Demyelinating Diseases: Diseases characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin in the central or peripheral nervous system.Polyradiculoneuropathy, Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating: A slowly progressive autoimmune demyelinating disease of peripheral nerves and nerve roots. Clinical manifestations include weakness and sensory loss in the extremities and enlargement of peripheral nerves. The course may be relapsing-remitting or demonstrate a step-wise progression. Protein is usually elevated in the spinal fluid and cranial nerves are typically spared. GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME features a relatively rapid progression of disease which distinguishes it from this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1337)Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS: Conditions characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin (see MYELIN SHEATH) in the brain, spinal cord, or optic nerves secondary to autoimmune mediated processes. This may take the form of a humoral or cellular immune response directed toward myelin or OLIGODENDROGLIA associated autoantigens.Neuromyelitis Optica: A syndrome characterized by acute OPTIC NEURITIS; MYELITIS, TRANSVERSE; demyelinating and/or necrotizing lesions in the OPTIC NERVES and SPINAL CORD; and presence of specific autoantibodies to AQUAPORIN 4.Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated: An acute or subacute inflammatory process of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM characterized histologically by multiple foci of perivascular demyelination. Symptom onset usually occurs several days after an acute viral infection or immunization, but it may coincide with the onset of infection or rarely no antecedent event can be identified. Clinical manifestations include CONFUSION, somnolence, FEVER, nuchal rigidity, and involuntary movements. The illness may progress to COMA and eventually be fatal. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p921)Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for central nervous system demyelinating disease. Inoculation with a white matter emulsion combined with FREUND'S ADJUVANT, myelin basic protein, or purified central myelin triggers a T cell-mediated immune response directed towards central myelin. The pathologic features are similar to MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, including perivascular and periventricular foci of inflammation and demyelination. Subpial demyelination underlying meningeal infiltrations also occurs, which is also a feature of ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED. Passive immunization with T-cells from an afflicted animal to a normal animal also induces this condition. (From Immunol Res 1998;17(1-2):217-27; Raine CS, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p604-5)Aquaporin 4: Aquaporin 4 is the major water-selective channel in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM of mammals.Theilovirus: A species of CARDIOVIRUS which contains three strains: Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, and Rat encephalomyelitis virus.Myelin Sheath: The lipid-rich sheath surrounding AXONS in both the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myelin sheath is an electrical insulator and allows faster and more energetically efficient conduction of impulses. The sheath is formed by the cell membranes of glial cells (SCHWANN CELLS in the peripheral and OLIGODENDROGLIA in the central nervous system). Deterioration of the sheath in DEMYELINATING DISEASES is a serious clinical problem.Polyneuropathies: Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.Guillain-Barre Syndrome: An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. Demyelination occurs in peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process is often preceded by a viral or bacterial infection, surgery, immunization, lymphoma, or exposure to toxins. Common clinical manifestations include progressive weakness, loss of sensation, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Weakness of respiratory muscles and autonomic dysfunction may occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1312-1314)Oligodendroglia: A class of large neuroglial (macroglial) cells in the central nervous system. Oligodendroglia may be called interfascicular, perivascular, or perineuronal (not the same as SATELLITE CELLS, PERINEURONAL of GANGLIA) according to their location. They form the insulating MYELIN SHEATH of axons in the central nervous system.Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: A transmembrane protein present in the MYELIN SHEATH of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is one of the main autoantigens implicated in the pathogenesis of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.Polyradiculoneuropathy: Diseases characterized by injury or dysfunction involving multiple peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process may primarily affect myelin or nerve axons. Two of the more common demyelinating forms are acute inflammatory polyradiculopathy (GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME) and POLYRADICULONEUROPATHY, CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY DEMYELINATING. Polyradiculoneuritis refers to inflammation of multiple peripheral nerves and spinal nerve roots.