Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.
Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.
'Medical Libraries' are repositories or digital platforms that accumulate, organize, and provide access to a wide range of biomedical information resources including but not limited to books, journals, electronic databases, multimedia materials, and other evidence-based health data for the purpose of supporting and advancing clinical practice, education, research, and administration in healthcare.
Facilities for collecting and organizing information. They may be specialized by subject field, type of source material, persons served, location, or type of services.
Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.
Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.
An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.
A direct communication system, usually telephone, established for instant contact. It is designed to provide special information and assistance through trained personnel and is used for counseling, referrals, and emergencies such as poisonings and threatened suicides.
Substances which, when ingested, inhaled, or absorbed, or when applied to, injected into, or developed within the body in relatively small amounts may, by their chemical action, cause damage to structure or disturbance of function. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.
Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)
Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)
Management of the organization of HEALTH FACILITIES.
A microcomputer-based software package providing a user-friendly interface to the MEDLARS system of the National Library of Medicine.
Reproduction of data in a new location or other destination, leaving the source data unchanged, although the physical form of the result may differ from that of the source.
A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.
A private, voluntary, not-for-profit organization which establishes standards for the operation of health facilities and services, conducts surveys, and awards accreditation.
The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.
Collection and analysis of data pertaining to operations of a particular library, library system, or group of independent libraries, with recommendations for improvement and/or ordered plans for further development.
The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cancer patient.
Process of teaching a person to interact and communicate with a computer.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Procedures, strategies, and theories of planning.
Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.
Specialists in the management of a library or the services rendered by a library, bringing professional skills to administration, organization of material and personnel, interpretation of bibliothecal rules, the development and maintenance of the library's collection, and the provision of information services.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Chicago" is a specific location and a major city in the United States, not a medical term or condition with a defined meaning within the medical field. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition in a singular sentence or otherwise. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or medical terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.
A computer in a medical context is an electronic device that processes, stores, and retrieves data, often used in medical settings for tasks such as maintaining patient records, managing diagnostic images, and supporting clinical decision-making through software applications and tools.
An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
Organized services to provide mental health care.
An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)
Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.
Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.
The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.
The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.
Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.
The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.
Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.
A general concept referring to the organization and administration of nursing activities.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.
Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.
A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
Organized services to provide diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of genetic disorders.
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.
Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.
A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.
The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.
Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.
Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Health care provided to individuals.
The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.
A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.
Organized services to provide immediate psychiatric care to patients with acute psychological disturbances.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.
Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".
Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.
The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place name and not a medical term, so it doesn't have a medical definition. It's the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, culture, and landmarks. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.
Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.
Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.

Information exchange in an epilepsy forum on the World Wide Web. (1/1190)

The Partners Healthcare Epilepsy Service hosts an epilepsy 'Webforum'. In this paper, we describe our observations regarding who uses it, what kind of information is exchanged, how much misinformation is present and how we can better serve our patients. We examined a sample of 155 posts to the forum and 342 responses to those posts. The individual making the post and the type of questions were categorized. We also determined whether any information was objectively inaccurate. The principal users were care-givers (49%) and patients (34%). Eighty percent of the primary posts were questions. Answers were given largely by patients (38%) and care-givers (34%). The most commonly asked questions were about treatment options (31%) and the natural history of the illness (28%). In 20% of the questions, the user incidentally remarked that a health-care provider had not met their information needs. Six percent of the information was objectively inaccurate. The Web can serve as an effective means for the exchange of information between individuals with a common medical condition. We found that a small amount of misinformation is exchanged and that health-care providers are sometimes perceived as unable or unwilling to supply important health-related information.  (+info)

An audit of distribution and use of guidelines for management of head injury. (2/1190)

Ensuring effective distribution of guidelines is an important step towards their implementation. To examine the effectiveness of dissemination of a guidelines card on management of head injury and determine its usefulness to senior house officers (SHOs), a questionnaire survey was performed in May 1990, after distribution of the cards in induction packs for new doctors and at postgraduate lectures and displaying the guidelines in accident and emergency departments and wards. A further survey, in March 1992, assessed the impact of modifying the distribution. All (175) SHOs working in general surgery, accident and emergency medicine, orthopaedics, and neurosciences on 1 February 1990 in 19 hospitals including two neurosurgical units in Northern region were sent self completion questionnaires about awareness, receipt, use, and perceived usefulness of the guidelines. 131 of 163(80%) SHOs in post responded (median response from hospitals 83% (range 50%-100%)). Over three quarters (103, 79%) of SHOs were aware of the guidelines and 82(63%) had ever possessed a guidelines card. Only 36(44%) acquired the card in the induction pack. 92%(98/107) found them useful and 81% (89/110) referred to them to some extent. Owning and carrying the card and referring to guidelines were associated with departmental encouragement to use the guidelines. Increasing the displays of guidelines in wards and departments and the supply of cards to consultants in accident and emergency medicine as a result of this survey did not increase the number of SHOs who received cards (52/83, 63%), but more (71/83, 86%) were aware of the guidelines. The guidelines were welcomed by SHOs and used in treating patients with head injury, but their distribution requires improvement. Increased use of the guidelines may be achieved by introducing other distribution methods and as a result of encouragement by senior staff.  (+info)

Developing countries' health expenditure information: what exists and what is needed? (3/1190)

In the past decade, the scarcity of financial resources for the health sector has increasingly led countries to take stock of national health resources used, review allocation patterns, assess the efficiency of existing resource use, and study health financing options. The primary difficulties in undertaking these analyses have been 1) the lack of information on health expenditures and 2) not using existing information to improve the planning and management of health sector resources. The principle sources of available health expenditure information are reported by organizations such as the World Bank, WHO, UNICEF and OECD. Special studies and non-routine information are a second major source of information. This existing data has a number of difficulties, including being sporadic, inconsistency, inclusion of only national level public expenditure, high opportunity and maintenance costs, quantitative and qualitative differences across countries, and validity and interpretability problems. Reliable health expenditure data would be useful not only for in-country, national purposes, but also for cross-national comparisons and for development agencies. Country uses of health expenditure data include policy formulation and planning and management, while international uses would facilitate examination of cross-national comparisons, reviews of existing programmes and identification of funding priorities. Collaborative efforts between countries and international development agencies, as well as between agencies, are needed to establish guidelines for health expenditure data sets. This development must ensure that the resulting information is of direct benefit to countries, as well as to agencies. Results of such collaborative efforts may include a set of standardized methodologies and tools; standardized national health accounts for developing countries; and training to enhance national capabilities to actively use the information. The opportunities for such collaboration are unique with the issuance of the World Development Report 1993, to build on this work in clearly identifying what is needed and proposing a standardized data set and the tools necessary to regularly and economically gather such data.  (+info)

Comparison of patients' needs for information on prostate surgery with printed materials provided by surgeons. (4/1190)

OBJECTIVES: To identify strengths, weaknesses, and omissions in existing leaflets and factsheets on prostatectomy given by surgeons to patients. DESIGN: Comparison of content of leaflets and factsheets with patients' needs and discontents in a questionnaire survey as part of the national prostatectomy audit. SETTING: All NHS and independent hospitals performing prostatectomy in four health regions. SUBJECTS: 87 surgeons, 53 of whom used printed material to inform patients about their operations; a total of 25 different factsheets being used. 5361 men undergoing prostatectomy were sent a closed response questionnaire about their treatment; 4226 men returned it completed. A random sample of 2000 patients was asked for further comments, of whom 807 supplied pertinent comments. MAIN MEASURES: Content of the 25 factsheets compared with patients' needs identified in the questionnaires. RESULTS: Much of the information distributed had considerable shortcomings: it lacked uniformity in form and content, topics of relevance to patients were omitted, terminology was often poor, and patients' experience was at variance with what their surgeons said. For example, only one factsheet discussed the potential consequences of malignancy. Patients wanted more information on prostate cancer (1250(29%)) and some thought that the explanation of biopsy results was inadequate (29(4%)). Only six factsheets discussed the possible changes in sexual sensation after transurethral resection of the prostate, stating that patients would feel no change. However, 1490(35%) patients reported a change and 500(12%) were worried about it. CONCLUSION: Current standards of printed information do not meet the needs and requirements of patients undergoing prostatectomy.  (+info)

Practice guidelines in Finland: availability and quality. (5/1190)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the quantity, quality, and availability of practice guidelines currently used in Finland. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. METHODS: Guidelines from 1989 to 1995 were collected through a database search, through hand searches of the two Finnish general medical journals, and through an inquiry into hospitals, health centres, and medical societies. The content and source of evidence for guidelines was assessed. RESULTS: 719 practice guidelines were found. 578 guidelines (80%) were retrieved by the inquiry, the database search identified 27 (4%) and hand searches 106 (15%). There were 150 guidelines (21%) developed nationally, 120 (17%) regionally, and 449 (62%) locally. The structure and quality of evidence supporting the guidelines was variable and only two guidelines were based on meta-analysis. The references were significantly more often (P < 0.001) documented in the national guidelines (n = 129, 86%) than in the regional or local guidelines (n = 65, 11%). CONCLUSIONS: There are many ways of disseminating guidelines and it may be difficult for end users to find the appropriate guidelines. Sources of evidence were seldom documented in the regional and local guidelines and even some national guidelines lacked all references. More attention should be paid to documenting the level of evidence, structuring the guidelines, and creating optimal strategies for development and dissemination of guidelines.  (+info)

AIDS information needs: conceptual and content analyses of questions asked of AIDS information hotlines. (6/1190)

Dissemination of accurate information about HIV is an essential element of national AIDS prevention strategies and AIDS telephone hotlines serve a vital function in providing such information. In this study, questions asked of two AIDS information hotlines were collected and examined to determine the AIDS information needs of the general public. Questions asked of local AIDS lines in Houston and Milwaukee (N = 1611) were independently classified into 30 content areas, with two independent raters achieving 94% agreement. The content areas were organized for analysis into 11 broader information domains. Questions about HIV antibody testing were the most frequently asked (27%), followed by questions about sexual transmission of HIV (16%), HIV-related symptoms (16%) and situations that do not confer risk for HIV infection (14%). Content analyses suggested that individuals were motivated to call hotlines by fears of contracting HIV from actual risk behaviors or to dismiss concerns about contracting HIV through casual modes. Many individuals had information needs related to their own personal experiences that could not be addressed through media campaigns or other means of mass public health education. Results suggest that HIV information dissemination to the public through hotlines and other means of direct health education serves both preventive and destigmatizing functions.  (+info)

Reform follows failure: II. Pressure for change in the Lebanese health sector. (7/1190)

This paper describes how, against a background of growing financial crisis, pressure for reform is building up in the Lebanese health care system. It describes the various agendas and influences that played a role. The Ministry of Health, backed by some international organizations, has started taking the lead in a reform that addresses both the way care is delivered and the way it is financed. The paper describes the interventions made to prepare reform. The experience in Lebanon shows that this preparation is a process of muddling through, experimentation and alliance building, rather than the marketing of an overall coherent blueprint.  (+info)

Impact of national immunization days on polio-related knowledge and practice of urban women in Bangladesh. (8/1190)

Bangladesh began to hold National Immunization Days (NIDs) from 1995 as part of the country's goal to eradicate poliomyelitis by the turn of the century. The NIDs brought together government agencies, the media, voluntary organisations and individual volunteers in social mobilization and service delivery activities. This paper assesses the impact of the first two polio NIDs in terms of the immunization coverage and change in knowledge about the disease among women living in Dhaka city, the capital of the country. Data were collected through pre- and post-NID cross-sectional surveys in a sample of one area of Dhaka city which included slum and non-slum households. Knowledge data were collected from 525 women with at least one child aged less than five years. The oral polio vaccine (OPV) coverage during NIDs was obtained from 720 children. Knowledge of polio as a vaccine preventable disease increased after NIDs among both slum and non-slum women. The knowledge gap between the two groups was significantly reduced. Field workers, who regularly visit women at their homes to promote health and family planning services, were the main source of information for the slum women while television was cited as the most important source of information by non-slum women. The study revealed that 88% of children under five years received at least one dose of oral polio vaccine (OPV) during NIDs, and 67% received two stipulated doses with no significant differences between slum (65%) and non-slum (69%) groups. In addition, 68% of the children contacted during the NIDs were given vitamin A supplementation. The study suggests that strategies like NID can be effectively used to tap into community resources and to generate political commitments for health programmes.  (+info)

In the context of healthcare, "Information Services" typically refers to the department or system within a healthcare organization that is responsible for managing and providing various forms of information to support clinical, administrative, and research functions. This can include:

1. Clinical Information Systems: These are electronic systems that help clinicians manage and access patient health information, such as electronic health records (EHRs), computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems, and clinical decision support systems.

2. Administrative Information Systems: These are electronic systems used to manage administrative tasks, such as scheduling appointments, billing, and maintaining patient registries.

3. Research Information Services: These provide support for research activities, including data management, analysis, and reporting. They may also include bioinformatics services that deal with the collection, storage, analysis, and dissemination of genomic and proteomic data.

4. Health Information Exchange (HIE): This is a system or service that enables the sharing of clinical information between different healthcare organizations and providers.

5. Telemedicine Services: These allow remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology.

6. Patient Portals: Secure online websites that give patients convenient, 24-hour access to their personal health information.

7. Data Analytics: The process of examining data sets to draw conclusions about the information they contain, often with the intention of predicting future trends or behaviors.

