Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)
A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.
DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.
A genus of minute bacteria in the family ACHOLEPLASMATACEAE that inhabit phloem sieve elements of infected PLANTS and cause symptoms such as yellowing, phyllody, and witches' brooms. Organisms lack a CELL WALL and thus are similar to MYCOPLASMA in animals. They are transmitted by over 100 species of INSECTS especially leafhoppers, planthoppers, and PSYLLIDS.
Proteins found in any species of insect.
A family of unenveloped RNA viruses with cubic symmetry. The twelve genera include ORTHOREOVIRUS; ORBIVIRUS; COLTIVIRUS; ROTAVIRUS; Aquareovirus, Cypovirus, Phytoreovirus, Fijivirus, Seadornavirus, Idnoreovirus, Mycoreovirus, and Oryzavirus.
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
A family of biting midges, in the order DIPTERA. It includes the genus Culicoides which transmits filarial parasites pathogenic to man and other primates.
A family of RNA plant viruses infecting disparate plant families. They are transmitted by specific aphid vectors. There are three genera: LUTEOVIRUS; Polerovirus; and Enamovirus.
A genus of RNA plant viruses as yet unassigned to any family. Plant hosts are all in the family Poaceae. Each species is transmitted by a particular species of planthopper. The type species is Rice stripe virus.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Rhodnius prolixus is a vector for TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
Diseases of plants.
The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.
The type species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus SPIROPLASMA, family SPIROPLASMATACEAE, causing citrus stubborn disease.
A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.
A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. Vinca rosea has been changed to CATHARANTHUS roseus.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE. It is found in the xylem of plant tissue.
Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.
Small, hairy, moth-like flies which are of considerable public health importance as vectors of certain pathogenic organisms. Important disease-related genera are PHLEBOTOMUS, Lutzomyia, and Sergentomyia.
A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Several species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.
A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.
A genus of plant viruses in the family BUNYAVIRIDAE. Tomato spotted wilt virus is the type species. Transmission occurs by at least nine species of thrips.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Bloodsucking flies of the genus Glossina, found primarily in equatorial Africa. Several species are intermediate hosts of trypanosomes.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.
A suborder of monoflagellate parasitic protozoa that lives in the blood and tissues of man and animals. Representative genera include: Blastocrithidia, Leptomonas, CRITHIDIA, Herpetomonas, LEISHMANIA, Phytomonas, and TRYPANOSOMA. Species of this suborder may exist in two or more morphologic stages formerly named after genera exemplifying these forms - amastigote (LEISHMANIA), choanomastigote (CRITHIDIA), promastigote (Leptomonas), opisthomastigote (Herpetomonas), epimastigote (Blastocrithidia), and trypomastigote (TRYPANOSOMA).
A genus of flagellate protozoans found in the blood and lymph of vertebrates and invertebrates, both hosts being required to complete the life cycle.
A hemoflagellate subspecies of parasitic protozoa that causes nagana in domestic and game animals in Africa. It apparently does not infect humans. It is transmitted by bites of tsetse flies (Glossina).
Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.
A genus of plant viruses in the family GEMINIVIRIDAE that are transmitted in nature by whitefly Bemisia tabaci.
Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.
Annual cereal grass of the family POACEAE and its edible starchy grain, rice, which is the staple food of roughly one-half of the world's population.
Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).
The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.
A plant genus in the family VITACEAE, order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae. It is a woody vine cultivated worldwide. It is best known for grapes, the edible fruit and used to make WINE and raisins.
Insects of the suborder Heterocera of the order LEPIDOPTERA.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A genus of flagellate protozoa comprising several species that are pathogenic for humans. Organisms of this genus have an amastigote and a promastigote stage in their life cycles. As a result of enzymatic studies this single genus has been divided into two subgenera: Leishmania leishmania and Leishmania viannia. Species within the Leishmania leishmania subgenus include: L. aethiopica, L. arabica, L. donovani, L. enrietti, L. gerbilli, L. hertigi, L. infantum, L. major, L. mexicana, and L. tropica. The following species are those that compose the Leishmania viannia subgenus: L. braziliensis, L. guyanensis, L. lainsoni, L. naiffi, and L. shawi.
A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals including rodents. The Leishmania mexicana complex causes both cutaneous (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, DIFFUSE CUTANEOUS) and includes the subspecies amazonensis, garnhami, mexicana, pifanoi, and venezuelensis. L. m. mexicana causes chiclero ulcer, a form of cutaneous leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, CUTANEOUS) in the New World. The sandfly, Lutzomyia, appears to be the vector.
The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The functional hereditary units of protozoa.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
A parasitic hemoflagellate of the subgenus Leishmania leishmania that infects man and animals and causes visceral leishmaniasis (LEISHMANIASIS, VISCERAL). The sandfly genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia are the vectors.
Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.
A genus of owlet moths of the family Noctuidae. These insects are used in molecular biology studies during all stages of their life cycle.
Family of INSECT VIRUSES containing two subfamilies: Eubaculovirinae (occluded baculoviruses) and Nudibaculovirinae (nonoccluded baculoviruses). The Eubaculovirinae, which contain polyhedron-shaped inclusion bodies, have two genera: NUCLEOPOLYHEDROVIRUS and GRANULOVIRUS. Baculovirus vectors are used for expression of foreign genes in insects.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
Hormones secreted by insects. They influence their growth and development. Also synthetic substances that act like insect hormones.
The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.
A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.
The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.
Bites and stings inflicted by insects.
An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).
A family of non-enveloped viruses infecting mammals (MASTADENOVIRUS) and birds (AVIADENOVIRUS) or both (ATADENOVIRUS). Infections may be asymptomatic or result in a variety of diseases.
A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, which are dependent on a coinfection with helper adenoviruses or herpesviruses for their efficient replication. The type species is Adeno-associated virus 2.
A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of non-oncogenic retroviruses that produce multi-organ diseases characterized by long incubation periods and persistent infection. Lentiviruses are unique in that they contain open reading frames (ORFs) between the pol and env genes and in the 3' env region. Five serogroups are recognized, reflecting the mammalian hosts with which they are associated. HIV-1 is the type species.
The blood/lymphlike nutrient fluid of some invertebrates.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Arthropods, other than insects and arachnids, which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.
Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Plant-eating orthopterans having hindlegs adapted for jumping. There are two main families: Acrididae and Romaleidae. Some of the more common genera are: Melanoplus, the most common grasshopper; Conocephalus, the eastern meadow grasshopper; and Pterophylla, the true katydid.
A suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Learning algorithms which are a set of related supervised computer learning methods that analyze data and recognize patterns, and used for classification and regression analysis.
A genus of beetles which infests grain products. Its larva is called mealworm.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.
Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.
A genus of small beetles of the family Tenebrionidae; T. confusum is the "confused flour beetle".
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.
A genus in the family Blattidae containing several species, the most common being P. americana, the American cockroach.
A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.
A genus of silkworm MOTHS in the family Bombycidae of the order LEPIDOPTERA. The family contains a single species, Bombyx mori from the Greek for silkworm + mulberry tree (on which it feeds). A native of Asia, it is sometimes reared in this country. It has long been raised for its SILK and after centuries of domestication it probably does not exist in nature. It is used extensively in experimental GENETICS. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p519)
An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.
Family of RNA viruses that infects birds and mammals and encodes the enzyme reverse transcriptase. The family contains seven genera: DELTARETROVIRUS; LENTIVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE B, MAMMALIAN; ALPHARETROVIRUS; GAMMARETROVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE D; and SPUMAVIRUS. A key feature of retrovirus biology is the synthesis of a DNA copy of the genome which is integrated into cellular DNA. After integration it is sometimes not expressed but maintained in a latent state (PROVIRUSES).
A species of mosquito in the genus Anopheles and the principle vector of MALARIA in Africa.
An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.
The family Gryllidae consists of the common house cricket, Acheta domesticus, which is used in neurological and physiological studies. Other genera include Gryllotalpa (mole cricket); Gryllus (field cricket); and Oecanthus (tree cricket).
Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.
Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)
Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.
Compounds, either natural or synthetic, which block development of the growing insect.
The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.
A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.
An order of insects comprising two suborders: Caelifera and Ensifera. They consist of GRASSHOPPERS, locusts, and crickets (GRYLLIDAE).
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.
The act of feeding on plants by animals.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.
Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.
The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
A genus of gram-negative bacteria existing symbiotically with nematodes of the family Heterorhabditidae (see RHABDITOIDEA). These nematodes infect a variety of soil-dwelling insects. Upon entering an insect host, the nematode releases Photorhabdus from its intestinal tract and the bacterium establishes a lethal septicemia in the insect.
Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Viruses which enable defective viruses to replicate or to form a protein coat by complementing the missing gene function of the defective (satellite) virus. Helper and satellite may be of the same or different genus.
Periodic casting off FEATHERS; HAIR; or cuticle. Molting is a process of sloughing or desquamation, especially the shedding of an outer covering and the development of a new one. This phenomenon permits growth in ARTHROPODS, skin renewal in AMPHIBIANS and REPTILES, and the shedding of winter coats in BIRDS and MAMMALS.
The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
A mitosporic fungal genus. Teleomorphs are found in the family Clavicipitaceae and include Cordyceps bassiana. The species Beauveria bassiana is a common pathogen of ARTHROPODS and is used in PEST CONTROL.
A compound used as a topical insect repellent that may cause irritation to eyes and mucous membranes, but not to the skin.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped cells which are motile by peritrichous flagella. Late in the growth cycle, spheroplasts or coccoid bodies occur, resulting from disintegration of the cell wall. The natural habitat is the intestinal lumen of certain nematodes. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
A genus of the family BACULOVIRIDAE, subfamily Eubaculovirinae, characterized by the formation of crystalline, polyhedral occlusion bodies in the host cell nucleus. The type species is Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus.
A nutritional reservoir of fatty tissue found mainly in insects and amphibians.
A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)
A mitosporic fungal genus in the family Clavicipitaceae. It has teleomorphs in the family Nectriaceae. Metarhizium anisopliae is used in PESTICIDES.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.
Any blood or formed element especially in invertebrates.
The very first viral gene products synthesized after cells are infected with adenovirus. The E1 region of the genome has been divided into two major transcriptional units, E1A and E1B, each expressing proteins of the same name (ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS and ADENOVIRUS E1B PROTEINS).
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
Slender tubular or hairlike excretory structures found in insects. They emerge from the alimentary canal between the mesenteron (midgut) and the proctodeum (hindgut).
A species of gram-positive bacteria which may be pathogenic for certain insects. It is used for the biological control of the Gypsy moth.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Profound physical changes during maturation of living organisms from the immature forms to the adult forms, such as from TADPOLES to frogs; caterpillars to BUTTERFLIES.
A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.
Paired sense organs connected to the anterior segments of ARTHROPODS that help them navigate through the environment.
Change brought about to an organisms genetic composition by unidirectional transfer (TRANSFECTION; TRANSDUCTION, GENETIC; CONJUGATION, GENETIC, etc.) and incorporation of foreign DNA into prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells by recombination of part or all of that DNA into the cell's genome.
The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
Cell line derived from SF21 CELLS which are a cell line isolated from primary explants of SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA pupal tissue.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.
A steroid hormone that regulates the processes of MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysterone is the 20-hydroxylated ECDYSONE.
Steroids that bring about MOLTING or ecdysis in insects. Ecdysteroids include the endogenous insect hormones (ECDYSONE and ECDYSTERONE) and the insect-molting hormones found in plants, the phytoecdysteroids. Phytoecdysteroids are natural insecticides.
Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
In a medical context, the term "wing" is not typically used as a standalone definition; however, it can refer to various flat, wing-shaped structures in anatomy, such as the iliac wings of the pelvis or the zygomatic wings of the cheekbone.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A species of migratory Old World locusts, in the family ACRIDIDAE, that are important pests in Africa and Asia.
The outer covering of the body composed of the SKIN and the skin appendages, which are the HAIR, the NAILS; and the SEBACEOUS GLANDS and the SWEAT GLANDS and their ducts.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly colored and patterned.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.
The integration of exogenous DNA into the genome of an organism at sites where its expression can be suitably controlled. This integration occurs as a result of homologous recombination.
Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.
Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.
A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.

Can anything be done to maintain the effectiveness of pyrethroid-impregnated bednets against malaria vectors? (1/3745)

Pyrethroid-treated bednets are the most promising available method of controlling malaria in the tropical world. Every effort should be made to find methods of responding to, or preventing, the emergence of pyrethroid resistance in the Anopheles vectors. Some cases of such resistance are known, notably in An. gambiae in West Africa where the kdr type of resistance has been selected, probably because of the use of pyrethroids on cotton. Because pyrethroids are irritant to mosquitoes, laboratory studies on the impact of, and selection for, resistance need to be conducted with free-flying mosquitoes in conditions that are as realistic as possible. Such studies are beginning to suggest that, although there is cross-resistance to all pyrethroids, some treatments are less likely to select for resistance than others are. Organophosphate, carbamate and phenyl pyrazole insecticides have been tested as alternative treatments for nets or curtains. Attempts have been made to mix an insect growth regulator and a pyrethroid on netting to sterilize pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes that are not killed after contact with the netting. There seems to be no easy solution to the problem of pyrethroid resistance management, but further research is urgently needed.  (+info)

Mayaro virus disease: an emerging mosquito-borne zoonosis in tropical South America. (2/3745)

This report describes the clinical, laboratory, and epidemiological findings on 27 cases of Mayaro virus (MV) disease, an emerging mosquito-borne viral illness that is endemic in rural areas of tropical South America. MV disease is a nonfatal, dengue-like illness characterized by fever, chills, headache, eye pain, generalized myalgia, arthralgia, diarrhea, vomiting, and rash of 3-5 days' duration. Severe joint pain is a prominent feature of this illness; the arthralgia sometimes persists for months and can be quite incapacitating. Cases of two visitors from the United States, who developed MV disease during visits to eastern Peru, are reported. MV disease and dengue are difficult to differentiate clinically.  (+info)

Vectors of Chikungunya virus in Senegal: current data and transmission cycles. (3/3745)

Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to human beings by Aedes genus mosquitoes. From 1972 to 1986 in Kedougou, Senegal, 178 Chikungunya virus strains were isolated from gallery forest mosquitoes, with most of them isolated from Ae. furcifer-taylori (129 strains), Ae. luteocephalus (27 strains), and Ae. dalzieli (12 strains). The characteristics of the sylvatic transmission cycle are a circulation periodicity with silent intervals that last approximately three years. Few epidemics of this disease have been reported in Senegal. The most recent one occurred in 1996 in Kaffrine where two Chikungunya virus strains were isolated from Ae. aegypti. The retrospective analysis of viral isolates from mosquitoes, wild vertebrates, and humans allowed to us to characterize Chikungunya virus transmission cycles in Senegal and to compare them with those of yellow fever virus.  (+info)

Isolation of tick-borne encephalitis virus from wild rodents and a seroepizootiologic survey in Hokkaido, Japan. (4/3745)

To determine the vertebrate host of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus in the southern part of Hokkaido, Japan, virus isolation was performed using spleens from small mammals captured in the area. Two virus strains were isolated, one strain from Apodemus speciosus and another from Clethrionomys rufocanus. Virus isolates were inoculated onto baby hamster kidney cell monolayers and antigen slides were prepared for an indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay. Two isolates were identified as TBE viruses by monoclonal antibody reactions. To specify the TBE-endemic area in Hokkaido, rodent, horse, and dog sera collected from 1992 to 1997 were tested for neutralization antibody against TBE virus previously isolated from a dog. The positive cases were distributed in four districts in the southern part of Hokkaido.  (+info)

Variation in oral susceptibility to dengue type 2 virus of populations of Aedes aegypti from the islands of Tahiti and Moorea, French Polynesia. (5/3745)

Twenty three samples of Aedes aegypti populations from the islands of Tahiti and Moorea (French Polynesia) were tested for their oral susceptibility to dengue type 2 virus. The high infection rates obtained suggest that the artificial feeding protocol used was more efficient than those previously described. Statistical analysis of the results allowed us to define two distinct geographic areas on Tahiti with respect to the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti: the east coast, with homogeneous infection rates, and the west coast, with heterogeneous infection rates. No geographic differences could be demonstrated on Moorea. The possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed in connection with recent findings on the variability of susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to insecticides.  (+info)

Replication of dengue type 2 virus in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). (6/3745)

We were able to infect Culex quinquefasciatus by the parenteral route with dengue virus type 2. The percentage of mosquitoes infected was dose dependent and we obtained a rate of 45.6% infected Cx. quinquefasciatus when a 10(5.9) MID50 (mosquito infectious dose for 50% of the individuals as measured in Aedes aegypti) of dengue virus type 2 per mosquito was used. Infection was detected by an immunofluorescent assay performed on mosquito head squashes 14 days after infection. The replication of dengue virus in Cx. quinquefasciatus was either at a very low level of magnitude or generated a large number of noninfectious particles since the triturated bodies of infected Cx. quinquefasciatus did not infect Ae. aegypti mosquitoes when inoculated parenterally. We were unable to infect Cx. quinquefasciatus females orally with an artificial meal that infected 100% of Ae. aegypti females. These findings lead us to agree with the consensus that Cx. quinquefasciatus should not be considered a biological vector of dengue viruses.  (+info)

Tissue tropism related to vector competence of Frankliniella occidentalis for tomato spotted wilt tospovirus. (7/3745)

The development of tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) infection in the midgut and salivary glands of transmitting and non-transmitting thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was studied to elucidate tissue tropism and the virus pathway within the body of this vector. Immunohistological techniques used in this study showed that the midgut, foregut and salivary glands were the only organs in which virus accumulated. The first signals of infection, observed as randomly distributed fluorescent granular spots, were found in the epithelial cells of the midgut, mainly restricted to the anterior region. The virus subsequently spread to the circular and longitudinal midgut muscle tissues, a process which occurred late in the larval stage. In the adult stage, the infection occurred in the visceral muscle tissues, covering the whole midgut and foregut, and was abolished in the midgut epithelium. The infection of the salivary glands was first observed 72 h post-acquisition, and simultaneously in the ligaments connecting the midgut with these glands. The salivary glands of transmitting individuals appeared heavily or completely infected, while no or only a low level of infection was found in the glands of non-transmitting individuals. Moreover, the development of an age-dependent midgut barrier against virus infection was observed in second instar larvae and adults. The results show that the establishment of TSWV infection in the various tissues and the potential of transmission seems to be regulated by different barriers and processes related to the metamorphosis of thrips.  (+info)

A GroEL homologue from endosymbiotic bacteria of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci is implicated in the circulative transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus. (8/3745)

Evidence for the involvement of a Bemisia tabaci GroEL homologue in the transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV) is presented. A approximately 63-kDa protein was identified in B. tabaci whole-body extracts using an antiserum raised against aphid Buchnera GroEL. The GroEL homologue was immunolocalized to a coccoid-shaped whitefly endosymbiont. The 30 N-terminal amino acids of the whitefly GroEL homologue showed 80% homology with that from different aphid species and GroEL from Escherichia coli. Purified GroEL from B. tabaci exhibited ultrastructural similarities to that of the endosymbiont from aphids and E. coli. In vitro ligand assays showed that tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) particles displayed a specific affinity for the B. tabaci 63-kDa GroEL homologue. Feeding whiteflies anti-Buchnera GroEL antiserum before the acquisition of virions reduced TYLCV transmission to tomato test plants by >80%. In the haemolymph of these whiteflies, TYLCV DNA was reduced to amounts below the threshold of detection by Southern blot hybridization. Active antibodies were recovered from the insect haemolymph suggesting that by complexing the GoEL homologue, the antibody disturbed interaction with TYLCV, leading to degradation of the virus. We propose that GroEL of B. tabaci protects the virus from destruction during its passage through the haemolymph.  (+info)

Insect vectors are insects that transmit disease-causing pathogens (such as viruses, bacteria, parasites) from one host to another. They do this while feeding on the host's blood or tissues. The insects themselves are not infected by the pathogen but act as mechanical carriers that pass it on during their bite. Examples of diseases spread by insect vectors include malaria (transmitted by mosquitoes), Lyme disease (transmitted by ticks), and plague (transmitted by fleas). Proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and reducing standing water where mosquitoes breed, can help reduce the risk of contracting these diseases.

