Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Platelet Factor 4: A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Platelet Activating Factor: A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.Platelet Function Tests: Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Antigens, Human Platelet: Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein IIb: Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is an integrin alpha subunit that heterodimerizes with INTEGRIN BETA3 to form PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX. It is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain which is then postranslationally cleaved and processed into two disulfide-linked subunits of approximately 18 and 110 kDa in size.Platelet Factor 3: A phospholipid from the platelet membrane that contributes to the blood clotting cascade by forming a phospholipid-protein complex (THROMBOPLASTIN) which serves as a cofactor with FACTOR VIIA to activate FACTOR X in the extrinsic pathway of BLOOD COAGULATION.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y12: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ADP binding and are coupled to GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT, GI. The P2Y12 purinergic receptors are found in PLATELETS where they play an important role regulating PLATELET ACTIVATION.Platelet Storage Pool Deficiency: Disorder characterized by a decrease or lack of platelet dense bodies in which the releasable pool of adenine nucleotides and 5HT are normally stored.Ristocetin: An antibiotic mixture of two components, A and B, obtained from Nocardia lurida (or the same substance produced by any other means). It is no longer used clinically because of its toxicity. It causes platelet agglutination and blood coagulation and is used to assay those functions in vitro.Thrombasthenia: A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).Thrombopoiesis: The process of generating thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW via the MEGAKARYOCYTES. The humoral factor with thrombopoiesis-stimulating activity is designated THROMBOPOIETIN.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic: Any form of purpura in which the PLATELET COUNT is decreased. Many forms are thought to be caused by immunological mechanisms.Cytoplasmic Granules: Condensed areas of cellular material that may be bounded by a membrane.Crotalid Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae or pit vipers, found mostly in the Americas. They include the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, fer-de-lance, bushmaster, and American copperhead. Their venoms contain nontoxic proteins, cardio-, hemo-, cyto-, and neurotoxins, and many enzymes, especially phospholipases A. Many of the toxins have been characterized.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Thromboxanes: Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Platelet-Rich Plasma: A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.Prostaglandin Endoperoxides, Synthetic: Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.Epoprostenol: A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Blood Preservation: The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Bernard-Soulier Syndrome: A familial coagulation disorder characterized by a prolonged bleeding time, unusually large platelets, and impaired prothrombin consumption.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Receptors, Thrombin: A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Plateletpheresis: The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.Apyrase: A calcium-activated enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP and orthophosphate. It can also act on ADP and other nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates. EC 3.6.1.5.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Indium: A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Receptors, Collagen: Collagen receptors are cell surface receptors that modulate signal transduction between cells and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. They are found in many cell types and are involved in the maintenance and regulation of cell shape and behavior, including PLATELET ACTIVATION and aggregation, through many different signaling pathways and differences in their affinities for collagen isoforms. Collagen receptors include discoidin domain receptors, INTEGRINS, and glycoprotein VI.Arachidonic AcidsKinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Receptors, Thromboxane: Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.Hemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Arachidonic Acid: An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.Thrombospondins: A family of related, adhesive glycoproteins which are synthesized, secreted, and incorporated into the extracellular matrix of a variety of cells, including alpha granules of platelets following thrombin activation and endothelial cells. They interact with a number of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS and anticoagulant factors. Five distinct forms have been identified, thrombospondin 1, -2, -3, -4, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). They are involved in cell adhesion, platelet aggregation, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, tumor metastasis, VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE growth, and tissue repair.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Gray Platelet Syndrome: A rare, inherited platelet disorder characterized by a selective deficiency in the number and contents of platelet alpha-granules. It is associated with THROMBOCYTOPENIA, enlarged platelets, and prolonged bleeding time.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Oxyquinoline: An antiseptic with mild fungistatic, bacteriostatic, anthelmintic, and amebicidal action. It is also used as a reagent and metal chelator, as a carrier for radio-indium for diagnostic purposes, and its halogenated derivatives are used in addition as topical anti-infective agents and oral antiamebics.Mean Platelet Volume: A measure of the size of PLATELETS.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).von Willebrand Diseases: Group of hemorrhagic disorders in which the VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR is either quantitatively or qualitatively abnormal. They are usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait though rare kindreds are autosomal recessive. Symptoms vary depending on severity and disease type but may include prolonged bleeding time, deficiency of factor VIII, and impaired platelet adhesion.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Calcimycin: An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Edetic Acid: A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Integrin alpha2: An integrin alpha subunit that primarily combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form the INTEGRIN ALPHA2BETA1 heterodimer. It contains a domain which has homology to collagen-binding domains found in von Willebrand factor.Sulfinpyrazone: A uricosuric drug that is used to reduce the serum urate levels in gout therapy. It lacks anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic properties.Hirudins: Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.Afibrinogenemia: A deficiency or absence of FIBRINOGEN in the blood.