8. Knowledge Management: The process of identifying, capturing, organizing, storing, and sharing information and expertise within an organization.

The primary goal of healthcare Information Services is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of patient care by providing timely, accurate, and relevant information to the right people in the right format.

Drug Information Services (DIS) are specialized resources within healthcare systems, typically staffed by clinical pharmacists and pharmacy residents, that provide evidence-based information and analysis about medications to healthcare professionals and patients. The primary goal of DIS is to optimize medication use and improve patient outcomes through the provision of accurate, unbiased, and timely information on drug therapy.

DIS commonly provide a range of services, including:

1. Answering medication-related questions from healthcare providers, such as physicians, nurses, and other pharmacists, regarding drug interactions, dosing, adverse effects, and therapeutic alternatives.
2. Developing and maintaining formulary management systems to ensure the safe and cost-effective use of medications within a healthcare institution or system.
3. Providing patient education materials and resources on medication therapy, including proper administration techniques, potential side effects, and storage requirements.
4. Conducting ongoing literature evaluations and synthesizing evidence-based recommendations for medication use in various clinical scenarios.
5. Collaborating with healthcare teams to develop and implement guidelines, policies, and procedures related to medication management and safety.
6. Offering educational programs and resources for healthcare professionals and students to enhance their knowledge of pharmacotherapy and medication safety practices.
7. Participating in multidisciplinary committees focused on improving medication use processes, reducing medication errors, and promoting patient safety.

DIS are essential components of modern healthcare systems, as they help ensure the safe, effective, and efficient use of medications for improved patient outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Library Services" is not a medical term. It generally refers to the various resources, services, and assistance provided by libraries to help individuals access, use, and manage information. This can include book lending, research assistance, database access, interlibrary loan, literacy programs, and more.

If you're looking for a medical term or concept, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate response.

Medical libraries are collections of resources that provide access to information related to the medical and healthcare fields. They serve as a vital tool for medical professionals, students, researchers, and patients seeking reliable and accurate health information. Medical libraries can be physical buildings or digital platforms that contain various types of materials, including:

1. Books: Medical textbooks, reference books, and monographs that cover various topics related to medicine, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and clinical specialties.
2. Journals: Print and electronic peer-reviewed journals that publish the latest research findings, clinical trials, and evidence-based practices in medicine.
3. Databases: Online resources that allow users to search for and access information on specific topics, such as PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library.
4. Multimedia resources: Audio and video materials, such as lectures, webinars, podcasts, and instructional videos, that provide visual and auditory learning experiences.
5. Electronic resources: E-books, databases, and other digital materials that can be accessed remotely through computers, tablets, or smartphones.
6. Patient education materials: Brochures, pamphlets, and other resources that help patients understand their health conditions, treatments, and self-care strategies.
7. Archives and special collections: Rare books, historical documents, manuscripts, and artifacts related to the history of medicine and healthcare.

Medical libraries may be found in hospitals, medical schools, research institutions, and other healthcare settings. They are staffed by trained librarians and information specialists who provide assistance with locating, accessing, and evaluating information resources. Medical libraries play a critical role in supporting evidence-based medicine, continuing education, and patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Information Centers" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broad context, information centers can refer to organized locations that provide specific health-related or medical information to patients, healthcare professionals, or the general public. These can be found in hospitals, clinics, universities, government agencies, and other organizations. They offer access to various resources such as books, pamphlets, databases, and online tools, with the aim of promoting evidence-based practices, enhancing knowledge, and supporting decision-making.

A hospital library, also known as a health sciences library or medical library, is a type of specialized library that serves the information needs of healthcare professionals, patients, students, and researchers in a hospital or healthcare facility. These libraries typically contain a wide range of resources related to medicine, nursing, allied health professions, and healthcare administration.

The resources available in a hospital library may include:

1. Print materials such as medical textbooks, journals, reference books, and patient education materials.
2. Electronic resources such as e-books, electronic journals, databases, and multimedia resources.
3. Audiovisual materials such as DVDs, CDs, and streaming media related to medical education and patient care.
4. Clinical decision support tools that help healthcare professionals make informed clinical decisions at the point of care.
5. Access to online learning platforms and continuing education resources for healthcare professionals.
6. Services such as literature searching, document delivery, interlibrary loan, and reference assistance.

Hospital libraries play a critical role in supporting patient care, medical education, research, and evidence-based practice in healthcare facilities. They provide access to high-quality, reliable information that helps healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care, stay up-to-date with the latest research and best practices, and improve their knowledge and skills. Hospital libraries also provide resources and services that help patients and their families make informed decisions about their health and treatment options.

Poison Control Centers are specialized organizations that provide immediate, free, and expert advice and treatment recommendations for exposure to potentially harmful substances, also known as poisons. They are staffed by trained healthcare professionals, including medical toxicologists, nurses, pharmacists, and poison information providers. These centers manage a wide range of poisoning cases, from accidental ingestions in children to intentional overdoses and chemical exposures in adults. They offer 24/7 emergency hotline services to the public, healthcare providers, and first responders for poison-related emergencies and provide valuable resources for poison prevention and education. The primary goal of Poison Control Centers is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with poison exposures and promote overall public health and safety.

I apologize for any confusion, but "hotlines" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Generally, a hotline refers to a direct communication link, often a telephone number, that provides immediate access to certain services or information. In a medical context, there could be various hotlines such as poison control hotline, mental health crisis hotline, or a hotline for reporting adverse effects of medications. However, the term "hotlines" itself is not a medical term with a specific definition.

A poison is defined in the context of medicine as any substance that, when introduced into or absorbed by a living organism, causes injury, illness, or death. Poisons can be solids, liquids, or gases and can enter the body through various routes such as ingestion, inhalation, injection, or absorption through the skin. They work by disrupting normal physiological processes, damaging cells, or interfering with the functioning of enzymes or signaling molecules. Examples of poisons include heavy metals like lead and mercury, certain plants and mushrooms, some medications when taken in excessive amounts, and various chemicals found in household and industrial products.

In the context of healthcare, an Information System (IS) is a set of components that work together to collect, process, store, and distribute health information. This can include hardware, software, data, people, and procedures that are used to create, process, and communicate information.

Healthcare IS support various functions within a healthcare organization, such as:

1. Clinical information systems: These systems support clinical workflows and decision-making by providing access to patient records, order entry, results reporting, and medication administration records.
2. Financial information systems: These systems manage financial transactions, including billing, claims processing, and revenue cycle management.
3. Administrative information systems: These systems support administrative functions, such as scheduling appointments, managing patient registration, and tracking patient flow.
4. Public health information systems: These systems collect, analyze, and disseminate public health data to support disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, and population health management.

Healthcare IS must comply with various regulations, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which governs the privacy and security of protected health information (PHI). Effective implementation and use of healthcare IS can improve patient care, reduce errors, and increase efficiency within healthcare organizations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Online Systems" is not a medical term. It generally refers to computer systems or networks that are connected to the internet and can be accessed remotely. In a medical context, it could refer to various online tools and platforms used in healthcare, such as electronic health records, telemedicine systems, or medical research databases. However, without more specific context, it's difficult to provide an accurate medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Libraries" is not a term that has a medical definition. A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a community for reference or borrowing. This can include books, magazines, audio visual materials, and digital resources. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Health facility administration refers to the management and oversight of medical and healthcare facilities, including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and other types of healthcare organizations. This involves ensuring that the facility is run efficiently and effectively, with a focus on providing high-quality patient care and maintaining compliance with relevant laws and regulations.

Health facility administration typically includes a wide range of responsibilities, such as:

* Developing and implementing policies and procedures
* Managing budgets and finances
* Overseeing staff recruitment, training, and performance evaluation
* Ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and standards
* Coordinating with other healthcare professionals and organizations to provide comprehensive care
* Planning and coordinating facility operations and resources
* Developing and implementing quality improvement initiatives

Health facility administrators must have a strong understanding of medical and healthcare practices and procedures, as well as business and management principles. They must be able to communicate effectively with staff, patients, and other stakeholders, and be skilled in problem-solving, decision-making, and leadership. Many health facility administrators have a background in healthcare or business administration, and may hold degrees such as a Master of Health Administration (MHA) or a Master of Business Administration (MBA).

I'm not aware of a medical definition for the term "Grateful Med." It may be a reference to a computer program called GRATEFUL MED, which was developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) in the 1980s. The program provided access to biomedical and health information, including citations from MEDLINE and other NLM databases. It was designed to be user-friendly and accessible for healthcare professionals, researchers, and the general public. However, it is no longer available or supported by the NLM.

I could not find a specific medical definition for "copying processes" as it is a fairly broad and non-specific term. However, in the context of biology and genetics, copying processes often refer to the mechanisms by which cells replicate their genetic material, specifically DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) during the cell cycle.

The main process involved in copying genetic material is called replication. During replication, an enzyme called helicase unwinds the double helix structure of DNA, and another enzyme called polymerase reads the template strand and synthesizes a new complementary strand. This results in two identical copies of the original DNA molecule.

In addition to DNA replication, there are other copying processes that occur in cells, such as transcription, which is the process by which the genetic information in DNA is copied into RNA (ribonucleic acid) molecules, and translation, which is the process by which the genetic code in RNA is translated into proteins.

It's worth noting that errors or mutations can occur during these copying processes, leading to changes in the genetic material that can have consequences for the function of cells and organisms.

MEDLARS (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System) is a computerized system for searching, retrieving, and disseminating biomedical literature. It was developed by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) in the 1960s as a tool to help medical professionals quickly and efficiently search through large volumes of medical literature.

The MEDLARS system includes several databases, including MEDLINE, which contains citations and abstracts from biomedical journals published worldwide. The system uses a controlled vocabulary thesaurus called Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) to help users find relevant articles by searching for specific medical concepts and keywords.

MEDLARS was eventually replaced by the more advanced online database system known as PubMed, which is now widely used by healthcare professionals, researchers, and students to search for biomedical literature. However, the term "MEDLARS" is still sometimes used to refer to the older system or to describe the process of searching medical databases using controlled vocabulary terms.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) is a non-profit organization in the United States that evaluates and accredits healthcare services and organizations. It was originally established in 1951 as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAH), and changed its name to JCAHO in 1987 to reflect its expansion beyond hospital accreditation to include other types of healthcare organizations. In 2007, the organization became known simply as "The Joint Commission."

The Joint Commission's mission is to continuously improve the safety and quality of care provided by healthcare organizations through evaluation, accreditation, and education. It accomplishes this by setting standards for healthcare services and facilities, and then conducting unannounced surveys to assess whether these standards are being met. The survey process includes an on-site review of the organization's policies, procedures, and practices, as well as interviews with staff, patients, and their families.

Healthcare organizations that meet or exceed The Joint Commission's standards can earn accreditation, which is recognized as a mark of quality by consumers, insurers, and regulatory bodies. Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations choose to participate because it demonstrates their commitment to excellence and helps them identify areas for improvement.

In addition to hospital accreditation, The Joint Commission also offers accreditation programs for ambulatory care facilities, behavioral health care organizations, home health agencies, laboratories, long-term care facilities, and office-based surgery practices.

Consumer advocacy in a medical context refers to the process of representing and supporting the rights and interests of patients and healthcare consumers. Consumer advocates work to ensure that individuals receive safe, effective, and affordable healthcare services, and that they are empowered to make informed decisions about their own care. This may involve promoting transparency and accountability in the healthcare system, advocating for policies that protect patient rights, and providing education and support to help consumers navigate the complex world of healthcare. Consumer advocacy can take many forms, including individual case advocacy, class action lawsuits, policy reform efforts, and public awareness campaigns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Library Surveys" is not a recognized medical term or concept. It seems that there might be a misunderstanding, as "library surveys" typically refers to the process of gathering information or data from library users or communities about their needs, experiences, and satisfaction with library resources, services, and facilities.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or healthcare concepts, please let me know and I would be happy to help.

An Oncology Service in a hospital refers to the specialized department or unit that provides comprehensive cancer care and treatment. It is typically staffed with various healthcare professionals such as medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgical oncologists, oncology nurses, radiologists, pathologists, social workers, and psychologists who work together to provide a multidisciplinary approach to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care.

The oncology service may offer various treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, hormone therapy, and surgery, depending on the type and stage of cancer. They also provide supportive care services like pain management, nutritional support, and rehabilitation to help patients manage symptoms and improve their quality of life during and after treatment.

Overall, an Oncology Service in a hospital is dedicated to providing compassionate and evidence-based cancer care to patients and their families throughout the entire cancer journey.

Computer user training is the process of teaching individuals how to use computer software, hardware, and systems effectively and safely. This type of training can include a variety of topics, such as:

* Basic computer skills, such as using a mouse and keyboard
* Operating system fundamentals, including file management and navigation
* Application-specific training for software such as Microsoft Office or industry-specific programs
* Cybersecurity best practices to protect against online threats
* Data privacy and compliance regulations related to computer use

The goal of computer user training is to help individuals become proficient and confident in their ability to use technology to perform their job duties, communicate with others, and access information. Effective computer user training can lead to increased productivity, reduced errors, and improved job satisfaction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Computer communication networks (CCN) refer to the interconnected systems or groups of computers that are able to communicate and share resources and information with each other. These networks may be composed of multiple interconnected devices, including computers, servers, switches, routers, and other hardware components. The connections between these devices can be established through various types of media, such as wired Ethernet cables or wireless Wi-Fi signals.