I apologize for any confusion, but "insects" are not a medical term. Insects are small air-breathing arthropods that have a segmented body with six legs and usually have wings. They make up the largest group of animals on Earth, with over a million described species.

If you're looking for information about a specific medical condition or topic, please provide more details so I can offer a relevant response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hemiptera" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic order in the classification of living things, also known as "true bugs." This group includes species such as cicadas, aphids, and bedbugs. If you have a medical term in mind, please provide it so I can give you an accurate definition.

A genetic vector is a vehicle, often a plasmid or a virus, that is used to introduce foreign DNA into a host cell as part of genetic engineering or gene therapy techniques. The vector contains the desired gene or genes, along with regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers, which are needed for the expression of the gene in the target cells.

The choice of vector depends on several factors, including the size of the DNA to be inserted, the type of cell to be targeted, and the efficiency of uptake and expression required. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, adenoviruses, retroviruses, and lentiviruses.

Plasmids are small circular DNA molecules that can replicate independently in bacteria. They are often used as cloning vectors to amplify and manipulate DNA fragments. Adenoviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect a wide range of host cells, including human cells. They are commonly used as gene therapy vectors because they can efficiently transfer genes into both dividing and non-dividing cells.

Retroviruses and lentiviruses are RNA viruses that integrate their genetic material into the host cell's genome. This allows for stable expression of the transgene over time. Lentiviruses, a subclass of retroviruses, have the advantage of being able to infect non-dividing cells, making them useful for gene therapy applications in post-mitotic tissues such as neurons and muscle cells.

Overall, genetic vectors play a crucial role in modern molecular biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study gene function, develop new therapies, and modify organisms for various purposes.

Phytoplasmas are tiny, wall-less, bacteria-like organisms that lack a cell wall and have a unique, small circular DNA genome. They are classified in the class Mollicutes and are obligate parasites, meaning they can only survive inside living cells. They infect a wide range of plant species, as well as some insects, and can cause various diseases that affect the growth, development, and yield of crops and ornamental plants.

Phytoplasmas are typically transmitted from plant to plant by sap-sucking insects such as leafhoppers, planthoppers, and psyllids. Once inside a plant host, they manipulate the host's metabolism and cause various symptoms, including yellowing of leaves, stunting, witches' broom (excessive branching), virescence (greening of flowers), and phyllody (transformation of floral parts into leaf-like structures).

Phytoplasmas are difficult to culture in the laboratory, which has made their study challenging. However, advances in molecular biology techniques such as PCR and DNA sequencing have facilitated their identification and characterization. Controlling phytoplasma diseases is also a challenge due to their complex transmission cycles and the lack of effective chemical treatments. Management strategies typically involve integrated pest management (IPM) approaches that combine cultural, biological, and chemical methods to reduce disease incidence and spread.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Insect Proteins" is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide some information about insect protein from a nutritional and food science perspective.

Insect proteins refer to the proteins that are obtained from insects. Insects are a rich source of protein, and their protein content varies by species. For example, mealworms and crickets have been found to contain approximately 47-63% and 60-72% protein by dry weight, respectively.

In recent years, insect proteins have gained attention as a potential sustainable source of nutrition due to their high protein content, low environmental impact, and the ability to convert feed into protein more efficiently compared to traditional livestock. Insect proteins can be used in various applications such as food and feed additives, nutritional supplements, and even cosmetics.

However, it's important to note that the use of insect proteins in human food is not widely accepted in many Western countries due to cultural and regulatory barriers. Nonetheless, research and development efforts continue to explore the potential benefits and applications of insect proteins in the global food system.

Reoviridae is a family of double-stranded RNA viruses that are non-enveloped and have a segmented genome. The name "Reoviridae" is derived from Respiratory Enteric Orphan virus, as these viruses were initially discovered in respiratory and enteric (gastrointestinal) samples but did not appear to cause any specific diseases.

The family Reoviridae includes several important human pathogens such as rotaviruses, which are a major cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, and orthoreoviruses, which can cause respiratory and systemic infections in humans. Additionally, many Reoviridae viruses infect animals, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects, and can cause a variety of diseases.

Reoviridae virions are typically composed of multiple protein layers that encase the genomic RNA segments. The family is divided into two subfamilies, Sedoreovirinae and Spinareovirinae, based on structural features and genome organization. Reoviruses have a complex replication cycle that involves multiple steps, including attachment to host cells, uncoating of the viral particle, transcription of the genomic RNA, translation of viral proteins, packaging of new virions, and release from infected cells.

'Insect control' is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, it generally refers to the methods and practices used to manage or reduce the population of insects that can be harmful or disruptive to human health, food supply, or property. This can include various strategies such as chemical pesticides, biological control agents, habitat modification, and other integrated pest management techniques.

In medical terms, 'vector control' is a more relevant concept, which refers to the specific practices used to reduce or prevent the transmission of infectious diseases by insects and other arthropods that act as disease vectors (such as mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas). Vector control measures may include the use of insecticides, larvicides, biological control agents, environmental management, personal protection methods, and other integrated vector management strategies.

A disease vector is a living organism that transmits infectious pathogens from one host to another. These vectors can include mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and other arthropods that carry viruses, bacteria, parasites, or other disease-causing agents. The vector becomes infected with the pathogen after biting an infected host, and then transmits the infection to another host through its saliva or feces during a subsequent blood meal.

Disease vectors are of particular concern in public health because they can spread diseases rapidly and efficiently, often over large geographic areas. Controlling vector-borne diseases requires a multifaceted approach that includes reducing vector populations, preventing bites, and developing vaccines or treatments for the associated diseases.

Ceratopogonidae is a family of small flies, also known as biting midges or no-see-ums. They are characterized by their slender segmented bodies, feathery antennae, and wings with extensive venation. Some species in this family are known to be vectors of various diseases, such as human and animal forms of filariasis, blue tongue virus in sheep, and several viral diseases in horses. The larvae of these flies are aquatic or semi-aquatic and can be found in a variety of habitats including wet soil, decaying vegetation, and freshwater bodies.

Luteoviridae is a family of positive-strand RNA viruses that primarily infect plants. The name "luteo" comes from Latin and means "yellow," which refers to the yellowing symptoms often caused by these viruses in infected plants. The virions are non-enveloped and icosahedral in shape, with a diameter of about 25-30 nanometers.

The genome of Luteoviridae viruses is monopartite and contains one molecule of linear, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA. The genome is encapsidated within the virion and protected by a capsid protein. The genome encodes several proteins, including a readthrough protein that functions as a movement protein, allowing the virus to move from cell to cell within the plant.

Luteoviridae viruses are transmitted by aphids in a persistent, circulative manner. Once an aphid ingests virus particles while feeding on an infected plant, the virus moves through the insect's body and accumulates in its salivary glands. When the aphid feeds on a healthy plant, it injects the virus into the plant tissue along with its saliva.

Some notable members of Luteoviridae include Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV), Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV), and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV). These viruses can cause significant economic losses in agriculture, particularly in cereal crops and potatoes.

Tenuivirus is a genus of negative-stranded RNA viruses that are transmitted by planthopper insects and cause serious diseases in crops such as rice, maize, and sorghum. The genus Tenuivirus is part of the family Phenuiviridae in the order Bunyavirales.

The virions of Tenuivirus are enveloped and filamentous, with a length of 800-1200 nm and a diameter of 3-4 nm. The genome consists of four single-stranded RNA segments, which are encapsidated in separate nucleocapsids.

Tenuiviruses are known to cause several important diseases in plants, including rice stripe disease, maize stripe disease, and sorghum stripe disease. These diseases can result in significant yield losses and economic damage to agriculture.

The transmission of Tenuivirus occurs through the feeding of infected planthoppers on healthy plants. The viruses replicate in both the insect vector and the plant host, and can be transmitted vertically from parent to offspring in the insect vector. Control measures for Tenuivirus diseases include the use of resistant crop varieties, chemical control of the vector population, and cultural practices such as crop rotation and sanitation.

"Rhodnius" is not a medical term, but rather it refers to a genus of true bugs in the family Reduviidae. These small, wingless insects are known as "bugs" and are commonly found in tropical regions of the Americas. They feed on plant sap and are also known to be vectors for certain diseases, such as Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. However, they are not typically associated with human medicine or medical conditions.

A plant disease is a disorder that affects the normal growth and development of plants, caused by pathogenic organisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or nematodes, as well as environmental factors like nutrient deficiencies, extreme temperatures, or physical damage. These diseases can cause various symptoms, including discoloration, wilting, stunted growth, necrosis, and reduced yield or productivity, which can have significant economic and ecological impacts.

Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis. It's transmitted to humans and other mammals through the feces of triatomine bugs, often called "kissing bugs." The parasite can also be spread through contaminated food, drink, or from mother to baby during pregnancy or birth.

The life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi involves two main forms: the infective metacyclic trypomastigote that is found in the bug's feces and the replicative intracellular amastigote that resides within host cells. The metacyclic trypomastigotes enter the host through mucous membranes or skin lesions, where they invade various types of cells and differentiate into amastigotes. These amastigotes multiply by binary fission and then differentiate back into trypomastigotes, which are released into the bloodstream when the host cell ruptures. The circulating trypomastigotes can then infect other cells or be taken up by another triatomine bug during a blood meal, continuing the life cycle.

Clinical manifestations of Chagas disease range from an acute phase with non-specific symptoms like fever, swelling, and fatigue to a chronic phase characterized by cardiac and gastrointestinal complications, which can develop decades after the initial infection. Early detection and treatment of Chagas disease are crucial for preventing long-term health consequences.

"Spiroplasma citri" is a species of bacterium that belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is a plant pathogen, responsible for the disease known as stubborn greening or citrus stubborn disease in citrus plants. The bacteria are transmitted by insects, particularly the brown winged leafhopper (Graphocephala atropunctata), and can cause significant damage to citrus crops.

The bacteria have a unique spiral shape and lack a cell wall, which makes them resistant to many antibiotics. They infect the phloem tissue of plants and disrupt the flow of nutrients, leading to stunted growth, yellowing of leaves, and reduced fruit production. Currently, there is no effective treatment for citrus stubborn disease, and management strategies focus on preventing the spread of the bacteria through insect control and the use of disease-free planting material.

Triatominae is a subfamily of insects in the family Reduviidae, also known as assassin bugs. Triatomines are commonly called "kissing bugs" because they often bite humans near the mouth or eyes while they sleep. They are called this because of their habit of feeding on the blood of mammals, including humans, and prefer to bite near the lips or eyes where the skin is thin.

Triatomines are vectors for Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasitic protozoan that causes Chagas disease, a potentially life-threatening illness endemic in the Americas. The transmission of T. cruzi to humans occurs when feces or urine from an infected triatomine is accidentally rubbed into the bite wound or mucous membranes, such as those found in the eyes or mouth.

Triatomines are typically nocturnal and hide during the day in crevices in walls, roofs, or beds. They are attracted to light and can be found near human dwellings, particularly in rural areas with poor housing conditions. Preventing triatomine infestations and reducing contact with these insects is an important part of Chagas disease prevention.

"Vinca" is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a group of plants that belong to the genus Vinca or the family Apocynaceae. Some species of Vinca are used in medicine and are known as "vinca alkaloids." These alkaloids include vincristine and vinblastine, which have been isolated from the Madagascar periwinkle (Vinca rosea) plant.

Vincristine and vinblastine are antimicrotubule agents that disrupt microtubule function during mitosis, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They have been used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including leukemias, lymphomas, and testicular cancer.

Therefore, when referring to "Vinca" in a medical context, it typically means the use of vinca alkaloids as anticancer agents.

Xylella is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that can cause serious plant diseases. The term "Xylella" does not have a specific medical definition, but it is often used in the context of plant pathology and agriculture. These bacteria are known to infect a wide range of plants, including important crops, causing various symptoms such as leaf scorching, dieback, and wilting. Some species of Xylella can also affect humans and animals, causing mild illnesses or no symptoms at all. However, human and animal infections are not the primary focus when discussing Xylella in a medical context.

A plant virus is not defined in medical terms, as viruses are typically considered within the context of living organisms and plants are not classified as such. However, I can provide a general virology definition for you:

Plant viruses are small infectious agents that consist of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) enclosed in a protein coat. They infect various plant species, causing a wide range of symptoms and diseases, which can result in significant economic losses in agriculture and horticulture. Plant viruses lack the ability to replicate outside a host cell, and they rely on the host's metabolic machinery for their reproduction. They can be transmitted through various means, such as insect vectors, seeds, or mechanical contact.

Psychodidae is a family of small, delicate flies known as psychodids or moth flies. The term "psychodidae" itself is the taxonomic name for this group of insects, and it does not have a specific medical definition. However, some species within this family are known to be vectors of various diseases, such as Leishmaniasis, which is transmitted through the bites of infected sandflies (a type of psychodid).

Therefore, in a broader medical context, "psychodidae" may refer to the group of flies that includes potential disease-carrying species. It's important to note that not all psychodids are vectors of diseases, and many species are harmless to humans.

Triatoma is a genus of insects in the family Reduviidae, also known as "kissing bugs" or "conenose bugs." These insects are called "kissing bugs" because they often bite humans around the mouth and face. They are found primarily in the Americas, ranging from the southern United States to Argentina.

Triatoma species are of medical importance because they can transmit a parasitic infection called Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) to humans through their feces. The parasite that causes Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, is found in the bug's feces and can enter the human body through mucous membranes or breaks in the skin.

Chagas disease can cause serious health problems, including heart damage and digestive system complications, if left untreated. Therefore, it is important to take precautions to prevent Triatoma bites and seek medical attention promptly if bitten by one of these insects.

Host-parasite interactions refer to the relationship between a parasitic organism (the parasite) and its host, which can be an animal, plant, or human body. The parasite lives on or inside the host and derives nutrients from it, often causing harm in the process. This interaction can range from relatively benign to severe, depending on various factors such as the species of the parasite, the immune response of the host, and the duration of infection.

The host-parasite relationship is often categorized based on the degree of harm caused to the host. Parasites that cause little to no harm are called commensals, while those that cause significant damage or disease are called parasitic pathogens. Some parasites can even manipulate their hosts' behavior and physiology to enhance their own survival and reproduction, leading to complex interactions between the two organisms.

Understanding host-parasite interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat parasitic infections, as well as for understanding the ecological relationships between different species in natural ecosystems.

Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan *Trypanosoma cruzi*. It is primarily transmitted to humans through the feces of triatomine bugs (also called "kissing bugs"), which defecate on the skin of people while they are sleeping. The disease can also be spread through contaminated food or drink, during blood transfusions, from mother to baby during pregnancy or childbirth, and through organ transplantation.

The acute phase of Chagas disease can cause symptoms such as fever, fatigue, body aches, headache, rash, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and vomiting. However, many people do not experience any symptoms during the acute phase. After several weeks or months, most people enter the chronic phase of the disease, which can last for decades or even a lifetime. During this phase, many people do not have any symptoms, but about 20-30% of infected individuals will develop serious cardiac or digestive complications, such as heart failure, arrhythmias, or difficulty swallowing.

Chagas disease is primarily found in Latin America, where it is estimated that around 6-7 million people are infected with the parasite. However, due to increased travel and migration, cases of Chagas disease have been reported in other parts of the world, including North America, Europe, and Asia. There is no vaccine for Chagas disease, but medications are available to treat the infection during the acute phase and to manage symptoms during the chronic phase.

Aphids, also known as plant lice, are small sap-sucking insects that belong to the superfamily Aphidoidea in the order Hemiptera. They are soft-bodied and pear-shaped, with most species measuring less than 1/8 inch (3 millimeters) long.

Aphids feed on a wide variety of plants by inserting their needle-like mouthparts into the plant's vascular system to extract phloem sap. This feeding can cause stunted growth, yellowing, curling, or distortion of leaves and flowers, and may even lead to the death of the plant in severe infestations.

Aphids reproduce rapidly and can produce several generations per year. Many species give birth to live young (nymphs) rather than laying eggs, which allows them to increase their population numbers quickly. Aphids also have a complex life cycle that may involve sexual reproduction, parthenogenesis (reproduction without fertilization), and winged or wingless forms.

Aphids are an important pest in agriculture and horticulture, causing significant damage to crops and ornamental plants. They can also transmit plant viruses and produce honeydew, a sticky substance that attracts ants and supports the growth of sooty mold fungi.