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Cardiovirus Infections: Infections caused by viruses of the genus CARDIOVIRUS, family PICORNAVIRIDAE.Neuritis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for the demyelinating disease of GUILLAINE-BARRE SYNDROME. In the most frequently used protocol, animals are injected with a peripheral nerve tissue protein homogenate. After approximately 2 weeks the animals develop a neuropathy secondary to a T cell-mediated autoimmune response directed towards the MYELIN P2 PROTEIN in peripheral nerves. Pathologic findings include a perivascular accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes in the peripheral nervous system, similar to that seen in the Guillaine-Barre syndrome. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1314; J Neuroimmunol 1998 Apr 1;84(1):40-52)Immunoglobulins, Intravenous: Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Plasma Exchange: Removal of plasma and replacement with various fluids, e.g., fresh frozen plasma, plasma protein fractions (PPF), albumin preparations, dextran solutions, saline. Used in treatment of autoimmune diseases, immune complex diseases, diseases of excess plasma factors, and other conditions.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.JC Virus: A species of POLYOMAVIRUS, originally isolated from the brain of a patient with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The patient's initials J.C. gave the virus its name. Infection is not accompanied by any apparent illness but serious demyelinating disease can appear later, probably following reactivation of latent virus.Myelin Proteins: MYELIN-specific proteins that play a structural or regulatory role in the genesis and maintenance of the lamellar MYELIN SHEATH structure.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Mice, Inbred C57BLMaus Elberfeld virus: A strain of ENCEPHALOMYOCARDITIS VIRUS, a species of CARDIOVIRUS, usually causing an inapparent intestinal infection in mice. A small number of mice may show signs of flaccid paralysis.Myelin Basic Protein: An abundant cytosolic protein that plays a critical role in the structure of multilamellar myelin. Myelin basic protein binds to the cytosolic sides of myelin cell membranes and causes a tight adhesion between opposing cell membranes.Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting: The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)Electrodiagnosis: Diagnosis of disease states by recording the spontaneous electrical activity of tissues or organs or by the response to stimulation of electrically excitable tissue.Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein: A myelin protein found in the periaxonal membrane of both the central and peripheral nervous systems myelin sheaths. It binds to cells surface receptors found on AXONS and may regulate cellular interactions between MYELIN and AXONS.Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive Multifocal: An opportunistic viral infection of the central nervous system associated with conditions that impair cell-mediated immunity (e.g., ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES; HEMATOLOGIC NEOPLASMS; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; and COLLAGEN DISEASES). The causative organism is JC Polyomavirus (JC VIRUS) which primarily affects oligodendrocytes, resulting in multiple areas of demyelination. Clinical manifestations include DEMENTIA; ATAXIA; visual disturbances; and other focal neurologic deficits, generally progressing to a vegetative state within 6 months. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp36-7)Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Encephalomyelitis: A general term indicating inflammation of the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD, often used to indicate an infectious process, but also applicable to a variety of autoimmune and toxic-metabolic conditions. There is significant overlap regarding the usage of this term and ENCEPHALITIS in the literature.Myelin P0 Protein: A protein that accounts for more than half of the peripheral nervous system myelin protein. The extracellular domain of this protein is believed to engage in adhesive interactions and thus hold the myelin membrane compact. It can behave as a homophilic adhesion molecule through interactions with its extracellular domains. (From J Cell Biol 1994;126(4):1089-97)Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Plasmapheresis: Procedure whereby plasma is separated and extracted from anticoagulated whole blood and the red cells retransfused to the donor. Plasmapheresis is also employed for therapeutic use.Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins: Proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, normally albumin and globulin present in the ratio of 8 to 1. Increases in protein levels are of diagnostic value in neurological diseases. (Brain and Bannister's Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p221)Hereditary Central Nervous System Demyelinating Diseases: Inherited conditions characterized by a loss of MYELIN in the central nervous system.Cuprizone: Copper chelator that inhibits monoamine oxidase and causes liver and brain damage.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Motor Neuron Disease: Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Myelin Proteolipid Protein: A myelin protein that is the major component of the organic solvent extractable lipoprotein complexes of whole brain. It has been the subject of much study because of its unusual physical properties. It remains soluble in chloroform even after essentially all of its bound lipids have been removed. (From Siegel et al., Basic Neurochemistry, 4th ed, p122)Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Murine hepatitis virus: A species of the CORONAVIRUS genus causing hepatitis in mice. Four strains have been identified as MHV 1, MHV 2, MHV 3, and MHV 4 (also known as MHV-JHM, which is neurotropic and causes disseminated encephalomyelitis with demyelination as well as focal liver necrosis).Immunologic Factors: Biologically active substances whose activities affect or play a role in the functioning of the immune system.