CCNs enable the sharing of data, applications, and services among users and devices, and they are essential for supporting modern digital communication and collaboration. Some common examples of CCNs include local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and the Internet. These networks can be designed and implemented in various topologies, such as star, ring, bus, mesh, and tree configurations, to meet the specific needs and requirements of different organizations and applications.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that "planning techniques" is not a medical term per se. However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, planning techniques can refer to various methods and approaches used to organize, coordinate, and implement care plans for patients. These techniques are often utilized by healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and social workers, to ensure that patients receive high-quality, evidence-based care that meets their individual needs and goals.

Here are some examples of planning techniques commonly used in healthcare:

1. Advance Care Planning (ACP): A process that helps individuals plan for future medical care in the event they become unable to make decisions for themselves. This can include creating an advance directive, such as a living will or healthcare power of attorney.
2. Goal-Setting: A collaborative process between patients and healthcare providers to establish specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) goals for treatment and care.
3. Care Mapping: A visual tool used to map out a patient's care plan, including their medical history, diagnoses, treatments, and support needs. This can help healthcare providers coordinate care and ensure that all team members are on the same page.
4. Root Cause Analysis (RCA): A problem-solving technique used to identify the underlying causes of medical errors or adverse events, with the goal of preventing similar incidents from occurring in the future.
5. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A proactive risk assessment tool used to identify potential failures in a system or process, and to develop strategies to mitigate those risks.
6. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Cycle: A continuous quality improvement technique that involves planning a change, implementing the change, studying its effects, and then acting on the results to make further improvements.

These are just a few examples of the many planning techniques used in healthcare. The specific methods and approaches used will depend on the individual patient's needs, as well as the context and resources available within the healthcare system.

A database, in the context of medical informatics, is a structured set of data organized in a way that allows for efficient storage, retrieval, and analysis. Databases are used extensively in healthcare to store and manage various types of information, including patient records, clinical trials data, research findings, and genetic data.

As a topic, "Databases" in medicine can refer to the design, implementation, management, and use of these databases. It may also encompass issues related to data security, privacy, and interoperability between different healthcare systems and databases. Additionally, it can involve the development and application of database technologies for specific medical purposes, such as clinical decision support, outcomes research, and personalized medicine.

Overall, databases play a critical role in modern healthcare by enabling evidence-based practice, improving patient care, advancing medical research, and informing health policy decisions.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Health services refer to the delivery of healthcare services, including preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. These services are typically provided by health professionals such as doctors, nurses, and allied health personnel in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and long-term care facilities. Health services may also include public health activities such as health education, surveillance, and health promotion programs aimed at improving the health of populations. The goal of health services is to promote and restore health, prevent disease and injury, and improve the quality of life for individuals and communities.

Community-institutional relations in a medical context generally refers to the interactions and relationships between healthcare institutions, such as hospitals or clinics, and the communities they serve. This can include initiatives and programs aimed at promoting community health, addressing social determinants of health, and building trust and engagement with community members. It may also involve collaborations and partnerships with other organizations, such as community-based organizations, public health agencies, and local government entities, to address shared health concerns and improve overall community wellbeing. Effective community-institutional relations can help to ensure that healthcare institutions are responsive to the needs of their communities and contribute to positive health outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Academic medical centers (AMCs) are institutions that combine medical care, research, and education in a single setting. They are typically affiliated with a medical school and often serve as teaching hospitals for medical students, residents, and fellows. AMCs are dedicated to providing high-quality patient care while also advancing medical knowledge through research and training the next generation of healthcare professionals.

AMCs often have a strong focus on cutting-edge medical technology, innovative treatments, and clinical trials. They may also be involved in community outreach programs and provide specialized care for complex medical conditions that may not be available at other hospitals or healthcare facilities. Additionally, AMCs often have robust research programs focused on developing new drugs, therapies, and medical devices to improve patient outcomes and advance the field of medicine.

Overall, academic medical centers play a critical role in advancing medical knowledge, improving patient care, and training future healthcare professionals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Librarians" is not a term related to medical definition. It refers to a professional who works in a library and are responsible for managing and maintaining collections of books and other media, as well as providing assistance and guidance to people who use the library. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead.

I apologize, but "Chicago" is not a medical term or concept. Chicago is the largest city in the state of Illinois and the third-most populous city in the United States. It's known for its impressive architecture, vibrant arts scene, and significant contributions to American culture, including jazz music, improvisational theater, and culinary innovations like deep-dish pizza and the Chicago-style hot dog.

If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, please feel free to ask!

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

A computer is a programmable electronic device that can store, retrieve, and process data. It is composed of several components including:

1. Hardware: The physical components of a computer such as the central processing unit (CPU), memory (RAM), storage devices (hard drive or solid-state drive), and input/output devices (monitor, keyboard, and mouse).
2. Software: The programs and instructions that are used to perform specific tasks on a computer. This includes operating systems, applications, and utilities.
3. Input: Devices or methods used to enter data into a computer, such as a keyboard, mouse, scanner, or digital camera.
4. Processing: The function of the CPU in executing instructions and performing calculations on data.
5. Output: The results of processing, which can be displayed on a monitor, printed on paper, or saved to a storage device.

Computers come in various forms and sizes, including desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. They are used in a wide range of applications, from personal use for communication, entertainment, and productivity, to professional use in fields such as medicine, engineering, finance, and education.

Mental health services refer to the various professional health services designed to treat and support individuals with mental health conditions. These services are typically provided by trained and licensed mental health professionals, such as psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health counselors, and marriage and family therapists. The services may include:

1. Assessment and diagnosis of mental health disorders
2. Psychotherapy or "talk therapy" to help individuals understand and manage their symptoms
3. Medication management for mental health conditions
4. Case management and care coordination to connect individuals with community resources and support
5. Psychoeducation to help individuals and families better understand mental health conditions and how to manage them
6. Crisis intervention and stabilization services
7. Inpatient and residential treatment for severe or chronic mental illness
8. Prevention and early intervention services to identify and address mental health concerns before they become more serious
9. Rehabilitation and recovery services to help individuals with mental illness achieve their full potential and live fulfilling lives in the community.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "telephone" is not a medical term. In general, it refers to a communication device that converts sound into electrical signals that can be transmitted over distances and then converts received electrical signals back into sounds. It allows people to communicate with each other remotely by speaking and listening.

However, in the context of healthcare, "telephone" may refer to a method of delivering healthcare services remotely through voice communication. This is often a part of telemedicine or telehealth services, where patients can consult with healthcare professionals over the phone.

Family planning services refer to comprehensive healthcare programs and interventions that aim to help individuals and couples prevent or achieve pregnancies, according to their desired number and spacing of children. These services typically include:

1. Counseling and education: Providing information about various contraceptive methods, their effectiveness, side effects, and appropriate use. This may also include counseling on reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and preconception care.
2. Contraceptive services: Making a wide range of contraceptive options available to clients, including barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormonal methods (pills, patches, injectables, implants), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and permanent methods (tubal ligation, vasectomy).
3. Screening and testing: Offering STI screening and testing, as well as cervical cancer screening for eligible clients.
4. Preconception care: Providing counseling and interventions to help women achieve optimal health before becoming pregnant, including folic acid supplementation, management of chronic conditions, and avoidance of harmful substances (tobacco, alcohol, drugs).
5. Fertility services: Addressing infertility issues through diagnostic testing, counseling, and medical or surgical treatments when appropriate.
6. Menstrual regulation: Providing manual vacuum aspiration or medication to safely and effectively manage incomplete miscarriages or unwanted pregnancies within the first trimester.
7. Pregnancy options counseling: Offering unbiased information and support to help individuals make informed decisions about their pregnancy, including parenting, adoption, or abortion.
8. Community outreach and education: Engaging in community-based initiatives to increase awareness of family planning services and promote reproductive health.
9. Advocacy: Working to remove barriers to accessing family planning services, such as policy changes, reducing stigma, and increasing funding for programs.

Family planning services are an essential component of sexual and reproductive healthcare and contribute significantly to improving maternal and child health outcomes, reducing unintended pregnancies, and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their reproductive lives.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Medline is not a medical condition or term, but rather a biomedical bibliographic database, which is a component of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM)'s PubMed system. It contains citations and abstracts from scientific literature in the fields of life sciences, biomedicine, and clinical medicine, with a focus on articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Medline covers a wide range of topics, including research articles, reviews, clinical trials, and case reports. The database is updated daily and provides access to over 26 million references from the years 1946 to the present. It's an essential resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and students in the biomedical field.

Health education is the process of providing information and strategies to individuals and communities about how to improve their health and prevent disease. It involves teaching and learning activities that aim to empower people to make informed decisions and take responsible actions regarding their health. Health education covers a wide range of topics, including nutrition, physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, mental health, substance abuse prevention, and environmental health. The ultimate goal of health education is to promote healthy behaviors and lifestyles that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life.

'Information Storage and Retrieval' in the context of medical informatics refers to the processes and systems used for the recording, storing, organizing, protecting, and retrieving electronic health information (e.g., patient records, clinical data, medical images) for various purposes such as diagnosis, treatment planning, research, and education. This may involve the use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, databases, data warehouses, and other digital technologies that enable healthcare providers to access and share accurate, up-to-date, and relevant information about a patient's health status, medical history, and care plan. The goal is to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and coordination of healthcare delivery by providing timely and evidence-based information to support clinical decision-making and patient engagement.

Home care services, also known as home health care, refer to a wide range of health and social services delivered at an individual's residence. These services are designed to help people who have special needs or disabilities, those recovering from illness or surgery, and the elderly or frail who require assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) or skilled nursing care.

Home care services can include:

1. Skilled Nursing Care: Provided by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to administer medications, wound care, injections, and other medical treatments. They also monitor the patient's health status, provide education on disease management, and coordinate with other healthcare professionals.
2. Therapy Services: Occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists help patients regain strength, mobility, coordination, balance, and communication skills after an illness or injury. They develop personalized treatment plans to improve the patient's ability to perform daily activities independently.
3. Personal Care/Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs): Home health aides and personal care assistants provide assistance with bathing, dressing, grooming, toileting, and other personal care tasks. They may also help with light housekeeping, meal preparation, and shopping.
4. Social Work Services: Provided by licensed social workers who assess the patient's psychosocial needs, connect them to community resources, and provide counseling and support for patients and their families.
5. Nutritional Support: Registered dietitians evaluate the patient's nutritional status, develop meal plans, and provide education on special diets or feeding techniques as needed.
6. Telehealth Monitoring: Remote monitoring of a patient's health status using technology such as video conferencing, wearable devices, or mobile apps to track vital signs, medication adherence, and symptoms. This allows healthcare providers to monitor patients closely and adjust treatment plans as necessary without requiring in-person visits.
7. Hospice Care: End-of-life care provided in the patient's home to manage pain, provide emotional support, and address spiritual needs. The goal is to help the patient maintain dignity and quality of life during their final days.
8. Respite Care: Temporary relief for family caregivers who need a break from caring for their loved ones. This can include short-term stays in assisted living facilities or hiring professional caregivers to provide in-home support.

Patient education, as defined by the US National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), is "the teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs. It includes the patient's understanding of his or her condition and the necessary procedures for self, assisted, or professional care." This encompasses a wide range of activities and interventions aimed at helping patients and their families understand their medical conditions, treatment options, self-care skills, and overall health management. Effective patient education can lead to improved health outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, and better use of healthcare resources.

Health services research (HSR) is a multidisciplinary field of scientific investigation that studies how social factors, financing systems, organizational structures and processes, health technologies, and personal behaviors affect access to healthcare, the quality and cost of care, and ultimately, our health and well-being. The goal of HSR is to inform policy and practice, improve system performance, and enhance the health and well-being of individuals and communities. It involves the use of various research methods, including epidemiology, biostatistics, economics, sociology, management science, political science, and psychology, to answer questions about the healthcare system and how it can be improved.

Examples of HSR topics include:

* Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different healthcare interventions and technologies
* Studying patient-centered care and patient experiences with the healthcare system
* Examining healthcare workforce issues, such as shortages of primary care providers or the impact of nurse-to-patient ratios on patient outcomes
* Investigating the impact of health insurance design and financing systems on access to care and health disparities
* Analyzing the organization and delivery of healthcare services in different settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities
* Identifying best practices for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing medical errors, and eliminating wasteful or unnecessary care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

Community health services refer to a type of healthcare delivery that is organized around the needs of a specific population or community, rather than individual patients. These services are typically focused on preventive care, health promotion, and improving access to care for underserved populations. They can include a wide range of services, such as:

* Primary care, including routine check-ups, immunizations, and screenings
* Dental care
* Mental health and substance abuse treatment
* Public health initiatives, such as disease prevention and health education programs
* Home health care and other supportive services for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities
* Health services for special populations, such as children, the elderly, or those living in rural areas

The goal of community health services is to improve the overall health of a population by addressing the social, economic, and environmental factors that can impact health. This approach recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining a person's health outcomes, and that other factors such as housing, education, and income also play important roles. By working to address these underlying determinants of health, community health services aim to improve the health and well-being of entire communities.

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Rural health services refer to the healthcare delivery systems and facilities that are located in rural areas and are designed to meet the unique health needs of rural populations. These services can include hospitals, clinics, community health centers, mental health centers, and home health agencies, as well as various programs and initiatives aimed at improving access to care, addressing health disparities, and promoting health and wellness in rural communities.