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Receptors, Thrombopoietin: Cell surface receptors that are specific for THROMBOPOIETIN. They signal through interaction with JANUS KINASES such as JANUS KINASE 2.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y1: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ATP and ADP. The activated P2Y1 receptor signals through the G-PROTEIN-coupled activation of PHOSPHOLIPASE C and mobilization of intracellular CALCIUM.Integrin alpha2beta1: An integrin found on fibroblasts, platelets, endothelial and epithelial cells, and lymphocytes where it functions as a receptor for COLLAGEN and LAMININ. Although originally referred to as the collagen receptor, it is one of several receptors for collagen. Ligand binding to integrin alpha2beta1 triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling, including activation of p38 MAP kinase.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Receptor, PAR-1: A thrombin receptor subtype that couples to HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS resulting in the activation of a variety of signaling mechanisms including decreased intracellular CYCLIC AMP, increased TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES and increased PHOSPHOLIPASE A2.Receptors, Thromboxane A2, Prostaglandin H2: A subclass of eicosanoid receptors that have specificity for THROMBOXANE A2 and PROSTAGLANDIN H2.Immunoelectrophoresis, Two-Dimensional: Immunoelectrophoresis in which a second electrophoretic transport is performed on the initially separated antigen fragments into an antibody-containing medium in a direction perpendicular to the first electrophoresis.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Factor VIII: Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Prostaglandins H: A group of physiologically active prostaglandin endoperoxides. They are precursors in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. The most frequently encountered member of this group is the prostaglandin H2.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid: A lipoxygenase metabolite of ARACHIDONIC ACID. It is a highly selective ligand used to label mu-opioid receptors in both membranes and tissue sections. The 12-S-HETE analog has been reported to augment tumor cell metastatic potential through activation of protein kinase C. (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1995; 274(3):1545-51; J Natl Cancer Inst 1994; 86(15):1145-51)Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Adenine NucleotidesThromboplastin: Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Mice, Inbred C57BLAntigens, CD31: Cell adhesion molecules present on virtually all monocytes, platelets, and granulocytes. CD31 is highly expressed on endothelial cells and concentrated at the junctions between them.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Dual Specificity Phosphatase 2: A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES and is primarily localized to the CELL NUCLEUS.Integrins: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Thromboxane-A Synthase: An enzyme found predominantly in platelet microsomes. It catalyzes the conversion of PGG(2) and PGH(2) (prostaglandin endoperoxides) to thromboxane A2. EC 5.3.99.5.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Receptors, Prostaglandin: Cell surface receptors that bind prostaglandins with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Prostaglandin receptor subtypes have been tentatively named according to their relative affinities for the endogenous prostaglandins. They include those which prefer prostaglandin D2 (DP receptors), prostaglandin E2 (EP1, EP2, and EP3 receptors), prostaglandin F2-alpha (FP receptors), and prostacyclin (IP receptors).Phosphatidylinositols: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to the hexahydroxy alcohol, myo-inositol. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid, myo-inositol, and 2 moles of fatty acids.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Tyrosine: A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.Fibrinopeptide A: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.Indomethacin: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Calpain: Cysteine proteinase found in many tissues. Hydrolyzes a variety of endogenous proteins including NEUROPEPTIDES; CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS; proteins from SMOOTH MUSCLE; CARDIAC MUSCLE; liver; platelets; and erythrocytes. Two subclasses having high and low calcium sensitivity are known. Removes Z-discs and M-lines from myofibrils. Activates phosphorylase kinase and cyclic nucleotide-independent protein kinase. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.4.22.4.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Purinergic P2 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2 RECEPTORS.Type C Phospholipases: A subclass of phospholipases that hydrolyze the phosphoester bond found in the third position of GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS. Although the singular term phospholipase C specifically refers to an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE (EC 3.1.4.3), it is commonly used in the literature to refer to broad variety of enzymes that specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Microfilament Proteins: Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.Phosphatidic Acids: Fatty acid derivatives of glycerophosphates. They are composed of glycerol bound in ester linkage with 1 mole of phosphoric acid at the terminal 3-hydroxyl group and with 2 moles of fatty acids at the other two hydroxyl groups.Receptors, Purinergic P2: A class of cell surface receptors for PURINES that prefer ATP or ADP over ADENOSINE. P2 purinergic receptors are widespread in the periphery and in the central and peripheral nervous system.Antigens, CD36: Leukocyte differentiation antigens and major platelet membrane glycoproteins present on MONOCYTES; ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; PLATELETS; and mammary EPITHELIAL CELLS. They play major roles in CELL ADHESION; SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION; and regulation of angiogenesis. CD36 is a receptor for THROMBOSPONDINS and can act as a scavenger receptor that recognizes and transports oxidized LIPOPROTEINS and FATTY ACIDS.Thrombocytopenia, Neonatal Alloimmune: A condition in newborns caused by immunity of the mother to PLATELET ALLOANTIGENS on the fetal platelets. The PLATELETS, coated with maternal ANTIBODIES, are destroyed and removed by the fetal MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. Affected infants may have INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Ginkgolides: DITERPENES with three LACTONES and a unique tert-butyl group, which are found in GINKGO plants along with BILOBALIDES.