Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Asbestos, Serpentine: A type of asbestos that occurs in nature as the dihydrate of magnesium silicate. It exists in two forms: antigorite, a plated variety, and chrysotile, a fibrous variety. The latter makes up 95% of all asbestos products. (From Merck Index, 11th ed, p.893)Asbestos, Crocidolite: A lavender, acid-resistant asbestos.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Asbestos, Amphibole: A class of asbestos that includes silicates of magnesium, iron, calcium, and sodium. The fibers are generally brittle and cannot be spun, but are more resistant to chemicals and heat than ASBESTOS, SERPENTINE. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Asbestos, Amosite: Asbestos, grunerite. A monoclinic amphibole form of asbestos having long fibers and a high iron content. It is used in insulation. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Thermal Conductivity: The heat flow across a surface per unit area per unit time, divided by the negative of the rate of change of temperature with distance in a direction perpendicular to the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Construction Materials: Supplies used in building.Mesothelioma: A tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (peritoneum, pleura, pericardium). It appears as broad sheets of cells, with some regions containing spindle-shaped, sarcoma-like cells and other regions showing adenomatous patterns. Pleural mesotheliomas have been linked to exposure to asbestos. (Dorland, 27th ed)Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Mineral Fibers: Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)Glass Ionomer Cements: A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Pleural Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the thin serous membrane that envelopes the lungs and lines the thoracic cavity. Pleural neoplasms are exceedingly rare and are usually not diagnosed until they are advanced because in the early stages they produce no symptoms.Silicate Cement: A relatively hard, translucent, restorative material used primarily in anterior teeth. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p50)ManikinsBody Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Pleural DiseasesPolycarboxylate Cement: Water-soluble low-molecular-weight polymers of acrylic or methacrylic acid that form solid, insoluble products when mixed with specially prepared ZnO powder. The resulting cement adheres to dental enamel and is also used as a luting agent.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Polymethyl Methacrylate: Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.Skin Temperature: The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Zinc Oxide-Eugenol Cement: Used as a dental cement this is mainly zinc oxide (with strengtheners and accelerators) and eugenol. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p50)Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Insulator Elements: Nucleic acid regulatory sequences that limit or oppose the action of ENHANCER ELEMENTS and define the boundary between differentially regulated gene loci.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Sweating: The process of exocrine secretion of the SWEAT GLANDS, including the aqueous sweat from the ECCRINE GLANDS and the complex viscous fluids of the APOCRINE GLANDS.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.ShoesSilicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.Methylmethacrylates: The methyl esters of methacrylic acid that polymerize easily and are used as tissue cements, dental materials, and absorbent for biological substances.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Bedding and Linens: Articles of cloth, usually cotton or rayon and other synthetic or cotton-blend fabrics, used in households, hospitals, physicians' examining rooms, nursing homes, etc., for sheets, pillow cases, toweling, gowns, drapes, and the like.Silicates: The generic term for salts derived from silica or the silicic acids. They contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals, and may contain hydrogen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th Ed)Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.MiningHumidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Calcium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain calcium as an integral part of the molecule.Aluminum Silicates: Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Heat Stress Disorders: A group of conditions that develop due to overexposure or overexertion in excessive environmental heat.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Self-Curing of Dental Resins: The hardening or polymerization of bonding agents (DENTAL CEMENTS) via chemical reactions, usually involving two components. This type of dental bonding uses a self-cure or dual-cure system.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Dental Restoration, Temporary: A prosthesis or restoration placed for a limited period, from several days to several months, which is designed to seal the tooth and maintain its position until a permanent restoration (DENTAL RESTORATION, PERMANENT) will replace it. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Magnesium Oxide: Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.Conservation of Energy Resources: Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Talc: Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Polyurethanes: A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Carcinogens, Environmental: Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Heating: The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives: The hardening or polymerization of bonding agents (DENTAL CEMENTS) via exposure to light.Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Zeolites: Zeolites. A group of crystalline, hydrated alkali-aluminum silicates. They occur naturally in sedimentary and volcanic rocks, altered basalts, ores, and clay deposits. Some 40 known zeolite minerals and a great number of synthetic zeolites are available commercially. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Acrylic ResinsTemperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Neoplasms, Mesothelial: Neoplasms composed of tissue of the mesothelium, the layer of flat cells, derived from the mesoderm, which lines the body cavity of the embryo. In the adult it forms the simple squamous epithelium which covers all true serous membranes (peritoneum, pericardium, pleura). The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in these organs. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic: Factors that modify the effect of the putative causal factor(s) under study.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Calcium Hydroxide: A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.Silicic Acid: A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.MontanaHot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Aluminum Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain aluminum as an integral part of the molecule.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Resins, Synthetic: Polymers of high molecular weight which at some stage are capable of being molded and then harden to form useful components.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Zinc Oxide: A mild astringent and topical protectant with some antiseptic action. It is also used in bandages, pastes, ointments, dental cements, and as a sunblock.Respiratory Tract NeoplasmsCuring Lights, Dental: Light sources used to activate polymerization of light-cured DENTAL CEMENTS and DENTAL RESINS. Degree of cure and bond strength depends on exposure time, wavelength, and intensity of the curing light.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Compomers: Composite materials composed of an ion-leachable glass embedded in a polymeric matrix. They differ from GLASS IONOMER CEMENTS in that partially silanized glass particles are used to provide a direct bond to the resin matrix and the matrix is primarily formed by a light-activated, radical polymerization reaction.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Electron Probe Microanalysis: Identification and measurement of ELEMENTS and their location based on the fact that X-RAYS emitted by an element excited by an electron beam have a wavelength characteristic of that element and an intensity related to its concentration. It is performed with an electron microscope fitted with an x-ray spectrometer, in scanning or transmission mode.Housing, AnimalExtraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Dental Cavity Lining: An inner coating, as of varnish or other protective substance, to cover the dental cavity wall. It is usually a resinous film-forming agent dissolved in a volatile solvent, or a suspension of calcium hydroxide in a solution of a synthetic resin. The lining seals the dentinal tubules and protects the pulp before a restoration is inserted. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Hardness Tests: A test to determine the relative hardness of a metal, mineral, or other material according to one of several scales, such as Brinell, Mohs, Rockwell, Vickers, or Shore. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Body Surface Area: The two dimensional measure of the outer layer of the body.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Eugenol: A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Polymerization: Chemical reaction in which monomeric components are combined to form POLYMERS (e.g., POLYMETHYLMETHACRYLATE).Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Cocarcinogenesis: The combination of two or more different factors in the production of cancer.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.RNA, Long Noncoding: A class of untranslated RNA molecules that are typically greater than 200 nucleotides in length and do not code for proteins. Members of this class have been found to play roles in transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional processing, CHROMATIN REMODELING, and in the epigenetic control of chromatin.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Exocrine Glands: Glands of external secretion that release its secretions to the body's cavities, organs, or surface, through a duct.Microscopy, Phase-Contrast: A form of interference microscopy in which variations of the refracting index in the object are converted into variations of intensity in the image. This is achieved by the action of a phase plate.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Silicon Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain silicon as an integral part of the molecule.
The anthophyllite was used in asbestos cement and for insulation, roofing material etc. Anthophyllite is also known as azbolen ... In Finland anthophyllite asbestos was mined in two mines, the larger one Paakkila in the Tuusniemi commune started in 1918 and ... It was mined in Finland and also in Matsubase, Japan where a large-scale open-cast asbestos mine and mill was in operation ... Some forms of anthophyllite are lamellar or fibrous and are classed as asbestos. The name is derived from the Latin word ...
Sometimes corrugated asbestos cement sheeting is used. The space between the lining and the exterior may be used for insulation ...
It can also be found in insulation, siding, roof gutters, and cement wallboard. The use of asbestos to manufacture transite was ... Asbestos cement "Asbestos in Transite". Asbestos.net. Retrieved 6 November 2015. "Transite Roofing: Friend or Foe? - retrofit ... similar asbestos-cement products, and later an even more generic term for a hard, fireproof composite material, fibre cement ... Transite originated as a brand that Johns-Manville created in 1929 for a line of asbestos-cement products, including boards and ...