Rural health services are often characterized by longer travel distances to healthcare facilities, a greater reliance on primary care and preventive services, and a higher prevalence of certain health conditions such as chronic diseases, injuries, and mental health disorders. As a result, rural health services must be tailored to address these challenges and provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible care to rural residents.

In many countries, rural health services are supported by government policies and programs aimed at improving healthcare infrastructure, workforce development, and telehealth technologies in rural areas. These efforts are critical for ensuring that all individuals, regardless of where they live, have access to the healthcare services they need to maintain their health and well-being.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

"Health services for the aged" is a broad term that refers to medical and healthcare services specifically designed to meet the unique needs of elderly individuals. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), health services for the aged should be "age-friendly" and "person-centered," meaning they should take into account the physical, mental, and social changes that occur as people age, as well as their individual preferences and values.

These services can include a range of medical and healthcare interventions, such as:

* Preventive care, including vaccinations, cancer screenings, and other routine check-ups
* Chronic disease management, such as treatment for conditions like diabetes, heart disease, or arthritis
* Rehabilitation services, such as physical therapy or occupational therapy, to help elderly individuals maintain their mobility and independence
* Palliative care and end-of-life planning, to ensure that elderly individuals receive compassionate and supportive care in their final days
* Mental health services, including counseling and therapy for conditions like depression or anxiety
* Social services, such as transportation assistance, meal delivery, or home care, to help elderly individuals maintain their quality of life and independence.

Overall, the goal of health services for the aged is to promote healthy aging, prevent disease and disability, and provide high-quality, compassionate care to elderly individuals, in order to improve their overall health and well-being.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

Child health services refer to a range of medical and supportive services designed to promote the physical, mental, and social well-being of children from birth up to adolescence. These services aim to prevent or identify health problems early, provide treatment and management for existing conditions, and support healthy growth and development.

Examples of child health services include:

1. Well-child visits: Regular checkups with a pediatrician or other healthcare provider to monitor growth, development, and overall health.
2. Immunizations: Vaccinations to protect against infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and hepatitis B.
3. Screening tests: Blood tests, hearing and vision screenings, and other diagnostic tests to identify potential health issues early.
4. Developmental assessments: Evaluations of a child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development to ensure they are meeting age-appropriate milestones.
5. Dental care: Preventive dental services such as cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants, as well as restorative care for cavities or other dental problems.
6. Mental health services: Counseling, therapy, and medication management for children experiencing emotional or behavioral challenges.
7. Nutrition counseling: Education and support to help families make healthy food choices and promote good nutrition.
8. Chronic disease management: Coordinated care for children with ongoing medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or cerebral palsy.
9. Injury prevention: Programs that teach parents and children about safety measures to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.
10. Public health initiatives: Community-based programs that promote healthy lifestyles, provide access to healthcare services, and address social determinants of health such as poverty, housing, and education.

Reproductive health services refer to the provision of health care services that aim to enhance reproductive health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), reproductive health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes.

Reproductive health services may include:

1. Family planning: This includes counseling, education, and provision of contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote planned pregnancies.
2. Maternal and newborn health: This includes antenatal care, delivery services, postnatal care, and newborn care to ensure safe pregnancy and childbirth.
3. Sexual health: This includes counseling, testing, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, and education on sexual health and responsible sexual behavior.
4. Infertility services: This includes diagnosis and treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).
5. Abortion services: This includes safe abortion services, post-abortion care, and counseling to prevent unsafe abortions and reduce maternal mortality and morbidity.
6. Menstrual health: This includes providing access to menstrual hygiene products, education on menstrual health, and treatment of menstrual disorders.
7. Adolescent reproductive health: This includes providing age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health education, counseling, and services to adolescents.

Reproductive health services aim to promote sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), which include the right to access information, education, and services; the right to make informed choices about one's own body and reproduction; and the right to be free from discrimination, coercion, and violence in relation to one's sexuality and reproduction.

Preventive health services refer to measures taken to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptoms. These services include screenings, vaccinations, and counseling aimed at preventing or identifying illnesses in their earliest stages. Examples of preventive health services include:

1. Screenings for various types of cancer (e.g., breast, cervical, colorectal)
2. Vaccinations against infectious diseases (e.g., influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia, human papillomavirus)
3. Counseling on lifestyle modifications to reduce the risk of chronic diseases (e.g., smoking cessation, diet and exercise counseling, alcohol misuse screening and intervention)
4. Screenings for cardiovascular disease risk factors (e.g., cholesterol levels, blood pressure, body mass index)
5. Screenings for mental health conditions (e.g., depression)
6. Preventive medications (e.g., aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in certain individuals)

Preventive health services are an essential component of overall healthcare and play a critical role in improving health outcomes, reducing healthcare costs, and enhancing quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Republic of Korea" is a geopolitical term referring to a country located in East Asia, also known as South Korea. It does not have a specific medical definition. The term refers to the political, social, and cultural aspects of the country, rather than medical conditions or health-related concepts. If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

A factual database in the medical context is a collection of organized and structured data that contains verified and accurate information related to medicine, healthcare, or health sciences. These databases serve as reliable resources for various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and patients, to access evidence-based information for making informed decisions and enhancing knowledge.

Examples of factual medical databases include:

1. PubMed: A comprehensive database of biomedical literature maintained by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM). It contains citations and abstracts from life sciences journals, books, and conference proceedings.
2. MEDLINE: A subset of PubMed, MEDLINE focuses on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles related to biomedicine and health. It is the primary component of the NLM's database and serves as a critical resource for healthcare professionals and researchers worldwide.
3. Cochrane Library: A collection of systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on evidence-based medicine. The library aims to provide unbiased, high-quality information to support clinical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.
4. OVID: A platform that offers access to various medical and healthcare databases, including MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. It facilitates the search and retrieval of relevant literature for researchers, clinicians, and students.
5. ClinicalTrials.gov: A registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies conducted around the world. The platform aims to increase transparency and accessibility of clinical trial data for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients.
6. UpToDate: An evidence-based, physician-authored clinical decision support resource that provides information on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of medical conditions. It serves as a point-of-care tool for healthcare professionals to make informed decisions and improve patient care.
7. TRIP Database: A search engine designed to facilitate evidence-based medicine by providing quick access to high-quality resources, including systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, and practice recommendations.
8. National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC): A database of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents developed through a rigorous review process. The NGC aims to provide clinicians, healthcare providers, and policymakers with reliable guidance for patient care.
9. DrugBank: A comprehensive, freely accessible online database containing detailed information about drugs, their mechanisms, interactions, and targets. It serves as a valuable resource for researchers, healthcare professionals, and students in the field of pharmacology and drug discovery.
10. Genetic Testing Registry (GTR): A database that provides centralized information about genetic tests, test developers, laboratories offering tests, and clinical validity and utility of genetic tests. It serves as a resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients to make informed decisions regarding genetic testing.

Maternal health services refer to the preventative, diagnostic, and treatment-based healthcare services provided during pregnancy, childbirth, and postnatal period. These services aim to ensure the best possible health outcomes for mothers throughout their reproductive years, including family planning, preconception care, antenatal care, delivery, postpartum care, and management of chronic conditions or complications that may arise during pregnancy and childbirth.

The World Health Organization (WHO) outlines several critical components of maternal health services:

1. Antenatal care: Regular check-ups to monitor the mother's and fetus's health, identify potential risks, provide essential interventions, and offer counseling on nutrition, breastfeeding, and birth preparedness.
2. Delivery care: Skilled attendance during childbirth, including normal vaginal delivery and assisted deliveries (forceps or vacuum extraction), and access to emergency obstetric care for complications such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, obstructed labor, and sepsis.
3. Postnatal care: Continuum of care for mothers and newborns during the first six weeks after childbirth, focusing on recovery, early detection and management of complications, immunization, family planning, and psychosocial support.
4. Family planning: Access to modern contraceptive methods, counseling on fertility awareness, and safe abortion services where legal, to enable women to plan their pregnancies and space their children according to their reproductive intentions.
5. Management of chronic conditions: Comprehensive care for pregnant women with pre-existing or pregnancy-induced medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and mental health disorders.
6. Preconception care: Identification and management of risk factors before conception to optimize maternal and fetal health outcomes.
7. Prevention and management of gender-based violence: Screening, counseling, and referral services for women experiencing intimate partner violence or sexual violence during pregnancy and childbirth.
8. Health promotion and education: Community-based interventions to raise awareness about the importance of maternal health, promote positive health behaviors, and reduce barriers to accessing healthcare services.

Maternal health services should be accessible, affordable, acceptable, and equitable for all women, regardless of their age, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or geographical location. Adequate investment in maternal health infrastructure, human resources, and service delivery models is essential to achieve universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

Community Mental Health Services (CMHS) refer to mental health care services that are provided in community settings, as opposed to traditional hospital-based or institutional care. These services are designed to be accessible, comprehensive, and coordinated, with the goal of promoting recovery, resilience, and improved quality of life for individuals with mental illnesses.

CMHS may include a range of services such as:

1. Outpatient care: Including individual and group therapy, medication management, and case management services provided in community clinics or healthcare centers.
2. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT): A team-based approach to providing comprehensive mental health services to individuals with severe and persistent mental illnesses who may have difficulty engaging in traditional outpatient care.
3. Crisis intervention: Including mobile crisis teams, emergency psychiatric evaluations, and short-term residential crisis stabilization units.
4. Supported housing and employment: Services that help individuals with mental illnesses to live independently in the community and to obtain and maintain competitive employment.
5. Prevention and early intervention: Programs that aim to identify and address mental health issues before they become more severe, such as suicide prevention programs, bullying prevention, and early psychosis detection and treatment.
6. Peer support: Services provided by individuals who have personal experience with mental illness and can offer support, guidance, and advocacy to others who are struggling with similar issues.
7. Family education and support: Programs that provide information, resources, and support to family members of individuals with mental illnesses.

The goal of CMHS is to provide accessible, comprehensive, and coordinated care that meets the unique needs of each individual and helps them to achieve their recovery goals in the community setting.

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a system that provides immediate and urgent medical care, transportation, and treatment to patients who are experiencing an acute illness or injury that poses an immediate threat to their health, safety, or life. EMS is typically composed of trained professionals, such as emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and first responders, who work together to assess a patient's condition, administer appropriate medical interventions, and transport the patient to a hospital or other medical facility for further treatment.

The goal of EMS is to quickly and effectively stabilize patients in emergency situations, prevent further injury or illness, and ensure that they receive timely and appropriate medical care. This may involve providing basic life support (BLS) measures such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), controlling bleeding, and managing airway obstructions, as well as more advanced interventions such as administering medications, establishing intravenous lines, and performing emergency procedures like intubation or defibrillation.

EMS systems are typically organized and managed at the local or regional level, with coordination and oversight provided by public health agencies, hospitals, and other healthcare organizations. EMS providers may work for private companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies, and they may be dispatched to emergencies via 911 or other emergency response systems.

In summary, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a critical component of the healthcare system that provides urgent medical care and transportation to patients who are experiencing acute illnesses or injuries. EMS professionals work together to quickly assess, stabilize, and transport patients to appropriate medical facilities for further treatment.

Adolescent health services refer to medical and related services that are specifically designed to meet the unique physical, mental, emotional, and social needs of young people between the ages of 10-24 years. These services encompass a broad range of interventions, including preventive care, acute and chronic disease management, reproductive health care, mental health services, substance use treatment, and health promotion and education. The goal of adolescent health services is to support young people in achieving optimal health and well-being as they navigate the complex transitions of adolescence and early adulthood. Such services may be provided in a variety of settings, including primary care clinics, schools, community health centers, and specialized youth clinics.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that the term "contract services" is more commonly used in business and healthcare administration than in clinical medicine. It generally refers to an agreement between a healthcare provider or organization and another entity for the delivery of specific medical services over a defined period of time. The contract outlines the scope, expectations, and compensation for these services.

For example, a hospital may have a contract with a staffing agency to provide nursing personnel on a temporary basis. Or, an insurance company might have a contract with a network of healthcare providers to deliver medical care to their policyholders at agreed-upon rates. These arrangements can help ensure consistent quality and cost control in the delivery of healthcare services.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pilot projects" is not a medical term per se. Instead, it is a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine, to describe a small-scale initiative that is implemented on a temporary basis to evaluate its feasibility, effectiveness, or impact before deciding whether to expand or continue it.

In the context of healthcare, pilot projects might involve testing new treatment protocols, implementing innovative care models, or introducing technology solutions in a limited setting to assess their potential benefits and drawbacks. The results of these projects can help inform decisions about broader implementation and provide valuable insights for improving the quality and efficiency of healthcare services.

Diagnostic services refer to medical tests, procedures, and evaluations performed by healthcare professionals to identify the nature and cause of a patient's health condition or symptom. These services may include various imaging techniques such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI, and ultrasound; laboratory tests such as blood tests, urine tests, and cultures; genetic testing; and specialized diagnostic procedures such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and biopsy.

The goal of diagnostic services is to provide accurate and timely information about a patient's health status, which can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about treatment plans, monitor disease progression, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. Diagnostic services are an essential component of modern medicine and play a critical role in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of various medical conditions.