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.HydrazinesBinding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Antigens, CD63: Ubiquitously-expressed tetraspanin proteins that are found in late ENDOSOMES and LYSOSOMES and have been implicated in intracellular transport of proteins.Cyclic GMP: Guanosine cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogen phosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to the sugar moiety in both the 3'- and 5'-positions. It is a cellular regulatory agent and has been described as a second messenger. Its levels increase in response to a variety of hormones, including acetylcholine, insulin, and oxytocin and it has been found to activate specific protein kinases. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Protein Kinase C: An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.Prothrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.Prostaglandin Endoperoxides: Precursors in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes from arachidonic acid. They are physiologically active compounds, having effect on vascular and airway smooth muscles, platelet aggregation, etc.Prostaglandins: A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.Coagulants: Agents that cause clotting.Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Receptors, IgG: Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).Prothrombin: A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Chromium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of chromium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cr atoms with atomic weights of 46-49, 51, 55, and 56 are radioactive chromium isotopes.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Beta-Globulins: Serum proteins with an electrophoretic mobility that falls between ALPHA-GLOBULINS and GAMMA-GLOBULINS.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Viper Venoms: Venoms from SNAKES of the viperid family. They tend to be less toxic than elapid or hydrophid venoms and act mainly on the vascular system, interfering with coagulation and capillary membrane integrity and are highly cytotoxic. They contain large amounts of several enzymes, other factors, and some toxins.Iloprost: An eicosanoid, derived from the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. It is a stable and synthetic analog of EPOPROSTENOL, but with a longer half-life than the parent compound. Its actions are similar to prostacyclin. Iloprost produces vasodilation and inhibits platelet aggregation.Thrombocythemia, Essential: A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.Megakaryocyte Progenitor Cells: The parent cells that give rise to cells in the MEGAKARYOCYTE lineage, and ultimately BLOOD PLATELETS.Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.Phosphatidylserines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.Phospholipases A: Phospholipases that hydrolyze one of the acyl groups of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Heparin Antagonists: Coagulant substances inhibiting the anticoagulant action of heparin.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Partial Thromboplastin Time: The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Phospholipases A2: Phospholipases that hydrolyze the acyl group attached to the 2-position of PHOSPHOGLYCERIDES.Cell Aggregation: The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.Phospholipases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates. EC 3.1.-.Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 12-hydroperoxyarachidonate (12-HPETE) which is itself rapidly converted by a peroxidase to 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoate (12-HETE). The 12-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in PLATELETS.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.PhosphoproteinsCytosol: Intracellular fluid from the cytoplasm after removal of ORGANELLES and other insoluble cytoplasmic components.
It sticks platelets together and promotes clotting; inhibiting this helps prevent heart disease. On the other hand, PTGS2 (COX- ... Wang Q1, He Y, Shen Y, Zhang Q, Chen D, Zuo C, Qin J, Wang H, Wang J, Yu Y. (2014). "Vitamin D inhibits COX-2 expression and ... Consequently, inhibiting PTGS2 (COX-2) may have benefit in the prevention and treatment of these types of cancer. COX-2 ... COX-2 is naturally inhibited by Calcitriol (the active form of Vitamin D). Both the peroxidase and PTGS activities are ...
vasodilation, inhibits platelets and pro-inflammatory cells. role(s) in human disease not yet proven[76][77] ... blood platelet aggregation; blood clotting; allergic reactions. NSAIDs inhibit its production to reduce incidence of strokes ... vasoconstriction, inhibits platelets. inactivating mutations in the 20-HETE-forming enzyme, CYP2U1, associated with Hereditary ... CMKLR1, inhibits BLT, TRPV1, TRPV3, NMDAR, TNFR. inhibits functions of pro-inflammatory cells. Specialized pro-resolving ...
It inhibits platelet activation and is also an effective vasodilator. When used as a drug, it is also known as epoprostenol. ... Sir John and a team from the Wellcome Foundation, had identified a lipid mediator they called "PG-X," which inhibits platelet ... cAMP goes on to inhibit any undue platelet activation (in order to promote circulation) and also counteracts any increase in ... Its production is inhibited indirectly by NSAIDs, which inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzymes COX1 and COX2. These convert ...
"Pamicogrel inhibits platelet aggregation". Inpharma Weekly. 1272 (1): 11. January 2001. doi:10.2165/00128413-200112720-00021. ... Pamicogrel is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor that was under development for its anti-platelet-aggregation effects. Light P ( ...
... a new class of anti-platelet drug. It functions by inhibiting thrombin-related platelet aggregation. This mechanism works by a ... Unlike many other medication, vorapaxar does not affect ADP-mediated platelet aggregation, coagulation parameters, or bleeding ... Vorapaxar is a new anti-platelet drug that is part of the PAR-1 antagonist family, ... different pathway than other anti-platelet medications such as aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors. ...
platelet factor-4. inhibits binding of bFGF and VEGF. TIMP and CDAI. inhibit cell migration of endothelial cells. ... inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of endothelial cells. endostatin. inhibit cell migration, cell proliferation ... inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of endothelial cells. endostatin. inhibit cell migration, cell proliferation ... inhibit cell proliferation of endothelial cells. thrombospondin. inhibit cell migration, cell proliferation, cell adhesion and ...
Furthermore, it is known that nicergoline inhibits platelet aggregation. Studies have shown that nicergoline also increases ... Migraines of vascular origin Coadjutant therapy in clinical situations accompanied by platelet hyper-aggregability, arterial ...
It sticks platelets together and promotes clotting; inhibiting this helps prevent heart disease. On the other hand, PTGS2 (COX- ... Consequently, inhibiting PTGS2 (COX-2) may have benefit in the prevention and treatment of these types of cancer.[30][31] ... positive regulation of platelet-derived growth factor production. • regulation of inflammatory response. • brown fat cell ... COX-2 is naturally inhibited by Calcitriol (the active form of Vitamin D).[10][11] ...