Timber and fiber cement sheeting now replaces the original asbestos and often the interior is completed gutted to create a ... Although not particularly durable as exterior roofing, the material provided excellent insulation and was used for ceilings and ... Fiber cement and timber cladding is often used with the iron to create a sympathetic blend of textures. Being of light weight ... Lime for cement was obtained by burning oyster shells. The first imported roofing material was corrugated iron sheeting. Roofs ...
Asbestos was mixed into the cement as a binder. CertainTeed phased out the use of asbestos in its products around 1990. As a ... Certainteed manufactures products for four industries : Roofing, Insulation, Gypsum and Ceilings. It exports building products ... Historically, CertainTeed was a major manufacturer of asbestos-cement pipes for water utilities for many decades. ... Kate Moser, "Jury Awards $200 Million in Punitive Damages in Asbestos Case," The Recorder, 3 May 2010. Toni L. Frain and Joseph ...
Raw asbestos fibers were stirred into cement slurries or beaten by hand and fed into carding machines. Ventilation was rarely ... By 1897, they were producing asbestos paper and millboard for electrical insulation and welding shields. As of 1905, they began ... Keasbey and Mattison Company was a manufacturing company that produced asbestos-related building products, including insulation ... Bell Mines excavated and milled raw Chrysotile asbestos, using the open-cut method. Asbestos was then shipped by railway to ...
... including asbestos pipe insulation, asbestos shingles, asbestos roofing materials and asbestos cement pipe. Johns Manville ... Government, Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency, Australian (2017-01-23). "History of asbestos - chronology , Asbestos ... In 1949, the Canadian branch of the corporation was involved in the Asbestos Strike at its mines in Asbestos, Canada. In 1958, ... Johns Manville 150 year commemoration publication Home Insulation site Building Materials site Energy Tax Credit Insulation ...
... pipes and fireplace cement, heat, fire, and acid resistant gaskets, pipe insulation, ceiling insulation, fireproof drywall, ... History of Asbestos, Asbestos.com, retrieved 2016-04-07. *^ a b "Asbestos in the home booklet. Wrekin housing trust" (PDF). ... brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos.[3]. Asbestos mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale ... The U.S. asbestos industry had an early start in 1858, when fibrous anthophyllite was mined for use as asbestos insulation by ...
... pipes and fireplace cement, heat, fire, and acid resistant gaskets, pipe insulation, ceiling insulation, fireproof drywall, ... Chrysotile asbestos Asbestos fibers Asbestos Asbestos Blue asbestos (crocidolite). The ruler is 1 cm. Blue asbestos, teased to ... They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos. Asbestos mining ... of minerals Asbestos abatement Asbestos and the law Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization Asbestos-ceramic Asbestos cement ...
... such as thermal insulation or flocking, in which loose asbestos fibres were used. However, asbestos fibres are inevitably ... The asbestos fibres are intimately bound to the cement matrix and were considered to be immobilized in the cement and therefore ... He mixed 90% cement and 10% asbestos fibres with water and ran it through a cardboard machine, forming strong thin sheets. ... Fibre cement products were amongst the last materials available to have contained large quantities of asbestos. ...
Guidelines for Safe Usage of Asbestos Cement Products like Asbestos Cement Sheets and Asbestos Cement Blocks. IS 11769 Part 2: ... Guidelines for Safe Usage of Asbestos Sealing and Insulation Products like CAF Gaskets, Gland Ropes, Insulation, Rope Lagging, ... Asbestos Licensing and the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations) aimed at minimising the use and disturbance of asbestos ... Asbestos was banned in South Africa in 2008. Prior to this, the country was one of the global leaders in asbestos production, ...
Some variations of plaster that contain powdered silica or asbestos may present health hazards if inhaled. Asbestos is a known ... Cement plaster was first introduced in America around 1909 and was often called by the generic name adamant plaster after a ... It also provides some insulation to retard heat flow into structural steel elements, that would otherwise lose their strength ... Note that asbestos is rarely used in modern plaster formulations because of its carcinogenic effects.) People can be exposed to ...
