Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Accessory Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the ACCESSORY NERVE. Damage to the nerve may produce weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Olfactory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Nodose Ganglion: The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Muscular Atrophy: Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Community Networks: Organizations and individuals cooperating together toward a common goal at the local or grassroots level.Multi-Institutional Systems: Institutional systems consisting of more than one health facility which have cooperative administrative arrangements through merger, affiliation, shared services, or other collective ventures.Abducens Nerve Injury: Traumatic injury to the abducens, or sixth, cranial nerve. Injury to this nerve results in lateral rectus muscle weakness or paralysis. The nerve may be damaged by closed or penetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA or by facial trauma involving the orbit.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Sphenoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.ArchivesSocial Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Libraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... London J, London NJ, Kay SP (1996). "Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 78 ... Medical procedures are the most common cause of injury to the spinal accessory nerve. In particular, radical neck dissection ...
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve is most commonly caused by medical procedures that involve the head and neck. Injury can ... Weakness in both muscles may point to a more general disease process such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain-Barre ... and accessory nerves. The accessory nerve (top left) travels down through the jugular foramen with the other two nerves, and ... "Is the cranial accessory nerve really a portion of the accessory nerve? Anatomy of the cranial nerves in the jugular foramen". ...
Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A ... Recovery rate also depends on the cause of the facial nerve palsy (e.g. infections, perinatal injury, congenital dysplastic). ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ...
... or any injury that damages the radial nerve. Harm inflicted upon the radial nerve through these mechanisms can paralyze the ... There are no specific acquired injuries that exclusively affect the anconeus muscle; however, any disease that compromises ... muscular functions, particularly arm extension (i.e. muscular dystrophy) will affect this particular accessory muscle. ... from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus called the nerve to the anconeus. The somatomotor portion of radial nerve ...
However, most times it is a nail technician who will note a subtle change in nail disease. Inherited accessory nail of the ... It is the part of the nail bed that is beneath the nail and contains nerves, lymph and blood vessels. The matrix produces cells ... ISBN 0-86577-776-4. Wang, Quincy C; Johnson, Brett A (May 2001). "Fingertip Injuries". American Family Physician. Retrieved 10 ... Nail disease can be very subtle and should be evaluated by a dermatologist with a focus in this particular area of medicine. ...
Accessory nerve disorder. Radiculopathy and plexopathy. *Brachial plexus injury. *Thoracic outlet syndrome ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. References[edit]. *^ Satran, R. (1980). "Dejerine-Sottas Disease Revisited". Archives of Neurology ... On medical imaging, the nerves of the extremities (and cranial nerves in some cases) appear enlarged due to hypertrophy of the ... Dejerine-Sottas disease, also known as, Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy, progressive hypertrophic interstitial polyneuropathy of ...
Nail disease can be very subtle and should be evaluated by a dermatologist with a focus in this particular area of medicine. ... Inherited accessory nail of the fifth toe occurs where the toenail of the smallest toe is separated, forming a smaller "sixth ... Vitamin D and calcium work together in cases of maintaining homeostasis, creating muscle contraction, transmission of nerve ... and the surrounding soft tissues from injuries. It also serves to enhance precise delicate movements of the distal digits ...
... is caused by genetic mutations that cause defects in neuronal proteins. Nerve signals are conducted ... Patients with CMT must avoid periods of prolonged immobility such as when recovering from a secondary injury, as prolonged ... Further information: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease classifications. CMT is a heterogeneous disease and the mutations linked to it ... In 2010, CMT was one of the first diseases where the genetic cause of a particular patient's disease was precisely determined ...
Trauma to the skull, disease of bone such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during neurosurgery (such as tumor removal) ... facial nerve (VII), vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII), glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI), and ... Cranial nerve mnemonics. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Vilensky, Joel; Robertson, ... They are: the olfactory nerve (I), the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), ...
Neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury, phrenic nerve injuries, Guillain-Barré syndrome, amyotrophic lateral ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease[edit]. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), most commonly emphysema ... Other respiratory muscles include the external and internal intercostal muscles, the abdominal muscles and the accessory ... In 85% of cases it is due to asthma, pneumonia, cardiac ischemia, interstitial lung disease, congestive heart failure, chronic ...
Nerve Stretching for the Relief or Cure of Pain 1882 Sir James Paget - Some New and Rare Diseases (Inaugural lecture) "Bradshaw ... Heath, C. (1892). "The Surgery of the Nose and Accessory Cavities: An Abstract of the Bradshaw Lecture delivered at the Royal ... 1916 Charters James Symonds, Laminectomy in Gunshot Injuries of the Spinal Cord 1915 Sir Anthony Bowlby, Wounds in War 1914 Sir ... Some Diseases of the Thyroid Gland 1892 Samuel Gee, On the Signs of Acute Peritoneal Diseases 1891 William Henry Allchin, The ...
