1a, A1b, and A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is most important since its sugar moiety is glucose covalently bound to the terminal amino acid of the beta chain. Since normal glycohemoglobin concentrations exclude marked blood glucose fluctuations over the preceding three to four weeks, the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin A is a more reliable index of the blood sugar average over a long period of time.Insulin, Regular, Human: Regular insulin preparations that contain the HUMAN insulin peptide sequence.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Insulins: Peptide hormones that cause an increase in the absorption of GLUCOSE by cells within organs such as LIVER, MUSCLE and ADIPOSE TISSUE. During normal metabolism insulins are produced by the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS in response to increased GLUCOSE. Natural and chemically-modified forms of insulin are also used in the treatment of GLUCOSE METABOLISM DISORDERS such as DIABETES MELLITUS.Receptor, Insulin: A cell surface receptor for INSULIN. It comprises a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits which are derived from cleavage of a single precursor protein. The receptor contains an intrinsic TYROSINE KINASE domain that is located within the beta subunit. Activation of the receptor by INSULIN results in numerous metabolic changes including increased uptake of GLUCOSE into the liver, muscle, and ADIPOSE TISSUE.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Sulfonylurea CompoundsInsulin Aspart: Insulin that has been modified to contain an ASPARTIC ACID instead of a PROLINE at position 38 of the B-chain.Metformin: A biguanide hypoglycemic agent used in the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus not responding to dietary modification. Metformin improves glycemic control by improving insulin sensitivity and decreasing intestinal absorption of glucose. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p289)Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.C-Peptide: The middle segment of proinsulin that is between the N-terminal B-chain and the C-terminal A-chain. It is a pancreatic peptide of about 31 residues, depending on the species. Upon proteolytic cleavage of proinsulin, equimolar INSULIN and C-peptide are released. C-peptide immunoassay has been used to assess pancreatic beta cell function in diabetic patients with circulating insulin antibodies or exogenous insulin. Half-life of C-peptide is 30 min, almost 8 times that of insulin.Infusions, Subcutaneous: The administration of liquid medication or nutrients under the skin, usually over minutes or hours.Drug Substitution: The practice of replacing one prescribed drug with another that is expected to have the same clinical or psychological effect.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring: Self evaluation of whole blood glucose levels outside the clinical laboratory. A digital or battery-operated reflectance meter may be used. It has wide application in controlling unstable insulin-dependent diabetes.Postprandial Period: The time frame after a meal or FOOD INTAKE.Insulin Antibodies: Antibodies specific to INSULIN.Hyperglycemia: Abnormally high BLOOD GLUCOSE level.Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins: A structurally-related group of signaling proteins that are phosphorylated by the INSULIN RECEPTOR PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE. The proteins share in common an N-terminal PHOSPHOLIPID-binding domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding domain that interacts with the phosphorylated INSULIN RECEPTOR, and a C-terminal TYROSINE-rich domain. Upon tyrosine phosphorylation insulin receptor substrate proteins interact with specific SH2 DOMAIN-containing proteins that are involved in insulin receptor signaling.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Insulin Infusion Systems: Portable or implantable devices for infusion of insulin. Includes open-loop systems which may be patient-operated or controlled by a pre-set program and are designed for constant delivery of small quantities of insulin, increased during food ingestion, and closed-loop systems which deliver quantities of insulin automatically based on an electronic glucose sensor.Glucose Clamp Technique: Maintenance of a constant blood glucose level by perfusion or infusion with glucose or insulin. It is used for the study of metabolic rates (e.g., in glucose, lipid, amino acid metabolism) at constant glucose concentration.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic: Works about comparative studies to verify the effectiveness of diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques determined in phase II studies. During these trials, patients are monitored closely by physicians to identify any adverse reactions from long-term use. These studies are performed on groups of patients large enough to identify clinically significant responses and usually last about three years. This concept includes phase III studies conducted in both the U.S. and in other countries.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Insulin Antagonists: Compounds which inhibit or antagonize the biosynthesis or action of insulin.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Multicenter Studies as Topic: Works about controlled studies which are planned and carried out by several cooperating institutions to assess certain variables and outcomes in specific patient populations, for example, a multicenter study of congenital anomalies in children.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Glucose Tolerance Test: A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).Thiazolidinediones: THIAZOLES with two keto oxygens. Members are insulin-sensitizing agents which overcome INSULIN RESISTANCE by activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Hyperinsulinism: A syndrome with excessively high INSULIN levels in the BLOOD. It may cause HYPOGLYCEMIA. Etiology of hyperinsulinism varies, including hypersecretion of a beta cell tumor (INSULINOMA); autoantibodies against insulin (INSULIN ANTIBODIES); defective insulin receptor (INSULIN RESISTANCE); or overuse of exogenous insulin or HYPOGLYCEMIC AGENTS.Insulin, Regular, Pork: Regular insulin preparations that contain the SUS SCROFA insulin peptide sequence.