Arnica: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The dried flower heads of Arnica montana are used externally as a counterirritant and tincture for sprains and bruises, either as crude extract or in homeopathic dilution (HOMEOPATHY). Arnica contains volatile oils (OILS, VOLATILE), arnicin, arnisterol, FLAVONOIDS; TANNINS; and resin. The common name of Wolf's Bane is similar to the common name for ACONITUM.Insects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Bryonia: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE that is the source of bryodin 1 (a ribosome-inactivating protein).Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Pleurodynia, Epidemic: An acute, febrile, infectious disease generally occurring in epidemics. It is usually caused by coxsackieviruses B and sometimes by coxsackieviruses A; echoviruses; or other enteroviruses.Carbuncle: An infection of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue that consists of a cluster of boils. Commonly, the causative agent is STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS. Carbuncles produce fever, leukocytosis, extreme pain, and prostration.Social Alienation: The state of estrangement individuals feel in cultural settings that they view as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable.Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.MontanaPulmonary Stretch Receptors: Stretch receptors found in the bronchi and bronchioles. Pulmonary stretch receptors are sensors for a reflex which stops inspiration. In humans, the reflex is protective and is probably not activated during normal respiration.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Coriandrum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.
  • People take arnica by mouth for sore mouth and throat, pain such as pain after surgery or wisdom tooth removal, insect bites , painful and swollen veins near the surface of the skin (superficial phlebitis ), bruising, muscle pain , vision problems due to diabetes, stroke, and for causing abortions. (webmd.com)
  • Arnica is most commonly used for pain caused by osteoarthritis, sore throat, surgery, and other conditions. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you exercise and have sore muscles after, if you have arthritis or suffer from stiff, swollen joints, bruise easily, or even if you get a bug bite, arnica is the answer to your prayers. (beautyinfozone.com)
  • For a milder, more isolated injury, like a bruise or sore muscles, apply topical arnica cream or gel as soon as possible and repeat three to five times daily until pain, bruising and swelling are gone. (care2.com)
  • Allied to wounds are h morrhages, and Arnica causes and cures h morrhages of many kinds: dilatation and rupture of small blood-vessels. (homeoint.org)
  • Arnica should only be applied to unbroken skin as it promotes blood circulation and may increase bleeding of wounds. (aquariusaroma-soap.com)
  • They didn't particularly enjoy being tended to, but since arnica rubs in quickly, doesn't sting (unless there are open wounds), and has little or no smell, they let us use it because they soon learned that it helped them heal faster. (joyfuljourneying.com)
  • According to the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMM), tinctures are the mostly common form of arnica available and typically contain almost three quarters ethanol. (evitamins.com)
  • This form of arnica is severely diluted to make it safe, but you shouldn't ingest arnica without consulting with a healthcare professional, be it your primary physician or a naturopathic doctor. (evitamins.com)
  • If you have any question about whether you have the herbal or homeopathic form of arnica, talk to your doctor. (umm.edu)
  • It is also effective for insect bites, frost bite and sunburn. (essentialdayspa.com)
  • People rarely come to doctors with insect bite and sting problems, as only a few reactions are serious. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • The symptoms you have described are of an insect bite,with inflammatory reaction around it. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • It appears that you are having an allergic or a hypersensitivity reaction to an insect bite. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • It calms hives, soothes sweet itch and insect bite hypersensitivity, controls mites living in feather, and inhibits the growth of bacterial, fungal and dermatophyte-based skin issues. (equiderma.com)
  • I can't remember if it was an insect bite or similar, but on the day of the flight, I woke up to find the whole side of my face hot, red and swollen and with some other symptoms I won't go into (in case you're eating! (hubpages.com)