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Poliomyelitis: An acute infectious disease of humans, particularly children, caused by any of three serotypes of human poliovirus (POLIOVIRUS). Usually the infection is limited to the gastrointestinal tract and nasopharynx, and is often asymptomatic. The central nervous system, primarily the spinal cord, may be affected, leading to rapidly progressive paralysis, coarse FASCICULATION and hyporeflexia. Motor neurons are primarily affected. Encephalitis may also occur. The virus replicates in the nervous system, and may cause significant neuronal loss, most notably in the spinal cord. A rare related condition, nonpoliovirus poliomyelitis, may result from infections with nonpoliovirus enteroviruses. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp764-5)Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Rats, Inbred LewCoronavirus Infections: Virus diseases caused by the CORONAVIRUS genus. Some specifics include transmissible enteritis of turkeys (ENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF TURKEYS); FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS; and transmissible gastroenteritis of swine (GASTROENTERITIS, TRANSMISSIBLE, OF SWINE).Enterovirus InfectionsAstrocytes: A class of large neuroglial (macroglial) cells in the central nervous system - the largest and most numerous neuroglial cells in the brain and spinal cord. Astrocytes (from "star" cells) are irregularly shaped with many long processes, including those with "end feet" which form the glial (limiting) membrane and directly and indirectly contribute to the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER. They regulate the extracellular ionic and chemical environment, and "reactive astrocytes" (along with MICROGLIA) respond to injury.Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: A hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy transmitted most often as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by progressive distal wasting and loss of reflexes in the muscles of the legs (and occasionally involving the arms). Onset is usually in the second to fourth decade of life. This condition has been divided into two subtypes, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) types I and II. HMSN I is associated with abnormal nerve conduction velocities and nerve hypertrophy, features not seen in HMSN II. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Coronaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by CORONAVIRIDAE.Neuritis: A general term indicating inflammation of a peripheral or cranial nerve. Clinical manifestation may include PAIN; PARESTHESIAS; PARESIS; or HYPESTHESIA.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Diffuse Cerebral Sclerosis of Schilder: A rare central nervous system demyelinating condition affecting children and young adults. Pathologic findings include a large, sharply defined, asymmetric focus of myelin destruction that may involve an entire lobe or cerebral hemisphere. The clinical course tends to be progressive and includes dementia, cortical blindness, cortical deafness, spastic hemiplegia, and pseudobulbar palsy. Concentric sclerosis of Balo is differentiated from diffuse cerebral sclerosis of Schilder by the pathologic finding of alternating bands of destruction and preservation of myelin in concentric rings. Alpers' Syndrome refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases that feature progressive cerebral deterioration and liver disease. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p914; Dev Neurosci 1991;13(4-5):267-73)Neuroglia: The non-neuronal cells of the nervous system. They not only provide physical support, but also respond to injury, regulate the ionic and chemical composition of the extracellular milieu, participate in the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER and BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER, form the myelin insulation of nervous pathways, guide neuronal migration during development, and exchange metabolites with neurons. Neuroglia have high-affinity transmitter uptake systems, voltage-dependent and transmitter-gated ion channels, and can release transmitters, but their role in signaling (as in many other functions) is unclear.Microglia: The third type of glial cell, along with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes (which together form the macroglia). Microglia vary in appearance depending on developmental stage, functional state, and anatomical location; subtype terms include ramified, perivascular, ameboid, resting, and activated. Microglia clearly are capable of phagocytosis and play an important role in a wide spectrum of neuropathologies. They have also been suggested to act in several other roles including in secretion (e.g., of cytokines and neural growth factors), in immunological processing (e.g., antigen presentation), and in central nervous system development and remodeling.Disease Susceptibility: A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.Cardiovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE causing encephalitis and myocarditis in rodents. ENCEPHALOMYOCARDITIS VIRUS is the type species.