... works by inhibiting the maturation of platelets from megakaryocytes. The exact mechanism of action is unclear, ... It is a potent (IC50 = 36nM) inhibitor of phosphodiesterase-II.[citation needed] It inhibits PDE-3 and phospholipase A2. ... age over 60 years platelet count over 1000×109/L a history of thrombosis According to a 2005 Medical Research Council ... or overproduction of blood platelets. It also has been used in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Anagrelide controlled ...
It inhibits the cellular reuptake of adenosine into platelets, red blood cells, and endothelial cells leading to increased ... It inhibits the replication of mengovirus RNA. It can be used for myocardial stress testing as an alternative to exercise- ... It inhibits proliferation of smooth muscle cells in vivo and modestly increases unassisted patency of synthetic arteriovenous ... cAMP impairs platelet aggregation and also causes arteriolar smooth muscle relaxation. Chronic therapy did not show significant ...
CO inhibits blood platelet aggregation and adhesion. CO may play a role as potential therapeutic agent. In mammals, carbon ... Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to vessel homeostasis by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle contraction and growth, platelet ... Liu D, Huang Y, Bu D, Liu AD, Holmberg L, Jia Y, Tang C, Du J, Jin H (May 2014). "Sulfur dioxide inhibits vascular smooth ... Nitrous oxide also inhibits methionine synthase and slows the conversion of homocysteine to methionine, increases homocysteine ...
CO inhibits blood platelet aggregation and adhesion. CO may play a role as potential therapeutic agent. In mammals, carbon ...
PGE2 and prostacyclin inhibit platelet aggregation and dilate blood vessels. Feeding is almost continuous with pulses of ...
Aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation by inhibiting the action of thromboxane A2. NSAIDs are useful in the management of post- ... the only NSAID able to irreversibly inhibit COX-1, is also indicated for inhibition of platelet aggregation. This is useful for ... Most NSAIDs inhibit the activity of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and thereby the synthesis of ... Antipyretics work by inhibiting the enzyme COX, which causes the general inhibition of prostanoid biosynthesis (PGE2) within ...
It works by irreversibly inhibiting a receptor called P2Y12, on platelets. Clopidogrel was first written about in 1982 and was ... which has no platelet-inhibiting effect, are very low and, in general, are below the quantification limit (0.258 µg/l) beyond ... which is important in activation of platelets and eventual cross-linking by the protein fibrin. Platelet inhibition can be ... As clopidogrel inhibits the liver enzyme CYP2C9 in cellular models, it has been theorized that it might increase blood plasma ...
... especially platelets. Mepacrine is a green fluorescent dye taken up by most cells. Platelets store mepacrine in dense granules ... It also inhibits NF-κB and activates p53. Mepacrine was initially approved in the 1930s as an antimalarial drug. It was used ... 1995). "A flow cytometric assay using mepacrine for study of uptake and release of platelet dense granule contents". Br. J. ... "Lysosomotropic Agents and Cysteine Protease Inhibitors Inhibit Scrapie-Associated Prion Protein Accumulation". J Virol. 74 (10 ...
... they inhibit the function of platelets and therefore may be involved in controlling and prove useful for inhibiting human ... Other platelet-inhibiting dihydroxy-E,Z,E-PUFA are: 10R,17S-dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid (10R,17S- ... 10R,17S-diHDHA and to slightly lesser degrees 10R,17S-diHDHA and PDX inhibit the human platelet aggregation response to ... These E,Z,E PUFA are 20- to 100-fold stronger in inhibiting human platelet aggregation than two mono-hydroxyl-containing ...
... inhibits glucose transport and platelet aggregation. It blocks adenosine-induced apoptotic body formation ... It inhibits cytoplasmic division by blocking the formation of contractile microfilaments. It inhibits cell movement and induces ... Cytokinesis is inhibited, however, mitosis is unaffected. Due to the effects on several cellular functions but lack of general ... Cytochalasin B has been shown to inhibit GLUT1, 2, 3 and 4. Binding to GLUT1 occurs at the inside as cytochalasin B acts as it ...
... inhibits platelet aggregation, as well as decreases capillary permeability, making the blood thinner and improving ... "Apigenin inhibits platelet adhesion and thrombus formation and synergizes with aspirin in the suppression of the arachidonic ... Rutin inhibits aldose reductase activity. Aldose reductase is an enzyme normally present in the eye and elsewhere in the body. ... it has been shown to inhibit in vitro the vascular endothelial growth factor in subtoxic concentrations, so acts as an ...
cAMP inhibits platelet aggregation, and decreased amounts of cAMP in platelets lead to platelet aggregation. The PGE1 reagent ... ASA irreversibly inhibits COX1 in platelets, thereby inhibiting the production of TXA2. The ASA Reagent is used as a quality ... Binding of fibrinogen to GPIIb/IIIa receptors leads to platelet-to-platelet bridges and results in platelet aggregation. ... Drugs that inhibit the GPIIb/IIIa receptor, e.g. eptifibatide, can also reduce or eliminate the ADP-induced platelet response. ...