Controlling aphids may involve cultural practices such as pruning, watering, and removing weeds; biological control using natural enemies such as lady beetles, lacewings, and parasitic wasps; or chemical control using insecticides.

Tospovirus is a type of virus that belongs to the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Tospovirus. It is transmitted by thrips, small insects that feed on plant sap. Tospoviruses are important pathogens of plants and can cause serious diseases in a wide range of crops, including vegetables, fruits, and ornamental plants.

Tospoviruses have a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome, consisting of large (L), medium (M), and small (S) segments, which encode the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, two glycoproteins, and the nucleocapsid protein, respectively. The M segment also encodes a nonstructural protein called NSm, which is involved in viral movement within the plant.

The most well-known tospovirus is the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which infects over 800 host plants and causes significant economic losses worldwide. Other important tospoviruses include Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), and Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV).

Tospovirus infections can cause a variety of symptoms in plants, including leaf spots, ring spots, necrosis, stunting, and reduced yield. There are no known cures for tospovirus infections, and control measures typically focus on preventing the spread of the virus through the use of resistant plant varieties, cultural practices, and insecticides to reduce thrips populations.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Tsetse flies are not a medical condition but rather insects that can transmit diseases. Here is their medical relevance:

Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) are large, biting flies found primarily in tropical Africa. They are vectors for African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in animals. The fly ingests the parasite when it takes a blood meal from an infected host, then transmits the disease to another host through its saliva during subsequent feedings. This makes tsetse flies medically relevant due to their role in spreading these diseases.

"Aedes" is a genus of mosquitoes that are known to transmit various diseases, including Zika virus, dengue fever, chikungunya, and yellow fever. These mosquitoes are typically found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. They are distinguished by their black and white striped legs and thorax. Aedes aegypti is the most common species associated with disease transmission, although other species such as Aedes albopictus can also transmit diseases. It's important to note that only female mosquitoes bite and feed on blood, while males feed solely on nectar and plant juices.

Trypanosomatina is not considered a medical term, but it is a taxonomic category in the field of biology. Trypanosomatina is a suborder that includes unicellular parasitic protozoans belonging to the order Kinetoplastida. Some notable members of this suborder include genera such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania, which are medically important parasites causing diseases in humans and animals.

Trypanosoma species are responsible for various trypanosomiases, including African sleeping sickness (caused by Trypanosoma brucei) and Chagas disease (caused by Trypanosoma cruzi). Leishmania species cause different forms of leishmaniasis, a group of diseases affecting the skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs.

In summary, while not a medical term itself, Trypanosomatina is a biology taxonomic category that includes several disease-causing parasites of medical importance.

Trypanosoma is a genus of flagellated protozoan parasites belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae. These microscopic single-celled organisms are known to cause various tropical diseases in humans and animals, including Chagas disease (caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) and African sleeping sickness (caused by Trypanosoma brucei).

The life cycle of Trypanosoma involves alternating between an insect vector (like a tsetse fly or kissing bug) and a mammalian host. The parasites undergo complex morphological changes as they move through the different hosts and developmental stages, often exhibiting distinct forms in the insect vector compared to the mammalian host.

Trypanosoma species have an undulating membrane and a single flagellum that helps them move through their environment. They can be transmitted through various routes, including insect vectors, contaminated food or water, or congenital transmission from mother to offspring. The diseases caused by these parasites can lead to severe health complications and may even be fatal if left untreated.

Trypanosoma brucei brucei is a species of protozoan flagellate parasite that causes African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in animals. This parasite is transmitted through the bite of an infected tsetse fly (Glossina spp.). The life cycle of T. b. brucei involves two main stages: the insect-dwelling procyclic trypomastigote stage and the mammalian-dwelling bloodstream trypomastigote stage.

The distinguishing feature of T. b. brucei is its ability to change its surface coat, which helps it evade the host's immune system. This allows the parasite to establish a long-term infection in the mammalian host. However, T. b. brucei is not infectious to humans; instead, two other subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, are responsible for human African trypanosomiasis.

In summary, Trypanosoma brucei brucei is a non-human-infective subspecies of the parasite that causes African trypanosomiasis in animals and serves as an essential model organism for understanding the biology and pathogenesis of related human-infective trypanosomes.

Biological pest control, also known as biocontrol, is a method of managing or eliminating pests such as insects, mites, weeds, and plant diseases using natural enemies or other organisms. These biological control agents include predators, parasites, pathogens, and competitors that regulate pest populations and reduce the need for chemical pesticides. Biological pest control is a key component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs and has minimal impact on the environment compared to traditional pest control methods.

Begomovirus is a genus of viruses in the family *Geminiviridae* that infect plants. These viruses are transmitted by insects, specifically whiteflies, and have circular, single-stranded DNA genomes. Begomoviruses cause various diseases in economically important crops, such as tomatoes, beans, cassava, and cotton, leading to significant yield losses worldwide. The name "Begomovirus" is derived from the type species *Bean golden mosaic virus*, which was isolated from beans in Mexico.

Insect viruses, also known as entomoviruses, are viruses that specifically infect and replicate in insect hosts. These viruses can be found in various insect species, including those of medical and agricultural importance. Insect viruses can cause diseases in insect populations, leading to significant impacts on their growth, development, and survival. Some insect viruses have been studied as potential biological control agents for managing pest insects that affect crops or transmit diseases. Examples of insect viruses include Baculoviridae, Reoviridae, and Picornaviridae families.

'Anopheles' is a genus of mosquitoes that are known for their role in transmitting malaria parasites to humans. These mosquitoes have a distinctive resting posture, with their abdomens raised and heads down, and they typically feed on human hosts at night. Only female Anopheles mosquitoes transmit the malaria parasite, as they require blood meals to lay eggs.

There are over 400 species of Anopheles mosquitoes worldwide, but only about 30-40 of these are considered significant vectors of human malaria. The distribution and behavior of these mosquitoes can vary widely depending on the specific species and geographic location.

Preventing and controlling the spread of malaria involves a variety of strategies, including the use of insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor residual spraying, antimalarial drugs, and vaccines. Public health efforts to reduce the burden of malaria have made significant progress in recent decades, but the disease remains a major global health challenge, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

"Oryza sativa" is the scientific name for Asian rice, which is a species of grass and one of the most important food crops in the world. It is a staple food for more than half of the global population, providing a significant source of calories and carbohydrates. There are several varieties of Oryza sativa, including indica and japonica, which differ in their genetic makeup, growth habits, and grain characteristics.

Oryza sativa is an annual plant that grows to a height of 1-2 meters and produces long slender leaves and clusters of flowers at the top of the stem. The grains are enclosed within a tough husk, which must be removed before consumption. Rice is typically grown in flooded fields or paddies, which provide the necessary moisture for germination and growth.

Rice is an important source of nutrition for people around the world, particularly in developing countries where it may be one of the few reliable sources of food. It is rich in carbohydrates, fiber, and various vitamins and minerals, including thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, iron, and magnesium. However, rice can also be a significant source of arsenic, a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in the grain during growth.

In medical terms, Oryza sativa may be used as a component of nutritional interventions for individuals who are at risk of malnutrition or who have specific dietary needs. It may also be studied in clinical trials to evaluate its potential health benefits or risks.

Salivary glands are exocrine glands that produce saliva, which is secreted into the oral cavity to keep the mouth and throat moist, aid in digestion by initiating food breakdown, and help maintain dental health. There are three major pairs of salivary glands: the parotid glands located in the cheeks, the submandibular glands found beneath the jaw, and the sublingual glands situated under the tongue. Additionally, there are numerous minor salivary glands distributed throughout the oral cavity lining. These glands release their secretions through a system of ducts into the mouth.

'Life cycle stages' is a term used in the context of public health and medicine to describe the different stages that an organism goes through during its lifetime. This concept is particularly important in the field of epidemiology, where understanding the life cycle stages of infectious agents (such as bacteria, viruses, parasites) can help inform strategies for disease prevention and control.

The life cycle stages of an infectious agent may include various forms such as spores, cysts, trophozoites, schizonts, or vectors, among others, depending on the specific organism. Each stage may have different characteristics, such as resistance to environmental factors, susceptibility to drugs, and ability to transmit infection.

For example, the life cycle stages of the malaria parasite include sporozoites (the infective form transmitted by mosquitoes), merozoites (the form that infects red blood cells), trophozoites (the feeding stage inside red blood cells), schizonts (the replicating stage inside red blood cells), and gametocytes (the sexual stage that can be taken up by mosquitoes to continue the life cycle).

Understanding the life cycle stages of an infectious agent is critical for developing effective interventions, such as vaccines, drugs, or other control measures. For example, targeting a specific life cycle stage with a drug may prevent transmission or reduce the severity of disease. Similarly, designing a vaccine to elicit immunity against a particular life cycle stage may provide protection against infection or disease.

Host-pathogen interactions refer to the complex and dynamic relationship between a living organism (the host) and a disease-causing agent (the pathogen). This interaction can involve various molecular, cellular, and physiological processes that occur between the two entities. The outcome of this interaction can determine whether the host will develop an infection or not, as well as the severity and duration of the illness.

During host-pathogen interactions, the pathogen may release virulence factors that allow it to evade the host's immune system, colonize tissues, and obtain nutrients for its survival and replication. The host, in turn, may mount an immune response to recognize and eliminate the pathogen, which can involve various mechanisms such as inflammation, phagocytosis, and the production of antimicrobial agents.

Understanding the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. This knowledge can help identify new targets for therapeutic interventions, inform vaccine design, and guide public health policies to control the spread of infectious agents.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Genes in insects refer to the hereditary units of DNA that are passed down from parents to offspring and contain the instructions for the development, function, and reproduction of an organism. These genetic materials are located within the chromosomes in the nucleus of insect cells. They play a crucial role in determining various traits such as physical characteristics, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases.

Insect genes, like those of other organisms, consist of exons (coding regions) that contain information for protein synthesis and introns (non-coding regions) that are removed during the process of gene expression. The expression of insect genes is regulated by various factors such as transcription factors, enhancers, and silencers, which bind to specific DNA sequences to activate or repress gene transcription.

Understanding the genetic makeup of insects has important implications for various fields, including agriculture, public health, and evolutionary biology. For example, genes associated with insect pests' resistance to pesticides can be identified and targeted to develop more effective control strategies. Similarly, genes involved in disease transmission by insect vectors such as mosquitoes can be studied to develop novel interventions for preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

"Vitis" is a genus name and it refers to a group of flowering plants in the grape family, Vitaceae. This genus includes over 70 species of grapes that are native to the Northern Hemisphere, particularly in North America and Asia. The most commonly cultivated species is "Vitis vinifera," which is the source of most of the world's table and wine grapes.

Therefore, a medical definition of 'Vitis' may not be directly applicable as it is more commonly used in botany and agriculture rather than medicine. However, some compounds derived from Vitis species have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, such as resveratrol found in the skin of red grapes, which has been investigated for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cardioprotective effects.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Moths" are not a medical term, but rather they are a group of insects closely related to butterflies. They belong to the order Lepidoptera and are characterized by their scales covering their wings and body. If you have any questions about moths or if you meant to ask something else, please let me know!

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites that are the causative agents of Leishmaniasis, a group of diseases with various clinical manifestations. These parasites are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female phlebotomine sandflies. The disease has a wide geographic distribution, mainly in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of Asia, Africa, South America, and Southern Europe.

The Leishmania species have a complex life cycle that involves two main stages: the promastigote stage, which is found in the sandfly vector, and the amastigote stage, which infects mammalian hosts, including humans. The clinical manifestations of Leishmaniasis depend on the specific Leishmania species and the host's immune response to the infection.

The three main forms of Leishmaniasis are:

1. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL): This form is characterized by skin lesions, such as ulcers or nodules, that can take several months to heal and may leave scars. CL is caused by various Leishmania species, including L. major, L. tropica, and L. aethiopica.

2. Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL): Also known as kala-azar, VL affects internal organs such as the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Symptoms include fever, weight loss, anemia, and enlarged liver and spleen. VL is caused by L. donovani, L. infantum, and L. chagasi species.

3. Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis (MCL): This form affects the mucous membranes of the nose, mouth, and throat, causing destruction of tissues and severe disfigurement. MCL is caused by L. braziliensis and L. guyanensis species.

Prevention and control measures for Leishmaniasis include vector control, early diagnosis and treatment, and protection against sandfly bites through the use of insect repellents and bed nets.

Leishmania mexicana is a species of protozoan parasite that causes cutaneous leishmaniasis, a skin infection, in humans and other mammals. It is transmitted to its hosts through the bite of infected female sandflies, primarily of the genus Lutzomyia. The parasites multiply within the skin lesions of the host, leading to symptoms such as ulcers, scarring, and disfigurement. The severity and duration of the infection can vary widely, and in some cases, the infection may heal on its own without treatment. However, in other cases, the infection can become chronic and lead to significant morbidity.

Leishmania mexicana is found primarily in Mexico and Central America, although it has also been reported in other parts of the world. It is one of several species of Leishmania that can cause cutaneous leishmaniasis, and diagnosis typically involves identifying the parasite through microscopic examination of tissue samples or through molecular testing. Treatment options for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. mexicana include systemic medications such as antimony compounds, miltefosine, and amphotericin B, as well as local treatments such as heat therapy and cryotherapy.

In the context of medicine and biology, symbiosis is a type of close and long-term biological interaction between two different biological organisms. Generally, one organism, called the symbiont, lives inside or on another organism, called the host. This interaction can be mutually beneficial (mutualistic), harmful to the host organism (parasitic), or have no effect on either organism (commensal).

Examples of mutualistic symbiotic relationships in humans include the bacteria that live in our gut and help us digest food, as well as the algae that live inside corals and provide them with nutrients. Parasitic symbioses, on the other hand, involve organisms like viruses or parasitic worms that live inside a host and cause harm to it.

It's worth noting that while the term "symbiosis" is often used in popular culture to refer to any close relationship between two organisms, in scientific contexts it has a more specific meaning related to long-term biological interactions.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Genes in protozoa refer to the hereditary units of these single-celled organisms that carry genetic information necessary for their growth, development, and reproduction. These genes are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules, which contain sequences of nucleotide bases that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Protozoan genes are responsible for various functions, such as metabolism, response to environmental stimuli, and reproduction.

It is important to note that the study of protozoan genes has contributed significantly to our understanding of genetics and evolution, particularly in areas such as molecular biology, cell biology, and genomics. However, there is still much to be learned about the genetic diversity and complexity of these organisms, which continue to be an active area of research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protozoan Proteins" is not a specific medical or scientific term. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms, and proteins are large biological molecules consisting of one or more chains of amino acid residues. Therefore, "Protozoan Proteins" generally refers to the various types of proteins found in protozoa.

However, if you're looking for information about proteins specific to certain protozoan parasites with medical relevance (such as Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malaria), I would be happy to help! Please provide more context or specify the particular protozoan of interest.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

'Leishmania donovani' is a species of protozoan parasite that causes a severe form of visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar. This disease primarily affects the spleen, liver, and bone marrow, leading to symptoms such as fever, weight loss, anemia, and enlargement of the spleen and liver. The parasite is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected female sandflies. It's worth noting that this organism can also affect dogs and other animals, causing a disease known as canine leishmaniasis.

Insect repellents are substances that are applied to the skin, clothing, or other surfaces to deter insects from landing or crawling on that surface. They work by masking the scents that attract insects or by repelling them with unpleasant odors. Insect repellents can be chemical-based, such as those containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), picaridin, or IR3535, or they can be natural, such as those containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or citronella. These substances work by interfering with the insect's ability to detect human scent, making it less likely that they will come into contact with the person using the repellent. Insect repellents are an important tool in preventing insect-borne diseases such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, and Zika virus.

"Spodoptera" is not a medical term, but a genus name in the insect family Noctuidae. It includes several species of moths commonly known as armyworms or cutworms due to their habit of consuming leaves and roots of various plants, causing significant damage to crops.

Some well-known species in this genus are Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm), Spodoptera litura (tobacco cutworm), and Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm). These pests can be a concern for medical entomology when they transmit pathogens or cause allergic reactions. For instance, their frass (feces) and shed skins may trigger asthma symptoms in susceptible individuals. However, the insects themselves are not typically considered medical issues unless they directly affect human health.

Baculoviridae is a family of large, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect arthropods, particularly insects. The virions (virus particles) are enclosed in a rod-shaped or occlusion body called a polyhedron, which provides protection and stability in the environment. Baculoviruses have a wide host range within the order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies), Hymenoptera (sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants), and Diptera (flies). They are important pathogens in agriculture and forestry, causing significant damage to insect pests.

The Baculoviridae family is divided into four genera: Alphabaculovirus, Betabaculovirus, Gammabaculovirus, and Deltabaculovirus. The two most well-studied and economically important genera are Alphabaculovirus (nuclear polyhedrosis viruses or NPVs) and Betabaculovirus (granulosis viruses or GVs).

Baculoviruses have a biphasic replication cycle, consisting of a budded phase and an occluded phase. During the budded phase, the virus infects host cells and produces enveloped virions that can spread to other cells within the insect. In the occluded phase, large numbers of non-enveloped virions are produced and encapsidated in a protein matrix called a polyhedron. These polyhedra accumulate in the infected insect's tissues, providing protection from environmental degradation and facilitating transmission to new hosts through oral ingestion or other means.

Baculoviruses have been extensively studied as models for understanding viral replication, gene expression, and host-pathogen interactions. They also have potential applications in biotechnology and pest control, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy vectors, and environmentally friendly insecticides.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

Insect hormones are chemical messengers that regulate various physiological and behavioral processes in insects. They are produced and released by endocrine glands and organs, such as the corpora allata, prothoracic glands, and neurosecretory cells located in the brain. Insect hormones play crucial roles in the regulation of growth and development, reproduction, diapause (a state of dormancy), metamorphosis, molting, and other vital functions. Some well-known insect hormones include juvenile hormone (JH), ecdysteroids (such as 20-hydroxyecdysone), and neuropeptides like the brain hormone and adipokinetic hormone. These hormones act through specific receptors, often transmembrane proteins, to elicit intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression, cell behavior, or organ function. Understanding insect hormones is essential for developing novel strategies for pest management and control, as well as for advancing our knowledge of insect biology and evolution.