Nursing services refer to the health care activities and practices performed by registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and other nursing professionals. These services encompass various aspects of patient care, including:

1. Assessment: Nurses evaluate a patient's physical, psychological, social, and emotional status to identify their healthcare needs and establish individualized care plans.
2. Diagnosis: Based on the assessment data, nurses formulate nursing diagnoses that describe the patient's response to health conditions or situations.
3. Outcome identification: Nurses determine expected outcomes for each nursing diagnosis based on evidence-based practice guidelines and best available research.
4. Planning: Nurses develop a plan of care that outlines interventions, resources, and strategies to achieve desired patient outcomes.
5. Implementation: Nurses execute the plan of care by providing direct patient care, administering medications, performing treatments, and coordinating with other healthcare team members.
6. Evaluation: Nurses assess the effectiveness of the interventions and modify the plan of care as needed to ensure optimal patient outcomes.
7. Patient education: Nurses teach patients, families, and caregivers about self-care, disease processes, medication management, and healthy lifestyle choices to promote wellness and prevent complications.
8. Case management: Nurses coordinate services across the healthcare continuum, including referrals to specialists, home health care, and community resources, to ensure comprehensive and cost-effective care.
9. Advocacy: Nurses advocate for patients' rights, preferences, and values in decision-making processes related to their healthcare.
10. Collaboration: Nurses collaborate with other healthcare professionals, such as physicians, social workers, and therapists, to provide integrated and coordinated care.

Nursing services can be provided in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, community health centers, and patients' homes. The primary goal of nursing services is to promote, maintain, or restore patients' health, well-being, and quality of life.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Health Services Administration (HSA) is not a medical term per se, but rather a field of study and practice within healthcare management. Here's a definition that encompasses its meaning:

Health Services Administration (HSA) refers to the planning, directing, coordinating, and supervising of health services in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, public health agencies, and other medical facilities. It involves managing financial resources, developing organizational policies, ensuring quality assurance, maintaining regulatory compliance, and promoting efficient delivery of healthcare services to improve patient outcomes and overall population health. HSA professionals may hold titles such as hospital administrator, clinical director, or healthcare executive.

Urban health services refer to the provision of healthcare and public health programs in urban areas, designed to meet the unique needs and challenges of urban populations. These services encompass a wide range of facilities, professionals, and interventions that aim to improve the health and well-being of people living in urban environments. They often address issues such as infectious diseases, chronic conditions, mental health, environmental hazards, and social determinants of health that are prevalent or amplified in urban settings. Examples of urban health services include hospital systems, community health centers, outreach programs, and policy initiatives focused on improving the health of urban populations.

Women's health services refer to medical services that are specifically designed, focused on, or tailored to the unique physiological and psychological needs of women, throughout various stages of their lives. These services encompass a wide range of healthcare areas including:

1. Gynecology and obstetrics - covering routine preventive care, family planning, prenatal and postnatal care, as well as management of gynecological conditions like menstrual disorders, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and reproductive system cancers (e.g., cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer).
2. Breast health - including breast cancer screening, diagnostics, treatment, and survivorship care, as well as education on breast self-examination and risk reduction strategies.
3. Mental health - addressing women's mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and perinatal mood disorders, while also considering the impact of hormonal changes, life events, and societal expectations on emotional wellbeing.
4. Sexual health - providing care for sexual concerns, dysfunctions, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as offering education on safe sexual practices and promoting healthy relationships.
5. Cardiovascular health - addressing women's specific cardiovascular risks, such as pregnancy-related complications, and managing conditions like hypertension and high cholesterol to prevent heart disease, the leading cause of death for women in many countries.
6. Bone health - focusing on prevention, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis and other bone diseases that disproportionately affect women, particularly after menopause.
7. Menopause care - providing support and treatment for symptoms related to menopause, such as hot flashes, sleep disturbances, and mood changes, while also addressing long-term health concerns like bone density loss and heart disease risk.
8. Preventive care - offering routine screenings and vaccinations specific to women's health needs, including cervical cancer screening (Pap test), breast cancer screening (mammography), human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and osteoporosis screening.
9. Education and counseling - empowering women with knowledge about their bodies, sexual and reproductive health, and overall wellbeing through evidence-based resources and support.
10. Integrative care - addressing the whole person, including mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing, by incorporating complementary therapies like acupuncture, mindfulness, and yoga into treatment plans as appropriate.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

Genetic services refer to specialized healthcare services that focus on the diagnosis, management, and counseling of individuals and families with genetic disorders or conditions that have a strong genetic component. These services may include:

1. Genetic counseling: A process where a trained healthcare professional provides information and support to individuals and families who are at risk of or have a genetic condition. This includes discussing the risks, benefits, and limitations of genetic testing, as well as helping patients understand the medical, psychological, and familial implications of test results.

2. Genetic testing: The analysis of DNA, RNA, chromosomes, proteins, and other molecules to identify genetic changes or mutations that may cause or increase the risk of developing a specific genetic condition. Testing can be performed on various samples, including blood, saliva, or tissue.

3. Diagnostic testing: Genetic tests used to confirm or rule out a suspected genetic disorder in an individual who has symptoms of the condition. These tests help establish a definitive diagnosis and guide medical management.

4. Predictive and pre-symptomatic testing: Genetic tests performed on individuals who do not have symptoms but are at risk of developing a genetic condition due to their family history or known genetic mutation. The goal is to identify those at risk before symptoms appear, allowing for early intervention and management.

5. Carrier testing: Genetic tests that determine if an individual carries a recessive gene mutation for a particular disorder. Carriers do not typically show symptoms but can pass the mutation on to their offspring, who may develop the condition if they inherit the mutation from both parents.

6. Prenatal and pre-implantation genetic testing: Genetic tests performed during pregnancy or before in vitro fertilization (IVF) to identify chromosomal abnormalities or genetic disorders in the fetus or embryo. These tests can help couples make informed decisions about their reproductive options.

7. Genomic medicine and research: The integration of genomic information into clinical care, including pharmacogenomics (the study of how genes affect a person's response to medications) and precision medicine (tailoring treatment plans based on an individual's genetic makeup).

Genetic services are typically provided by a team of healthcare professionals, including medical geneticists, genetic counselors, nurses, social workers, and other specialists as needed. These professionals work together to provide comprehensive care, education, and support for patients and their families throughout the genetic testing and decision-making process.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is not a medical term per se, but it is a government organization that oversees and provides funding for many public health initiatives, services, and institutions in the United States. Here's a brief definition:

The HHS is a cabinet-level department in the US federal government responsible for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. It achieves this by promoting effective and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare, conducting critical medical research through its agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and enforcing public health laws and regulations, including those related to food safety, through its agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Additionally, HHS oversees the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which provide healthcare coverage for millions of elderly, disabled, and low-income Americans.

Dental health services refer to medical care and treatment provided for the teeth and mouth. This can include preventative care, such as dental cleanings and exams, as well as restorative treatments like fillings, crowns, and root canals. Dental health services may also include cosmetic procedures, such as teeth whitening or orthodontic treatment to straighten crooked teeth. In addition to these services, dental health professionals may provide education on oral hygiene and the importance of maintaining good dental health. These services are typically provided by dentists, dental hygienists, and other dental professionals in a variety of settings, including private dental practices, community health clinics, and hospitals.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

An emergency service in a hospital is a department that provides immediate medical or surgical care for individuals who are experiencing an acute illness, injury, or severe symptoms that require immediate attention. The goal of an emergency service is to quickly assess, stabilize, and treat patients who require urgent medical intervention, with the aim of preventing further harm or death.

Emergency services in hospitals typically operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are staffed by teams of healthcare professionals including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and other allied health professionals. These teams are trained to provide rapid evaluation and treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, from minor injuries to life-threatening emergencies such as heart attacks, strokes, and severe infections.

In addition to providing emergency care, hospital emergency services also serve as a key point of entry for patients who require further hospitalization or specialized care. They work closely with other departments within the hospital, such as radiology, laboratory, and critical care units, to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment. Overall, the emergency service in a hospital plays a crucial role in ensuring that patients receive prompt and effective medical care during times of crisis.

Health services for Indigenous people refer to medical and healthcare provision that is specifically designed, delivered, and organized to meet the unique cultural, historical, and social needs of indigenous populations. These services aim to address the health disparities and inequalities that often exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations. They are typically community-based and involve traditional healing practices, as well as modern medical interventions. Indigenous health services may also incorporate cultural safety training for healthcare providers to ensure respectful and appropriate care.

Social work is a professional field of practice that promotes social change, problem-solving in human relationships, and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. According to the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), social work involves "the application of social sciences, theory, knowledge, and skills to effect positive changes in individuals, groups, communities, and societies."

Social workers are trained to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities to address a wide range of social, emotional, and practical needs. They help people navigate complex systems, access resources, and advocate for their rights. Social workers may be employed in various settings, including hospitals, mental health clinics, schools, community centers, and government agencies.

In medical settings, social work is often focused on helping patients and their families cope with illness, disability, or injury. Medical social workers provide counseling, support, and advocacy to help patients and families navigate the healthcare system, access needed resources, and make informed decisions about treatment options. They may also assist with discharge planning, coordinating care transitions, and connecting patients with community-based services.

Medical social work is a specialized area of practice that requires knowledge and skills in areas such as psychosocial assessment, crisis intervention, case management, and advocacy. Medical social workers must be able to communicate effectively with healthcare professionals, patients, and families, and have a deep understanding of the social determinants of health and the impact of illness on individuals and communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Quality of health care is a term that refers to the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Clinical effectiveness: The use of best available evidence to make decisions about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care. This includes considering the benefits and harms of different options and making sure that the most effective interventions are used.
2. Safety: Preventing harm to patients and minimizing risks associated with healthcare. This involves identifying potential hazards, implementing measures to reduce errors, and learning from adverse events to improve systems and processes.
3. Patient-centeredness: Providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values. This includes ensuring that patients are fully informed about their condition and treatment options, involving them in decision-making, and providing emotional support throughout the care process.
4. Timeliness: Ensuring that healthcare services are delivered promptly and efficiently, without unnecessary delays. This includes coordinating care across different providers and settings to ensure continuity and avoid gaps in service.
5. Efficiency: Using resources wisely and avoiding waste, while still providing high-quality care. This involves considering the costs and benefits of different interventions, as well as ensuring that healthcare services are equitably distributed.
6. Equitability: Ensuring that all individuals have access to quality healthcare services, regardless of their socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, age, or other factors. This includes addressing disparities in health outcomes and promoting fairness and justice in healthcare.

Overall, the quality of health care is a multidimensional concept that requires ongoing evaluation and improvement to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

Occupational Health Services (OHS) refer to a branch of healthcare that focuses on the prevention and management of health issues that arise in the workplace or are caused by work-related factors. These services aim to promote and maintain the highest degree of physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all occupations.

OHS typically includes:

1. Health surveillance and screening programs to identify early signs of work-related illnesses or injuries.
2. Occupational health education and training for employees and managers on topics such as safe lifting techniques, hazard communication, and bloodborne pathogens exposure control.
3. Ergonomic assessments and interventions to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders and other work-related injuries.
4. Development and implementation of policies and procedures to address workplace health and safety issues.
5. Case management and return-to-work programs for employees who have been injured or become ill on the job.
6. Medical monitoring and treatment of work-related injuries and illnesses, including rehabilitation and disability management services.
7. Collaboration with employers to identify and address potential health hazards in the workplace, such as chemical exposures, noise pollution, or poor indoor air quality.

Overall, Occupational Health Services play a critical role in protecting the health and safety of workers, reducing the burden of work-related illnesses and injuries, and promoting a healthy and productive workforce.

"Marketing of Health Services" refers to the application of marketing principles and strategies to promote, sell, and deliver health care services to individuals, families, or communities. This can include activities such as advertising, public relations, promotions, and sales to increase awareness and demand for health services, as well as researching and analyzing consumer needs and preferences to tailor health services to better meet those needs. The ultimate goal of marketing in health services is to improve access to and utilization of high-quality health care while maintaining ethical standards and ensuring patient satisfaction.

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

Personal health services refer to healthcare services that are tailored to an individual's specific needs, preferences, and goals. These services can include preventive care, such as vaccinations and screenings, as well as medical treatments for acute and chronic conditions. Personal health services may be provided by a variety of healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, physician assistants, and allied health professionals.

The goal of personal health services is to promote the overall health and well-being of the individual, taking into account their physical, mental, emotional, and social needs. This approach recognizes that each person is unique and requires a customized plan of care to achieve their optimal health outcomes. Personal health services may be delivered in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and long-term care facilities.

Patient satisfaction is a concept in healthcare quality measurement that reflects the patient's perspective and evaluates their experience with the healthcare services they have received. It is a multidimensional construct that includes various aspects such as interpersonal mannerisms of healthcare providers, technical competence, accessibility, timeliness, comfort, and communication.

Patient satisfaction is typically measured through standardized surveys or questionnaires that ask patients to rate their experiences on various aspects of care. The results are often used to assess the quality of care provided by healthcare organizations, identify areas for improvement, and inform policy decisions. However, it's important to note that patient satisfaction is just one aspect of healthcare quality and should be considered alongside other measures such as clinical outcomes and patient safety.

The term "Integrated Delivery of Healthcare" refers to a coordinated and seamless approach to providing healthcare services, where different providers and specialists work together to provide comprehensive care for patients. This model aims to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that all aspects of a person's health are addressed in a holistic and coordinated manner.