The VP35 protein directly inhibits the production of interferon-beta. By inhibiting these immune responses, EBOV may quickly ... Blood products such as packed red blood cells, platelets or fresh frozen plasma may also be used. Other regulators of ... Possible non-specific laboratory indicators of EVD include a low platelet count; an initially decreased white blood cell count ... which enables the virus to evade the immune system by inhibiting early steps of neutrophil activation. The presence of viral ...
Because of treprostinil's inhibiting effect on platelet aggregation, there is an increased risk of bleeding, especially among ... Vane and a team from the Wellcome Foundation had identified a lipid mediator they called "PG-X," which inhibited platelet ... Treprostinil also inhibits platelet aggregation and smooth muscle proliferation. The pharmacokinetics of continuous ... "An enzyme isolated from arteries transforms prostaglandin endoperoxides to an unstable substance that inhibits platelet ...
Acts by inhibiting the breakdown of both cAMP and cGMP by the phosphodiesterase (PDE3) enzyme. There is a long-standing ... PDE III is present in cardiac muscle, vascular smooth muscle and platelets. PDE III degrades the phosphodiester bond in cAMP to ... When PDE III is inhibited, cAMP cannot be inactivated. An increase in cAMP with the administration of amrinone in vascular ... Furthermore, PKA phosphorylates and deactivates the phospholambans that inhibit SERCA, which is an enzymatic pump that, to ...
Apo-H also inhibits the generation of factor Xa in the presence of platelets. Apo-H also inhibits that activation of factor ... Nimpf J, Wurm H, Kostner GM (1987). "Beta 2-glycoprotein-I (apo-H) inhibits the release reaction of human platelets during ADP- ... Apo-H appears to completely inhibit serotonin release by the platelets and prevents subsequent waves of the ADP-induced ... 1986). "Prothrombinase activity of human platelets is inhibited by beta 2-glycoprotein-I". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 884 (1): 142 ...
Natural ligands like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were shown to inhibit platelet aggregation and has been identified as a weak ... Activation of platelets and the subsequent aggregation of platelets has a crucical role maintaining normal haemostasis. ... When a vessel is damaged ADP is released from damaged cells and activated platelets, inducing further platelet aggregation. The ... "P2Y12 antibody inhibits platelet activity and protects against thrombogenesis". Biochemical and Biophysical Research ...
The VP35 protein directly inhibits the production of interferon-beta.[95] By inhibiting these immune responses, EBOV may ... Blood products such as packed red blood cells, platelets, or fresh frozen plasma may also be used.[135] Other regulators of ... This enables the virus to evade the immune system by inhibiting early steps of neutrophil activation.[medical citation needed] ... Possible non-specific laboratory indicators of EVD include a low platelet count; an initially decreased white blood cell count ...
When preincubated with a platelet suspension before shearing, IV.3 markedly inhibited shear-induced platelet aggregation (60% ... Cholesterol Depletion Markedly Inhibits GP Ib-IX-V-mediated Adhesion of Platelets to a VWF Surface Under Conditions of Flow. ... Treatment of the platelets with MβCD markedly inhibited their ability to adhere to the A1 surface at both high (1,500 1/s) and ... Cholesterol depletion inhibits platelet adhesion to immobilized VWF-A1 domain. Glass coverslips were coated with VWF A1 domain ...
... Yi Chang,1,2,3 Wei-Fan Chen,3 Kuan-Hung Lin,3 Cheng- ... P. Mangin, Y. Yuan, I. Goncalves et al., "Signaling role for phospholipase Cγ2 in platelet glycoprotein Ibα calcium flux and ... A. Ragab, S. Séverin, M. P. Gratacap et al., "Roles of the C-terminal tyrosine residues of LAT in GPVI-induced platelet ... N. A. Al Awwadi, A. Borrot-Bouttefroy, A. Umar et al., "Effect of armagnac fractions on human platelet aggregation in vitro and ...
... inhibits carboxyl methylation of these proteins in human platelets. Here we show that concentrations of AFC that inhibit Ras ... Protein prenylcysteine analog inhibits agonist-receptor-mediated signal transduction in human platelets.. Huzoor-Akbar1, Wang W ... These findings indicate that AFC inhibits agonist-receptor-mediated signal transduction in human platelets. ... AFC does not inhibit aggregation induced by effectors such as ionomycin, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and bacterial phospholipase ...
Furthermore, platelets from Stxbp5. KO mice had defects in platelet secretion and activation; thus, STXBP5 inhibits endothelial ... transcript variants were detected by RT-PCR using primers flanking splice region in human brain, HUVECs, human platelets, and ... We hypothesized that STXBP5 inhibits endothelial cell exocytosis. We found that STXBP5 is expressed in human endothelial cells ... had higher levels of vWF in the plasma, increased P-selectin translocation, and more platelet-endothelial interactions, which ...
The yellow fluid around tomato seeds appears to suppress platelet activation without affecting blood clotting. This anti- ... The video that I set up the background on the role of platelet activation is Inhibiting Platelet Aggregation with Berries. ... Platelets. 2001 Jun;12(4):218-27. * AK Dutta-Roy. Dietary components and human platelet activity. Platelets. 2002 Mar;13(2):67- ... Platelets. 2001 Jun;12(4):218-27. * AK Dutta-Roy. Dietary components and human platelet activity. Platelets. 2002 Mar;13(2):67- ...