A genome in the context of insects refers to the complete set of genetic material, including all of the DNA and RNA, that is present in the cells of an insect. The genome contains all of the genes that provide the instructions for the development, growth, and function of the insect. It also includes non-coding regions of DNA that may have regulatory functions or may be the result of historical processes.

The genome of an insect is typically divided into several chromosomes, which are structures in the cell's nucleus that contain long stretches of DNA. The number and appearance of these chromosomes can vary between different species of insects. For example, some insects may have a diploid number of two sets of chromosomes (one set from each parent), while others may have a haploid number of a single set of chromosomes.

The genome size of insects can also vary significantly, with some species having genomes that are only a few hundred million base pairs in length, while others have genomes that are several billion base pairs long. The genome sequence of an insect can provide valuable insights into its evolutionary history, as well as information about the genes and regulatory elements that are important for its biology and behavior.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lepidoptera" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic order that includes moths and butterflies, which are insects known for their distinctive wing scales. This term is used in the field of biology, not medicine.

Gene transfer techniques, also known as gene therapy, refer to medical procedures where genetic material is introduced into an individual's cells or tissues to treat or prevent diseases. This can be achieved through various methods:

1. **Viral Vectors**: The most common method uses modified viruses, such as adenoviruses, retroviruses, or lentiviruses, to carry the therapeutic gene into the target cells. The virus infects the cell and inserts the new gene into the cell's DNA.

2. **Non-Viral Vectors**: These include methods like electroporation (using electric fields to create pores in the cell membrane), gene guns (shooting gold particles coated with DNA into cells), or liposomes (tiny fatty bubbles that can enclose DNA).

3. **Direct Injection**: In some cases, the therapeutic gene can be directly injected into a specific tissue or organ.

The goal of gene transfer techniques is to supplement or replace a faulty gene with a healthy one, thereby correcting the genetic disorder. However, these techniques are still largely experimental and have their own set of challenges, including potential immune responses, issues with accurate targeting, and risks of mutations or cancer development.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Genetic transduction is a process in molecular biology that describes the transfer of genetic material from one bacterium to another by a viral vector called a bacteriophage (or phage). In this process, the phage infects one bacterium and incorporates a portion of the bacterial DNA into its own genetic material. When the phage then infects a second bacterium, it can transfer the incorporated bacterial DNA to the new host. This can result in the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of traits such as antibiotic resistance or virulence factors between bacteria.

There are two main types of transduction: generalized and specialized. In generalized transduction, any portion of the bacterial genome can be packaged into the phage particle, leading to a random assortment of genetic material being transferred. In specialized transduction, only specific genes near the site where the phage integrates into the bacterial chromosome are consistently transferred.

It's important to note that genetic transduction is not to be confused with transformation or conjugation, which are other mechanisms of HGT in bacteria.

"Beetles" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to insects belonging to the order Coleoptera, which is one of the largest orders in the class Insecta. Beetles are characterized by their hardened forewings, known as elytra, which protect their hind wings and body when not in use for flying.

There are many different species of beetles found all over the world, and some can have an impact on human health. For example, certain types of beetles, such as bed bugs and carpet beetles, can cause skin irritation and allergic reactions in some people. Other beetles, like the Colorado potato beetle, can damage crops and lead to economic losses for farmers. However, it is important to note that most beetles are not harmful to humans and play an essential role in ecosystems as decomposers and pollinators.

Insect bites and stings refer to the penetration of the skin by insects, such as mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, or bees, often resulting in localized symptoms including redness, swelling, itching, and pain. The reaction can vary depending on the individual's sensitivity and the type of insect. In some cases, systemic reactions like anaphylaxis may occur, which requires immediate medical attention. Treatment typically involves relieving symptoms with topical creams, antihistamines, or in severe cases, epinephrine. Prevention measures include using insect repellent and protective clothing.

Diptera is an order of insects that includes flies, mosquitoes, and gnats. The name "Diptera" comes from the Greek words "di," meaning two, and "pteron," meaning wing. This refers to the fact that all members of this order have a single pair of functional wings for flying, while the other pair is reduced to small knob-like structures called halteres, which help with balance and maneuverability during flight.

Some common examples of Diptera include houseflies, fruit flies, horseflies, tsetse flies, and midges. Many species in this order are important pollinators, while others can be significant pests or disease vectors. The study of Diptera is called dipterology.

Adenoviridae is a family of viruses that includes many species that can cause various types of illnesses in humans and animals. These viruses are non-enveloped, meaning they do not have a lipid membrane, and have an icosahedral symmetry with a diameter of approximately 70-90 nanometers.

The genome of Adenoviridae is composed of double-stranded DNA, which contains linear chromosomes ranging from 26 to 45 kilobases in length. The family is divided into five genera: Mastadenovirus, Aviadenovirus, Atadenovirus, Siadenovirus, and Ichtadenovirus.

Human adenoviruses are classified under the genus Mastadenovirus and can cause a wide range of illnesses, including respiratory infections, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis, and upper respiratory tract infections. Some serotypes have also been associated with more severe diseases such as hemorrhagic cystitis, hepatitis, and meningoencephalitis.

Adenoviruses are highly contagious and can be transmitted through respiratory droplets, fecal-oral route, or by contact with contaminated surfaces. They can also be spread through contaminated water sources. Infections caused by adenoviruses are usually self-limiting, but severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care.

A dependovirus, also known as a dependent adenovirus or satellite adenovirus, is a type of virus that requires the presence of another virus, specifically an adenovirus, to replicate. Dependoviruses are small, non-enveloped viruses with a double-stranded DNA genome. They cannot complete their replication cycle without the help of an adenovirus, which provides necessary functions for the dependovirus to replicate.

Dependoviruses are clinically significant because they can cause disease in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. In some cases, dependoviruses may also affect the severity and outcome of adenovirus infections. However, it is important to note that not all adenovirus infections are associated with dependovirus co-infections.

A lentivirus is a type of slow-acting retrovirus that can cause chronic diseases and cancers. The term "lentivirus" comes from the Latin word "lentus," which means slow. Lentiviruses are characterized by their ability to establish a persistent infection, during which they continuously produce new viral particles.

Lentiviruses have a complex genome that includes several accessory genes, in addition to the typical gag, pol, and env genes found in all retroviruses. These accessory genes play important roles in regulating the virus's replication cycle and evading the host's immune response.

One of the most well-known lentiviruses is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. Other examples include the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Lentiviruses have also been used as vectors for gene therapy, as they can efficiently introduce new genes into both dividing and non-dividing cells.

Hemolymph is not a term typically used in human medicine, but it is commonly used in the study of invertebrates, particularly arthropods such as insects and crustaceans. Hemolymph is the fluid that circulates within the open circulatory system of these animals, serving multiple functions similar to both blood and lymphatic systems in vertebrates.

In simpler terms, hemolymph is a combined fluid that performs the functions of both blood and lymph in invertebrates. It serves as a transport medium for nutrients, waste products, hormones, and immune cells (hemocytes) throughout the body. Hemolymph does not contain red and white blood cells like human blood; instead, hemocytes are the primary cellular components responsible for immune responses and wound healing in these animals.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Arthropod vectors are living organisms, specifically arthropods such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and lice, that can transmit infectious agents (such as viruses, bacteria, or parasites) from one host to another. This process is called vector-borne transmission. The arthropod vectors become infected with the pathogen while taking a blood meal from an infected host, then transmit the pathogen to another host during subsequent feedings. The transmission can occur through various means, including biting, stinging, or even mechanical contact. It's important to note that not all arthropods are vectors, and only certain species within each group are capable of transmitting diseases.

Insecticides are substances or mixtures of substances intended for preventing, destroying, or mitigating any pest, including insects, arachnids, or other related pests. They can be chemical or biological agents that disrupt the growth, development, or behavior of these organisms, leading to their death or incapacitation. Insecticides are widely used in agriculture, public health, and residential settings for pest control. However, they must be used with caution due to potential risks to non-target organisms and the environment.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Cockroaches are not a medical condition or disease. They are a type of insect that can be found in many parts of the world. Some species of cockroaches are known to carry diseases and allergens, which can cause health problems for some people. Cockroach allergens can trigger asthma symptoms, especially in children. Additionally, cockroaches can contaminate food and surfaces with bacteria and other germs, which can lead to illnesses such as salmonellosis and gastroenteritis.

If you have a problem with cockroaches in your home or workplace, it is important to take steps to eliminate them to reduce the risk of health problems. This may include cleaning up food and water sources, sealing entry points, and using pesticides or hiring a professional pest control service.

A transgene is a segment of DNA that has been artificially transferred from one organism to another, typically between different species, to introduce a new trait or characteristic. The term "transgene" specifically refers to the genetic material that has been transferred and has become integrated into the host organism's genome. This technology is often used in genetic engineering and biomedical research, including the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural purposes or the creation of animal models for studying human diseases.

Transgenes can be created using various techniques, such as molecular cloning, where a desired gene is isolated, manipulated, and then inserted into a vector (a small DNA molecule, such as a plasmid) that can efficiently enter the host organism's cells. Once inside the cell, the transgene can integrate into the host genome, allowing for the expression of the new trait in the resulting transgenic organism.

It is important to note that while transgenes can provide valuable insights and benefits in research and agriculture, their use and release into the environment are subjects of ongoing debate due to concerns about potential ecological impacts and human health risks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "grasshoppers" is not a term used in medical definitions. Grasshoppers are a type of insect that belongs to the order Orthoptera and suborder Caelifera. They are known for their long hind legs which they use for jumping, and some species can jump over 20 times their own body length. If you have any questions about medical terminology or topics, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Heteroptera is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in zoology. It refers to a suborder of insects within the order Hemiptera, also known as true bugs. This group includes a wide variety of species, such as bed bugs, assassin bugs, and stink bugs. While Heteroptera is not directly related to human health or medicine, some species can have medical importance as disease vectors or pests.

Support Vector Machines (SVM) is not a medical term, but a concept in machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence. SVM is used in various fields including medicine for data analysis and pattern recognition. Here's a brief explanation of SVM:

Support Vector Machines is a supervised learning algorithm which analyzes data and recognizes patterns, used for classification and regression analysis. The goal of SVM is to find the optimal boundary or hyperplane that separates data into different classes with the maximum margin. This margin is the distance between the hyperplane and the nearest data points, also known as support vectors. By finding this optimal boundary, SVM can effectively classify new data points.

In the context of medical research, SVM has been used for various applications such as:

* Classifying medical images (e.g., distinguishing between cancerous and non-cancerous tissues)
* Predicting patient outcomes based on clinical or genetic data
* Identifying biomarkers associated with diseases
* Analyzing electronic health records to predict disease risk or treatment response

Therefore, while SVM is not a medical term per se, it is an important tool in the field of medical informatics and bioinformatics.

"Tenebrio" is the genus name for mealworm beetles, which are insects commonly found in stored grains and animal feed. The most common species is Tenebrio molitor. Mealworms and their larvae are often used as a food source for pets, such as reptiles and birds, but they can also cause damage to crops and structures if they infest them. They have been studied in various medical and scientific research fields including nutrition, toxicology, and allergies. Some people may have allergic reactions to mealworms or their byproducts.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

"Animal Flight" is not a medical term per se, but it is a concept that is studied in the field of comparative physiology and biomechanics, which are disciplines related to medicine. Animal flight refers to the ability of certain animal species to move through the air by flapping their wings or other appendages. This mode of locomotion is most commonly associated with birds, bats, and insects, but some mammals such as flying squirrels and sugar gliders are also capable of gliding through the air.

The study of animal flight involves understanding the biomechanics of how animals generate lift and propulsion, as well as the physiological adaptations that allow them to sustain flight. For example, birds have lightweight skeletons and powerful chest muscles that enable them to flap their wings rapidly and generate lift. Bats, on the other hand, use a more complex system of membranes and joints to manipulate their wings and achieve maneuverability in flight.

Understanding animal flight has important implications for the design of aircraft and other engineering systems, as well as for our broader understanding of how animals have evolved to adapt to their environments.

"Bees" are not a medical term, as they refer to various flying insects belonging to the Apidae family in the Apoidea superfamily. They are known for their role in pollination and honey production. If you're looking for medical definitions or information, please provide relevant terms.

"Tribolium" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is actually the name of a genus of beetles, also known as flour beetles, which are often used in scientific research, particularly in the fields of genetics and evolution. If you have any confusion with a specific medical context where this term was used, I would recommend checking the source again for clarification.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "wasps" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Wasps are a type of insect in the order Hymenoptera, and some people can have allergic reactions to their stings. However, there is no medical condition or disease specifically associated with wasps. If you have any specific medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try to help if I can!

"Periplaneta" is a genus name that refers to a group of large, winged insects commonly known as cockroaches. The two most common species in this genus are the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and the German cockroach (Periplaneta germantica). These insects are typically found in warm, humid environments and can often be seen scurrying across floors or walls in homes, restaurants, and other buildings. They are known to carry diseases and can cause allergies and asthma attacks in some people.

'Culicidae' is the biological family that includes all species of mosquitoes. It consists of three subfamilies: Anophelinae, Culicinae, and Toxorhynchitinae. Mosquitoes are small, midge-like flies that are known for their ability to transmit various diseases to humans and other animals, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and Zika virus. The medical importance of Culicidae comes from the fact that only female mosquitoes require blood meals to lay eggs, and during this process, they can transmit pathogens between hosts.

"Bombyx" is a genus name that refers to a group of insects in the family Bombycidae, which are known as silk moths. The most well-known species in this genus is "Bombyx mori," which is the domesticated silkworm used for commercial silk production.

The term "Bombyx" itself does not have a specific medical definition, but it is sometimes used in medical or scientific contexts to refer to this group of insects or their characteristics. For example, researchers might study the effects of Bombyx mori silk on wound healing or tissue regeneration.

It's worth noting that while some species of moths and butterflies can be harmful to human health in certain circumstances (such as by acting as vectors for diseases), the Bombyx genus is not typically considered a medical concern.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hymenoptera" is not a medical term. It is a scientific classification in biology, specifically referring to an order of insects that includes sawflies, bees, ants, and wasps. These insects are characterized by having two pairs of membranous wings (except for some species that have only one pair or are wingless) and a slender waist. Some people may have allergic reactions to the venom of stinging Hymenoptera, such as bees and wasps, which can cause medical issues. However, "Hymenoptera" itself is not a medical term.

Retroviridae is a family of viruses that includes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other viruses that primarily use RNA as their genetic material. The name "retrovirus" comes from the fact that these viruses reverse transcribe their RNA genome into DNA, which then becomes integrated into the host cell's genome. This is a unique characteristic of retroviruses, as most other viruses use DNA as their genetic material.

Retroviruses can cause a variety of diseases in animals and humans, including cancer, neurological disorders, and immunodeficiency syndromes like AIDS. They have a lipid membrane envelope that contains glycoprotein spikes, which allow them to attach to and enter host cells. Once inside the host cell, the viral RNA is reverse transcribed into DNA by the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which is then integrated into the host genome by the enzyme integrase.

Retroviruses can remain dormant in the host genome for extended periods of time, and may be reactivated under certain conditions to produce new viral particles. This ability to integrate into the host genome has also made retroviruses useful tools in molecular biology, where they are used as vectors for gene therapy and other genetic manipulations.

'Anopheles gambiae' is a species of mosquito that is a major vector for the transmission of malaria. The female Anopheles gambiae mosquito bites primarily during the nighttime hours and preferentially feeds on human blood, which allows it to transmit the Plasmodium parasite that causes malaria. This species is widely distributed throughout much of Africa and is responsible for transmitting a significant proportion of the world's malaria cases.

The Anopheles gambiae complex actually consists of several closely related species or forms, which can be difficult to distinguish based on morphological characteristics alone. However, advances in molecular techniques have allowed for more accurate identification and differentiation of these species. Understanding the biology and behavior of Anopheles gambiae is crucial for developing effective strategies to control malaria transmission.

I must clarify that the term 'pupa' is not typically used in medical contexts. Instead, it is a term from the field of biology, particularly entomology, which is the study of insects.

In insect development, a pupa refers to a stage in the life cycle of certain insects undergoing complete metamorphosis. During this phase, the larval body undergoes significant transformation and reorganization within a protective casing called a chrysalis (in butterflies and moths) or a cocoon (in other insects). The old larval tissues are broken down and replaced with new adult structures. Once this process is complete, the pupal case opens, and the adult insect emerges.

Since 'pupa' is not a medical term, I couldn't provide a medical definition for it. However, I hope this explanation helps clarify its meaning in the context of biology.

"Gryllidae" is not a medical term. It is the family designation for crickets in the order Orthoptera, which includes various species of insects that are characterized by their long antennae and ability to produce chirping sounds. The misinterpretation might have arisen from the fact that some scientific research or studies may reference these creatures; however, it is not a medical term or concept.

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is not a medical term per se, but a scientific term used in the field of molecular biology. GFP is a protein that exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to light, particularly blue or ultraviolet light. It was originally discovered in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.

In medical and biological research, scientists often use recombinant DNA technology to introduce the gene for GFP into other organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals, including humans. This allows them to track the expression and localization of specific genes or proteins of interest in living cells, tissues, or even whole organisms.

The ability to visualize specific cellular structures or processes in real-time has proven invaluable for a wide range of research areas, from studying the development and function of organs and organ systems to understanding the mechanisms of diseases and the effects of therapeutic interventions.

I believe you may have accidentally omitted the word "in" from your search. Based on that, I'm assuming you are looking for a medical definition related to the term "ants." However, ants are not typically associated with medical terminology. If you meant to ask about a specific condition or concept, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

If you are indeed asking about ants in the insect sense, they belong to the family Formicidae and order Hymenoptera. Some species of ants may pose public health concerns due to their ability to contaminate food sources or cause structural damage. However, ants do not have a direct medical definition associated with human health.

Genetic engineering, also known as genetic modification, is a scientific process where the DNA or genetic material of an organism is manipulated to bring about a change in its characteristics. This is typically done by inserting specific genes into the organism's genome using various molecular biology techniques. These new genes may come from the same species (cisgenesis) or a different species (transgenesis). The goal is to produce a desired trait, such as resistance to pests, improved nutritional content, or increased productivity. It's widely used in research, medicine, and agriculture. However, it's important to note that the use of genetically engineered organisms can raise ethical, environmental, and health concerns.