  • I tried this on an insect bite and it helped but once the penny is removed the stinging came back. (drbenkim.com)
  • Huber R. Bross F, Schempp C, Grundermann C. Arnica and stinging nettle for treating burns - a self-experiment. (umm.edu)
  • Historically, herbalists used arnica to prepare teas and tinctures they believed would benefit a wide range of ailments, from anemia and depression to heart disease. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Arnica is an herb that grows mainly in Siberia and central Europe, as well as temperate climates in North America. (webmd.com)
  • Using the herb in a hot, moist compress may be helpful for arthritis pain, though it is not known whether it is simply the heat or the arnica that provides the relief. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Arnica is a perennial herb that grows in the northern United States, Canada, Europe and eastern Asia. (hubpages.com)
  • The healing properties of the arnica herb have been recognized since the twelfth century, when German nun, Saint Hildegard of Bingen, first wrote about arnica. (doctorshealthpress.com)
  • This article will discuss what arnica is, common uses, and health benefits as well as the possible side effects and safe ways to use this herb. (nootriment.com)
  • Arnica refers to a clan of flowering perennial plants from the daisy family (Compositae) that's native to Europe and Siberia but also grows in North America, especially in mountainous regions. (mercola.com)
  • Arnica is a perennial that grows to a height of 1 to 2 feet with yellow-orange flowers similar to daisies. (umm.edu)
  • But it was eventually discovered that even small amounts of arnica (except for super-diluted homeopathic formulations) can irritate mucous membranes, cause vomiting and diarrhea, and lead to drowsiness. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • You can generally take homeopathic remedies, which use extremely small amounts of arnica, safely. (umm.edu)
  • Other aches and pains involving muscle and bone are potential candidates for treatment with arnica 30c. (wisegeek.com)
  • But one study shows that taking 12 doses of a specific arnica product (SinEcch, Alpine Pharmaceuticals) might reduce bruising under the skin in women following face-lift surgery. (webmd.com)
  • Early research shows that taking one tablet of homeopathic arnica 30C under the tongue every 2 hours for six doses does not benefit people who have had a stroke. (webmd.com)
  • Homeopathic doses of arnica are highly unlikely to exert any adverse reactions because of the minimal amount ingested. (hubpages.com)
  • The Canadian government, however, is concerned enough about the safety of arnica to prohibit its use as a food ingredient. (medlineplus.gov)
  • avoid if allergy to arnica and plants in Asteraceae family exists. (tabers.com)
  • Arnica belongs to the plant family Asteraceae-also called Compositae-which also includes the daisy and sunflower. (doctorshealthpress.com)
  • Arnica is a member of the Asteraceae family. (nootriment.com)
  • It is important to note that arnica belongs to the sunflower family Asteraceae and may engender allergic reactions as a result of its sesquiterpene lactones and polyacetylenes content. (natureword.com)
  • Although SLs are present in approximately 16 plant families, they are prevalent in Asteraceae family where they can be found in almost all genera, notably in Artemisia , Arnica , Ambrosia , Helenium , Tanacetum , and Vernonia [ 1 , 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This same activity makes arnica useful for irritated insect bites. (medicinehunter.com)
  • Basically, what makes arnica healthy is a combination of naturally-occurring constituents such as volatile essential oils, thymol, sesquiterpene lactones such as helenalin and flavanone glycosides from the flavanoid family. (natureword.com)
  • Pure soy oil is combined with selected botanical massage oils, such as shea butter, arnica, marula, coconut and avocado oil. (thegreentimes.co.za)
  • See also our Arnica Massage Oil with our infused oils on our Carrier Oil page. (naturesgift.com)
  • Not as popular as many other essential oils, arnica oil belongs in every medicine cabinet. (draxe.com)
  • When it comes to carpal tunnel relief , arnica oils is also a smart choice in the natural painkillers department. (draxe.com)
  • 9 Arnica oil contains a compound called helenalin, which may cause allergic reactions in people with sensitivity. (mercola.com)
  • If you develop a mild rash while using arnica oil, you are probably helenalin-sensitive and should stop using the oil. (mercola.com)
  • Studies show that an active component in arnica, called helenalin, impedes the body's inflammatory response to injury by preventing the release of an immune system regulator called NF-kB. (care2.com)