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Schwann Cells: Neuroglial cells of the peripheral nervous system which form the insulating myelin sheaths of peripheral axons.Adrenoleukodystrophy: An X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids in the LYSOSOMES of ADRENAL CORTEX and the white matter of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This disease occurs almost exclusively in the males. Clinical features include the childhood onset of ATAXIA; NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HYPERPIGMENTATION; ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY; SEIZURES; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and DEMENTIA. The slowly progressive adult form is called adrenomyeloneuropathy. The defective gene ABCD1 is located at Xq28, and encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS).Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Ranvier's Nodes: Regularly spaced gaps in the myelin sheaths of peripheral axons. Ranvier's nodes allow saltatory conduction, that is, jumping of impulses from node to node, which is faster and more energetically favorable than continuous conduction.Encephalitis, Viral: Inflammation of brain parenchymal tissue as a result of viral infection. Encephalitis may occur as primary or secondary manifestation of TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PARAMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; and ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy: A group of slowly progressive inherited disorders affecting motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Subtypes include HMSNs I-VII. HMSN I and II both refer to CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE. HMSN III refers to hypertrophic neuropathy of infancy. HMSN IV refers to REFSUM DISEASE. HMSN V refers to a condition marked by a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with spastic paraplegia (see SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA, HEREDITARY). HMSN VI refers to HMSN associated with an inherited optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY), and HMSN VII refers to HMSN associated with retinitis pigmentosa. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343)Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Callithrix: A genus of the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE occurring in forests of Brazil and Bolivia and containing seventeen species.Polyomavirus Infections: Infections with POLYOMAVIRUS, which are often cultured from the urine of kidney transplant patients. Excretion of BK VIRUS is associated with ureteral strictures and CYSTITIS, and that of JC VIRUS with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY, PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein: An intermediate filament protein found only in glial cells or cells of glial origin. MW 51,000.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.
Some groups have reported some kind of response of this variant to biotin Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases Xia L ... Tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating and inflammatory disease. Myelination of the axons are highly important for ... 2016). "Tumefactive demyelinating lesions: spectrum of disease, diagnosis and treatment". Current Neurobiology. CS1 maint: ... The disease is heterogeneous and the lesions do not always comply with the requirements for multiple sclerosis diagnosis ( ...
Demyelinating diseases are traditionally classified in two kinds: demyelinating myelinoclastic diseases and demyelinating ... 2008). "MRI characteristics of atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions of the brain". Journal of Neurology. 255 ... since Poser demyelinating diseases normally refers to the myelinoclastic part. Demyelinating diseases of the CNS can be ... Multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) produce lesions (demyelinated areas in ...
It is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is mostly used with rodents and is widely ... However, similar to MS, the disease symptoms reflect the anatomical location of the inflammatory lesions, and may also include ... Recently it has been found that CSF from MS patients can carry the disease to rodents, opening the door to an alternative model ... EAE was motivated by observations during the convalescence from viral diseases by Thomas M. Rivers, D. H. Sprunt and G. P. ...
It has been classified inside the anti-MOG associated inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis ... When a person has more than one demyelinating episode of ADEM, the disease is then called recurrent disseminated ... Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), or acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, is a rare autoimmune disease marked by a ... This disease has been occasionally associated with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, malaria, septicemia associated with ...
More uncommon diseases include ALS, myasthenia gravis, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Using their ... Electrodiagnosis in Diseases of Nerve and Muscle: Principles and Practice; September 9, 2013; Jun Kimura OCLC 793814205. ... Neuromuscular Function and Disease: Basic, Clinical, and Electrodiagnostic Aspects, 2-Volume Set, 1st edition: April 30, 2002; ... Electrodiagnosis (EDX) is a method of medical diagnosis that obtains information about diseases by passively recording the ...