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.JapanCost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Insulin-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 50-80% of the islet cells. Beta cells secrete INSULIN.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Maternal-Fetal Exchange: Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Glucagon: A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Proinsulin: A pancreatic polypeptide of about 110 amino acids, depending on the species, that is the precursor of insulin. Proinsulin, produced by the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS, is comprised sequentially of the N-terminal B-chain, the proteolytically removable connecting C-peptide, and the C-terminal A-chain. It also contains three disulfide bonds, two between A-chain and B-chain. After cleavage at two locations, insulin and C-peptide are the secreted products. Intact proinsulin with low bioactivity also is secreted in small amounts.Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, primarily of TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS with severe INSULIN deficiency and extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA. It is characterized by KETOSIS; DEHYDRATION; and depressed consciousness leading to COMA.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Chronotherapy: The adaptation of therapeutic approaches such as pharmacological (DRUG CHRONOTHERAPY), surgical, radiological, or physical to the known variations in biological RHYTHMICITY, such as CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS. The treatment is aimed at supporting normal rhythms, or modifying the timing of therapy to achieve maximal efficacy and minimal adverse effect.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Glucagon-Like Peptide 1: A peptide of 36 or 37 amino acids that is derived from PROGLUCAGON and mainly produced by the INTESTINAL L CELLS. GLP-1(1-37 or 1-36) is further N-terminally truncated resulting in GLP-1(7-37) or GLP-1-(7-36) which can be amidated. These GLP-1 peptides are known to enhance glucose-dependent INSULIN release, suppress GLUCAGON release and gastric emptying, lower BLOOD GLUCOSE, and reduce food intake.Receptor, IGF Type 1: A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is closely related in structure to the INSULIN RECEPTOR. Although commonly referred to as the IGF-I receptor, it binds both IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. It is comprised of a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits which are derived from cleavage of a single precursor protein. The beta subunit contains an intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain.Isoindoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number two carbon, in contrast to INDOLES which have the nitrogen adjacent to the six-membered ring.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Fatty Acids, Nonesterified: FATTY ACIDS found in the plasma that are complexed with SERUM ALBUMIN for transport. These fatty acids are not in glycerol ester form.Glucose Transporter Type 4: A glucose transport protein found in mature MUSCLE CELLS and ADIPOCYTES. It promotes transport of glucose from the BLOOD into target TISSUES. The inactive form of the protein is localized in CYTOPLASMIC VESICLES. In response to INSULIN, it is translocated to the PLASMA MEMBRANE where it facilitates glucose uptake.Adipocytes: Cells in the body that store FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. WHITE ADIPOCYTES are the predominant type and found mostly in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue. BROWN ADIPOCYTES are thermogenic cells that can be found in newborns of some species and hibernating mammals.Rats, Zucker: Two populations of Zucker rats have been cited in research--the "fatty" or obese and the lean. The "fatty" rat (Rattus norvegicus) appeared as a spontaneous mutant. The obese condition appears to be due to a single recessive gene.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Insulin, Short-Acting: Insulin derivatives and preparations that are designed to induce a rapid HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECT.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Great BritainKinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors: Compounds that suppress the degradation of INCRETINS by blocking the action of DIPEPTIDYL-PEPTIDASE IV. This helps to correct the defective INSULIN and GLUCAGON secretion characteristic of TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS by stimulating insulin secretion and suppressing glucagon release.Glucose Intolerance: A pathological state in which BLOOD GLUCOSE level is less than approximately 140 mg/100 ml of PLASMA at fasting, and above approximately 200 mg/100 ml plasma at 30-, 60-, or 90-minute during a GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST. This condition is seen frequently in DIABETES MELLITUS, but also occurs with other diseases and MALNUTRITION.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Insulin-Like Growth Factor I: A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.Leptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Triglycerides
Includes NPH insulin which begins working in 1 to 3 hours and is active 16 to 24 hours. Includes the analogues glargine and ... There are several variations with different proportions of the mixed insulins (e.g. Novolog Mix 70/30 contains 70% aspart ... Sample regimen using insulin glargine and insulin lispro: Insulin glargine: 20 units at bedtime A more complicated method that ... such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine). Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles ...