Platelet-rich plasma releasate decreases NFκB activation, a major pathway involved in the pathogenesis of OA. These results ... Platelet-rich plasma releasate counteracts effects of an inflammatory environment on genes regulating matrix degradation and ... Platelet-rich plasma releasate inhibits inflammatory processes in osteoarthritic chondrocytes Am J Sports Med. 2011 Nov;39(11): ... Hypothesis: Platelet-rich plasma inhibits inflammatory effects of interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta on human osteoarthritic ...
of the left lung from platelet-depleted recipient mice (. n. = 5) at 1 day after i.v. injection of platelets (from COX-1-/- or ... Aspirin blocks formation of metastatic intravascular niches by inhibiting platelet-derived COX-1/thromboxane A2. ... Aspirin blocks formation of metastatic intravascular niches by inhibiting platelet-derived COX-1/thromboxane A2. ... B16F10 metastatic lung nodules from platelet-depleted mice reinfused with COX-1 or COX-1-/- platelets (. n. = 8) or COX-1+/+ ...
Aspirin blocks formation of metastatic intravascular niches by inhibiting platelet-derived COX-1/thromboxane A2. ... Aspirin blocks formation of metastatic intravascular niches by inhibiting platelet-derived COX-1/thromboxane A2. ... Inhibition of the COX-1/TXA2 pathway in platelets decreased aggregation of platelets on tumor cells, endothelial activation, ... Thus, platelet-derived TXA2 orchestrates the generation of a favorable intravascular metastatic niche that promotes tumor cell ...
atRA Inhibited Expression of CD62-P and Fibrinogen Binding in Platelets. Platelet activation was investigated by checking ... AtRA also inhibited the expression of P-selectin and fibrinogen binding on platelets and deposition on the intima of the aorta ... Z. S. Huang, C. L. Zeng, L. J. Zhu, L. Jiang, N. Li, and H. Hu, "Salvianolic acid A inhibits platelet activation and arterial ... "Platelet PAR1 receptor density-correlation to platelet activation response and changes in exposure after platelet activation," ...
A Study of the Effects of Inhibiting Platelet Function on Circulating Cancer Cells in Breast Cancer Patients. The safety and ... Mean platelet inhibition vs. time plotted for Plavix & Aspirin Arm and Observation group. Citrated whole blood is added to a ... Platelet Inhibition of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) Measured by the Number of Patients With Detectable CTCs [ Time Frame: ... The Impact Of Platelet Function Inhibition On Circulating Cancer Cells In Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients. ...
NPP-BJ, a nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase from Bothrops jararaca snake venom, inhibits platelet aggregation.. [ ... Depending on the substrate used, dithiothreitol and EDTA differently inhibited the catalytic activity of NPP-BJ. Platelet ... and inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The enzyme, named NPP-BJ, showed an apparent molecular mass of 228 kDa by size ... but interferes with mechanisms of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. ...
... that inhibited human platelet aggregation. PGX was 30 times more potent in this respect than prostaglandin E1. PGX contracted ... An enzyme isolated from arteries transforms prostaglandin endoperoxides to an unstable substance that inhibits platelet ... Prostaglandin endoperoxides cause platelet aggregation possibly through the generation by platelets of thromboxane A2. ... that inhibited human platelet aggregation. PGX was 30 times more potent in this respect than prostaglandin E1. PGX contracted ...
Platelet-inhibiting drug does not significantly reduce pain crises in sickle cell disease. ... "As we learn more about this disease, we are finding that other blood cells beyond red blood cells, including platelets, have ... All patients were monitored for VOCs prompting medical visits and for any increased risk of bleeding due to reduced platelet ... The Determining Effects of Platelet Inhibition of Vaso-Occlusive Events (DOVE) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01794000) was a ...
... ... Our results demonstrated that MP407 dose-dependently inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) ... Platelet hyperactivity plays a critical role for initiating several vascular diseases such as atherothrombosis. Therefore, ... In this study, we investigated the effects of the new synthesized compound, MP407 on platelet aggregation and further ...
Aqueous Extract of Tournefortia sarmentosa Stem Inhibits ADP-induced Platelet Aggregation, L. K. Wang, F. M. Tsai, M. L. Chen, ... Aqueous Extract of Tournefortia sarmentosa Stem Inhibits ADP-induced Platelet Aggregation. L. K. Wang, F. M. Tsai1, S. Wu1,2, M ... reduced platelet aggregation by 15.5 % to 56 % in platelets incubated with A2P5P. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was blocked ... Caffeic acid inhibited P2Y1-induced calcium influx. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with T. sarmentosa, or the components ...
... notably inhibited adhesion. Finally, we investigated their effects on mCRP-induced platelet aggregation. All three small ... notably inhibited adhesion. Finally, we investigated their effects on mCRP-induced platelet aggregation. All three small ... These results highlight the potential of targeted antibodies and small molecule therapeutics to inhibit the binding mCRP via ... Methods: We used three established models (platelet aggregation assay, endothelial leucocyte binding assay and monocyte ...