His death was due to Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, a rare autoimmune disease. Davis authored several ...
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS). Several ... Disease-modifying treatments only reduce the progression rate of the disease but do not stop it. As multiple sclerosis ... The disease is associated with a variety of symptoms and functional deficits that result in a range of progressive impairments ... A wide range of medications have been used to try to slow the progression of the disease, with results that have been at best ...
Interest in MOG has centered on its role in demyelinating diseases. Some of them are not-inflammatory, such as ... Reindl M, Di Pauli F, Rostásy K, Berger T (August 2013). "The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases". ... Berger T, Reindl M (August 2015). "Antibody biomarkers in CNS demyelinating diseases - a long and winding road". European ... Ichiro Nakashima, Anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody in demyelinating diseases [1] Kezuka T, Usui Y, Yamakawa N ...
PMID 10814796 Kalman, B. and Lublin, F.D. Spectrum and classification of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central ... Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports, Demyelinating Disorders section 1:249-256, 2001. PMID 11898526 Lublin, F.D., ...
... a Novel Herpesvirus Isolated from a Nonhuman Primate with a Spontaneous Inflammatory Demyelinating Disease". Journal of ... Research on pseudorabies virus (PrV), the causative agent of Aujeszky's disease in pigs, has pioneered animal disease control ... These include: Alzheimer's disease atherosclerosis cholangiocarcinoma Crohn's disease chronic fatigue syndrome dysautonomia ... Both have been shown to down regulate IFN-γ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are all pro-inflammatory cytokines. They have ...
Chronic spinal inflammatory conditions such as Paget disease, neurosarcoidosis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating ... If the syndrome is due to an inflammatory condition e.g., ankylosing spondylitis, anti-inflammatory, including steroids can be ... CES is often concurrent with congenital or degenerative diseases and represents a high cost of care to those admitted to the ... "Cauda equina syndrome". Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD). 2015. Retrieved 9 November 2017. "Cauda Equina ...
2015). "Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS". Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm. 2 (6 ... AntiMOG associated encephalomyelitis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease previously considered part of the multiple ... as any other pattern-II Inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. Anti-MOG positive patients should ... Reindl, M; Di Pauli, F; Rostásy, K; Berger, T (Aug 2013). "The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases ...
For instance in the case of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, one finds that it is a autoimmune disease. Here ... "Orphanet: Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy". www.orpha.net. Retrieved 2016-08-26. "Chronic Inflammatory ... Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J. (7 April 2013). "Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy". Current Treatment ... The most common cause is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy AIDP, the most common form of Guillain-Barré syndrome( ...
chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). In this rare disease, the immune system (the body's defence system) ... chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Kawasaki disease, certain cases of HIV/AIDS and measles, Guillain-Barré ... specific antibody disease, acquired or secondary hypogammaglobulinemia and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. ... which then mediate anti-inflammatory effects helping to reduce the severity of the autoimmune disease or inflammatory state. ...
Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS in which activated immune cells invade the central ... The scleroses that define the disease are the remainders of previous demyelinating lesions in the CNS white matter of a patient ... breaks down and the immune attack begins Multiple sclerosis differs from other idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases ... In multiple sclerosis there is an inflammatory, a demyelinating and a neurodegenerative condition together. Some clinical ...
... this was the first time a molecular target had been identified for a type of demyelinating inflammatory disease. Since the ... Whether Devic's disease is a distinct disease or part of the wide spectrum of multiple sclerosis is debated. Devic's disease ... Devic's disease is now studied along a collection of similar diseases called "Neuromyelitis optica spectrum diseases". Some ... Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Guo, Yong; Popescu, Bogdan F. Gh.; Fujihara, Kazuo; ...
... chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Kawasaki disease, certain cases of HIV/AIDS and measles, Guillain-Barré ... October 2003). "Mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases". Neurol. Sci. 24 ... cells which then mediate anti-inflammatory effects helping to reduce the severity of the autoimmune disease or inflammatory ... such as immune thrombocytopenia and Kawasaki disease), some neurological diseases (multifocal motor neuropathy, stiff person ...