Long-acting insulin analogs such as insulin glargine (brand name Lantus, made by Sanofi-Aventis) and insulin detemir (brand ... Insulin levels rise immediately as we begin to eat, remaining higher than the basal rate for 1 to 4 hours. This meal-associated ... Rapid-acting insulin analogs such as lispro (brand name Humalog, made by Eli Lilly and Company) and aspart (brand name Novolog/ ... The insulin pump is about the size of a beeper. It can be programmed to send a steady stream of insulin as basal insulin. It ...
... compared to 18 to 26 hours provided by other marketed long-acting insulins such as insulin glargine and insulin detemir). ... Novo Nordisk created "aspart" and marketed it as NovoLog/NovoRapid (UK-CAN) as a rapid-acting insulin analogue. It was created ... and the basal level of insulin will be maintained up to 24 hours. The onset of action of subcutaneous insulin glargine is ... These insulin analogues are used to replace the basal level of insulin, and may be effective over a period of up to 24 hours. ...
Insulin, Globin Zinc. Insulin glulisine. Insulin. Insulin Glargine. Insulin Aspart. Insulin Lispro. Hypoglycemic Agents. ... The purpose of the study is to compare Humalog (Insulin lispro)-recombinant human hyaluronidase (rHuPH20) or Novolog (Insulin ... Data were collected 1 and 2 hours (hr) after each meal for 3 days and the means of each excursion are presented. ... Drug: Insulin lispro Drug: recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20 Drug: Insulin aspart Drug: Insulin glulisine Drug: Insulin ...
Types: detemir (Levemir), and glargine (Basaglar, Lantus). *Ultra long-acting reaches the blood stream in 6 hours, does not ... Types: Insulin glulisine (Apidra), insulin lispro (Admelog, Humalog), and insulin aspart (Fiasp, NovoLog) ... Types of insulin. *Rapid-acting insulin, begins to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and continues ... Long-acting insulin reaches the bloodstream several hours after injection and tends to lower glucose levels up to 24 hours. ...
Novolog), and glulisine (Apidra). They start working in about 15 minutes. These drugs ... Rapid-acting forms of insulin include lispro (Humalog), aspart ( ... Long-acting insulins include detemir (Levemir) and glargine ( ... These drugs reach their peak effect in about an hour, and the effects last for 2 to 4 hours.. Short-acting or regular insulin ( ... It reaches peak effect in about 2 to 3 hours, and its effects last about 3 to 6 hours. Intermediate-acting or NPH insulin ( ...
The option to administer insulin with multiple daily injections vs. a pump should be individualized. Adjunctive medical therapy ... with a combination of multiple mealtime bolus and basal injections or with continuous insulin infusion through an insulin pump ... including the bionic pancreas and the closed-loop system of glucose monitoring with an automated insulin pump, may have a ... with type 1 diabetes should participate in diabetes self-management education and develop individualized premeal insulin bolus ...
Find out how pens, injections, and pumps are used in insulin therapy to manage diabetes. ... Learn about the different types of basal and bolus insulin. ... Insulin Glargine (Lantus) works for 24 hours and is relatively ... Insulin aspart (novolog) begins working immediately, peaks in about 1.0-1.5 hours, and lasts about 3-4 hours ... NPH insulin (intermediate acting insulin which usually peaks in 6-8 hours) and works for 10-12 hours. ...
Diabetes, Type 1 insulin aspart, Lantus, Levemir, Tresiba, Humalog, Novolog, Apidra, Toujeo Solostar, Basaglar, Lantus Solostar ... Lasts for two hours. Severe cramping and pain in feet ,calves, shoulders, and hands Diarrhea on and off through out the two ... Insulin Glargine (AHFS Monograph). Related treatment guides. *Diabetes, Type 2. *Diabetes, Type 1 ... my endocrinologist prescribed Toujeo pens for my basal insulin and Humalog pens for my mealtime and correction doses of insulin ...