Juvenile hormones (JHs) are a class of sesquiterpenoid compounds that play a crucial role in the regulation of insect development, reproduction, and other physiological processes. They are primarily produced by the corpora allata, a pair of endocrine glands located in the head of insects.

JHs are essential for maintaining the larval or nymphal stage of insects, preventing the expression of adult characteristics during molting. As the concentration of JH decreases in the hemolymph (insect blood), a molt to the next developmental stage occurs, and if the insect has reached its final instar, it will metamorphose into an adult.

In addition to their role in development, JHs also influence various aspects of insect reproductive physiology, such as vitellogenesis (yolk protein synthesis), oocyte maturation, and spermatogenesis. Furthermore, JHs have been implicated in regulating diapause (a period of suspended development during unfavorable environmental conditions) and caste determination in social insects like bees and ants.

Overall, juvenile hormones are vital regulators of growth, development, and reproduction in insects, making them attractive targets for the development of novel pest management strategies.

Insecticide resistance is a genetic selection process in insect populations that allows them to survive and reproduce despite exposure to insecticides. It's the result of changes in the genetic makeup of insects, which can be caused by natural selection when insecticides are used repeatedly. Over time, this leads to the prevalence of genes that provide resistance to the insecticide, making the pest control methods less effective. Insecticide resistance is a significant challenge in public health and agriculture, as it can reduce the efficacy of interventions aimed at controlling disease-carrying insects or protecting crops from pests.

Feeding behavior refers to the various actions and mechanisms involved in the intake of food and nutrition for the purpose of sustaining life, growth, and health. This complex process encompasses a coordinated series of activities, including:

1. Food selection: The identification, pursuit, and acquisition of appropriate food sources based on sensory cues (smell, taste, appearance) and individual preferences.
2. Preparation: The manipulation and processing of food to make it suitable for consumption, such as chewing, grinding, or chopping.
3. Ingestion: The act of transferring food from the oral cavity into the digestive system through swallowing.
4. Digestion: The mechanical and chemical breakdown of food within the gastrointestinal tract to facilitate nutrient absorption and eliminate waste products.
5. Assimilation: The uptake and utilization of absorbed nutrients by cells and tissues for energy production, growth, repair, and maintenance.
6. Elimination: The removal of undigested material and waste products from the body through defecation.

Feeding behavior is regulated by a complex interplay between neural, hormonal, and psychological factors that help maintain energy balance and ensure adequate nutrient intake. Disruptions in feeding behavior can lead to various medical conditions, such as malnutrition, obesity, eating disorders, and gastrointestinal motility disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "weevils" are not a medical term. They are small beetles, typically characterized by their elongated snouts. Some species are known to infest and damage crops such as grains, causing agricultural harm. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to help!

'Drosophila melanogaster' is the scientific name for a species of fruit fly that is commonly used as a model organism in various fields of biological research, including genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. Its small size, short generation time, large number of offspring, and ease of cultivation make it an ideal subject for laboratory studies. The fruit fly's genome has been fully sequenced, and many of its genes have counterparts in the human genome, which facilitates the understanding of genetic mechanisms and their role in human health and disease.

Here is a brief medical definition:

Drosophila melanogaster (droh-suh-fih-luh meh-lon-guh-ster): A species of fruit fly used extensively as a model organism in genetic, developmental, and evolutionary research. Its genome has been sequenced, revealing many genes with human counterparts, making it valuable for understanding genetic mechanisms and their role in human health and disease.

Orthoptera is not a medical term, but rather a taxonomic order in zoology. It includes grasshoppers, crickets, and related insects. These insects are characterized by their long antennae, rear wings that are typically narrower than the front pair, and jumping or leaping locomotion.

While not directly related to medicine, some species of Orthoptera can have medical implications for humans. For example, certain types of ticks (which belong to a different order) can transmit diseases, and chigger mites (also not Orthoptera) can cause itchy skin rashes. However, the order Orthoptera itself does not have specific relevance to medical definitions or human health.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

'Mosquito Control' is not a medical term per se, but it is a public health concept that refers to the systematic reduction or elimination of mosquito populations through various methods to prevent or minimize the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. This multidisciplinary field involves entomologists, ecologists, engineers, and public health professionals working together to manage mosquito habitats, apply insecticides, and educate communities about personal protection measures. By controlling mosquito populations, we can significantly reduce the risk of contracting vector-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, Zika virus, and West Nile virus, among others.

Herbivory is not a medical term, but rather a term used in biology and ecology. It refers to the practice of consuming plants or plant matter for food. Herbivores are animals that eat only plants, and their diet can include leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruits, seeds, and other parts of plants.

While herbivory is not a medical term, it is still relevant to the field of medicine in certain contexts. For example, understanding the diets and behaviors of herbivores can help inform public health initiatives related to food safety and disease transmission. Additionally, research on herbivory has contributed to our understanding of the evolution of plant-animal interactions and the development of ecosystems.

'Culex' is a genus of mosquitoes that includes many species that are vectors for various diseases, such as West Nile virus, filariasis, and avian malaria. They are often referred to as "house mosquitoes" because they are commonly found in urban environments. These mosquitoes typically lay their eggs in standing water and have a cosmopolitan distribution, being found on all continents except Antarctica. The life cycle of Culex mosquitoes includes four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Both male and female adults feed on nectar, but only females require blood meals to lay eggs.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals characterized by the presence of a segmented body, a pair of jointed appendages on each segment, and a tough exoskeleton made of chitin. This phylum includes insects, arachnids (spiders, scorpions, mites), crustaceans (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes). They are the largest group of animals on Earth, making up more than 80% of all described species. Arthropods can be found in nearly every habitat, from the deep sea to mountaintops, and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers, pollinators, and predators.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nymph" does not have a medical definition. In general, nymph is a term used in mythology to refer to a minor nature deity typically represented as an attractive maiden or beautiful young woman who animates nature and is often associated with various natural phenomena.

If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to help if you could provide more information.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Arachnid vectors are arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida that are capable of transmitting infectious diseases to humans and other animals. Arachnids include spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks. Among these, ticks and some mites are the most significant as disease vectors.

Ticks can transmit a variety of bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens, causing diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, tularemia, and several types of encephalitis. They attach to the host's skin and feed on their blood, during which they can transmit pathogens from their saliva.

Mites, particularly chiggers and some species of birds and rodents mites, can also act as vectors for certain diseases, such as scrub typhus and rickettsialpox. Mites are tiny arachnids that live on the skin or in the nests of their hosts and feed on their skin cells, fluids, or blood.

It is important to note that not all arachnids are disease vectors, and only a small percentage of them can transmit infectious diseases. However, those that do pose a significant public health risk and require proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellents, wearing protective clothing, and checking for and promptly removing attached ticks.

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

*Photorhabdus* is a genus of gram-negative, bioluminescent bacteria that are symbiotic with certain species of entomopathogenic nematodes (nematodes that infect and kill insects). These bacteria are found in the gut of the nematodes and are released into the insect host when the nematode infects it. The bacteria produce toxins and other virulence factors that help to kill the insect and provide a nutrient-rich environment for the nematodes to reproduce. After reproduction, the nematodes and *Photorhabdus* bacteria work together again to seek out a new insect host. Some species of *Photorhabdus* have also been shown to have potential as biological control agents for certain insect pests.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Houseflies" are not a medical condition or term. Houseflies (Musca domestica) are a species of fly that are commonly found in human habitats. They are often considered nuisance pests because they can contaminate food and spread diseases. However, they do have an important role in the ecosystem as decomposers. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to try to help with those!

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Helper viruses, also known as "auxiliary" or "satellite" viruses, are defective viruses that depend on the assistance of a second virus, called a helper virus, to complete their replication cycle. They lack certain genes that are essential for replication, and therefore require the helper virus to provide these functions.

Helper viruses are often found in cases of dual infection, where both the helper virus and the dependent virus infect the same cell. The helper virus provides the necessary enzymes and proteins for the helper virus to replicate, package its genome into new virions, and bud off from the host cell.

One example of a helper virus is the hepatitis B virus (HBV), which can serve as a helper virus for hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection. HDV is a defective RNA virus that requires the HBV surface antigen to form an envelope around its nucleocapsid and be transmitted to other cells. In the absence of HBV, HDV cannot replicate or cause disease.

Understanding the role of helper viruses in viral infections is important for developing effective treatments and vaccines against viral diseases.

"Molting" is not a term typically used in medical contexts. It is primarily used to describe the shedding and replacement of feathers, hair, or skin in animals, including birds, reptiles, insects, and other invertebrates. In humans and other mammals, this process is more commonly referred to as "shedding" or "growing new hair/skin."

However, if you are referring to the medical term "molt," it is a rare genetic disorder that affects the skin's pigmentation and causes it to shed in patches. It is also known as "congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma" or "non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma." The condition is present at birth, and affected individuals have red, scaly skin that sheds in a pattern similar to snake skin. Molting is not contagious and has no known cure, but various treatments can help manage its symptoms.

Oviposition is a medical/biological term that refers to the process of laying or depositing eggs by female organisms, including birds, reptiles, insects, and fish. In humans and other mammals, the term is not applicable since they give birth to live young rather than laying eggs.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Luminescent proteins are a type of protein that emit light through a chemical reaction, rather than by absorbing and re-emitting light like fluorescent proteins. This process is called bioluminescence. The light emitted by luminescent proteins is often used in scientific research as a way to visualize and track biological processes within cells and organisms.

One of the most well-known luminescent proteins is Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which was originally isolated from jellyfish. However, GFP is actually a fluorescent protein, not a luminescent one. A true example of a luminescent protein is the enzyme luciferase, which is found in fireflies and other bioluminescent organisms. When luciferase reacts with its substrate, luciferin, it produces light through a process called oxidation.

Luminescent proteins have many applications in research, including as reporters for gene expression, as markers for protein-protein interactions, and as tools for studying the dynamics of cellular processes. They are also used in medical imaging and diagnostics, as well as in the development of new therapies.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

'Beauveria' is a genus of fungi that belongs to the family Cordycipitaceae. These fungi are known for their ability to parasitize various insects and arthropods, and they have been studied for their potential as biocontrol agents. The most well-known species in this genus is Beauveria bassiana, which has been used to control a variety of pest insects in agriculture and forestry.

Beauveria fungi produce a range of bioactive compounds that can have toxic effects on insects and other organisms. When an infected insect comes into contact with the spores of Beauveria, the spores germinate and penetrate the insect's cuticle, eventually killing the host. The fungus then grows inside the insect's body, producing more spores that can infect other hosts.

In addition to their use as biocontrol agents, Beauveria fungi have also been studied for their potential medicinal properties. Some research has suggested that certain species of Beauveria may have antimicrobial, antitumor, and immunomodulatory effects, although more research is needed to confirm these findings and to understand the mechanisms behind them.

DEET is a common abbreviation for N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, which is a widely used active ingredient in insect repellents. It works by blocking the ability of insects to sense the presence of humans, making it difficult for them to land and bite. DEET can provide long-lasting protection against a variety of insects, including mosquitoes, ticks, and other arthropods.

DEET is available in various forms, such as lotions, sprays, and wipes, and its concentration can range from 5% to 100%. Higher concentrations provide longer protection but may also increase the risk of skin irritation and other adverse effects. It is important to follow the manufacturer's instructions when using DEET-containing products and avoid applying them to broken or damaged skin, eyes, mouth, and mucous membranes.

DEET has been extensively studied for its safety and efficacy, and it is considered safe for use by people of all ages, including pregnant and breastfeeding women. However, it should be used with caution in young children due to their higher surface area-to-mass ratio and the potential for accidental ingestion or eye contact. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends using DEET products with a concentration of no more than 30% on children over two months of age.

Xenorhabdus is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are symbiotically associated with nematodes of the family Heterorhabditidae. These bacteria are pathogenic to insects and have been studied for their potential as biocontrol agents. They produce a variety of bioactive compounds that are toxic to insects and also have antibacterial, antifungal, and insecticidal properties. When the nematodes infect an insect host, they release the bacteria into the insect's hemocoel (the equivalent of the mammalian bloodstream), where the bacteria multiply and produce toxins that kill the insect. The nematodes then feed on the bacterial mass and use it as a food source, allowing them to reproduce within the dead insect.

Beta-galactosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of beta-galactosides into monosaccharides. It is found in various organisms, including bacteria, yeast, and mammals. In humans, it plays a role in the breakdown and absorption of certain complex carbohydrates, such as lactose, in the small intestine. Deficiency of this enzyme in humans can lead to a disorder called lactose intolerance. In scientific research, beta-galactosidase is often used as a marker for gene expression and protein localization studies.

A nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) is a type of large, complex DNA virus that infects insects, particularly members of the order Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies). NPVs are characterized by their ability to produce multiple virions within a single polyhedral occlusion body, which provides protection for the virions in the environment and facilitates their transmission between hosts.

NPVs replicate in the nucleus of infected cells, where they induce the production of large quantities of viral proteins that ultimately lead to the lysis of the host cell. The virions are then released and can infect other cells or be transmitted to other insects. NPVs are important pathogens of many agricultural pests, and some species have been developed as biological control agents for use in integrated pest management programs.

A "fat body" is not a medical term that is typically used to describe human anatomy. It is more commonly used in the context of insects and other invertebrates, where it refers to a specialized tissue that functions to store energy in the form of fat.

However, in humans, we do have adipose tissue, which is the medical term for body fat. Adipose tissue is found throughout the body, but is particularly concentrated in certain areas such as the abdomen, hips, and thighs. It serves a variety of functions, including storing energy, insulating the body, and producing hormones that regulate metabolism and appetite.

If you are looking for information on obesity or excess body fat in humans, there are many medical resources available to help you understand these topics better.

Wolbachia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that naturally infects a wide variety of arthropods (insects, spiders, mites) and filarial nematodes (roundworms). These bacteria are transmitted vertically from mother to offspring, often through the cytoplasm of eggs. Wolbachia can manipulate the reproductive biology of their hosts in various ways, such as feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing, and cytoplasmic incompatibility, which favor the spread and maintenance of the bacteria within host populations. The interactions between Wolbachia and their hosts have implications for insect pest management, disease transmission, and evolutionary biology.

"Metarhizium" is not a medical term, but rather it refers to a genus of fungi that are widely distributed in soil and on insects. Some species of Metarhizium are entomopathogenic, meaning they can cause diseases in insects and are being studied as potential biological control agents for pest insects. There is no direct medical relevance or definition associated with the term "Metarhizium."

In genetics, sequence alignment is the process of arranging two or more DNA, RNA, or protein sequences to identify regions of similarity or homology between them. This is often done using computational methods to compare the nucleotide or amino acid sequences and identify matching patterns, which can provide insight into evolutionary relationships, functional domains, or potential genetic disorders. The alignment process typically involves adjusting gaps and mismatches in the sequences to maximize the similarity between them, resulting in an aligned sequence that can be visually represented and analyzed.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

A "reporter gene" is a type of gene that is linked to a gene of interest in order to make the expression or activity of that gene detectable. The reporter gene encodes for a protein that can be easily measured and serves as an indicator of the presence and activity of the gene of interest. Commonly used reporter genes include those that encode for fluorescent proteins, enzymes that catalyze colorimetric reactions, or proteins that bind to specific molecules.

In the context of genetics and genomics research, a reporter gene is often used in studies involving gene expression, regulation, and function. By introducing the reporter gene into an organism or cell, researchers can monitor the activity of the gene of interest in real-time or after various experimental treatments. The information obtained from these studies can help elucidate the role of specific genes in biological processes and diseases, providing valuable insights for basic research and therapeutic development.

Hemocytes are specialized cells found in the open circulatory system of invertebrates, including insects, crustaceans, and mollusks. They play crucial roles in the immune response and defense mechanisms of these organisms. Hemocytes can be categorized into several types based on their functions and morphologies, such as phagocytic cells, encapsulating cells, and clotting cells. These cells are responsible for various immunological activities, including recognition and removal of foreign particles, pathogens, and debris; production of immune effector molecules; and contribution to the formation of blood clots to prevent excessive bleeding. In some invertebrates, hemocytes also participate in wound healing, tissue repair, and other physiological processes.

Adenovirus E1 proteins are the earliest expressed and most critical proteins in the replication cycle of adenoviruses. The "E" stands for "early," indicating that these proteins are produced before the viral DNA begins to replicate. The E1 proteins play a crucial role in regulating the viral life cycle, altering cellular processes to support efficient viral replication, and inhibiting the host's antiviral responses.

The adenovirus E1 proteins are divided into two groups: E1A and E1B.

1. E1A proteins: These proteins are involved in transactivating various viral and cellular promoters, which leads to the expression of early and late viral genes. They also interact with several cellular proteins to alter the host cell cycle, promote cell growth, and inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). E1A proteins are essential for efficient viral replication and can transform cells in culture, contributing to adenovirus-induced tumorigenesis in certain animal models.

2. E1B proteins: These proteins have multiple functions during the viral life cycle. E1B 55kDa protein is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis and contributes to efficient viral replication by preventing premature cell death. It also interacts with several cellular proteins, including tumor suppressor p53, to modulate their functions. The E1B 19kDa protein, on the other hand, is a DNA-binding protein that plays a role in viral mRNA processing and export from the nucleus.

Together, adenovirus E1 proteins are essential for successful viral replication and manipulate host cellular processes to create a favorable environment for viral propagation. Understanding their functions has contributed significantly to our knowledge of viral pathogenesis and cancer biology.

Genetic recombination is the process by which genetic material is exchanged between two similar or identical molecules of DNA during meiosis, resulting in new combinations of genes on each chromosome. This exchange occurs during crossover, where segments of DNA are swapped between non-sister homologous chromatids, creating genetic diversity among the offspring. It is a crucial mechanism for generating genetic variability and facilitating evolutionary change within populations. Additionally, recombination also plays an essential role in DNA repair processes through mechanisms such as homologous recombinational repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ).

Malpighian tubules are specialized excretory structures found in the circulatory system of many arthropods, including insects. They are named after Marcello Malpighi, an Italian physician and biologist who was one of the first to describe them. These tubules play a crucial role in eliminating waste products and maintaining water and ion balance within the insect's body.