... injuries are injuries that affect the nerves that carry signals from the spine to the shoulder. This can be ... Brachial plexus injury affects cutaneous sensations and movements in the upper limb. They can be caused by stretching, diseases ... the trapezius muscle innervated by the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI) and an area of skin near the axilla innervated by the ... the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the median nerve, and the ulnar nerve. Due to both emerging from the lateral cord the ...
The glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves; the sympathetic trunk leaving from the cranial cervical ganglion ... Guttural pouch mycosis (GPM) is a fungal disease that is rare but potentially life-threatening. GPM is of unknown pathogenesis ... This anatomical adaptation acts to protect friable brain tissue from injury due to overheating. Odd-toed perrisodactyls such as ... also if glossopharyngeal nerve is involved); and Horner's syndrome from the involvement of sympathetic nerves. Involvement of ...
... with the most common sources of damage being injury from trauma or surgery, and motor neuron disease. The first recorded ... It then travels close to the vagus nerve and spinal division of the accessory nerve, spirals downwards behind the vagus nerve ... Motor neuron disease is the most common disease affecting the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal nerve is tested by examining ... The hypoglossal nerve may be connected (anastamosed) to the facial nerve to attempt to restore function when the facial nerve ...
The nuclei of the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) are located in ... Diseases of the brainstem can result in abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to visual disturbances, ... braininjuryhelp.com/video-tutorial/brain-injury-help-video-tutorial/ http://www.martindalecenter.com/MedicalAnatomy_3_SAD.html ... Oculomotor nerve nucleus: This is the third cranial nerve nucleus. Trochlear nerve nucleus: This is the fourth cranial nerve. ...
Polysplenia is a congenital disease manifested by multiple small accessory spleens, rather than a single, full-sized, normal ... In mice the spleen stores half the body's monocytes so that upon injury, they can migrate to the injured tissue and transform ... There are other openings present for lymphatic vessels and nerves. Like the thymus, the spleen possesses only efferent ... An accessory spleen is a small splenic nodule extra to the spleen usually formed in early embryogenesis. Accessory spleens are ...
These injuries often lead to a reduced ability to taste and smell. Lesions of the olfactory nerve do not lead to a reduced ... Patients with Alzheimer's disease almost always have an abnormal sense of smell when tested.[2] ... The olfactory nerve is typically considered the first cranial nerve, or simply CN I, that contains sensory nerve fibers ... The olfactory nerve is the shortest of the twelve cranial nerves and, similar to the optic nerve, does not emanate from the ...
Trauma, of course, can cause serious injury to the nerve. Direct optic nerve injury can occur from a penetrating injury to the ... Disease[edit]. Main article: List of eye diseases and disorders. Damage to the optic nerve typically causes permanent and ... The optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve II, or simply as CN II, is a paired nerve that transmits visual information from ... Although glaucoma does eventually damage the optic nerve, it is usually initially a disease of the eye, not of the nerve. ...
Diseases of the nose, accessory sinuses, and nasopharynx RF460-547 Laryngology. Diseases of the throat RG104-104.7 Operative ... Bedsores RL701-751 Diseases due to psychosomatic and nerve disorders. Dermatoneuroses RL760-785 Diseases due to parasites RL790 ... Wounds and injuries RD98-98.4 Surgical complications RD99-99.35 Surgical nursing RD101-104 Fractures (General) RD118-120.5 ... Allergy RC620-627 Nutritional diseases. Deficiency diseases RC627.5-632 Metabolic diseases RC633-647.5 Diseases of the blood ...
Injury of abducent nerve (S04.5) Injury of facial nerve (S04.6) Injury of acoustic nerve (S04.7) Injury of accessory nerve ( ... social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). This page ... Injury of cranial nerves (S04.0) Injury of optic nerve and pathways (S04.1) Injury of oculomotor nerve (S04.2) Injury of ... Injury of ulnar nerve at upper arm level (S44.1) Injury of median nerve at upper arm level (S44.2) Injury of radial nerve at ...
NervesEdit. The reptilian nervous system contains the same basic part of the amphibian brain, but the reptile cerebrum and ... Traumatic injuries on the other hand, form scars that will not allow new scales to form and disrupt the process of ecdysis.[94] ... Paterson, Sue (December 17, 2007). Skin Diseases of Exotic Pets. Blackwell Science, Ltd. pp. 74-79. ISBN 9780470752432. .. ... Turtles have two or more accessory urinary bladders, located lateral to the neck of the urinary bladder and dorsal to the pubis ...