Various composite materials are also used for siding: asphalt shingles, asbestos, fiber cement, aluminium (ACM), fiberboard, ... Unlike wood, vinyl siding does not provide additional insulation for the building, unless an insulation material (e.g., foam) ... Fiber cement siding is a class of composite siding that is usually made from a combination of cement, cellulose (wood), sand, ... Insulation was placed between each stud. While the Hoess Brothers company continued to function for about twelve more years ...
This was made by mixing raw asbestos with water and cement, the resulting slurry being spray applicated on to the surface to be ... By 1906, its factory on Canal Road, known as the Midland Works, specialised in the manufacture of asbestos insulation ... "Asbestos Exposure: Causes, Symptoms, Risks, and Diagnosis". I Asbestos. Asbestos Blog. Retrieved 28 February 2015. Bennetto, ... In 1920 it merged with Turner Brothers Asbestos Company Ltd., Newalls Insulation Company Ltd., and the Washington Chemical ...
Asbestos Asbestos cement Cement Fibre cement Construction materials Stephan Schmidheiny Casale Monferrato "Description of ... and inhaled in the lung than in other materials or applications such as thermal insulation or flocking in which bare asbestos ... Fibre cement were probably amongst the latest materials on the market to have contained large quantities of asbestos. The ... However, asbestos fibres are inevitably released during machining operations of the objects made of fibre-cement and by long- ...
... in the mid-1980s James Hardie developed an asbestos-free fibre cement technology, without the dangers associated with asbestos ... insulation, pipes and brake linings containing it. In Australia, it ran asbestos plants in New South Wales, South Australia, ... For much of the twentieth century, James Hardie was the dominant manufacturer in Australia of asbestos cement sheet and other ... Crusader for asbestos releated diseases at Homepage of ADRI - Asbestos Diseases Research Institute. Retrieved 29 June 2013. ...
... lime and cement solutions; as an air involving admixture in the preparation of cement solution Liquid is a mixture of tetra ... for concrete, asbestos, gypsum, ceramic, porcelain in the production of waterproof papers and leather; in the production of ... Increases frost resistance and improves thermal insulation materials; Does not prevent air exchange - the construction outputs ... manufacture of acid-resistant cement; Glasswork and cerarnics: antireflection treatment of optical glass; application of light- ...
Asbestos was one material historically used for fireproofing, either on its own, or together with binders such as cement, ... enclosing the i-beam in sheet metal and fill with loose insulation. hollow columns filled with liquid water or antifreeze. When ... or calcium aluminate cements. Cementitious plasters that contain Portland cement have been traditionally lightened by the use ... Common materials used include solid lumber, plywood, OSB, Particle board, gypsum board, cement fiberboard, or glass fiber ...
Turnall Fibre Cement Ltd still operates in Zimbabwe but as an independent company, mainly producing asbestos cement sheets and ... United Asbestos Companies and several asbestos insulation companies in the UK. The company operated a plant in Leeds where the ... a UK Asbestos Trust was established to provide for the payment of asbestos claims in addition to the US-focused Asbestos Trust ... "What is the T&N Asbestos Trustee Company? - The T&N Asbestos Trust". The T&N Asbestos Trust. Retrieved 2017-09-06. Nellie ...
Although it is popularly considered an asbestos substitute, early uses of calcium silicate for insulation still made use of ... As a component of cement[edit]. It also occurs in cements, where it is known as belite or in cement chemist notation C2S.[13] ... Calcium silicate is commonly used as a safe alternative to asbestos for high-temperature insulation materials. Industrial-grade ... High-temperature insulation[edit]. Calcium-silicate passive fire protection board being clad around steel structure in order to ...