Functionally, Malpighian tubules are analogous to the vertebrate kidneys as they filter the hemolymph (insect blood) and reabsorb necessary substances while excreting waste materials. The main waste product excreted by these tubules is uric acid, which is a less toxic form of nitrogenous waste compared to urea or ammonia, making it more suitable for terrestrial arthropods.

Malpighian tubules originate from the midgut epithelium and extend into the hemocoel (insect body cavity). They are lined with a single layer of epithelial cells that contain microvilli, increasing their surface area for efficient filtration. The tubules receive nutrient-rich hemolymph from the hemocoel through open-ended or blind-ended structures called ostia.

The filtrate formed by Malpighian tubules passes through a series of cellular transport processes involving both active and passive transport mechanisms. These processes help in reabsorbing water, ions, and nutrients back into the hemolymph while concentrating waste products for excretion. The final waste-laden fluid is then released into the hindgut, where it gets mixed with fecal material before being eliminated from the body through the anus.

In summary, Malpighian tubules are vital excretory organs in arthropods that filter hemolymph, reabsorb essential substances, and excrete waste products to maintain homeostasis within their bodies.

'Bacillus thuringiensis' (Bt) is a gram-positive, soil-dwelling bacterium that produces crystalline parasporal proteins during sporulation. These proteins are insecticidal and have the ability to kill certain insects when ingested. Different strains of Bt produce different types of insecticidal proteins, allowing them to target specific insect pests.

Bt is widely used in organic farming and integrated pest management programs as a natural alternative to chemical pesticides. It can be applied as a spray or incorporated into the genetic material of crops through biotechnology, producing transgenic plants known as Bt crops. These crops express the insecticidal proteins and protect themselves from specific pests, reducing the need for external applications of Bt formulations.

Bt is considered safe for humans, animals, and non-target organisms when used properly, as the parasporal proteins are not toxic to them. However, misuse or overreliance on Bt can lead to resistance development in target pests, reducing its effectiveness.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

Biological metamorphosis is a complex process of transformation that certain organisms undergo during their development from embryo to adult. This process involves profound changes in form, function, and structure of the organism, often including modifications of various body parts, reorganization of internal organs, and changes in physiology.

In metamorphosis, a larval or juvenile form of an animal is significantly different from its adult form, both morphologically and behaviorally. This phenomenon is particularly common in insects, amphibians, and some fish and crustaceans. The most well-known examples include the transformation of a caterpillar into a butterfly or a tadpole into a frog.

The mechanisms that drive metamorphosis are regulated by hormonal signals and genetic programs. In many cases, metamorphosis is triggered by environmental factors such as temperature, moisture, or food availability, which interact with the organism's internal developmental cues to initiate the transformation. The process of metamorphosis allows these organisms to exploit different ecological niches at different stages of their lives and contributes to their evolutionary success.

"Drosophila" is a genus of small flies, also known as fruit flies. The most common species used in scientific research is "Drosophila melanogaster," which has been a valuable model organism for many areas of biological and medical research, including genetics, developmental biology, neurobiology, and aging.

The use of Drosophila as a model organism has led to numerous important discoveries in genetics and molecular biology, such as the identification of genes that are associated with human diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease, and obesity. The short reproductive cycle, large number of offspring, and ease of genetic manipulation make Drosophila a powerful tool for studying complex biological processes.

Arthropod antennae are the primary sensory organs found in arthropods, which include insects, crustaceans, arachnids, and myriapods. These paired appendages are usually located on the head or nearest segment to the head and are responsible for detecting various stimuli from the environment such as touch, taste, smell, temperature, humidity, vibration, and air motion.

The structure of arthropod antennae varies among different groups but generally consists of one or more segments called flagellum or funicle that may be further divided into subsegments called annuli. The number and arrangement of these segments are often used to classify and identify specific taxa.

Insect antennae, for example, typically have a distinct shape and can be thread-like, feathery, or clubbed depending on the species. They contain various sensory receptors such as olfactory neurons that detect odor molecules, mechanoreceptors that respond to touch or movement, and thermoreceptors that sense temperature changes.

Overall, arthropod antennae play a crucial role in enabling these organisms to navigate their environment, find food, avoid predators, and communicate with conspecifics.

Genetic transformation is the process by which an organism's genetic material is altered or modified, typically through the introduction of foreign DNA. This can be achieved through various techniques such as:

* Gene transfer using vectors like plasmids, phages, or artificial chromosomes
* Direct uptake of naked DNA using methods like electroporation or chemically-mediated transfection
* Use of genome editing tools like CRISPR-Cas9 to introduce precise changes into the organism's genome.

The introduced DNA may come from another individual of the same species (cisgenic), from a different species (transgenic), or even be synthetically designed. The goal of genetic transformation is often to introduce new traits, functions, or characteristics that do not exist naturally in the organism, or to correct genetic defects.

This technique has broad applications in various fields, including molecular biology, biotechnology, and medical research, where it can be used to study gene function, develop genetically modified organisms (GMOs), create cell lines for drug screening, and even potentially treat genetic diseases through gene therapy.

Pyrethrins are a group of naturally occurring organic compounds extracted from the flowers of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium and Chrysanthemum coccineum. They have been used for centuries as insecticides due to their ability to disrupt the nervous system of insects, leading to paralysis and death. Pyrethrins are composed of six esters, pyrethrin I and II, cinerin I and II, and jasmolin I and II, which have different insecticidal properties but share a similar mode of action. They are commonly used in household insect sprays, pet shampoos, and agricultural applications to control a wide range of pests. However, pyrethrins can be toxic to fish and some beneficial insects, so they must be used with caution.

Malaria is not a medical definition itself, but it is a disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. Here's a simple definition:

Malaria: A mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, characterized by cycles of fever, chills, and anemia. It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. The five Plasmodium species known to cause malaria in humans are P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi.

Sf9 cells are a type of insect cell line that are derived from the ovary of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. They are widely used in molecular biology and biochemistry research, particularly for the production of recombinant proteins using baculovirus expression systems. Sf9 cells have the ability to infect with baculoviruses and support high levels of foreign gene expression, making them a popular choice for this purpose. They are also relatively easy to culture and maintain in the laboratory.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population density" is actually a term used in population geography and epidemiology, rather than medical terminology. It refers to the number of people living in a specific area or region, usually measured as the number of people per square mile or square kilometer.

However, understanding population density can be important in public health and medicine because it can influence various factors related to health outcomes and healthcare delivery, such as:

1. Disease transmission rates: Higher population densities can facilitate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly those that are transmitted through close contact between individuals.
2. Access to healthcare services: Areas with lower population density might have fewer healthcare resources and providers available, making it more challenging for residents to access necessary medical care.
3. Health disparities: Population density can contribute to health inequities, as urban areas often have better access to healthcare, education, and economic opportunities than rural areas, leading to differences in health outcomes between these populations.
4. Environmental factors: Higher population densities might lead to increased pollution, noise, and other environmental hazards that can negatively impact health.

Therefore, while "population density" is not a medical definition per se, it remains an essential concept for understanding various public health and healthcare issues.

Recombinant DNA is a term used in molecular biology to describe DNA that has been created by combining genetic material from more than one source. This is typically done through the use of laboratory techniques such as molecular cloning, in which fragments of DNA are inserted into vectors (such as plasmids or viruses) and then introduced into a host organism where they can replicate and produce many copies of the recombinant DNA molecule.

Recombinant DNA technology has numerous applications in research, medicine, and industry, including the production of recombinant proteins for use as therapeutics, the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural or industrial purposes, and the development of new tools for genetic analysis and manipulation.

It's important to note that while recombinant DNA technology has many potential benefits, it also raises ethical and safety concerns, and its use is subject to regulation and oversight in many countries.

Ecdysterone is a type of steroid hormone that occurs naturally in various plants and animals. In animals, ecdysterones are known to play important roles in the growth, development, and reproduction of arthropods, such as insects and crustaceans. They are called "ecdysteroids" and are crucial for the process of molting, in which the arthropod sheds its exoskeleton to grow a new one.

In plants, ecdysterones are believed to function as growth regulators and defense compounds. Some studies suggest that they may help protect plants against pests and pathogens.

Ecdysterone has also gained attention in the context of human health and performance enhancement. While it is not a hormone naturally produced by the human body, some research suggests that ecdysterone may have anabolic effects, meaning it could potentially promote muscle growth and improve physical performance. However, more studies are needed to confirm these findings and establish the safety and efficacy of ecdysterone supplementation in humans.

It is important to note that the use of performance-enhancing substances, including ecdysterone, may be subject to regulations and anti-doping rules in various sports organizations. Always consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen.

Ecdysteroids are a class of steroid hormones that are primarily known for their role in the regulation of molting and growth in arthropods, such as insects and crustaceans. They are structurally similar to vertebrate steroid hormones, such as estrogens and androgens, but have different physiological functions.

Ecdysteroids bind to specific receptors in the cell nucleus, leading to changes in gene expression that regulate various processes related to molting and growth, including the synthesis of new exoskeleton components and the breakdown of old ones. They also play a role in other physiological processes, such as reproduction, development, and stress response.

In recent years, ecdysteroids have attracted interest in the medical community due to their potential therapeutic applications. Some studies suggest that certain ecdysteroids may have anabolic effects, promoting muscle growth and protein synthesis, while others have shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory properties. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential therapeutic uses of ecdysteroids in humans.

'Drosophila proteins' refer to the proteins that are expressed in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This organism is a widely used model system in genetics, developmental biology, and molecular biology research. The study of Drosophila proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of various biological processes, including gene regulation, cell signaling, development, and aging.

Some examples of well-studied Drosophila proteins include:

1. HSP70 (Heat Shock Protein 70): A chaperone protein involved in protein folding and protection from stress conditions.
2. TUBULIN: A structural protein that forms microtubules, important for cell division and intracellular transport.
3. ACTIN: A cytoskeletal protein involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape.
4. BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (LACZ): A reporter protein often used to monitor gene expression patterns in transgenic flies.
5. ENDOGLIN: A protein involved in the development of blood vessels during embryogenesis.
6. P53: A tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer by regulating cell growth and division.
7. JUN-KINASE (JNK): A signaling protein involved in stress response, apoptosis, and developmental processes.
8. DECAPENTAPLEGIC (DPP): A member of the TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor Beta) superfamily, playing essential roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

These proteins are often studied using various techniques such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and structural biology to understand their functions, interactions, and regulation within the cell.

In medical terms, "wing" is not a term that is used as a standalone definition. However, it can be found in the context of certain anatomical structures or medical conditions. For instance, the "wings" of the lungs refer to the upper and lower portions of the lungs that extend from the main body of the organ. Similarly, in dermatology, "winging" is used to describe the spreading out or flaring of the wings of the nose, which can be a characteristic feature of certain skin conditions like lupus.

It's important to note that medical terminology can be highly specific and context-dependent, so it's always best to consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information related to medical definitions or diagnoses.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

"Locusta migratoria" is the scientific name for the migratory locust, which is a species of short-horned grasshopper. While it is not a medical term, I can provide some general information about this insect.

Migratory locusts are known for their ability to form large swarms that can travel long distances, consuming vast amounts of vegetation and causing significant damage to crops and pastures. They are native to Africa, Asia, and Europe but have been introduced to other parts of the world as well. The migratory locust is a agricultural pest and can pose a serious threat to food security in areas where they occur in large numbers.

From a medical perspective, some species of grasshoppers, including the migratory locust, can carry various pathogens that may affect humans and animals if ingested or come into contact with mucous membranes. However, there are no specific medical concerns associated with "Locusta migratoria" itself.

The integumentary system is the largest organ system in the human body, encompassing the skin, hair, nails, and various glands. Its primary function is to act as a barrier, protecting the body from external damage, radiation, and pathogens while also helping regulate body temperature, prevent water loss, and maintain fluid balance. The integumentary system plays crucial roles in sensory perception through nerve endings in the skin, synthesizing vitamin D via sunlight exposure, and excreting waste products through sweat. Overall, it serves as a vital organ system that ensures the body's integrity and homeostasis.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

"Butterflies" is not a medical term, but rather a colloquial or informal term that is often used to describe a feeling of nervousness or excitement in the stomach. It is thought to be due to the release of adrenaline and the increased heart rate and breathing that can occur when someone is anxious or excited. The sensation may be caused by the contraction of the muscles in the stomach, which can feel like fluttering or flips. This feeling is not a medical condition and does not typically require treatment, but if it is severe or persistent, it may be helpful to speak with a healthcare provider to address any underlying anxiety or stress.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

Virus replication is the process by which a virus produces copies or reproduces itself inside a host cell. This involves several steps:

1. Attachment: The virus attaches to a specific receptor on the surface of the host cell.
2. Penetration: The viral genetic material enters the host cell, either by invagination of the cell membrane or endocytosis.
3. Uncoating: The viral genetic material is released from its protective coat (capsid) inside the host cell.
4. Replication: The viral genetic material uses the host cell's machinery to produce new viral components, such as proteins and nucleic acids.
5. Assembly: The newly synthesized viral components are assembled into new virus particles.
6. Release: The newly formed viruses are released from the host cell, often through lysis (breaking) of the cell membrane or by budding off the cell membrane.

The specific mechanisms and details of virus replication can vary depending on the type of virus. Some viruses, such as DNA viruses, use the host cell's DNA polymerase to replicate their genetic material, while others, such as RNA viruses, use their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase enzymes. Understanding the process of virus replication is important for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Gene targeting is a research technique in molecular biology used to precisely modify specific genes within the genome of an organism. This technique allows scientists to study gene function by creating targeted genetic changes, such as insertions, deletions, or mutations, in a specific gene of interest. The process typically involves the use of engineered nucleases, such as CRISPR-Cas9 or TALENs, to introduce double-stranded breaks at desired locations within the genome. These breaks are then repaired by the cell's own DNA repair machinery, often leading to the incorporation of designed changes in the targeted gene. Gene targeting is a powerful tool for understanding gene function and has wide-ranging applications in basic research, agriculture, and therapeutic development.

Adenoviruses, Human: A group of viruses that commonly cause respiratory illnesses, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, and croup, in humans. They can also cause conjunctivitis (pink eye), cystitis (bladder infection), and gastroenteritis (stomach and intestinal infection).

Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that belong to the family Adenoviridae. There are more than 50 different types of human adenoviruses, which can be classified into seven species (A-G). Different types of adenoviruses tend to cause specific illnesses, such as respiratory or gastrointestinal infections.

Human adenoviruses are highly contagious and can spread through close personal contact, respiratory droplets, or contaminated surfaces. They can also be transmitted through contaminated water sources. Some people may become carriers of the virus and experience no symptoms but still spread the virus to others.

Most human adenovirus infections are mild and resolve on their own within a few days to a week. However, some types of adenoviruses can cause severe illness, particularly in people with weakened immune systems, such as infants, young children, older adults, and individuals with HIV/AIDS or organ transplants.

There are no specific antiviral treatments for human adenovirus infections, but supportive care, such as hydration, rest, and fever reduction, can help manage symptoms. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands frequently, avoiding close contact with sick individuals, and not sharing personal items like towels or utensils.

Capsid proteins are the structural proteins that make up the capsid, which is the protective shell of a virus. The capsid encloses the viral genome and helps to protect it from degradation and detection by the host's immune system. Capsid proteins are typically arranged in a symmetrical pattern and can self-assemble into the capsid structure when exposed to the viral genome.

The specific arrangement and composition of capsid proteins vary between different types of viruses, and they play important roles in the virus's life cycle, including recognition and binding to host cells, entry into the cell, and release of the viral genome into the host cytoplasm. Capsid proteins can also serve as targets for antiviral therapies and vaccines.

RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit the expression of specific genes. This process is mediated by small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

RNAi plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and defending against foreign genetic elements, such as viruses and transposons. It has also emerged as an important tool for studying gene function and developing therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including cancer and viral infections.