Basal therapy with glargine insulin provides similar to lower A1C levels with less hypoglycemia than NPH insulin. Insulin ... Basal insulin, using long-acting insulins (i.e., neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], ultralente, glargine) is injected once or ... Bolus (or mealtime) insulin, using short-acting or rapid-acting insulins (i.e., regular, aspart, lispro) covers mealtime ... About 50 to 60 percent of the total daily insulin requirement should be a basal type, and 40 to 50 percent should be a bolus ...
Find the best information about Insulin. Visit Best of the Web. Medical resources at your fingertips: Best of the Web presents ... NovoLog Mix 70/30 Official site. 70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection (rDNA origin). ... RxList: Lantus (Insulin Glargine [rDNA origin] Injection) Details include description, indications, warnings, usage, patient ... Offer information on 24-hour insulin approved exclusively for use once a day. ...
Glargine injected once daily (at bedtime or before breakfast) provides basal coverage for ~24 hours. ... Humalog, Novolog, Apidra *onset = 5 - 15 min. *peak =1 - 1.5 hr. *duration = 3 - 5 hr ... morning/evening glargine (24-hr basal coverage) + pre-meal rapid acting insulin analog (post-prandial coverage) ... Initial release of insulin in response to ingestion of food is termed "first-phase insulin secretion". * This occurs ...
When it first became available in the 1920s, there was only one kind of insulin, still known as ... When it first became available in the 1920s, there was only one kind of insulin, still known as ... Insulin can be a lifesaver if you have diabetes, and its considered one of modern medicines true breakthroughs. ... Insulin can be a lifesaver if you have diabetes, and its considered one of modern medicines true breakthroughs. ...
15u Novolog after lunch and 10u Novolog after supper. Super: José, Taking Lantus ® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL ... 75 for a free video demonstration or call the 24-hour helpline 1-800-633-1610 to talk to a Lantus®SoloSTAR ®expe rta a eLe av m ... insulin detemir) and Novolog (insulin aspart injection), of which Levemir is the closest alternative. People with diabetes ... Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Read ...
Peak: 6-14 hours. *Duration: up to 24hours * Glargine (Insulin) Duration: Onset: 1 hr , 24 hours. No peak. ... Three rapid-acting insulins; *aspart (NovoLog) *lispro (Humalog) *glulisine (Apidra). *Administer within 15 minutes of start ... Store opened vials of regular insulin at room temperature. *Administer regular insulin with an insulin syringe into an ... half life 19 hours, if patch not replaced plasma level drops after 8 hours ...
... which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. ... Insulin glargine is effective over 24 hours.. Explain that ... Rapid acting insulins (Novolog, Humalog) may be injected before or after eating.. Dosage may be adjusted based on the actual ... Long-acting insulin: Ultralente, insulin glargine (Lantus). Have an onset of one hour after administration. Duration of action ... Rapid-acting insulin analogs: lispro insulin (Humalog), insulin aspart. Have an onset of action within 15 minutes of ...
Mixing insulins. Insulin glargine (Lantus) cannot be mixed in the same syringe with any other insulin. All of the other ... So-called "mealtime" insulins include Regular and the rapid-acting insulin analogs lispro (Humalog) and aspart (NovoLog). ... are typically injected at bedtime and are usually effective for up to 24 hours. Intermediate-acting insulins, which include NPH ... insulin and one short-acting, or bolus, insulin. The long-acting insulin supplies the low-level, background insulin needed by ...
Inhalable Insulin3 Buying and Storing Insulin4 Using Insulin4.1 Understanding Insulin Action5 Insulin Pumps What is Insulin? ... Produced in the pancreas, insulin is considered the ... insulin is the hormone in our body that allows glucose (sugar) ... In This Section1 What is Insulin?2 Types of Insulin2.1 Bolus Insulin2.2 Basal Insulin2.3 ... Long-acting insulin analogs (Insulin Glargine, Insulin Detemir): Usually taken once or twice a day as a basal insulin to cover ...
... glargine or lantus) and short-acting insulin (novolog or humalog) by injection. Make sure you have at least 1 vial of lantus ... 6. Lantus lasts for 24 hours so restart the basal rate 24 hours after the last Lantus dose is given. ... The insulin pump for children The insulin pump for children. The Berrie Center Pediatric Insulin Pump Program. An insulin pump ... The insulin pump helps mimic how our body provides insulin by providing a combination of continuous low-dose insulin (the basal ...