... and aluminum siding Cement board Eternit Asbestos cement Bob Vila (2015-03-30), Cement Fiber Siding Installation, retrieved ... Fiber cement sheet products rate poorly in thermal resistance and sound transmission and separate wall insulation is highly ... Early fiber cement panels used asbestos fibers to add strength. Fiber cement products came about as a replacement for the ... Fiber cement is a composite material made of sand, cement and cellulose fibers. Fiber cement board may come pre-painted or pre- ...
"Effect of Respiratory Protective Equipment on Exposure to Asbestos Fibres During Removal of Asbestos Insulation". The Annals of ... They made a mistake: they measured the in-facepiece concentration by weighing, but the dust contains cement. Dust ... their measurements of efficiency of respirators that have been used to protect against asbestos during removal of insulation ... The respirators were used to protect workers against asbestos during brake manufacturing. (1987) The researchers studied the ...
Concrete or fibre cement, usually reinforced with fibres of some sort. may also be in the form of concrete tiles. Structural ... Asbestos shingles. Very long lifespan, fireproof and low cost but now rarely used because of health concerns. Stone slab. Heavy ... This membrane is installed by two methods: 1.) Rolls of membrane are attached to the ridged insulation using a bonding adhesive ... "Asbestos and your health". Better Health Channel. State Government of Victoria. September 2011. Retrieved 26 October 2014. The ...
It acquired Bradford Insulation in 1959, which produced heat insulation materials for buildings, and currently has a ... The company also produces fibre cement sheeting, aerated concrete products, bricks, and systems to support plasterboard ... operating years would be diagnosed with a fatal disease caused by their dangerous exposures to blue asbestos. This would be an ... It has established insulation businesses in China, Thailand and Malaysia, originally in joint ventures with local partners, but ...
"Vermiculite Insulation Containing Asbestos". Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety. Retrieved 12 November 2014. " ... cements and other aggregates such as expanded shale, clay, and slate to produce refractory/insulation concretes and mortars. In ... "Asbestos dangers remained hidden for decades". Salt Lake City Tribune. AP Feature on Libby, MT: "For asbestos-ravaged town, ... "Libby Asbestos". United States Environmental Protection Agency. Verhovek, Sam Howe (2006-10-11). "Firm Must Pay Asbestos Costs ...
Cement board, which is more water-resistant than greenboard, for use in showers or sauna rooms, and as a base for ceramic tile. ... asbestos, or a combination of these materials), plasticizer, foaming agent, and various additives that can reduce mildew, ... insulation, and other details reducing sound transmission. Sound transmission class (STC) ratings can be increased from 33 for ... It is for these reasons that greenboard[17] and ideally cement board are used for rooms expected to have high humidity, ...
The sound insulation of our materials will be over 45db. Additionally, they have a better performance on the heat insulation ... The Mgo Board from Chinsunboard is completely free from formaldehyde, toxicity, and asbestos. The unique features make it bend- ... gypsum and cement based products. Chinsunboard Magnesium Oxide Board is virtually impervious to fire, water, insects; does not ...
Skillful installation enginee Concerte/cement/foam/fiber thermal insulation composite inforce board/ panel making machine line ... Fireproof,waterproof,soundproof No asbestos Fireproofing materials Magnesium Oxide Board Product Description: Magnesium Oxide ... Thickness Magnesium Oxide Board Production Line for External Wall Panel Insulation Mgo drywall board making machine production ... Magnesium Oxide Fireproof Board Features: 1) 100% asbestos free 2) Non-combustible: PSB,GB8624, CLASS A 3) Moisture resistant 4 ...
Wetsfelts, Dry Felts, Meshdryer & Wires, Asbestos, Cement Felts, Paper Machine Clothing , Calender & Controled Compressing ... Construction Chemicals, Protective Coatings, Sealants, Waterproofing, Adhesives, Membranes, Insulation Chemical Supplies S N ...
5. Heat preservation, heat insulation, sound insulation. 6. Scientific prescrption, real green ... 4)100% asbestos free. Outstanding fireproof performance 1. With density about 0.9g/cm3-1. ... Cement Fiber Partition Board Manufacturers. *Isolation Board Factory. *Zirconia Oxide Factory. *Zhangjiagang Mgo Factory ... 7.100% no Asbestos Contained. 8. It is applicable to other desighs of decoration and quadric process& ...