Cutaneous sensation to these areas is via the trigeminal nerve, the attendant nerve of the 1st branchial arch. The final three ... Hawke, M. (2003) Chapter 1: Diseases of the Pinna. Ear Disease: A Clinical Guide. Hamilton, Ontario. Decker DTC. Pinna ... En route accessory auricles (also known as preauricular tags) may be left behind. The first three hillocks are derived from the ... There are various visible ear abnormalities: traumatic injury infection wart, mole, birthmark scars, including keloids cyst ...
The absence or deficit of health is illness which includes disease and injury. Diseases cause symptoms felt, seen or perceived ... Nerves connect the spinal cord and brain to the rest of the body. All major bones, muscles, and nerves in the body are named, ... with the exception of anatomical variations such as sesamoid bones and accessory muscles. Blood vessels carry blood throughout ... Illnesses may be from birth (congenital) or arise later in life (acquired). Acquired diseases may be contagious, caused or ...
Peripheral nerves. *Nerve injury *Peripheral nerve injury. *classification. *Wallerian degeneration. *Injury of accessory nerve ... It accounts for 20% of all cases of cerebrovascular disease in the United States, behind cerebral thrombosis (40%) and cerebral ... Chapter 5, "Pathology of Brain Damage After Head Injury" Cooper P and Golfinos G. 2000. Head Injury, 4th Ed. Morgan Hill, New ... The risk of death from an intraparenchymal bleed in traumatic brain injury is especially high when the injury occurs in the ...
... the accessory nerve) but the second, third and fourth cervical nerves are also involved.[10] Pathologies in these blood and ... Disease of the VIIIth cranial nerve the N. Vestibulocochlearis through trauma, infection, inflammation or neoplasia ... or toxic or traumatic brain injury.[2] A rough categorization discerns between congenital torticollis and acquired torticollis ... "Trochlear Nerve Palsy: Background, History of the Procedure, Problem". 2016-08-12.. Cite journal requires ,journal=. (help). ...
Transvaginal Pudendal Nerve Block. WebMD LLC. [2015-07-19].. *^ Mellion MB. Common cycling injuries. Management and prevention ... Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Causes Prolonged Pudendal Nerve Terminal Motor Latency. Diseases of the Colon & ... 闭孔内肌神经(英语:Obturator internus nerve). *梨状肌神经(英语:Piriformis nerve)). 皮神经(英语:Cutaneous nerve): 股后皮神经(英语:Posterior cutaneous nerve ... 薦神經(英语:Sacral nerve)(S2 ~ S4). 走向. 下直腸神經(英语:Inferior rectal nerves). 會陰神經. 陰莖
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... London J, London NJ, Kay SP (1996). "Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 78 ... Medical procedures are the most common cause of injury to the spinal accessory nerve. In particular, radical neck dissection ...
Accessory Nerve Disease. *Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acute Inflammatory ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
Accessory Nerve Disease. *Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acromegaly. *Acute ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acoustic neuroma. *acromegaly. *acute ...
Accessory Nerve Injury. *Fatigue. Date: 2015-12-28. Interventions: *Behavioral: Therapeutic Exercise ... Accessory Nerve Diseases - 2 Studies Found. Status. Study Recruiting. Study Name: Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital ...
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve is most commonly caused by medical procedures that involve the head and neck. Injury can ... Weakness in both muscles may point to a more general disease process such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain-Barre ... and accessory nerves. The accessory nerve (top left) travels down through the jugular foramen with the other two nerves, and ... "Is the cranial accessory nerve really a portion of the accessory nerve? Anatomy of the cranial nerves in the jugular foramen". ...
It may also result from disease or injury of the olfactory tract, bone disease near the olfactory nerve, disease of the nasal ... accessory sinuses, meningitis, or tumors or syphilis affecting the olfactory nerve. It may rarely represent a conversion ... In rare instances, injury or disease causes such damage to the olfactory nerve that loss of the sense of smell is permanent. ... The olfactory cells are connected to the brain by the first cranial nerve (olfactory nerve). Air currents do not flow directly ...
Sixth-Nerve Palsy, Traumatic. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several ... A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided. ... Trigeminal Nerve Injuries. 4. + + 17. Accessory Nerve Injuries ... Abducens Nerve Injury; Abducens Neuropathy, Traumatic; Sixth-Nerve Palsy, Traumatic. Fast. Hierarchical. ... Diseases. Frequent searches. Medicinal plants. Health topics. Medical dictionary. Health sites. Questions and answers. ...
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acoustic neuroma. *acromegaly. *acute ...
Perhaps most commonly, shoulder dysfunction and pain occur after neck dissection due to accessory nerve injury (11-14). More ... This suggests a role for identification of sentinel levels for first echelon disease assessment using a disease-specific agent ... The marginal mandibular nerve and the accessory nerve are often injured during neck dissection (16). Modified radical neck ... Spinal accessory nerve and lymphatic neck dissection]. Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac 1997;98:138-42. ...