Integrated delivery of healthcare may involve various components such as:

1. Primary Care: A primary care provider serves as the first point of contact for patients and coordinates their care with other specialists and providers.
2. Specialty Care: Specialists provide care for specific medical conditions or diseases, working closely with primary care providers to ensure coordinated care.
3. Mental Health Services: Mental health providers work alongside medical professionals to address the mental and emotional needs of patients, recognizing that mental health is an essential component of overall health.
4. Preventive Care: Preventive services such as screenings, vaccinations, and health education are provided to help prevent illnesses and promote overall health and well-being.
5. Chronic Disease Management: Providers work together to manage chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer, using evidence-based practices and coordinated care plans.
6. Health Information Technology: Electronic health records (EHRs) and other health information technologies are used to facilitate communication and coordination among providers, ensuring that all members of the care team have access to up-to-date patient information.
7. Patient Engagement: Patients are actively engaged in their care, with education and support provided to help them make informed decisions about their health and treatment options.

The goal of integrated delivery of healthcare is to provide high-quality, cost-effective care that meets the unique needs of each patient, while also improving overall population health.

National health programs are systematic, large-scale initiatives that are put in place by national governments to address specific health issues or improve the overall health of a population. These programs often involve coordinated efforts across various sectors, including healthcare, education, and social services. They may aim to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, prevent the spread of diseases, promote healthy behaviors, or reduce health disparities. Examples of national health programs include immunization campaigns, tobacco control initiatives, and efforts to address chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease. These programs are typically developed based on scientific research, evidence-based practices, and public health data, and they may be funded through a variety of sources, including government budgets, grants, and private donations.

Pharmaceutical services refer to the direct patient care activities conducted by licensed pharmacists, which include but are not limited to:

1. Medication therapy management: This involves reviewing a patient's medications to ensure they are appropriate, effective, and safe. Pharmacists may make recommendations to the prescriber about changes to medication therapy as needed.
2. Patient education: Pharmacists provide education to patients about their medications, including how to take them, potential side effects, and storage instructions. They also provide information on disease prevention and management.
3. Immunizations: Many pharmacists are trained to administer vaccines, which can help increase access to this important preventive health service.
4. Monitoring and evaluation: Pharmacists monitor patients' responses to medication therapy and make adjustments as needed. They also evaluate the effectiveness of medication therapy and make recommendations for changes if necessary.
5. Clinical services: Pharmacists may provide a range of clinical services, such as managing anticoagulation therapy, providing diabetes education, or conducting medication reconciliation after hospital discharge.
6. Collaborative practice: Pharmacists work collaboratively with other healthcare providers to optimize medication therapy and improve patient outcomes. This may involve participating in multidisciplinary teams, consulting with prescribers, or sharing information with other healthcare professionals.

Overall, pharmaceutical services aim to improve patient outcomes by ensuring that medications are used safely and effectively.

Emergency services in psychiatry, also known as crisis intervention services, refer to immediate and urgent mental health services provided to individuals who are experiencing an acute mental health emergency. These services aim to assess, manage, and stabilize the individual's mental health crisis and ensure their safety, as well as the safety of others.

Psychiatric emergency services may include:

1. Crisis hotlines: 24-hour telephone support lines that provide immediate assistance and referral to appropriate mental health services.
2. Mobile crisis teams: Mental health professionals who provide on-site assessment, intervention, and referral services in the community.
3. Psychiatric emergency departments: Specialized units within hospitals that provide urgent psychiatric evaluation, treatment, and short-term stabilization for individuals in a mental health crisis.
4. Inpatient psychiatric units: Short-term hospitalization for individuals who require intensive psychiatric care and monitoring during a crisis.
5. Respite care services: Temporary supportive housing and care for individuals in a mental health crisis, providing relief for both the individual and their family or caregivers.

The primary goal of psychiatric emergency services is to provide timely and effective interventions that can help prevent further deterioration of the individual's mental health, reduce the risk of suicide or self-harm, and promote recovery and stabilization.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

A needs assessment in a medical context is the process of identifying and evaluating the health needs of an individual, population, or community. It is used to determine the resources, services, and interventions required to address specific health issues and improve overall health outcomes. This process often involves collecting and analyzing data on various factors such as demographics, prevalence of diseases, access to healthcare, and social determinants of health. The goal of a needs assessment is to ensure that resources are allocated effectively and efficiently to meet the most pressing health needs and priorities.

Physician services insurance refers to a type of health insurance coverage that helps pay for medically necessary services provided by licensed physicians. This can include office visits, hospital care, diagnostic tests, and treatments for injuries and illnesses. The specific services covered and the amount reimbursed will depend on the terms of the individual's insurance policy. Some policies may also have restrictions on which providers are considered in-network and covered under the plan. It is important to understand the details of one's coverage to know what is included and what out-of-pocket costs may be required.

Organizational models in the context of medicine refer to frameworks that are used to describe, analyze, and improve the structure, processes, and outcomes of healthcare organizations. These models provide a systematic way of understanding how different components of an organization interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall performance of the system.

Examples of organizational models in healthcare include:

1. The Donabedian model: This model focuses on the structure, process, and outcome of healthcare as interrelated components that influence the quality of care.
2. The Baldrige Performance Excellence Program: This model provides a framework for organizations to evaluate their performance and identify areas for improvement in seven categories: leadership, strategic planning, customer focus, measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; workforce focus; process management; and results.
3. The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) six aims for improvement: The IOM has identified six aims that should be the focus of healthcare quality improvement efforts: safety, timeliness, patient-centeredness, effectiveness, efficiency, and equity.
4. The Lean management system: This model is a process improvement approach that focuses on eliminating waste and maximizing value for customers through continuous improvement and respect for people.
5. The Six Sigma methodology: This model is a data-driven approach to quality improvement that seeks to reduce variation and defects in processes through the use of statistical tools and techniques.

These are just a few examples of organizational models used in healthcare. Each model has its own strengths and limitations, and organizations may choose to adopt one or more models depending on their specific needs and goals.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

'Government Financing' in the context of healthcare refers to the role of government in funding healthcare services, programs, and infrastructure. This can be achieved through various mechanisms such as:

1. Direct provision of healthcare services: The government operates and funds its own hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities, where it employs healthcare professionals to deliver care.
2. Public insurance programs: The government establishes and manages health insurance programs, like Medicare and Medicaid in the United States, which provide coverage for specific populations and reimburse healthcare providers for services delivered to enrollees.
3. Tax subsidies and incentives: Governments may offer tax breaks or other financial incentives to encourage private investments in healthcare infrastructure, research, and development.
4. Grants and loans: Government agencies can provide funding to healthcare organizations, researchers, and educational institutions in the form of grants and loans for specific projects, programs, or initiatives.
5. Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Governments collaborate with private entities to jointly fund and manage healthcare services, facilities, or infrastructure projects.

Government financing plays a significant role in shaping healthcare systems and ensuring access to care for vulnerable populations. The extent of government involvement in financing varies across countries, depending on their political, economic, and social contexts.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Health expenditures refer to the total amount of money spent on health services, goods, and resources in a given period. This can include expenses for preventive care, medical treatments, medications, long-term care, and administrative costs. Health expenditures can be made by individuals, corporations, insurance companies, or governments, and they can be measured at the national, regional, or household level.

Health expenditures are often used as an indicator of a country's investment in its healthcare system and can reflect the overall health status of a population. High levels of health expenditures may indicate a strong commitment to healthcare, but they can also place a significant burden on individuals, businesses, and governments. Understanding patterns and trends in health expenditures is important for policymakers, healthcare providers, and researchers who are working to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accessibility of healthcare services.

Health care costs refer to the expenses incurred for medical services, treatments, procedures, and products that are used to maintain or restore an individual's health. These costs can be categorized into several types:

1. Direct costs: These include payments made for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications, diagnostic tests, surgeries, and other medical treatments and services. Direct costs can be further divided into two subcategories:
* Out-of-pocket costs: Expenses paid directly by patients, such as co-payments, deductibles, coinsurance, and any uncovered medical services or products.
* Third-party payer costs: Expenses covered by insurance companies, government programs (like Medicare, Medicaid), or other entities that pay for health care services on behalf of patients.
2. Indirect costs: These are the expenses incurred as a result of illness or injury that indirectly impact an individual's ability to work and earn a living. Examples include lost productivity, absenteeism, reduced earning capacity, and disability benefits.
3. Non-medical costs: These are expenses related to caregiving, transportation, home modifications, assistive devices, and other non-medical services required for managing health conditions or disabilities.

Health care costs can vary significantly depending on factors such as the type of medical service, geographic location, insurance coverage, and individual health status. Understanding these costs is essential for patients, healthcare providers, policymakers, and researchers to make informed decisions about treatment options, resource allocation, and health system design.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place and not a medical term or condition. It is the capital city and largest metropolitan area in both England and the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I would be happy to help!

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Ambulatory care is a type of health care service in which patients are treated on an outpatient basis, meaning they do not stay overnight at the medical facility. This can include a wide range of services such as diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care for various medical conditions. The goal of ambulatory care is to provide high-quality medical care that is convenient, accessible, and cost-effective for patients.

Examples of ambulatory care settings include physician offices, community health centers, urgent care centers, outpatient surgery centers, and diagnostic imaging facilities. Patients who receive ambulatory care may have a variety of medical needs, such as routine checkups, chronic disease management, minor procedures, or same-day surgeries.

Overall, ambulatory care is an essential component of modern healthcare systems, providing patients with timely and convenient access to medical services without the need for hospitalization.

Costs refer to the total amount of resources, such as money, time, and labor, that are expended in the provision of a medical service or treatment. Costs can be categorized into direct costs, which include expenses directly related to patient care, such as medication, supplies, and personnel; and indirect costs, which include overhead expenses, such as rent, utilities, and administrative salaries.

Cost analysis is the process of estimating and evaluating the total cost of a medical service or treatment. This involves identifying and quantifying all direct and indirect costs associated with the provision of care, and analyzing how these costs may vary based on factors such as patient volume, resource utilization, and reimbursement rates.

Cost analysis is an important tool for healthcare organizations to understand the financial implications of their operations and make informed decisions about resource allocation, pricing strategies, and quality improvement initiatives. It can also help policymakers and payers evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different treatment options and develop evidence-based guidelines for clinical practice.

Health care reform refers to the legislative efforts, initiatives, and debates aimed at improving the quality, affordability, and accessibility of health care services. These reforms may include changes to health insurance coverage, delivery systems, payment methods, and healthcare regulations. The goals of health care reform are often to increase the number of people with health insurance, reduce healthcare costs, and improve the overall health outcomes of a population. Examples of notable health care reform measures in the United States include the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare for All proposals.

Qualitative research is a methodological approach in social sciences and healthcare research that focuses on understanding the meanings, experiences, and perspectives of individuals or groups within a specific context. It aims to gather detailed, rich data through various techniques such as interviews, focus groups, observations, and content analysis. The findings from qualitative research are typically descriptive and exploratory, providing insights into processes, perceptions, and experiences that may not be captured through quantitative methods.

In medical research, qualitative research can be used to explore patients' experiences of illness, healthcare providers' perspectives on patient care, or the cultural and social factors that influence health behaviors. It is often used in combination with quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex health issues.

Fees and charges in a medical context refer to the costs that patients are required to pay for healthcare services, treatments, or procedures. These may include:

1. Professional fees: The amount charged by healthcare professionals such as doctors, nurses, or therapists for their time, expertise, and services provided during consultations, examinations, or treatments.

2. Hospital charges: The costs associated with a patient's hospital stay, including room and board, nursing care, medications, and diagnostic tests.

3. Facility fees: Additional charges levied by hospitals, clinics, or ambulatory surgery centers to cover the overhead expenses of maintaining the facility and its equipment.

4. Procedure or treatment-specific fees: Costs directly related to specific medical procedures, surgeries, or treatments, such as anesthesia, radiology services, laboratory tests, or surgical supplies.

5. Ancillary fees: Additional costs for items like crutches, slings, or durable medical equipment that patients may need during their recovery process.

6. Insurance copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles: The portion of healthcare expenses that patients are responsible for paying based on their insurance policy terms.