n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), a biting midge--trypanosome vector association from the Early Cretaceous". Memórias do ... "New fossil insect order Permopsocida elucidates major radiation and evolution of suction feeding in hemimetabolous insects ( ... "Batesian insect-insect mimicry-related explosive radiation of ancient alienopterid cockroaches". Biologia. 73 (10): 987-1006. ... "The earliest Timematids in Burmese Amber reveal diverse tarsal pads of stick insects in the mid‐Cretaceous". Insect Science. 26 ...
... s can overwinter in insect vectors or perennial plants. Phytoplasmas can have varying effects on their insect hosts ... "Interactions between a membrane protein of a pathogen and insect microfilament complex determines insect vector specificity". ... They are transmitted from plant to plant by vectors (normally sap-sucking insects such as leafhoppers) in which they both ... Phytoplasmas are obligate intracellular parasites of plant phloem tissue and of the insect vectors that are involved in their ...
Weintraub, Phyllis G.; Beanland, Leann (2006). "Insect Vectors of Phytoplasmas". Annual Review of Entomology. 51: 91-111. doi: ... They are parasites or commensals of vertebrates, insects, or plants; some are saprophytes. Phytoplasmas colonize the phloem ... They are transmitted by sap-sucking insects (primarily leafhoppers, planthoppers, and psyllids ), living in the gut, haemolymph ... non-helical prokaryotes that colonize plant phloem and insects Archived 2009-05-03 at the Wayback Machine; Int J Syst Evol ...
Insect Vectors of Chagas Disease. Acta Tropica. 122, 196-204. Telleze-Garcia, A. A., Bello-Bedoy, R., Enriquez- Vara, J. N., ... Parasites & Vectors. 10(412): 1-15. Pacheco de Souza, J. M., Rodrigues, V. L. C. C., Olavo da Rocha e Silva, E. (1978). ... Parasites & Vectors. 8:1-5. Luz, C., Rocha, L. F. N., and Humber, R. A. (2003). Record of Evlachovaea sp. (Hyphomycetes) on ... Also referred to as kissing bugs, T. sordida are most well known for their role as a secondary vector of Chagas Disease. ...
In R. Pal, J. B. Kitzmiller and T. Kanda (eds.), Cytogenetics and genetics of vectors. Proceedings of XVI International ... Genetically modified insect Insect ecology Knipling, E.F. 1955. Possibilities of insect control or eradication through the use ... History of the sterile insect technique, pp. 3-36 In V. A. Dyck, J. Hendrichs, and A. S. Robinson. The Sterile Insect Technique ... Insect Pest Control (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list, Use dmy dates from September 2019, Insect control). ...
"Dragonfly or Insect Spy? Scientists at Work on Robobugs". October 9, 2007 - via www.washingtonpost.com. "Patent Vector". ... Uppal, Rajesh (1 May 2019). "DARPA's HI-MEMS (Hybrid Insect Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) Created Cyborg Insects for ... Hybrid Insect Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (HI-MEMS) is a project of DARPA, a unit of the United States Department of ... After implantation, the "insect cyborgs" could be controlled by sending electrical impulses to their muscles. The primary ...
Vectors and medical and veterinary entomology. 3: 14-21. doi:10.1016/j.cois.2014.07.002. PMC 4190037. PMID 25309850. Hemocytes ... Hillyer JF, Strand MR (September 2014). "Mosquito hemocyte-mediated immune responses". Current Opinion in Insect Science. ...
There are no known insect vectors; however, humans can be considered the main vector for this pathogen. The virus is widespread ...
Genetics of insect vectors of disease. pp. 617-650. hdl:10665/38937. Robinson, A. S. (2005), "Genetic Basis of the Sterile ... Proverbs, M. D. (1982). "Sterile insect technique in codling moth control". Sterile Insect Technique and Radiation in Insect ... Sterilizing insects with ionizing radiation. pp. 233-268 In V. A. Dyck, J. Hendrichs, and A. S. Robinson (eds.), Sterile Insect ... Genetically modified insect Infertility Sterile insect technique Sterility (physiology) North, D T (1975). "Inherited Sterility ...
Current Opinion in Insect Science. Vectors and medical and veterinary entomology • Social insects. 34: 117-122. doi:10.1016/j. ... Another way cognition has been studied in animals, specifically insects, is through a cognitive test battery. This method ... Simons, Meagan; Tibbetts, Elizabeth (2019-08-01). "Insects as models for studying the evolution of animal cognition". ...
The IVCC vision is to save lives, protect health and increase prosperity in areas where disease transmitted by insects is ... "Vector Control Innovation" (PDF). "WHO , Vector control". WHO. Archived from the original on August 22, 2017. Retrieved 2019-03 ... "New vector-control response seen as game-changer". www.who.int. Retrieved 2019-03-19. Desowitz, Robert S. (1993). The Malaria ... The Innovative Vector Control Consortium (IVCC) is a not-for-profit public-private partnership that was established in 2005. ...
The flowers are pollinated by insects. Little is known about pollen vectors. A year-long study around the town of St. Katherine ... many insects. It also contains (four) alkaloids, in relatively high concentration compared to the flowers of other species, ...
Phytoplasma infection also spreads through insect vectors; it is, therefore, important to control them. General field ... Oligonucleotide as Hybridization probes to Localize Phytoplasmas in Host Plants and Insect Vectors. (1998). Phytopathology. 89 ... Transovarial transmission of sugarcane white leaf phytoplasma in the insect vector Matsumuratettix hiroglyphicus (Matsumura). ... Sugar List of sugarcane diseases Vector (epidemiology) Chlorosis Nasare, K., Yadav, Amit., Singh, A. K., Shivasharanappa, K. B ...
This disease is spread by insect vectors. The biological vector of the virus is the Culicoides (midges) species, but this ... AHS is not directly contagious, but is known to be spread by insect vectors. AHS virus was first recorded south of the Sahara ... This disease can also be prevented by destroying the insect vector habitats and by using insecticides.[citation needed] African ... where cyclic disease outbreaks coincide with high numbers of competent vectors. The most important vector for AHS in endemic ...
R. prolixus is an important insect vector of Chagas disease that is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. The strategy was to engineer R ... A future direction on vector paratransgenesis is within the natural insect populations and it has not been determined if ... Sinkins SP, Gould F (June 2006). "Gene drive systems for insect disease vectors". Nature Reviews. Genetics. 7 (6): 427-35. doi: ... "Paratransgenesis focuses on utilizing genetically modified insect symbionts to express molecules within the vector that are ...
which is cited by - Lounibos, L. Philip (2002). "Invasions by insect vectors of human disease". Annual Review of Entomology. ... "Insecticide Resistance Issues in Vector-Borne Disease Control". The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. American ...
Mouchet, Jean (1988). "Agriculture and Vector Resistance". International Journal of Tropical Insect Science. Cambridge ... Pests with limited viable range (such as insects with a specific diet of a few related crop plants) are more likely to evolve ... Insect predators and parasites generally have smaller populations and are less likely to evolve resistance than are pesticides ... Berenbaum, May (1995). Bugs In The System: Insects And Their Impact On Human Affairs. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley. pp. xvi+ ...
Bull Soc Vector Ecol. 1986;11:271-275. Anderson GS. Insect succession on carrion and its relationship to determining time of ... Insects are valuable as forensic indicators in cases of abuse and neglect. Some insects, such as the Green Bottle Fly, (Lucilia ... Insect evidence is customarily used to determine post-mortem interval (PMI) but can also be used as evidence of neglect or ... The Use of Insects in Death Investigations: An Analysis of Forensic Entomology Cases in British Columbia Over A Five Year ...
Insects described in 1917, Insect vectors of human pathogens). ... koreicus vector species. 16S next generation sequencing of ... van Tol, S.; Dimopoulos, G. (2016), "Influences of the Mosquito Microbiota on Vector Competence", Advances in Insect Physiology ... Aedes koreicus can act as a vector for human-to-human transmitted viruses, as well as a vector for animal-to-human viruses. ... "Biological Control Strategies for Mosquito Vectors of Arboviruses". Insects. 8 (1): 21. doi:10.3390/insects8010021. ISSN 2075- ...
The adult female mites are mostly parasitic on insects. Their host range includes many holometabolous insects such as honeybees ... Some species are the vectors of pathogenic fungi. O'Connor, B.; Klimov, Pavel B. (1 May 2012). "Family Pyemotidae Oudemans, ... Pyemotidae is a family of mostly parasitic mites that feed on the larvae and other developmental stages of various insects but ... Resh, Vincent H.; Cardé, Ring T. (2009). Encyclopedia of Insects. Academic Press. p. 155. ISBN 978-0-08-092090-0. Güldalı, B.; ...
Steven P. Sinkins; Fred Gould (2006). "Gene drive systems for insect disease vectors" (PDF). Nature Reviews Genetics. 7 (6): ... Male-killing occurs in many insects. In the case of male embryo death, a variety of bacteria have been implicated, including ...
Hemingway is distinguished as the international authority on insecticide resistance in insect vectors of disease. She was first ... Hemingway, J.; Ranson, H. (2000). "Insecticide Resistance in Insect Vectors of Human Disease". Annual Review of Entomology. 45 ... Awarded Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to the Control of Tropical Disease Vectors in the ... For her 2012 contributions to the Prevention of Tropical Disease Vectors, she received the Commander of the British Empire (CBE ...
No insect vector is known. Its major host is clover (Trifolium spp). It was first reported in Trifolium repens in 1935. In the ...
Hard-bodied ticks of the genus Ixodes are the vectors of Lyme disease (also the vector for Babesia). Most infections are caused ... Nguyen QD, Vu MN, Hebert AA (November 2018). "Insect repellents: an updated review for the clinician". J Am Acad Dermatol. 88 ( ... Companion Vector-Borne Diseases. Archived from the original on 7 June 2019. Retrieved 21 May 2019. Eisen L, Eisen RJ (September ... In North America, the black-legged tick or deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) is the main vector on the East Coast. The lone star ...
Aphids as Virus Vector, 1977. Insect and Plant Viruses-An Atlas, 1977. Viruses and Environment, 1978. Invertebrate Tissue ... Insect Viruses, 1968. Viruses, Vectors, and Vegetation, 1969. Comparative Virology, 1971. Mycoplasma Diseases, 1973. Viruses, ... Vectors of Plant Pathogens, 1980. Invertebrate Systems in Vitro, 1980. Vectors of Disease Agents, 1981. Mycoplasma Diseases of ... As of 1996, the Mitsuhashi-Maramorosch insect culture medium for culturing insect cells was a widely used standard medium. In ...
No insect vector is known. However, it is easily mechanically transmitted on contaminated tools used for propagation or ...
No insect vector is known. This virus is transmitted by mechanical inoculation, sometime by seeds and by dodder (Cuscuta ...
Beside fogging there are some other insect repellents for indoors and outdoors. An example of a synthetic insect repellent is ... "Aerial spraying planned in eight Orange County cities in battle to control West Nile virus; Vector Control says it's safe". The ... For the first time, a combination of the nuclear sterile insect technique (SIT) with the incompatible insect technique (IIT) ... Research was done to show the fungi would not affect other insects or humans. An oil drip can or oil drip barrel was a common ...
Lastly, cucumber beetles act as insect vectors for MNSV. They feed on flowers of the plants, if these are available, rather ... Control of the Olipidium vector can be obtained via soil sterilization with steam or methyl bromide. Controlling pest insects ... insects, and by the root-inhabiting fungus vector Olpidium bornovanus. Symptoms vary between Curbitaceae crops, but generally ... it is transmitted through vectors. Vectors are mediums with which any pathogens are transmitted.[citation needed] Through seed ...
Hurd H (2003). "Manipulation of medically important insect vectors by their parasites". Annual Review of Entomology. 48 (1): ... The pathways that these hormones regulate is largely dependent on the evolutionary growth of the insect species. Together, JH, ... The two hormones responsible for vitellogenesis stimulation in insects are sesquiterpenoid juvenile hormone (JH) and ... "Regulatory Mechanisms of Vitellogenesis in Insects". Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology. 8: 593613. doi:10.3389/fcell. ...
Both are transmitted by contact and by insect vectors. Unlike the previous viruses, the vectors in these two cases are not ... insecticide applications to eliminate insect vectors can be effective as a control measure. The use of virus-free seed tubers ... Thus, the vectors are aphids in the case of AMV and PAMV, and nematodes in the case of TFISV and TBRV. This virosis is quite ... Towards the center of these necrotic rings there is usually a rot caused by the fungal vector. Symptoms on the aerial part of ...
... and insect vectors are both key model systems for genomics and important organisms for clinical medicine. Scientists in the ... Broad community are sequencing and analyzing the genomes of a wide range of insects and microorganisms to understand their ... Microorganisms (including fungi, bacteria, and viruses) and insect vectors are both key model systems for genomics and ... Parasite and Vector Genomics. The Parasite and Vector Genomics group applies genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data to ...
Download the Set of insects and silhouettes 303300 royalty-free Vector from Vecteezy for your project and explore over a ... million other vectors, icons and clipart graphics! ... Sponsored Vectors Click here to save 15% on all subscriptions ...
Evolva to sell nootkatone as an active ingredient to be incorporated into insect repellents and insecticides. *Insect ... Ten vector-borne pathogens were newly identified in the United States in the past 13 years, including chikungunya, Zika, and ... Every state and US territory is at risk for vector-borne diseases (VBD). The number of reported cases of VBD doubled from 2004 ... For various reasons, many people dont like to use insect repellents. In order to address mosquito and tickborne threats, we ...
In-sect Vec-tor Con-trol Di-vi-sion au-thor-i-ties han-dling the Zi-ka threat are to-day spray-ing ar-eas of St George West, in ... In-sec-tor Vec-tor of-fi-cials ini-tial-ly vis-it-ed the par-tic-u-lar Diego Mar-tin com-mu-ni-ty yes-ter-day to be-gin spray- ...
... insects in AI, SVG or EPS! ✓ Free Download ✓ Non-Copyright for Personal & Commercial Use ... Download 61 Download Free Vector Insects Clipart Vector with animals & ... 61 Download Free Vector Insects Clipart free vector by clipart.me. Free Download ... FREE VECTORS Backgrounds American flag Flowers Patterns Trees World map Premium vectors 👑 ...
Functional RNA Structures in the 3UTR of Tick-Borne, Insect-Specific and No-Known-Vector Flaviviruses Viruses. 2019 Mar 24;11( ... insect-specific and no-known-vector flaviviruses in silico. Our data support the wide distribution of previously experimentally ... and no-known-vector flaviviruses and provide evidence for the existence of a cascade of duplicated RNA structures within insect ...
... insect, bug illustration Stock Vector and explore similar vectors at Adobe Stock. ...
... with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, ... The discovery of this insect specific site may pave the way for the development of new strategies essential in the management ... results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector ... In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because ...
Malaria mosquito buzzing, infectious parasitic spreading Stock Vector and explore similar vectors at Adobe Stock. ... Gnat and pest, spreading viruses and diseases, gnats flock, repellent or spray promo poster vector concept. ... Flying mosquito insects. Gnat and pest, spreading viruses and diseases, gnats flock, repellent or spray promo poster vector ...
These insects will also be tested to determine the presence of phytoplasmas in them. Finally, potential insect vectors, will be ... Identification of possible insect vectors of phytoplasmas in Quercus humboldtii Bonpla in Bogotá, Colombia August 8, 2018. ... Insect vectors feed on infected plants and carry phytoplasmas to healthy plants. Quercus humboldtii (Andean Oak tree), is one ... Phytoplasmas are bacteria transmitted by insect vectors that infect plants causing their deformation and affecting the services ...
Vectors graphic art designs black insect set in editable .ai .eps .svg .cdr format ✓ Premium quality ✓ Free for commercial use ... black black insect black set insect insect set set black flower free cute animals vector set free vector banner set christmas ... sports icon set black banner black white tattoo black and white love vector black cat vector free vector insect wings insect ... black black and white globe vector black heart black t shirt vector flying insect black sheep black tree black dragon vector ...
Vectors graphic art designs wild insects icons colorful 3d design in editable .ai .eps .svg .cdr format ✓ Premium quality ✓ ... vector wild flower free vector weather icons financial icons star icon wedding icons vector fax icon vector pdf icon vector ... colorful icons icons colorful insects insects icons wild wild colorful wild icons wild insects gift icon wild boar animal icons ... wild vector nature insect animal wildlife icon design illustration ant symbol dragonfly creature wing mosquito graphic beetle ...
Researchers from two CSIC institutes developed a predictive tool that can help limit the populations of the main insect vector ... Researchers from two CSIC institutes developed a predictive tool that can help limit the populations of the main insect vector ... New tool to predict the optimal time of intervention to control the nymphs of Philaenus spumarius, insect vector of Xylella ... New tool to predict the optimal time of intervention to control the nymphs of Philaenus spumarius, insect vector of Xylella ...
Recently, a control project to eliminate tsetse flies ( Glossina fuscipes fuscipes ) in this focus using the sterile insect ... The objective of this work was therefore to experimentally assess the vector competence of sterile males treated with ... Journal Articles Parasites & Vectors Year : 2023 Vector competence of sterile male Glossina fuscipes fuscipes for Trypanosoma ... implications for the implementation of the sterile insect technique in a sleeping sickness focus in Chad. Parasites & Vectors, ...
Digital Vision Vectors, Insect Lithographs) available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Photo Gifts ... Home , Digital Vision Vectors , Insect Lithographs Insect Lithographs Collection. Colourful, anique insect print art ... Choose from 149 items in our Insect Lithographs Collection for your Wall Art and Photo Gifts ... Insect Lithographs Collection from Fine Art Storehouse ( ... Moths, Insects, Wainscot, Rufous, Lyme grass, Slender Clouded ...
Colladonus montanus (van Duzee 1917a: 298 ): Wilson M. R. & Turner J. A. 2021. Insect Vectors of Plant Disease. Amgueddfa Cymru ... Taxonomic relationships of leafhopper vectors of plant pathogens. In: Leafhopper Vectors and Plant Disease Agents. K. ... Effect of benzothiadiazole on transmission of X-Disease phytoplasma by the vector Colladonus montanus to Arabidopsis thaliana, ... Available online at http://insectvectors.science/vector/1848. [ Accessed: 28/11/2023 ]. ...
Public domain vectors - download vector images, svg cut files and graphics free of copyright. You can use our images for ... Publicdomainvectors.org, offers copyright-free vector images in popular .eps, .svg, .ai and .cdr formats.To the extent possible ... under law, uploaders on this site have waived all copyright to their vector images. You are free to edit, distribute and use ...
The page contains insect silhouette vector art images like butterfly, housefly, ladybug, spider, etc. We hope this collection ... Insects are the most diverse group of animals with an estimated six to ten million species, which is more than half of all ... This page contains the most beautiful collection of insect silhouette vectors for download and sharing online. ... of insects will be more helpful to you. ... Insect Silhouettes Vector Art. This page contains the most ...
Planthopper Families ( * Indicates Known Vectors). Family. Example Images. *Delphacidae. Hind tibia with movable spur. The spur ... Delphacids are mostly small insects, usually between 2-4 mm (but range 1.5 - ~7mm). The wings are membranous or somewhat ... Identification of the main families of Leafhopper & Planthopper, many if which contain vector species. ...
These vector vector designs are available now under a traditional rf license. ... Royalty Free Insect Stock Vector Clipart Illustrations. *. Aggressive Bee Pointing Finger-Up While Gritting Teeth and Preparing ...
Did the Malaria Parasite First Evolve in the Insect Vector or the Vertebrate Host? 28/03/2016 ...
Papers presented at the Symposium on Insect Vector Biology, held at Madras during November 22-24 1979. by Symposium on Insect ... Genetics of insect vectors of disease / edited for the World Health Organization by J. W. Wright and R. Pal. by Wright, J. W , ... Pest and vector management in the tropics : with particular reference to insects, ticks, mites and snails / Anthony Youdeowei, ... Handbook for identification of the principal insect vectors in China] / [chief editor, Lu Baolin] by Lu, Pao-lin. ...
Free Real 20+ Insects Vector Icons:. Here is a complete collection of 20 insects vector icons set which features almost all ... Free Tasty Barbecue Vector Icons (Ai). Ritika S - January 13, 2022. 0 ...