The thrombin-induced activated PLT-Exo carrying miR-25-3p reduced Adam10 expression to inhibit ox-LDL-induced CVEC inflammation ... Atherosclerosis models were induced in ApoE−/− mice and the peripheral blood platelet exosomes (PLT-Exo) were extracted and ... Atherosclerosis models induced in ApoE-/- mice, the peripheral blood platelet exosomes (PLT-Exo) were extracted and induced by ... Platelet-Derived Exosomal MicroRNA-25-3p Inhibits Coronary Vascular Endothelial Cell Inflammation Through Adam10 via the NF-κB ...
A blood meal-induced Ixodes scapularis tick saliva serpin inhibits trypsin and thrombin, and interferes with platelet ... Our data also show that rIxscS-1E1 may not inhibit chymotrypsin, kallikrein, chymase, plasmin, elastase and papain even at a ... Additionally, rIxscS-1E1 also inhibited, but did not apparently form detectable complexes with, cathepsin G and factor Xa. ... functions by inhibiting the actions of thrombin, trypsin and other yet unknown trypsin-like proteases at the tick-host ...
sMer inhibits platelet aggregation in vitro and protects against fatal thromboembolism in vivo. Because an effect of sMer was ... Mer extracellular domain inhibits platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen and protects mice against collagen- ... A soluble form of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase inhibits macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and platelet aggregation. ... A soluble form of the Mer receptor tyrosine kinase inhibits macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells and platelet aggregation. ...
At a final VCL concentration of 2 μmol/L, platelet adhesion was not inhibited at a shear rate of 300 s−1 but was inhibited by ... Platelet binding studies were performed with platelets washed with Krebs-Ringer buffer at pH 6.5.43 Platelets were resuspended ... and botrocetin-induced platelet aggregation,24 was investigated for its ability to inhibit platelet adhesion. We found a dose- ... R12986 inhibited platelet adhesion in the same range as VCL. The data of Gralnick et al24 and those of Dardik et al,55 combined ...
Interaction with platelet function by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is related to the inhibition of cyclo- ... Abstract: Platelet function is inhibited by non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but not by cyclo-oxygenase-2- ... Platelet aggregation was significantly less influenced, thromboxane levels were less inhibited (246 vs 117 pg/ml) and bleeding ... Interaction with platelet function by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is related to the inhibition of cyclo- ...
AJvW-2, an Anti-vWF Monoclonal Antibody, Inhibits Enhanced Platelet Aggregation Induced by High Shear Stress in Platelet-Rich ... AJvW-2, an Anti-vWF Monoclonal Antibody, Inhibits Enhanced Platelet Aggregation Induced by High Shear Stress in Platelet-Rich ... AJvW-2, an Anti-vWF Monoclonal Antibody, Inhibits Enhanced Platelet Aggregation Induced by High Shear Stress in Platelet-Rich ... AJvW-2, an Anti-vWF Monoclonal Antibody, Inhibits Enhanced Platelet Aggregation Induced by High Shear Stress in Platelet-Rich ...
SU11248 Inhibits KIT and Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor β in Preclinical Models of Human Small Cell Lung Cancer. Tinya ... SU11248 Inhibits KIT and Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor β in Preclinical Models of Human Small Cell Lung Cancer ... SU11248 Inhibits KIT and Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor β in Preclinical Models of Human Small Cell Lung Cancer ... SU11248 Inhibits KIT and Platelet-derived Growth Factor Receptor β in Preclinical Models of Human Small Cell Lung Cancer ...
... induced platelet aggregation; Not active at 110 uM concentration. ... antagonistic ability to inhibit SFLLRN-NH2 (2.7 uM)- ...
Sevoflurane Does Not Inhibit Human Platelet Aggregation Induced by Thrombin Shinji Nozuchi, M.D.; Toshiki Mizobe, M.D., Ph.D.; ... concluding that sevoflurane inhibited human platelet aggregation. However, their study was performed on the platelet ... although it is reported to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Clinically, platelet aggregation is thought to be induced ... Sevoflurane Does Not Inhibit Human Platelet Aggregation Induced by Thrombin You will receive an email whenever this article is ...