The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis is that of a inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS in which activated immune ... Neurobiology of Disease, 37(3), 510-518. doi:10.1016/j.nbd.2009.11.004 Golan, Daniel; Staun-Ram, Elsebeth; Miller, Ariel (2016 ... Germ theory of disease crystallized the concept of cause-presumably identifiable by scientific investigation. The American ... Also, as to septicemia, Davaine had injected rabbits with a highly diluted, tiny amount of putrid blood, duplicated disease, ...
Pathology is generally regarded as the gold standard in defining different forms of inflammatory demyelinating diseases. ... The criteria try to prove the existence of demyelinating lesions, by image or by their effects, showing that they occur in ... propose that their criteria should be applied only after any other disease has been ruled out. In 2008 a consensus was ... Because early initiation of MS disease-modifying therapy is associated with better clinical outcomes, it is important to ...
... it is demyelinating and it is considered inside the anti-MOG associated inflammatory demyelinating diseases. In most MS- ... The presence of demyelinating white matter lesions on brain MRI at the time of presentation of optic neuritis is the strongest ... Optic neuritis is a demyelinating inflammation of the optic nerve. It is also known as optic papillitis (when the head of the ... to anti-MOG and AQP4-negative neuromyelitis optica When an inflammatory recurrent optic neuritis is not demyelinating, it is ...
"Peripheral nerve proteins as potential autoantigens in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies". ... This list of autoimmune diseases is categorized by organ and tissue type to help locate diseases that may be similar. Overview ... These conditions are included here because: The disease was listed in the prior version of this table The disease is included ... This list includes conditions that are not diseases but signs common to autoimmune disease. Some, such as Chronic Fatigue ...
Devic's disease and other disorders with immune system involvement called inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Leukodystrophic ... Demyelinating diseases are traditionally classified in two kinds: demyelinating myelinoclastic diseases and demyelinating ... MS is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that develops in genetically susceptible ... A demyelinating disease is any disease of the nervous system in which the myelin sheath of neurons is damaged. This damage ...
Transverse myelitis Neuromyelitis optica Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases - A wider group of diseases which ... Demyelinating diseases - Group including them all, regardless of their autoimmunity or idiopathic and inflammatory status.. ... CNS demyelinating autoimmune diseases are autoimmune diseases which primarily affect the central nervous system. Examples ... includes also the non-autoimmune demyelinating diseases. ...
Autoimmune diseases Neurology Kissel JT (2003). "The treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy". ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the peripheral ... These include Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with subtypes: Classical CIDP CIDP with diabetes CIDP/ ... Prednisone improves chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy more than no treatment. Ann Neurol 11: 136-141 ...
Demyelinating disorders Infectious/Inflammatory Degenerative disorders Metabolic Neoplastic Traumatic Vascular Diseases Flaccid ...
... chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and autoimmune anemias.[16] The most dangerous, although among the most rare ... and IgG4-related disease.[27] There is some evidence that it is ineffective in treating IgA-mediated autoimmune diseases.[28] ... Autoimmune diseases[edit]. Rituximab has been shown to be an effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment in three randomised ... Bosch, Xavier; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Khamashta, Munther A. (2013). Drugs Targeting B-Cells in Autoimmune Diseases. Springer ...
Treatment dependence in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: is it related to disease phenotype or to the ... Treatment dependence in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: is it related to disease phenotype or to the ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare and disabling immune neuropathy which often has a ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: search for factors associated with treatment dependence or ...
"Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as an autoimmune disease",. abstract = "Chronic inflammatory demyelinating ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as an autoimmune disease. Yhojan Rodríguez, Nikhil Vatti, Carolina Ramírez- ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as an autoimmune disease. In: Journal of autoimmunity. 2019. ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as an autoimmune disease. / Rodríguez, Yhojan; Vatti, Nikhil; Ramírez-Santana ...