I need a sliding scale for taking novalog insulin.? Contact your doctor. That prescription would come from the doctor providing ... Glargine is a basal Insulin that lasts for 24 hours and has no peak. It can be given once/day. It is much better and safer than ... No: Novolog is a short acting, however Novolin (insulin) N is Intermediate acting. ...Read more ... has an onset of 1-3 hours, peak of 8 hours and duration of 12 to 16 hours. Humulin R is Regular insulin, a short-acting insulin ...
Includes NPH insulin which begins working in 1 to 3 hours and is active 16 to 24 hours. Includes the analogues glargine and ... There are several variations with different proportions of the mixed insulins (e.g. Novolog Mix 70/30 contains 70% aspart ... Sample regimen using insulin glargine and insulin lispro: Insulin glargine: 20 units at bedtime A more complicated method that ... such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine). Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles ...
According to a publication in the Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism, the abdomen is a safe site for insulin ... Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue. ... Can You Inject Insulin On The Stomach When Pregnant? ... Rapid-acting insulins: Aspart Novolog and Lispro Humalog Works in 15 minutes; Peaks in 1 to 2 hours; Stays in your body for 3 ... insulin injection. Oct 06, 2009 · Insulin glargine Lantus is an extended-action insulin analog with greater stability and ...
My comments here are simply a brief review of insulins used by type 2 diabetics. Anyone taking insulin must work closely with a ... Many type 2 diabetics will eventually, if not at the outset, need to take insulin for adequate control of blood sugars, which ... and may keep working for 20 or more hours (glargine), for 6 to 24 hours (detemir), or 30 to 42 hours (degludec). ... insulin, lantus, levemir, lispro, novolog, NPH, NPL, regular insulin, type 2 diabetes. ...
The insulin you take will depend on your personal needs. Different types of insulin work differently in different people. The ... insulin your body did not produce but that was instead made by a pharmaceutical company), there are several different types and ... For people who need to take external or supplemental insulin ( ... University of California, San Francisco explains that insulin ... 4 to 12 hours. 12 to 18 hours. Long-Acting or Basal Insulin Lantus (glargine),. Levemir (detemir), Basaglar (glargine). 2 to 4 ...
Insulin aspart (Novolog). ◦Insulin requirements will increase beginning around 28 weeks gestation and continue to increase due ... Take the 24 hour starting dose of new opioid and divide by the frequency of administration to give the new dose ... Increasing data on safety of insulin glargine in pregnancy. oral agents (metformin / glyburide) 2nd line ... Insulin. What are the various insulins and describe the pharmacokinetics (onset, peak, duration)and how are they used (eg basal ...
GC given IV or PO often results in hyperglycemia 4-8 hours after dosage administration, which can be treated with an insulin ... can be administered as a once daily injection of a long-acting insulin such as glargine (Lantus®), a twice daily injection of ... or insulin aspart (Novolog®). ... The choice of insulin, dose of insulin, and frequency of blood ... L-asparaginase decreases insulin synthesis by depletion of asparagine and decreasing insulin secretion from beta cells. Insulin ...
6-12 hours Intermediate Acting Lente (Humulin L) 8-12 hours Long Acting Ultralente 14-20 hours Glargine (Lantus) none Example: ... Time to watch for insulin reaction) Rapid Acting Humalog (Lispro) 30-90 minutes Rapid Acting Novolog (Aspart) 1-3 hours Short ... Regular insulin MUST be drawn up FIRST. keep it in vial until you have drawn up the regular insulin. 2. 1. use regular insulin ... 2) Inject air into the Regular insulin vial as shown 3) Invert bottle & pull up Regular insulin dose 1st. Commonly used insulin ...
Long-acting insulin, which includes glargine (Lantus) and detemir (Levemir), takes effect within an hour and lowers glucose ... Rapid-acting insulin, which includes aspart (Novolog), lispro (Humalog), gluulisine (Apidra), is typically taken right before a ... Intermediate-acting insulin, which includes NPH, Humulin N, Novolin N, starts working within two to four hours. It is effective ... Injectable Non-Insulin Medications Insulin is not the only injectable drug used in diabetes treatment. We also use:. *GLP-1 ...
  • All enrolled participants underwent a titration period of 4-6 weeks in which they received 100 units per milliliter (U/mL) insulin glulisine, injected subcutaneously (SC), pre-meals, with doses titrated to each participant individually. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Insulin hexamers dissociate back into monomers (active form) in order to be diffused into the blood stream (results in delay in insulin onset of action). (brainscape.com)