Right Brachial Plexus Stretch Injury - No Text. +. * Right Shoulder Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy and Eden Lange Procedure. $ ...
Accessory Nerve: injuries,Accessory Nerve: anatomy & histology,Suture Techniques,Electromyography,Humans,Iatrogenic Disease, ... Accessory Nerve: injuries, Accessory Nerve: anatomy & histology, Suture Techniques, Electromyography, Humans, Iatrogenic ... Iatrogenic injury to the accessory nerve.. Bostrom, Daniella and Dahlin, Lars LU (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and ... The incidence of such nerve injuries during lymph node biopsies is 3%-10%, but the diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms are ...
Often in degenerative joint disease, secondary degenerative joint. J bone joint surg am. The spinal accessory nerve and ... the work and using the saphenous cutaneous nerve. %, vascular injuries. ... The nerve after before viagra and pics descends through the base of the seven pitchers returned to their purpose; the ... Injury is often not possible to get rid of wastes, respiratory structure and function of surgical decompression of the humeral ...
The doctor may prescribe you with an orthopedic brace or cast in case you are recovering from an injury, require injury ... Back and Abdomen supports are used to care for diseases or deformities in the torso. We have a wide collection or braces and ... tendons and nerves (elements that make the musculoskeletal system). Orthopedic braces, splints and casts help in protecting, ... These supports stabilize, correct and prevent the upper extremities post strains, sprains, dislocation or fracture injuries. We ...
When one of these nerves suffers injury or trauma, surgical treatment may be needed. ... The peripheral nervous system is a network of 43 pairs of motor and sensory nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord to ... Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury. One particular type of peripheral nerve damage is spinal accessory nerve injury. The spinal ... Health Home Conditions and Diseases Peripheral Nerve Injury. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print. The peripheral nervous ...
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acute inflammatory demyelinating ...
In metastatic disease occurs mainly found to half the accessory nerve, motor, vibration, and skin changes. Minimally invasive ... I will try if most important cause fetal head injuries may be a guide, cannulate the pacing wire insulation, and slows as ... Acute accumulation of the disease? Offer small bowel disease, and their doctors. A tight lateral ventricle. Laterally, ... In cognitive therapy or normal hepatic failure of diseases and stomach. The following the mediator of arcane relationships on ...
... the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary. ... To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve ... Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle ... seen after surgical procedures in the posterior cervical triangle for malignant diseases and after penetrating injuries [1, 2 ...
Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury. *Spinal Cord Tumors. *Spinal Cord Tumor - in children ...
... w indications for laparotomy include penetrating injuries, Accessory nerve block. Performed for spasm of trapezius obvious ... disease (e.g. certain skin diseases, metastasis of cancer cells).tein) to interact with adenylate cyclase with resultant Many ... altered pain response (head injury, spinal cord injury, l Dosage: 50 mg orally once daily, increasing up to 200 mg drugs, etc ... medulla w parasympathetic postganglionic nerve endings. (b) w sympathetic postganglionic nerve endings at sweat glands and some ...
Cranial Nerve Diseases. *Abducens Nerve Diseases. *Accessory Nerve Diseases. *Cranial Nerve Injuries ... Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases ... "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" ... "Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ...
64 t3-weighted mri and pet, in the upper spinal accessory nerve, extending from the disease process. 5. Assess for signs and ... Ineffective breathing pattern related to injury. - Mayo Clinic (@MayoClinic) August 19, 2019. Management 1. Diuretics to reduce ... lacrimal nerve, superior ophthalmic vein, trochlear nerve, and the amount of drainage from each of two or three tracheal rings ... Antibiotic ointment is applied on the effective use of additional adjacent nerves and the abdomen (fig. (c) mild redness ...
ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index. ... Injury of cranial nerve (S04). *S04.71XS - Injury of accessory ... Short Description: Injury of accessory nerve, right side, sequela Long Description: Injury of accessory nerve, right side, ... They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) *Injury of ...
Shoulder Dystosia Nerve Avulsion Damage Spinal cord injury Epidural Catheter Coronary Artery Heart Disease ... Centers for Disease Control (CDC) - W.B. Saunders College Publishing. - Workman Publishing. - Nichols -Dezenhall. - StackPole ...
Accessories. Orthobiologics. PART 07: Market segmentation by procedures. Joint replacement and fracture. Nerve diseases and ... Exhibit 35: Number of road injuries reported in UK 2015. Exhibit 36: Revision hip replacement procedures in UK 2014 and 2015. ... Exhibit 11: Market overview: Accessories. Exhibit 12: Global lower extremities accessories market 2016-2021 ($ billions). ... The extremity products are used to treat, repair, replace, or heal extremity injuries such as fractures and damage. These ...
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