You may have had contact with asbestos if you served in Iraq or other countries in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, or if ... Find out if you can get VA disability pay for illnesses related to asbestos exposure. ... Cement sheet. *Pipes. *Insulation. *Clutch facings and brake linings (called friction products) ... Veterans asbestos exposure. Asbestos is a material that was once used in many buildings and products. If you served in Iraq or ...
Standard Specification for Asbestos-Cement Fiberboard Insulating Panels insulating panels~ asbestos-cement panels~ ... UNSPSC Code 30111601(Cement); 30140000(Insulation). Referencing This Standard. Link Here. Link to Active (This link will always ... two sheets of asbestos-cement facing board. Asbestos-cement insulating panels are designed for exterior and interior walls, ... two sheets of asbestos-cement facing board. Asbestos-cement insulating panels are designed for exterior and interior walls, ...
Asbestos is a group of heat-resistant minerals. It is not fully banned in the U.S. and present in many products. Exposure can ... Asbestos is a group of heat-resistant minerals. It is not fully banned in the U.S. and present in many products. Exposure can ... Asbestos use peaked towards the late 1900s. The mineral was used in insulation, cement, flooring, roofing and fireproof ... Manufacturing products with raw asbestos (Example: Using asbestos to create asbestos cement) ...
... block insulation and valve insulation pads for use on navy ships that were responsible for mesothelioma in many veterans. ... Metalclad Insulation made asbestos products including pipe insulation, ... insulation cement and asbestos cloth to U.S. Navy shipyards for use on pipes and boilers aboard naval vessels. ... Asbestos Exposure › Asbestos Companies › Metalclad Insulation Company Metalclad Insulation Company. Metalclad Insulation ...
Asbestos Ceiling Asbestos Ceiling Made Of Fibre Cement Sheet Asbestos Ceiling Tiles Testing Asbestos Ceiling Insulation ... asbestos ceiling asbestos ceiling made of fibre cement sheet asbestos ceiling tiles testing asbestos ceiling insulation ... asbestos ceiling insulation australia non sheets in sri lanka board removal cost of popcorn company,asbestos stipple ceiling nz ... asbestos ceiling removal cost nz board sizes in tile tongue and groove tiles,asbestos ceiling removal process removing that old ...
Asbestos poses health risks only when fibres are present in the air that people breathe. ... Asbestos was a popular material used widely in construction and many other industries. ... cement and plaster. *industrial furnaces and heating systems. *building insulation. *floor and ceiling tiles ... Small asbestos fibres can be released into the air when:. *disturbing or removing insulation that contains asbestos, including ...
Metros transfer stations cannot accept materials that contain asbestos. ... Heating: white paper or seam tape on ducts, air-duct cement and insulation ... More information about asbestos. Find information about how to identify asbestos and protect yourself, your family and ... Where to take waste that contains asbestos. Delivering asbestos-containing materials to Metro household hazardous waste ...
Asbestos insulation was responsible for more asbestos exposure occurrences than any other asbestos-containing material of the ... The fibrous nature of asbestos also allows manufacturers to mix it into other materials, such as paper, cement and spray-on ... Asbestos Insulation. Fact Checked Asbestos insulation was the biggest source of asbestos exposure for workers throughout the ... Spray-On Asbestos Insulation. Spray-on insulation was developed to reduce the amount of labor required to apply insulation and ...
pipe and boiler insulation. *floor tiles and associated mastics. *cement pipe and sheeting ... Asbestos Information. What is Asbestos?. Asbestos is the generic term for a group of naturally occurring, fibrous minerals with ... What are the dangers of asbestos exposure?. Asbestos fibers enter the body when a person inhales or ingests airborne particles ... The purpose of the asbestos NESHAP is to protect the public health by minimizing the release of asbestos when buildings ...