We aim to monitor hemipteran insects and investigate new invasive species to understand the potential impact on plant health ...
Download Free Set Of Cute Cartoon Insects Vector 01 under the free Vector Animals category(ies) at TitanUI.CoM! ... Vector. Vector Animals. Set Of Cute Cartoon Insects Vector 01. Set Of Cute Cartoon Insects Vector 01. ... Next Post Set Of Cute Cartoon Insects Vector 02 Related Resources Cartoon Mushroom Stickers Figma 24 Beautiful Christmas Icons ... Cartoon Penguins Happy Birthday Background Vector Cute Cartoon Cupcake PSD Set Of Vector Lovely Cartoon Label Stickers For ...
The Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) strives to protect the nation from viruses and bacteria spread by mosquitoes, ... Insect repellent. Top of Page. J. Jamestown Canyon virus. Japanese encephalitis (vaccine available) ... Vector-borne pathogens are spread to people and animals primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea. Only ... The Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) strives to protect the nation from viruses and bacteria spread by mosquitoes, ...
Buy clipart and vector illustrations for as low as $2. ... Buy clipart, vector illustrations, and stock photos at ...
Many of these insects emerge in large numbers during the… ... Marin and Sonoma counties are home to numerous insects that ... Insects that Resemble Mosquitoes. Marin and Sonoma counties are home to numerous insects that closely resemble mosquitoes. Many ... These non-biting insects do not constitute a health problem but can create an annoyance when found inside homes or in large ... These insects can be annoying at certain times of year but unlike mosquitoes, they do not bite and cannot transmit disease. The ...
n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), a biting midge--trypanosome vector association from the Early Cretaceous". Memórias do ... "New fossil insect order Permopsocida elucidates major radiation and evolution of suction feeding in hemimetabolous insects ( ... "Batesian insect-insect mimicry-related explosive radiation of ancient alienopterid cockroaches". Biologia. 73 (10): 987-1006. ... "The earliest Timematids in Burmese Amber reveal diverse tarsal pads of stick insects in the mid‐Cretaceous". Insect Science. 26 ...
To have an insect identified, please send photo(s) and descriptions using the form below, or… ... The District provides insect identification at no cost. ... To have an insect identified, please send photo(s) and ... I need help identifying an insect.. The District provides insect identification at no cost. ... Please describe where you found this insect and any other information about it (required). ...
  • The best way to protect yourself and family from mosquito and tick bites is to use insect repellent. (cdc.gov)
  • Gnat and pest, spreading viruses and diseases, gnats flock, repellent or spray promo poster vector concept. (adobe.com)
  • If you use both sunscreen and insect repellent, apply the sunscreen first and then the repellent. (cdc.gov)
  • Do not spray insect repellent on the skin under your clothing. (cdc.gov)
  • Always follow the label instructions when using insect repellent or sunscreen. (cdc.gov)
  • N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide, commonly known as DEET, has become a widely used insect repellent in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Personal measures such as using insect repellent, covering exposed skin with clothing, and using mosquito nets also provide simple, cost-effective--albeit not foolproof-- protection. (cdc.gov)
  • Prevention depends on community and household efforts to reduce vector populations and personal protective measures to prevent mosquito and tick bites, such as use of Environmental Protection Agency-registered insect repellent and wearing protective clothing. (medscape.com)
  • Ten vector-borne pathogens were newly identified in the United States in the past 13 years, including chikungunya, Zika, and six tickborne pathogens. (cdc.gov)
  • Taxonomic relationships of leafhopper vectors of plant pathogens. (insectvectors.science)
  • Vector-borne pathogens are spread to people and animals primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea. (cdc.gov)
  • continued struggles of humans versus biting and stinging insects, including those that transmit vector-borne pathogens, from an intimate perspective. (cdc.gov)
  • Able to repel and kill ticks and insects, including mosquitoes. (cdc.gov)
  • The Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) strives to protect the nation from viruses and bacteria spread by mosquitoes, ticks, or fleas. (cdc.gov)
  • Marin and Sonoma counties are home to numerous insects that closely resemble mosquitoes. (msmosquito.org)
  • These insects can be annoying at certain times of year but unlike mosquitoes, they do not bite and cannot transmit disease. (msmosquito.org)
  • mosquitoes are We thank Olivia O'Connor for her advice and technical support considered a secondary vector of malaria because of their and Vincent Richard, Cyrille Goarant, and Arnaud Tarantola for weak anthropophilic feeding behavior and their small num- editorial comments. (cdc.gov)
  • aegypti citywide at fine spatial and temporal scales for vector surveillance (MI-Aedes) to detect high Aedes infestation areas using a GIS environment and the identification of arbovirus-infected trapped mosquitoes by RT-PCR (MI-Virus platforms). (intechopen.com)
  • If you or someone you know plans on traveling to countries where ZIKV virus or other viruses spread by mosquitoes (such as dengue or chikungunya) are found, take insect repellents when traveling inside and outside of the country. (cdc.gov)
  • DEET is highly effective against a broad spectrum of insect pests, including potential disease vectors such as mosquitoes, biting flies and ticks (CDC 2015). (cdc.gov)
  • Every state and US territory is at risk for vector-borne diseases (VBD). (cdc.gov)
  • We aim to monitor hemipteran insects and investigate new invasive species to understand the potential impact on plant health and related plant diseases to contribute to landscape conservation. (experiment.com)
  • Many of the major diseases of humans are transmitted by insect vectors. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • By reorienting to IVM, vector control programmes will be better able to meet the growing challenges in the control of malaria, dengue and other vector-borne diseases in the face of dwindling public sector human and financial resources. (ivcc.com)
  • Insects can also spread diseases. (medlineplus.gov)
  • We have synthesized a new quinoline (4,7-dichloroquinoline) derivative which showed significant larvicidal and pupicidal properties against a malarial and a dengue vector and a lethal toxicity ranging from 4.408 µM/mL (first instar larvae) to 7.958 µM/mL (pupal populations) for Anopheles stephensi and 5.016 µM/mL (larva 1) to 10.669 µM/mL (pupae) for Aedes aegypti . (nature.com)
  • Such integration of continuous vector surveillance and targeting vector control in hotspot areas is cost-effective (less than US$ 1.00/person/year), and it has been shown to reduce mosquito population and prevent dengue transmission. (intechopen.com)
  • These vectors also transmit dengue and chikungunya virus and are found throughout much of the Americas, including parts of the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • For various reasons, many people don't like to use insect repellents. (cdc.gov)
  • Registration of a manufacturing use product paves the way for manufacturers to develop nootkatone-based products for consumers to buy, including insect repellents, lotions, and soaps. (cdc.gov)
  • For example, DEET is an active ingredient that is used in many brand name insect repellents. (cdc.gov)
  • EPA registration of nootkatone paves the way for businesses to develop new insect repellents. (cdc.gov)
  • When used as directed, insect repellents are safe and effective for everyone, including pregnant and nursing women. (cdc.gov)
  • Most insect repellents can be used on children in proper concentrations. (cdc.gov)
  • Every year, approximately one-third of the U.S. population uses DEET-containing insect repellents (CDC, 2009), and exposure to DEET is widespread (Calafat 2016). (cdc.gov)
  • Scroll down the page and check out all our insect silhouettes vector art and use the best suitable ones for your non-commercial works. (silhouette.pics)
  • You can find a great selection of vector icons, decorations, silhouettes to buttons… All these vectors are great items to add to your vector library. (vectordiary.com)
  • I'd like to inform you that insect silhouettes you post, was is not created by vectorstuff.blogspot.com it was stolen from my blog! (vectordiary.com)
  • A set of cute cartoon Insects in eps format, including Ladybug, bee, Coccinella septempunctata and butterfly. (titanui.com)
  • Buy clipart, vector illustrations, and stock photos at affordable rates. (vectoons.com)
  • Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT). (who.int)
  • The advantage to humans is that we can act on the insect vector and break the cycle of transmission. (gresham.ac.uk)
  • Infected insects take blood meals from humans and their domestic animals and deposit parasite-laden feces. (medscape.com)
  • T cruzi occurs in 2 forms in humans, the intracellular amastigote and the trypomastigote form in blood, which is ingested by the insects (see image below). (medscape.com)
  • The Parasite and Vector Genomics group applies genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data to profile variation among individuals and divergence among species to understand the basic biology underlying vector-borne disease transmission, with a focus on malaria. (broadinstitute.org)
  • Insects are the most diverse group of animals with an estimated six to ten million species, which is more than half of all known living organisms. (silhouette.pics)
  • There are millions of species of insects in this Earth, and we try to provide you with the maximum number of insect silhouette vectors. (silhouette.pics)
  • Identification of the main families of Leafhopper & Planthopper, many if which contain vector species. (insectvectors.science)
  • Here, the geographic distribution of mosquito species known to be competent JEV vectors in the country was estimated by combining known mosquito occurrences and ecological drivers of distribution to reveal insights into communities at highest risk of infectious disease transmission. (mdpi.com)
  • How those are combined in locally-tailored IVM strategies is a critical factor in determining their effectiveness against malaria vectors. (ivcc.com)
  • Pest and vector management in the tropics : with particular reference to insects, ticks, mites and snails / Anthony Youdeowei, Mike W. Service. (who.int)
  • There is no information about the insects that could be responsible for the transmission of this disease to urban trees, but this information is indispensable to produce control strategies. (treefund.org)
  • In: Leafhopper Vectors and Plant Disease Agents. (insectvectors.science)
  • Effect of benzothiadiazole on transmission of X-Disease phytoplasma by the vector Colladonus montanus to Arabidopsis thaliana, a new experimental host plant. (insectvectors.science)
  • The aim of the IVM approach is to contribute to the achievement of the global targets set for vector-borne disease control, by making vector control more efficient, cost effective, ecologically sound and sustainable. (ivcc.com)
  • Vector behavior is a critical science in disease control. (who.int)
  • This mechanism of transmission contrasts with that of the two subspecies of African trypanosomes that cause human disease, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense , which are transmitted via the saliva of their vectors, and with the mechanism by which a nonpathogenic trypanosome found in the Americas, Trypanosoma rangeli , is transmitted to its mammalian hosts. (medscape.com)
  • Ixodes scapularis (dammini), tick vector for Lyme disease. (medscape.com)
  • Baby animal vector art for baby - these baby animal vectors would be perfect for kids designs. (freeimages.com)
  • Also: Can the Bible Code help us find the animal vector hiding place, the carrier host animal where the Ebola virus hides between outbreaks? (revelation13.net)
  • Finally, potential insect vectors, will be tested to determine its ability to transmit phytoplasmas by feeding from artificial feeders. (treefund.org)
  • The behavior of mosquito that transmit malaria is critical to design tactics to control or limit human contact with the vector. (who.int)
  • Laboratory-reared Monochamus carolinensis (Olivier) were used to study the temporal pattern of pinewood nematode dauer larval exit from this beetle vector. (flvc.org)
  • To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were carried out to provide key data on spatial and seasonal dynamics of local vector populations. (who.int)
  • An assessed 3.3 billion of the world human population lives in areas with risk of Malaria infection 2 is contaminated with its mosquito vector Anopheles spp. (nature.com)
  • WHO issued a vector alert following recording the Anopheles stephensi, in Djibouti in 2012. (who.int)
  • Using the knowledge of the behavior and biological make up of vectors including anopheles, experts have developed chemicals for spraying and insecticide treated nets," said Dr. Jovin Kitau, WHO Malaria Expert. (who.int)
  • Malaria vector surveillance officers from 32 sentinel sites of the government, collect, identify malaria then transport samples of dead female anopheles for more in-depth lab analysis at a designated centre of the National Institute of Medical Research in Muheza Tanga. (who.int)
  • [ 1 ] T cruzi mostly is found in blood-sucking triatomine insects (kissing bugs) and small mammals in a sylvatic cycle that is enzootic from the southern and southwestern United States to central Argentina and Chile. (medscape.com)
  • Microorganisms (including fungi, bacteria, and viruses) and insect vectors are both key model systems for genomics and important organisms for clinical medicine. (broadinstitute.org)
  • Phytoplasmas are bacteria transmitted by insect vectors that infect plants causing their deformation and affecting the services they offer to people. (treefund.org)
  • Here is a complete collection of 20 insects vector icons set which features almost all known insects in it. (templaten.net)
  • This page contains the most beautiful collection of insect silhouette vectors for download and sharing online. (silhouette.pics)
  • Are you looking for insect silhouette vector? (silhouette.pics)
  • 800x800 Spider Insect Spiral Pattern Color Silhouette Animal. (getdrawings.com)
  • 800x800 Praying Mantis Insect Black Silhouette Animal. (getdrawings.com)
  • Papers presented at the Symposium on Insect Vector Biology, held at Madras during November 22-24 1979. (who.int)
  • Text reading spider, spider webs, bricks, small insects and abstract lines around the black-and-white word. (freeimages.com)
  • Delphacids are mostly small insects, usually between 2-4 mm (but range 1.5 - ~7mm). (insectvectors.science)
  • As with other parasites that infect both mammalian and insect hosts, the life cycle of T cruzi is complex (see image below). (medscape.com)
  • The recent introduction of chikungunya and Zika virus and their subsequent dispersion in the Americas have encouraged the use of novel technologies for adult Aedes surveillance to improve vector control. (intechopen.com)
  • Exploring the immunogenicity of an insect-specific virus vectored Zika vaccine candidate. (bvsalud.org)
  • These patterns were not evident in vector populations breeding in artificial water sources away from the river. (who.int)
  • The epimastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi is the multiplying stage of the parasite that grows in the gut of the insect vector and also in cell-free culture medium as shown here. (medscape.com)
  • Here we report on a comparative genomics approach to characterize evolutionarily conserved RNAs in the 3 ' UTR of tick-borne, insect-specific and no-known-vector flaviviruses in silico. (nih.gov)
  • Our data support the wide distribution of previously experimentally characterized exoribonuclease resistant RNAs (xrRNAs) within tick-borne and no-known-vector flaviviruses and provide evidence for the existence of a cascade of duplicated RNA structures within insect-specific flaviviruses. (nih.gov)
  • Insect -specific flaviviruses (ISFVs) have recently garnered attention as an antigen presentation platform for vaccine development and diagnostic applications. (bvsalud.org)
  • And search more of iStock's library of royalty-free stock images that features Butterfly - Insect photos available for quick and easy download. (istockphoto.com)
  • It's a win-win, and it's why everything on iStock is only available royalty-free - including all Butterfly - Insect images and footage. (istockphoto.com)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Insect vectors. (who.int)
  • The trypomastigote is the infective flagellated form of the parasite found in the blood of the mammalian hosts (blood trypomastigote) and in the hindgut of vectors (metacyclic trypomastigote). (medscape.com)
  • Herodotus described how people living in marshes in ancient Egypt fished with nets during the day, then slept under the same nets to repel insects. (cdc.gov)
  • The insect defecates on the host's skin as it feeds, contaminating the bite wound with feces containing the parasites. (medscape.com)
  • Insect vectors feed on infected plants and carry phytoplasmas to healthy plants. (treefund.org)
  • These insects will also be tested to determine the presence of phytoplasmas in them. (treefund.org)
  • Via collaborations with academic and industry partners, we explore the evolutionary basis of drug and insecticide resistance, develop new methods of generating and applying genomic data in parasite and vector systems, and identify the genetic determinants of vaccine efficacy. (broadinstitute.org)
  • Did the Malaria Parasite First Evolve in the Insect Vector or the Vertebrate Host? (sbmt.org.br)
  • 800x776 Triatominae Skin Parasite Insect Vector Bug. (getdrawings.com)
  • Epimastigotes are an extracellular and noninfective form of the parasite found in the midgut of insect vectors, where they multiply by binary fission. (medscape.com)
  • You can download for free and use this Vector Dragon image to create any graphic or tattoo. (freeimages.com)
  • The Set Of Cute Cartoon Insects Vector 01 was generously created and offered for free by sccnn.com - download it now to enhance your next project with a professional-grade asset at no cost. (titanui.com)
  • The best free Insect vector images. (getdrawings.com)
  • 560x470 Free Art Print Of Centipede Insect Vector. (getdrawings.com)
  • 560x470 Free Art Print Of Cockroach Vector Icon. (getdrawings.com)
  • Let's kick start the New Year with a great compilation of the best free vectors online. (vectordiary.com)
  • A pack of free vector glass buttons and bars for your webpage or blog. (vectordiary.com)
  • The objectives of this project are: i) to study the diversity of insects found in Andean Oak trees of Bogotá, ii) to determine the presence of possible insect vectors in Andean Oak trees and iii) to generate DNA barcodes (genetic identification method) that complement the standard taxonomic method. (treefund.org)
  • The insects will be identified by standard taxonomic procedures and selected individuals will be subjected to genetic analysis to produce their DNA barcodes. (treefund.org)
  • Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The malaria vector entomological surveillance was established in Tanzania in 2016 with support from WHO, the WHO has since been providing guidance in updating the protocol and review of collected data. (who.int)
  • The technologies also provide data to model the role of climate on the vector population dynamics. (intechopen.com)
  • Therefore, vector surveillance information, as well as data on the cost effectiveness of the interventions and their underlying parameters, are key for locally-tailored IVM decision-making. (ivcc.com)
  • The main advantage of the MI-Aedes platform over traditional mosquito surveillance is the integration of continuous vector monitoring coupled with an information technology platform for near real-time data collection, analysis, and decision-making. (intechopen.com)
  • Tanzania Strengthens Malaria Vector Surveillance to control it spread. (who.int)
  • Most recently, WHO facilitated in a training of district vector surveillance (and control) officers (DVSOs) who collect mosquito samples in district 32 sentinel sites across the country for analysis. (who.int)
  • Other institutions that participated in the training of 56 vectors surveillance officers are the national institute of medical research, national malaria control program, Ifakara health institute, PSI, and the ministry of health. (who.int)
  • If I don't do my job diligently, I may be misleading decision makers by providing information that does not help them make the right decisions about malaria interventions in vector control and treatment," said Paschal Thobias Lutubija, a Malaria Vector Surveillance Officer from Ruangwa district. (who.int)
  • Set include vector version (Adobe Illustrator 8 ver) for easy use in your favorite vector editing application + csh for Adobe Photoshop CS. (freeimages.com)
  • IVM strategies are geographically tailored by definition and depend on the availability and quality of product economic data, local vector knowledge and evidence. (ivcc.com)
  • The absence of all potential vectors of human Plas- an internal transcribed spacer 2 gene sequence analysis modium spp. (cdc.gov)
  • If malaria eradication efforts are to succeed in the face of rising insecticide resistance, the full potential of vector control must be realised through a re-invigorated vision for IVM. (ivcc.com)
  • The insect vectors are reduviid bugs such as Rhodnius prolixus ("vinchuca"), Triatoma infestans, and Panstrongylus megistus. (medscape.com)
  • The District provides insect identification at no cost. (lcvcd.org)