It is essential for patients to understand the fees and charges associated with their medical care to make informed decisions about their treatment options and manage their healthcare costs effectively.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

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"JANE'S GROUP UK LIMITED overview - Find and update company information - GOV.UK". find-and-update.company-information.service. ... Jane's Information Group was founded in 1898 by Fred T. Jane, who had begun sketching ships as an enthusiast naval artist while ... The books and trade magazines published by the company are often considered the de facto public source of information on ... "Jane's Information Group [Library catalogue name authority]", Trove, retrieved 9 April 2021 Library of Congress. "Search ...
The Information Services Department (ISD) is the Hong Kong Government's public relations office, publisher, advertiser, and ... The PRO was renamed as the Information Services Department (ISD) on 1 April 1959. On 8 June 1963, ISD's headquarters moved from ... It was also commonly called Government Information Services (GIS). In September 1945, following the end of the Japanese ... Following the 1995 sale of Beaconsfield House to a private developer, the Information Services Department relocated to the ...
Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Information Service, Foreign Office, British Information Service. 1968-1970.{{cite ... British Information Services (BIS) was an overt propaganda organization that was part of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of ... "BRITISH INFORMATION SERVICES, U.S.A.", House of Commons Debates, UK Parliament, vol. 460, cc834-77, 25 January 1949, retrieved ... ISBN 978-1-57607-820-4. "BRITISH INFORMATION SERVICES", House of Commons Debates, UK Parliament, vol. 540, cc133-58, 19 April ...
... (IIS, 2S) is an extensible web server created by Microsoft for use with the Windows NT family. ... "Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.5 Express". Download Center. Microsoft. 10 January 2011. Retrieved 27 January 2011. "IIS ... "Vulnerability Report: Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) 6". Secunia. Secunia ApS. Retrieved 1 July 2011. "IIS ... Wikiversity has learning resources about Internet Information Services Official website Portals: Internet Computer programming ...
Consultation - the issue of information by an information service provider under programmatic control of an information service ... the issue of information by an information service consumer under the programmatic control of an information service centre. ... Tele-information services consist of four definable information traffic patterns being allocution, conversation, consultation ... Allocution - the issue of information by an information service centre under programmatic control of the centre itself. ...
... (SIS) is a company which provides content and production services to the betting industry; such as ... The official line was "Satellite Information Services does not accurately reflect where we are today, and where we want to be ... It was formed in 1986 as Satellite Information Service, when bookmakers took the opportunity to broadcast live racing in their ... Service launched on 5 May, supplying race coverage from two horse race and one greyhound meeting per day. Received by just 100 ...
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YP Connecticut Information Services LLC, originally SNET Information Services, Inc., was the directory publishing arm of ... "YP CONNECTICUT INFORMATION SERVICES LLC , Connecticut Business Directory". www.ctcompanydir.com. Retrieved 2022-06-21. " ... In 2012, the company's operations were reincorporated in Delaware as YP Connecticut Information Services LLC. The company was ... STREET JOURNAL, Almar LatourStaff Reporter of THE WALL (2004-11-04). "BellSouth, SBC Plan Web Service For Yellow Pages". Wall ...
... (ISC) is a publicly traded Canadian multinational that offers registry and information ... "September 2015: Origin Merchant Partners Advises Information Services Corp. on the Acquisition of ESC Corporate Services - ... "Information Services Corporation (ISV.TO) Company Profile & Facts - Yahoo Finance". "Canada Company List". Canada Companies ... Corporation, Information Services (2017-01-23). "ISC Acquires ERS and Enhances Core Registry Offering". GlobeNewswire News Room ...
... PVT LTD (formerly Sukshm Information Services) is a rural or non-urban BPO in India. The ... It contributes directly to the bottom line of the clients by providing services from tier 2 and tier 3 cities and passing on ...
... is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering the area of information technology, especially ... Information Services & Use is abstracted and indexed in: ACM Computing Reviews ACM Guide to Computing Literature Cambridge ... Bibliographies Information Science & Technology Abstracts Inspec Internet & Personal Computing Abstracts Library and ... information management and applications. It is peer-reviewed. Its current editors-in-chief are Arnoud De Kemp and Elliot R. ...
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Communications and Information Services Corps Defence Forces Ireland - Air Corps - Communication & Information Services ... the Communications and Information Services Corps is responsible for the development and operation of Information Technology ... The Communications and Information Services Corps (CIS) (Irish: An Cór Seirbhísí Cumarsáide agus Eolais) - formerly the Army ... Soldiers join the Communications and Information Services Corps in one of the following apprenticeship trades; Communication ...
The Myanmar Times Fish Information and Services website - Worldwide Fish Information and Services website - Japan Fish ... Fish Information and Services (FIS) claims to be the world's largest online provider of information for the fishing industry. ... The service also offers market reports, market prices and industry news. The Market Prices section is updated using information ... Fish Information & Services (FIS) (Morocco), Middle East Economic Digest, 31 August 2001 Thein Linn (13 February 2006), FIS ...
Military Information Services (Wojskowe Służby Informacyjne, or WSI) was a common name for the Polish military intelligence and ... the Military Counter-intelligence Service (Służba Kontrwywiadu Wojskowego) and the Military Intelligence Service (Służba ... WSI was bound by law to shield vital state information for the newly independent Poland, under the direct control and ... WSI was to investigate and counteract threats to Poland's defense forces and vital defense information. It also regulated arms ...
... (BiSL), previously known as Business Information Service Management Library, is a ... and IT Service Management (framed by ITIL). Information Management representing 'Demand' Information Management is the domain ... and the management of the delivery of IT services by IT management. Information Management is supported by the most recent BiSL ... in Computable magazine about the ASL-BiSL Foundation Wikimedia Commons has media related to Business Information Services ...
Information technology company stubs, Internet in Switzerland, Liechtenstein-Switzerland relations, National research and ... education networks, Telecommunications in Switzerland, Telecommunications in Liechtenstein, Information technology ...
... (ITSA) was an executive agency of the United Kingdom Department of Social Security ( ... "Concept - Information Technology Services Agency". api.parliament.uk. Retrieved 29 September 2021. "HP News HP to Acquire EDS ... ITSA was established to "help create and deliver an active modern social security service, which encourages and enables ...
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"2011 Form 10-K, Stewart Information Services Corporation". Stewart Information Services Corporation (via the U.S. Securities ... Stewart Information Services Corporation (SISCO) is a real estate information, title insurance and transaction management ... www.stewart.com Allegiant Reverse Services - https://allegiantreverse.com Ask Services - https://www.ask-services.com Asset ... and Stewart Title Company offer products and services in the United States and abroad through its direct retail operations, ...
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"Afghanistan Information Management Service". Staff. "Afghanistan Information Management Services (AIMS) project". United ... Afghanistan Information Management Services (AIMS) is a Kabul-based Afghan non-governmental organisation (NGO). It specialises ... "Afghanistan Information Management Services - AIMS, Kabul (2022)". "GIS Mapping Software, Location Intelligence & Spatial ... The regional offices provide services in information management, capacity development (i.e. job training), and mapping.[ ...
... is a department of the Scottish Police Services Authority. Previously called the Scottish ... "To manage information for the Scottish Police Service, wider Criminal Justice Community and the public to assist in the ... This controversy lead to the separation in 2001 of these services from local control by each of the eight Scottish police ... As a result, they were reinstated and employed in the newly created Scottish Fingerprint Service. During a civil action in ...
... (SGIS) (known as the 254 (Specialist Group Information Services) Signal Squadron until 1 ... 254 (SGIS) Signal Squadron provides consultancy-style expertise in relation to both Information Management and Information ... 254 (SGIS) Signal Squadron 15th Signal Regiment (Information Support) v t e (Articles needing additional references from June ... Information technology consulting firms of the United Kingdom, Army Reserve (United Kingdom), All stub articles, United Kingdom ...
... bill and maintain services and equipment. Universal Service Order or USO Codes are used by telecommunications service providers ... This information can be used for making repairs, replacing old equipment, ordering phone service, recovering call detail ... Common Language Information Services encompasses several products that are in general use by the global telecommunications ... Special Service Circuit or CLCI S/S codes provide a coded designation for a service that is dedicated and billed to a ...
The Cognitive Information Processing (CIP) Approach to Career Development and Services is a theory of career problem solving ... Using readiness assessment to improve career services: A cognitive information processing approach. The Career Development ... Use staff teamwork in delivering services to individuals Clients being served with brief staff-assisted services work with a ... Screen individuals for career decision-making readiness before delivering services Increases the likelihood that the services ...
German News Information Services Interview with the chief editor Horst Teubert (in German) (CS1 German-language sources (de), ... German News Information Services GmbH is a German "left and critical" news platform of "independent scientists and journalists ... According to the German newspaper Die Welt, the Chinese referred to German News Information Services GmbH as a state operated ...
Information Systems & Services provided the procurement and support functions for integrated information and communication ... Information Systems & Services (ISS) was a cluster within Strategic Command Top Level Budget of the United Kingdom Ministry of ... Defence Digital brought together and replaced a number of organisations, including Information Systems and Services (ISS) in ... v t e (Use dmy dates from February 2021, Defence agencies of the United Kingdom, Information technology organisations based in ...
... ebooks and discovery service for academic libraries, public libraries, corporations, schools, government and medical ... By submitting this form, you acknowledge that EBSCO Information Services will collect and process your personal information in ... Interested in purchasing? Explore products & services for your institution Academic Libraries Public Libraries Schools Health ... accordance with its Privacy Policy, including the categories and purposes of use for such information as described here. ...
Review a tax chart of information returns, reporting requirements and deadlines for Indian Tribal Governments. ... Payments for services performed for a trade. or business by people who are not your employees (non-. Employee compensation). ... Employers Annual Information Return of Tip Income & Allocated Tips. Large food and beverage establishments when the employer ... Annual Summary & Transmittal of U.S. Information Returns. Used to transmit paper Forms 1098, 1099, 5498, and W-2G.. Summary of ...
If your contact responds within the first couple days, schedule a time for an information interview. However, if there is no ... Before you leave, make sure to exchange contact information/business cards with your contact. ... such as interacting with others or conducting information interviews. Networking, building connections, and learning about ...
Information Technology Services (ITS)ServicesTechnology RoadmapNew StudentsStage 4Electronic Billing and the iPlan. ... Information Technology Services · 1032 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL 60660 · (773) 508-4487 · [email protected] ... Information Technology Services · 1032 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, IL 60660 · (773) 508-4487 · [email protected] ... Information Technology Services 1032 W. Sheridan Rd.. Chicago, IL 60660 (773) 508-4487 · [email protected] ...
Using geographic information systems for sampling. As shown here, housing data, roads, and neighborhood information can be used ... With this information, choropleth maps of the number of cases, or rates, within each home can be compared with the quantity in ... Geographic information system data about the natural or built environment can be collected in the field, mapped, and spatially ... Alternatively, service area or activity space analyses can help characterize the extent of disease distribution on a more ...
IT Service Catalogue Contact Staff Service Ctr Information Services & Technology. University of Alberta. Edmonton, Alberta, ...
The use of information provided here for any other purpose, including the sending of unsolicited commercial material via email ... The information in this directory is provided to support the academic, administrative and business activities of the University ...
European Unions Digital Services Act This page includes information relevant to the EU Digital Services Act (Regulation (EU) ... In accordance with Article 12 of the DSA, recipients of our services can contact SIENE by contacting PlayStation Support or ... When contacting SIENEs DSA single point of contact, the following contact information must be included:. · Your first and last ... 2022/2065 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 October 2022 on a Single Market for Digital Services and amending ...
The Mentoring Program facilitates a supportive and developmental partnership between two individuals, typically one more experienced (mentor) and one less experienced (mentee). connecting a less-experienced person, the mentee, with a more experienced or knowledgeable person, the mentor. The Shared Leadership Mentoring Program empowers employees to reach their full potential, enhance job satisfaction and retention, and contribute to a culture of learning and professional development within the university community.. Mentors are guides who help mentees develop goals toward their career path or work on solutions to stumbling blocks. Mentors past experiences help them empathize with the mentee and understand the issues they face.. Mentoring empowers mentees to plan out their career direction and set achievable goals. It is an effective way to help a mentee progress in his or her career.. ...
Criminal Justice Information Services. Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to LinkedIn Share ia Email ...
If you require IT support please contact the IT Services Help desk. We can only respond to UCL email addresses. ...
Information Technology Services. Feldberg Communications Center. MS 017. Brandeis University. 415 South Street. Waltham, MA ... Protect your personal information. The more information you put on Facebook or Twitter, the easier for a phishing email to look ... Bookmark login.brandeis.edu on your preferred browser for easy access to Brandeis services.. Managing DUO. To manage your DUO ... Additional information is available on the Brandeis Library website.. Brandeis Sponsored Software. Your Brandies account gives ...
Return to Campus -- Week of August 2nd. As you return to your campus office, you should anticipate your technology will require time for updates and may run into other small issues before operating as expected/normal.. Issues to expect include old passwords blocking you from logging in, wireless connectivity issues, and overdue software patches being applied on your computer.. Please visit the IITS Reconnect to Campus website for more on what to expect.. ...
To help with the continuous improvement of the CSUSB Campus Map please submit the following form or email [email protected] ...
Information Technology Services. If you have suggestions or ideas for ITS, please share them in the Suggestion Box. ...
ITS provides information technology leadership, services, and innovative solutions to support RIT s strategic goals. We plan, ... RIT Service Center. Getting support shouldnt be hard or complicated! Thats why weve created the RIT Service Center - your ... Information Security. Providing leadership to the RIT community in safeguarding the confidentiality, integrity and availability ... We are committed to providing our customers with the highest level of service. ...
LEAD SERVICE LINE (LSL) INFORMATION. At American Water, providing safe, reliable water service is our top priority. In July ... American Water Contract Services Group (CSG) proudly partners with the City of Camden to provide water and wastewater services ... Click Here To View A Copy Of The Lead Service Line Inventory Click Here To View The American Water Lead Fact Sheet. Learn about ... Basic Information about Lead & Drinking Water (EPA) Protect Your Family from Sources of Lead Para ver el sitio web completo en ...
Hours vary by building and by season. Always, always, consult the hours.. ...
Important information about Office Mix Preview end of service. PowerPoint for Microsoft 365 PowerPoint 2016 More...Less ... We will continually update this article as more information becomes available.. Frequently asked questions. * Im a current ... For more information about the PowerPoint Recording tab, see Record a slide show with narration and slide timings. ... By pressing submit, your feedback will be used to improve Microsoft products and services. Your IT admin will be able to ...