Dangerous asbestos fibers are often released into the air during natural disasters like earthquakes, fires, floods, tornadoes ... Asbestos-containing materials (asbestos shingles, siding and insulation). Tornadoes. Tornadoes can destroy property and cause ... The external walls, roofs, window awnings and bathrooms in many of these buildings were made with asbestos cement sheets - ... Naturally Occurring Asbestos and Flooding. Floods can also disturb naturally occurring asbestos deposits. Asbestos fibers from ...
Pipe insulation. *Spray-applied insulations and fireproofing. *Texture coating (particularly ceilings). *Asbestos cement board ... asbestos, or any traceable asbestos in vermiculite insulation, using the WorkSafeBC-approved sampling methods outlined below. ... Removing asbestos-containing vermiculite insulation. *Removing any ACM in circumstances where there would be a significant ... Airborne asbestos levels must not exceed 0.02 f/mL.. Managing Asbestos. Upon receipt of the BRHEMP RFI, the BRHEMP ...
CEMENT SHEET, MILLBOARD, and PAPER used as insulation around furnaces and woodburning stoves. Repairing or removing appliances ... Oil and coal furnaces and door gaskets may have asbestos insulation.. What Should Be Done About Asbestos In The Home?. *If you ... Where Can Asbestos Hazards Be Found In The Home?. *Some roofing and siding shingles are made of asbestos cement. ... ASBESTOS CEMENT ROOFING, SHINGLES, and SIDING. These products are not likely to release asbestos fibers unless sawed, dilled, ...
... and engine rooms were asbestos insulation was rampant. But, the other boats also used asbestos in piping, ducts, and other ... Insulation on equipment like boilers. When it comes to asbestos exposure, veterans have always been on the front lines. While ... Asbestos insulation was packed into every corner of a ship, including in gaskets and valves. Many metal girders and other ... Mesothelioma and Asbestos Exposure Explained. Mesothelioma is one of the most notable asbestos-related diseases because its ...
... has been known to cause several cancers, the most notable being mesothelioma. Learn more about the dangers ... Cement. *Pipe insulation. *Fireproof drywall. *Flooring. *Roofing. *Joint compound. *And, More. Over time, asbestos found its ... Asbestos Exposure Videos. Watch the videos below to learn more about asbestos, exposure to asbestos and lawsuits related to ... Growth of Asbestos Lawsuits. By the middle of the 20th century, it was clear that asbestos was dangerous. Articles and reports ...
Many occupations have an increased risk of asbestos exposure, including firefighters, plant workers, construction workers, ... In order to cool that down and limit the risk of a fire, power plants often employed spray-on asbestos insulation as a coating. ... vinyl flooring or cement). But, even those materials can be damaged enough during a fire or other catastrophe to release ... What is Asbestos?. Workplace Exposure. Asbestos Ban. Unions and Asbestos. Handling Asbestos. ...
Repair of damaged ACM such as the insulation around pipes, boilers, tanks, or ducts by wrapping the ACM with heavy tape such as ... Cement Asbestos Board Siding and Undersheeting. *Roof Felt and Shingles. *Window Putty ... What is asbestos?. Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral found in certain rocks. This mineral separates into strong, thin ... Common uses of asbestos include the following: *As a building material additive to enhance strength (for example, asbestos was ...
Insulation for boilers. Spray insulation. Brake linings. Gaskets in heating installations. Cement asbestos in sheeting ...
... there is a chance the home contains asbestos. Asbestos causes a plethora of health issues if disturbed. Make sure to get the ... Cement in roof gutters. *Thermal Insulation. *Insulation on HVAC ducts and pipes ... Is Asbestos in the Home Really a Threat?. Although undisturbed asbestos poses a relatively low risk, asbestos becomes a major ... [email protected]asbestos.net. © 2019 Mesothelioma Justice Network at Asbestos.net - The information provided by www.asbestos.net is not ...
Learn more about electricians working with asbestos leading to a mesothelioma diagnosis. ... Many of the products that electricians encountered on a daily basis, such as insulation and conduit, contained asbestos. They ... Asbestos and the Electrical Industry Today. Although the government began to regulate the use of asbestos in the 1970s, many ... Asbestos Exposure in the Electrical Industry. Because of its fire-resistant qualities, asbestos was a popular choice for ...