Clinical Message Neuromyelitis optica is certainly a rare inflammatory demyelinating disease. March 1, 2017. Marjorie Bates ... Clinical Message Neuromyelitis optica is certainly a rare inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that ... Neuromyelitis optica should be MK-2206 2HCl recognized from various other demyelinating diseases for instance multiple ... The syndrome was eponymously named Devics disease 2. The discovery of a specific NMO immunoglobulin (NMO‐IgG) opened a new era ...
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System. Demyelinating Diseases. Autoimmune Diseases. Immune System Diseases. Thioctic Acid. ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase CIDP Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Drug: lipoic acid ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a progressive disease leading to paralysis. CIDP is an immune- ...
There is uncertainty about the best treatments for two important diseases causing peripheral neuropathy: chronic inflammatory ... You are here: Home / Randomised trials of treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy... ... Randomised trials of treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy 27 ... Randomised trials of treatment for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy. ...
HTF Market Intelligence released a new research report of 62 pages on title Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy ( ... latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy - Pipeline Review ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) - Overview. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Market 2017 Analysis and Forecast to 2021. March 17th, 2017 HTF MARKET ...
... is a rare autoimmune disorder that attacks the myelin sheaths around ... disease, CIDP is considered a chronic, or long-term, disease. CIDP is less common than Guillain-Barre syndrome. ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy. What is chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy?. ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare type of autoimmune disorder. In an autoimmune ...
BCS is a rare acute inflammatory demyelinating disease, classically considered to be a rapidly progressive and severe variant ... Enhancement can occur within the demyelinating rings, and - as with other demyelinating diseases - if present, is considered to ... post-infectious and/or inflammatory, or traumatic in nature. Demyelinating processes, on the other hand, often occur in young ... If left untreated, many patients with BCS have aggressive disease. Recognizing the characteristic MRI pattern of BCS can aid in ...
... polyneuropathy pipeline is expected to grow in the next few years on account of increasing prevalence of the disease, which is ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Therapeutics - Pipeline Analysis 2018. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is an inflammatory disorder, which affectsthe peripheral nervous system. The ... get affected from the disease, every year. High prevalence of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is in turn ...
Raynauds Disease Pipeline Review H2 2016: Latest Study of Top Companies with Competitive Landscape ... Scope of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Pipeline Review Report-. - The report provides a snapshot of ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) - Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides an overview of the Chronic ... Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Therapeutic Pipeline Review H2 2016, Drug Profile and Major Key Players ...
Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder is an autoimmune disease. Learn about the hereditary and environmental factors, and ... complex inflammatory disease. NMOSD is sometimes linked with other autoimmune diseases (such as systemic autoimmune diseases ... Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, chronic (long-term), demyelinating, autoimmune disease of the central ... Although some experts feel there is a genetic link to having an autoimmune disease, such as NMOSD, it has not yet been proven. ...
Case Analysis for Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, (CIDP) By: Like Wu, Xiaojuan Wang, Shuangshuang ... Case Analysis for Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, (CIDP). By: Like Wu, Xiaojuan Wang, Shuangshuang ... The disease progressed gradually. He can barely raise his upper limbs. When he is in recumbent position, it is difficult for ... electrophysiology examination and NMR at the local hospital and was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating ...
Mehndiratta MM, Hughes RAC, Agarwal P. Plasma exchange for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cochrane ... Lhermitte-Duclos Disease - a Case Report Development of National Set of Clinical Standards and Healthcare Indicators and First ... Research criteria for diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Neurology 1991; 41(5): 617-618. ... Randomized controlled trial of intravenous immunoglobulin versus oral prednisolone in chronic inflammatory demyelinating ...
Acute Inflammatory. On-line free medical diagnosis assistant. Ranked list of possible diseases from either several symptoms or ... A similarity measure between symptoms and diseases is provided. ... Guillain Barre SyndromeBarreAcute inflammatory demyelinating ... Acute Inflammatory Polyneuropathy; Landry-Guillain-Barre Syndrome; Polyradiculoneuropathy, ... Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy; Acute Inflammatory Polyneuropathy; Landry-Guillain-Barre Syndrome; ...
Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and related disorders through:. • Providing information and support to ... including disease mechanisms. ICAP funding will cover clinical assessments, nerve studies and blood tests. The Guillain Barre ... A donation from ICAP will support a pioneering research project to better understand inflammatory neuropathies, ...
A 85-year-old female treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy had three episodes of anaemia one ... Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E. Lyme Disease Natural Wellness Supplement News Forums Our Story ... Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness ... Receive up-to-date ME/CFS, Fibromyalgia & Lyme Disease treatment and research news ...
Chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuritis): A distinct clinical entity from other inflammatory demyelinating diseases ... Inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IDDs), sometimes called Idiopathic (IIDDs) because the unknown etiology of some of them, ... Bruno Brochet, Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases, Springer international, Switzerland 2015, ISBN ... Demyelinating disease Pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis The Myelin Project Fontaine B (2001). "[Borderline forms of ...
Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS. Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System. Nervous System Diseases. Autoimmune Diseases ... Neurodegenerative Diseases. Optic Neuritis. Optic Nerve Diseases. Cranial Nerve Diseases. Eye Diseases. Leukoencephalopathies. ... Disease Characteristics--. *Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating syndrome, as follows: biopsy-proven if necessary - ... I. Evaluate the effectiveness of plasma exchange in the treatment of acute severe attacks of inflammatory demyelinating disease ...
1978) Oculoglandular disease of Parinaud: a manifestation of cat scratch disease. Am J Dis Child 132:1195-1200. ... We report on a 3 year old boy who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) 6 weeks after ... are compatible with the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).. He was treated with ... Cat scratch disease (CSD) was first described in 1950 as a benign regional lymphadenitis. This infection is caused byBartonella ...
The Demyelinating Diseases laboratory, directed by Dr. Moses Rodriguez, studies the role of apoptosis in the development of ... Mechanisms of Axonal Injury in Demyelinating Disease. Recent studies in MS indicate that axonal injury is a major cause of long ... goal of these studies is to determine the role of kallikreins in the pathogenesis of CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases, ... Understanding Pathogenesis and Pathological Substrates of Inflammatory CNS Demyelinating Disorders. ...
Evaluate the effectiveness of plasma exchange in the treatment of acute severe attacks of inflammatory demyelinating disease in ... Disease Characteristics--. - Idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating syndrome, as follows: biopsy-proven if. necessary - ... No chronically progressive demyelinating disease. - No HIV-associated demyelinating syndrome. - No progressive multifocal ... disease type; each stratum is randomized separately.. The first group of patients receives a true plasma exchange using ...
Inflammatory demyelinating diseases in children: an update. Fernández Carbonell C. 1, 2, Chitnis T. 1, 2 ✉ ... Inflammatory demyelinating diseases (DD) affecting the central nervous system (CNS) are increasingly recognized in children. ... 2 Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA, USA ...
Potential Therapy for Inflammatory Demyelinating Disease?. Author(s): Torben Lykke Sørensen. The MS Clinic, Department of ... Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the CNS and a leading cause of disability. Inflammatory mediators play an ... Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the CNS and a leading cause of disability. Inflammatory mediators ... Potential Therapy for Inflammatory Demyelinating Disease?", Current Neurovascular Research (2004) 1: 183. https://doi.org/ ...
Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy typically presents with both proximal and distal weakness, areflexia, and ... Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy typically presents with both proximal and distal weakness, areflexia, and ...
Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Sung-Min Kim, Mark R. Woodhall, Ji-Sun Kim, ... inflammatory demyelinating disease; MOG=. myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein; MS=. multiple sclerosis; NMO=. neuromyelitis ... Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS ... in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. ...
  • According to a study conducted by American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine, around 40,000 people in the U.S. get affected from the disease, every year. (psmarketresearch.com)
  • Under the leadership of Richard Hughes (London), Eduardo Nobile-Orazio (Milan), and Ivo van Schaik (Amsterdam), 12 experts from 6 European countries assembled at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam on October 27th to decide on the design of trials to demonstrate the efficacy of drugs in suppressing the immune response and treating these diseases. (enmc.org)
  • An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. (lookfordiagnosis.com)
more