... emerging technologies and user support services. This guide provides concise information about the services and resources ... Library (2023). Academic staff : information about Library services. Abstract: The Librarys mission is to support the ... Universitys teaching programmes and research initiatives by providing adequate scholarly information resources, ...
Information and guidance from AHS regarding the current outbreak of COVID-19. ... Find the latest information about COVID-19 including information about testing (self-assessment), getting test results, getting ... COVID-19 Information for Albertans. Iska Iabi,አማርኛ,عربي,Niitsipowahssin,简体中文,繁體中文,Nêhiyawêwin,دری,Tsaatine,Français, ... Information for travelers and airline passengers, travel health notices. Tags:. 1000. Traveller; all. travel; public; all. More ...
... support for PCCs administrative information system for students, faculty, and staff. ...
Information Technology Services. Location. Information Technology Services. Upper Iowa University. Garbee Hall. 605 Washington ... UIU Information Technology Services (ITS) provides strategic insights, resources, and support for the increasingly diverse ...
Business Information Services in Manchester, use thomsonlocal to find and compare trusted local businesses. View profiles, ... We strive to provide customers with the very best and accurate information to help them make the right decision when selecting ... That is why so many customers come back to us or recommend our services to friends and family. ... We provide Quality Kitchen Services Cheshire with rigid built kitchens that are tailored to requirements and are delivered ...
What is the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment?. The TSI Assessment is part of the Texas Success Initiative program designed to help your college or university determine if you are ready for college-level course work in the areas of reading, writing, and mathematics. If you are an incoming college student in Texas, you are required to take the TSI Assessment, unless you meet an exemption criteria, to determine your readiness for college-level work. The TSI is also used for students taking dual credit. In the chart below, you can see the dual credit waivers available for dual credit students.. ...
Student Services. * Student Services Explore the wide variety of services and resources available at UAA to help promote your ... The Enrollment Services Center offers virtual and walk-in appointments to help students apply; get help with financial aid, ...
Review the OneDrive information page for more information on how to use this service. Contact the ITS Service Desk at 901.678. ... Information Technology Services Security Security Incident - Feb. 16, 2021. The University of Memphis is committed to ... about service impact may contact the ITS Service Desk at 901.678.8888 or via email at [email protected].. What steps are being ... For more information, visit the Security Policies and Guidelines page.. How were attackers able to gain access to systems with ...
Find Service Information. Share This Page. * Share to Facebook (opens in a new window) ... Top Trending Information. Residential oversized items for collection Property tax billing What to do with your waste materials ...
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  • They include internal services to the faculties, departments and centers in Lund University as well as external services to companies, organizations, and institutes within and outside Sweden. (lu.se)
  • In accordance with Article 12 of the DSA, recipients of our services can contact SIENE by contacting PlayStation Support or users can report illegal content using our content reporting tools detailed here . (playstation.com)
  • The course relates the diversity of contemporary IT developments to organisational innovation and emphasises the increased complexity of this challenge with ubiquitous and pervasive technologies affording intimate everyday experiences relying on digitisation and convergence of device functionality, data, content, systems, services and infrastructures. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Many websites and apps use Google services to improve their content and keep it free. (google.com)
  • For example, when you visit a website that uses advertising services like AdSense, including analytics tools like Google Analytics, or embeds video content from YouTube, your web browser automatically sends certain information to Google. (google.com)
  • Google uses the information shared by sites and apps to deliver our services, maintain and improve them, develop new services, measure the effectiveness of advertising, protect against fraud and abuse, and personalize content and ads you see on Google and on our partners' sites and apps. (google.com)
  • Community members seeking information on the procedures or the content of this health consultation should contact ATSDR Health Assessor Jill Dyken, toll free, at 1-888-42-ATSDR (1-888-422-8737). (cdc.gov)
  • We automatically collect and store information about your use of the Services, such as your engagement with particular content including editorial, advertisements, sponsored informational programs from our advertisers, which may include pharmaceutical companies ("Sponsored Programs"), whether you opened a particular email, clicked on a link, your search queries and how often and when you engage with the Services. (medscape.com)
  • Ad Settings helps you control ads you see on Google services (such as Google Search or YouTube), or on non-Google websites and apps that use Google ad services. (google.com)
  • Information Systems & Services provided the procurement and support functions for integrated information and communication services across the Armed Forces, the Ministry of Defence and to overseas bases, operations and ships. (wikipedia.org)
  • The information in this directory is provided to support the academic, administrative and business activities of the University of Adelaide. (edu.au)
  • If you require IT support please contact the IT Services Help desk . (ucl.ac.uk)
  • ITS provides information technology leadership, services, and innovative solutions to support RIT s strategic goals. (rit.edu)
  • That's why we've created the RIT Service Center - your one-stop shop for questions, concerns, and support related to select RIT Services. (rit.edu)
  • The Library's mission is to support the University's teaching programmes and research initiatives by providing adequate scholarly information resources, emerging technologies and user support services. (edu.mt)
  • UIU Information Technology Services (ITS) provides strategic insights, resources, and support for the increasingly diverse technology needs of an international cast of students, faculty, staff, and visitors. (uiu.edu)
  • A one-week WHO mission, scheduled from 1 to 5 December 2012, aims to provide technical support to the Ministry of Health of Oman on the quality management system for blood transfusion services in Oman. (who.int)
  • We provide the Services as a professional resource intended to support healthcare professionals in their efforts to provide high quality medical care to patients. (medscape.com)
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  • If you are signed in to your Google Account, and depending on your Account settings, My Activity allows you to review and control data that's created when you use Google services, including the information we collect from the sites and apps you have visited. (google.com)
  • By submitting this form, you acknowledge that EBSCO Information Services will collect and process your personal information in accordance with its Privacy Policy , including the categories and purposes of use for such information as described here . (lu.se)
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  • Unless otherwise specified herein or on the property from which you have accessed this Privacy Policy, WebMD LLC is the controller of the personal information that we collect about you as described in this Privacy Policy. (medscape.com)
  • We also collect information about your device when you access the Services including IP address, precise location information, browser information (including referring URL), cookie information and advertising ID (which is a unique, user-resettable identification number for advertising associated with a mobile device). (medscape.com)
  • We use cookies and other tracking technologies, such as pixels, tags, web beacons and software development kits, to collect the information about your use of the Services and your device. (medscape.com)
  • We and our service providers collect and store information about users' interactions with unaffiliated websites and applications that use our technologies, including cookies and similar tracking technologies. (medscape.com)
  • In those instances, investigators might need to rely on dated or minimally detailed information before beginning fieldwork. (cdc.gov)
  • Information Systems & Services (ISS) was a cluster within Strategic Command Top Level Budget of the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence. (wikipedia.org)
  • We provide leadership and expertise in development of enterprise dashboards and reports, conducting comprehensive data analysis to generate meaningful insights, and cultivating a culture that systematically uses information as a strategic asset. (rit.edu)
  • Providing leadership to the RIT community in safeguarding the confidentiality, integrity and availability of RIT's information resources. (rit.edu)
  • This guide provides concise information about the services and resources offered by the Library. (edu.mt)
  • Find useful links and relevant study information for current students at Lund university. (lu.se)
  • To help you find the right topic, Research Services are arranging a full programme of digital information meetings at Lund. (lu.se)
  • Geographic information science, systems, software (collectively known as GIS) and methods are one of the tools epidemiologists use in defining and evaluating the where . (cdc.gov)
  • Using geographic information science, systems, or software (collectively known as GIS), boundaries can be drawn for the area of interest and from which specific GIS data files, known as shapefiles , can be created (2,4,5). (cdc.gov)
  • Information Technology Services 1032 W. Sheridan Rd. (luc.edu)
  • In addition, Mariana is a Graphic Designer and an active member at NCWIT (The National Center for Women & Information Technology). (luc.edu)
  • The course aims to give the students theoretical and practical insights into the key issues informing the design of contemporary information technology (IT). (lse.ac.uk)
  • Business innovation with information technology. (lse.ac.uk)
  • The Commission runs a full programme of information events. (lu.se)
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  • Please disseminate this information to healthcare providers, especially infectious diseases specialists, intensive care physicians, internists, infection preventionists, and to emergency departments and microbiology laboratories. (cdc.gov)
  • Does the facility have the capability to flex up intensive care across all services, staffing, and specialties? (medscape.com)
  • Priorities for health services information. (cdc.gov)
  • White, K L "Priorities for health services information. (cdc.gov)
  • Talk sexual health services with other STD prevention professionals. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2019 ISS and a number of organisations were brought together as Defence Digital, with an annual budget of over £2 billion and about 2,400 staff including military, civil servants and contractors, led by Ministry of Defence chief information officer Charles Forte. (wikipedia.org)
  • Defence Digital brought together and replaced a number of organisations, including Information Systems and Services (ISS) in 2019. (wikipedia.org)
  • This course is available on the MSc in Management of Information Systems and Digital Innovation and MSc in Management, Organisations and Governance. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Healthcare organizations, physicians, and nurses must therefore remain prepared to meet the demands for patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and for patients in need of essential surgery services. (medscape.com)
  • You are leaving a California American Water regulated operations page and proceeding to a page with information about our parent company, American Water and its affiliates. (amwater.com)
  • See our Privacy Policy to learn more about how we process data for each of these purposes and our Advertising page for more about Google ads, how your information is used in the context of advertising, and how long Google stores this information. (google.com)
  • In July 2021, the state of New Jersey enacted legislation for all water providers to share with customers the material of the utility-owned service lines leading to their properties and the material of the customer-owned service lines leading to their properties, if known. (amwater.com)
  • Users with the relevant Privacy Sandbox settings enabled in Chrome or Android may see relevant ads from Google's advertising services based on Topics or Protected Audience data stored on their browser or mobile device. (google.com)
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  • For more information about arsenic and health effects related to exposure, please visit the ATSDR Web site, at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov , and click on the ToxFAQs. (cdc.gov)
  • The use of information provided here for any other purpose, including the sending of unsolicited commercial material via email or any other electronic format, is strictly prohibited. (edu.au)
  • The more information you put on Facebook or Twitter, the easier for a phishing email to look legitimate. (brandeis.edu)
  • In order to use the Services, you may be required to register an account and provide certain personal information such as your name, email address, zip/postal code, profession, occupation, specialty and depending on your country of practice, your medical license number or equivalent. (medscape.com)
  • This article contains details on the end-of-service plan for Office Mix Preview. (microsoft.com)
  • International Conference for Occupational Health, Safety and Hygiene Information Specialists : proceedings / organized by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate-General for Employment, Industrial Relations and Social Affairs and the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive, held in Luxembourg from 26 to 28 June 1989. (who.int)
  • GIS Center, with its advanced infrastructure and skilled staff, provides a wide variety of GIS/SDI/Geomatics services. (lu.se)
  • Throughout the course small groups of students will describe an existing complex real-life set of services and suggest design improvements, sensitised by theoretical elements from the course. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Ideas for additional information or other system improvements. (cdc.gov)
  • After 2+ years working with Loyola's Service Desk, Jess now works to distribute computing software to university members and additionally trains users on the software. (luc.edu)
  • At American Water, providing safe, reliable water service is our top priority. (amwater.com)
  • Orthopedics, or orthopedic services, aim at the treatment of the musculoskeletal system. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If it feels "phishy", call the sender or customer service instead of clicking. (brandeis.edu)
  • You may choose to update or supplement the personal information that you provided at registration at any time through your account settings or by contacting Our Customer Service. (medscape.com)
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  • Sometimes, when processing information shared with us by sites and apps, those sites and apps will ask for your consent before allowing Google to process your information. (google.com)
  • As you develop your career, you will need to do some research and take a few small risks, such as interacting with others or conducting information interviews. (sfu.ca)
  • Library and information science research : perspectives and strategies for improvement / edited by Charles R. McClure, Peter Hernon. (who.int)
  • On top of these meetings, you are always welcome to contact us directly at Research Services to discuss your specific interests and needs for your research. (lu.se)
  • If your contact responds within the first couple days, schedule a time for an information interview. (sfu.ca)
  • For added protection and to comply with the new legislation, we will be removing lead and lead/galvanized piping from service lines over time. (amwater.com)
  • For a limited time CDC is accepting public comment on the information services you used. (cdc.gov)
  • I am a part of the global Transport & Services Sustainability team who works together across areas such as Asia Pacific and Central Europe and in close corporation with the carriers that transport goods for IKEA. (lu.se)
  • The information in this database is provided as a service to our users. (who.int)
  • If you do choose to use the Services, you must agree to the Medscape Network Terms of Use which is a contract between us and users of the Services. (medscape.com)
  • Check service websites for specific information. (pasadena.edu)
  • Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Question: Has your country introduced government-sponsored mobile apps to get feedback on health care services? (who.int)
  • The purpose of this meeting summary is to provide updated clinical information to health care providers and updated recommendations for nonpregnant adults ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Cost analysis, cost recovery, marketing, and fee-based services : a guide for the health sciences librarian / M. Sandra Wood, editor. (who.int)
  • The Library and information professional's guide to the internet / Gwyneth Tseng, Alan Poulter, Debra Hiom. (who.int)
  • This Privacy Policy does not apply to our properties and services that display a link to a different privacy policy. (medscape.com)
  • American Water Contract Services Group (CSG) proudly partners with the City of Camden to provide water and wastewater services to the community. (amwater.com)
  • Welcome to the Department of Service Studies! (lu.se)
  • When they integrate our services, these sites and apps share information with Google. (google.com)
  • Apps that use Google advertising services also share information with Google, such as the name of the app and a unique identifier for advertising. (google.com)