... of cases are caused by asbestos exposure. So what exactly is asbestos and what measures can you put in place to protect ... Less-commonly known asbestos-containing materials *Flat or corrugated sheeting. *Insulation. *Cement pipes ... Bonded (non-friable) asbestos materials are made up of a bonding agent (such as cement) with asbestos fibres added. They ... Consider using enclosures and capping as appropriate to overlay asbestos fibro with another product.. • Replace asbestos cement ...
An asbestos-related disease can harm an entire family. If you have Mesothelioma, get a lawyer who fights for you and your loved ... Insulation workers. *Electricians. *Carpenters. *Drywall workers. *Cement workers. *Painters. *Motor vehicle and aircraft ... large amounts of raw asbestos and asbestos products are still imported annually. Legislation that would have banned asbestos ... Asbestos Use in the United States. The asbestos industry has been compared to the tobacco industry in the way it promoted known ...
  • Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite: The non-asbestos form of these minerals which meet the definition of a fiber. (osha.gov)
  • The duty to manage is all about putting in place the practical steps necessary to protect maintenance workers and others from the risk of exposure to asbestos fibres. (haringey.gov.uk)
  • The primary focus of the plan is to eliminate accidental worker, student, and contractor exposure to asbestos fibres and to ensure the health and safety of building occupants and visitors. (sfu.ca)
  • Calcium silicate insulation board Specifications Thickness:4-20mm Size:2440*1220mm,2400*1200mm Other optional specifications available upon request Optional surface sanding and finishing treatment Interior and exterior wall Furred ceiling Sound. (ecplaza.net)
  • There are skip companies that provide skips for asbestos removal, they are more expensive than a regular skip (we were quoted 400 +vat) but it saves you using your own car to transport it. (homeownershub.com)
  • The report said while existing buildings in the green belt could be redeveloped, the presence of asbestos meant the existing building could not be converted for residential use. (crewechronicle.co.uk)
  • The only way to confirm the presence of asbestos is to take more than one sample of the material and have it tested by an accredited asbestos laboratory. (pinchin.com)
  • The mandate of the Plan is to identify, assess and control any potential health hazard caused by the presence of asbestos in SFU buildings. (sfu.ca)
  • If you are not aware of the presence of asbestos, you may not be able to do what you would like to do with the new building or else incur huge and unknown costs removing the asbestos. (safeandsoundpropertyinspections.com.au)
  • If you served in Iraq or other countries in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, you may have had contact with asbestos when old buildings got damaged, releasing toxic chemicals into the air. (va.gov)
  • Or, you may have had contact with asbestos if you worked in certain jobs or settings, like shipyards, construction, or vehicle repair. (va.gov)
  • You may be able to get disability benefits if you have an illness believed to be caused by contact with asbestos and you meet both of the requirements listed below. (va.gov)
  • How do I know if I have an illness caused by my contact with asbestos? (va.gov)
  • Do you think you may have had contact with asbestos? (va.gov)
  • During this time, hundreds of thousands of Army personnel may have come in contact with asbestos. (sokolovelaw.com)
  • In such cases that workers must have contact with asbestos, the use of personal protective equipment is necessary to prevent any potential exposure to the material. (cdc.gov)
  • Even so, it took decades for the military to remove asbestos from older buildings like barracks or mess halls on bases, and it could still be lurking in buildings today. (mesotheliomanews.com)
  • In addition to wearing protective gear and ventilating the area, there are specific techniques and procedures which an insulator must use in order to safely remove asbestos. (mesotheliomasymptoms.com)
  • We do not remove asbestos so when you have an inspection by Safe and Sound you can be assured that we are acting in your best interests. (safeandsoundpropertyinspections.com.au)
  • Glove bag containment is also explained in this page to prevent asbestos emissions, other surveillance programs and documents associates to occupational respiratory disease surveillance and documentation are also available. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of this hazard, laws have been enacted to prevent asbestos exposures. (wa.gov)