  • Platelet adhesion is a first and essential step in the development of a hemostatic plug or a thrombus. (ahajournals.org)
  • ALA impairs arterial thrombus formation, TF expression, and platelet activation and thereby represents an attractive nutritional intervention with direct dual antithrombotic effects. (uzh.ch)
  • Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. (uzh.ch)
  • Upon perfusion of control blood over a collagen surface, pazopanib inhibited thrombus size as well as PS exposure. (vumc.nl)
  • Methanolic extract of Chick (Garden) Peas may have a potential effect in decreased platelet aggregation and inhibited thrombus formation, thus improving blood circulation for prevention of cardiovascular disease, some scientists suggested. (blogspot.com)
  • Additionally, IGF-I has been shown to interact with other stimuli of SMCs replication, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), thrombin, and angiotensin-II, to enhance cellular responsiveness ( 2 , 7 , 8 ). (pnas.org)
  • The cells were stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in the presence or absence of ZR. (kribb.re.kr)
  • ZR inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced cell-proliferation and collagen α1(I) and (IV) mRNA expressions. (kribb.re.kr)
  • NFI-C can inhibit PDGF-induced up-regulation of TβRII and thus reduce the sensitivity of the dermal fibroblasts to TGF-β. (bvsalud.org)
  • Platelets of patients with diabetes are characterized by intensified activation, so 20 diabetics were asked to drink a daily cup of tomato juice for three weeks -or a tomato-flavored placebo beverage and there was a significant drop in platelet activation. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • In addition, platelet procoagulant activity was inhibited in thrombi formed under flow conditions. (vumc.nl)
  • In addition, PrTX-III platelet aggregant activity was inhibited by treatment with HP-2, p-BPB and aristolochic acid, and these results were corroborated by docking scores. (unesp.br)
  • We have previously shown that the prenylcysteine analog N-acetyl-S-trans,trans-farnesyl-L-cysteine (AFC) inhibits carboxyl methylation of these proteins in human platelets. (nih.gov)
  • The most prominent proteins adhesive for platelets in flowing blood are vWF, different types of collagen, fibronectin, and to a lesser extent laminin 4 and thrombospondin. (ahajournals.org)
  • However, when platelets are stimulated by the proteins (and other chemicals) that are released by tissue injuries , they aggregate together to form plugs that can fill breaks in blood vessels and stop bleeding. (citizendium.org)
  • In Sierra Leone during 2015-2018, we assessed LF patients' day-of-admission plasma samples for levels of proteins necessary for coagulation, fibrinolysis, and platelet function. (cdc.gov)
  • Similar impairment of platelet function has been reported by others in baboons given linear G.H.-R.I.H. Infusions in the four healthy men studied also produced abdominal pain, dizziness, and diarrhœa in three, as have been reported in patients similarly infused. (elsevier.com)
  • Coy, D. H. / IMPAIRMENT OF PLATELET FUNCTION BY GROWTH-HORMONE RELEASE- INHIBITING HORMONE . (elsevier.com)
  • We hypothesized that STXBP5 inhibits endothelial cell exocytosis. (jci.org)
  • VCL inhibited adhesion to endothelial cell matrix, which served as a model of the vessel wall. (ahajournals.org)
  • This study was to investigate the effect of capecitabine on recurrent tumor and metastasis after curative resection of liver cancer, xenograft of a highly metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor (LCI-D20), with special reference to the expression of platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF). (aacrjournals.org)
  • In this study, we derived miR-96 and -26a from platelets activated by the anti-β2GPI/β2GPI complex and explored their role in modulating human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and tube formation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Inhibiting Platelet Activation with Tomato Seeds" In the prevention of cardiovascular disease, the consumption of fruits and vegetables is crucial. (increasebloodplatelets.info)
  • Its production is inhibited indirectly by NSAIDs , which inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzymes COX1 and COX2. (wikipedia.org)
  • The compound can inhibit both the activity and the inflammatory metabolic byproducts of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and 5-lipooxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes, as well as other enzymes and hormones that modulate inflammation. (mercola.com)
  • Atherosclerosis models were induced in ApoE −/− mice and the peripheral blood platelet exosomes (PLT-Exo) were extracted and induced by thrombin, followed by co-culture with CVECs. (frontiersin.org)
  • We used three established models (platelet aggregation assay, endothelial leucocyte binding assay and monocyte inflammation via ELISA and Western blotting) to assess the potential of these therapeutics. (frontiersin.org)
  • 2 , 3 Significant improvements in platelet quality and yield will require the ability to assay multiple individual components of the BM microenvironment empirically in high throughput for quantitative improvements in megakaryocyte maturation and proplatelet production before they are incorporated in scaled biomimetic systems. (bloodjournal.org)
  • The PF4-dependent P-selectin expression assay (PEA) using platelets pretreated with low-dose PF4 (PEA, low PF4: 3.75 μg/mL) was performed as previously described 5 (for full details, see supplemental Data available on the Blood Web site). (ashpublications.org)
  • A novel antithrombotic effect of sulforaphane via activation of platelet adenylate cyclase: ex vivo and in vivo studies," Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry , 2012. (hindawi.com)
  • Venous blood (32 ml) was obtained by antecubital venipuncture from healthy volunteers who had not taken any drug known to affect platelet aggregation for at least 2 weeks. (asahq.org)
  • Our work reveals that the platelet-derived growth factor-BB, by inhibiting nociceptive M-type potassium channels, acts as a pain-inducing proinflammatory factor that significantly contributes to inflammatory pain. (lww.com)
  • 16 - 18 Based on our previous observations that ALA reduces platelet reactivity, 10 , 19 and on studies showing the presence of GpIb in lipid rafts, 20 - 22 we hypothesized that ALA might interfere with the distribution of GpIb on the plasma membrane in high-shear flow and, therefore, alter binding to vWF. (haematologica.org)
  • Shear stress-induced platelet aggregation (SIPA), which occurs under abnormally high shear stress, plays a crucial role in the development of arterial thrombotic diseases. (aspetjournals.org)
  • By showing that PTX-2/SAP has dominant therapeutic effects even downstream of TGFβ1 pathways through the ability to inhibit pathologic fibrocytes and macrophages and promote regulatory macrophage function, these results further confirm that Pentraxin-2 regulates fundamental mechanisms of the innate immune system, opening an exciting new approach to treat inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. (phys.org)
  • Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon collagen stimulation are implicated in propagating various platelet-activating pathways. (ewha.ac.kr)