Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.
An infant during the first month after birth.
All deaths reported in a given population.
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
Care of infants in the home or institution.
Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.
The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.
Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.
Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.
Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.
Liquid formulations for the nutrition of infants that can substitute for BREAST MILK.
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.
Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.
Female parents, human or animal.
The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The nursing of an infant at the breast.
The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.
CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.
Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The offspring in multiple pregnancies (PREGNANCY, MULTIPLE): TWINS; TRIPLETS; QUADRUPLETS; QUINTUPLETS; etc.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.
The sequence in which children are born into the family.
The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.
Events, characteristics, or other definable entities that have the potential to bring about a change in a health condition or other defined outcome.
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The absence of certain expected and acceptable cultural phenomena in the environment which results in the failure of the individual to communicate and respond in the most appropriate manner within the context of society. Language acquisition and language use are commonly used in assessing this concept.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Coordination of activities and programs among health care institutions within defined geographic areas for the purpose of improving delivery and quality of medical care to the patients. These programs are mandated under U.S. Public Law 89-239.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.
DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.
Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.
The number of pregnancies, complete or incomplete, experienced by a female. It is different from PARITY, which is the number of offspring borne. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.
Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
The status of health in urban populations.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.
A self-governing territory formed from the central and eastern portions of the Northwest Territories. It was officially established April 1, 1999. The capital is Iqaluit.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Ethnic group originating in India and entering Europe in the 14th or 15th century.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1000 grams (2.2 lbs), regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from one generation to another. It includes transmission in utero or intrapartum by exposure to blood and secretions, and postpartum exposure via breastfeeding.
A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
The development and establishment of environmental conditions favorable to the health of the public.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.
Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.
Members of a Semitic people inhabiting the Arabian peninsula or other countries of the Middle East and North Africa. The term may be used with reference to ancient, medieval, or modern ethnic or cultural groups. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.
A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Three individuals derived from three FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother.
The status of health in rural populations.
The branch of mathematics dealing with the purely logical properties of probability. Its theorems underlie most statistical methods. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and west of GUINEA. Its capital is Bissau.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.
Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)
The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.
A human infant born before 28 weeks of GESTATION.
A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.
Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.
Use of nursing bottles for feeding. Applies to humans and animals.
Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.
Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.
City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.
The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.
Australia, New Zealand and neighboring islands in the South Pacific Ocean. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.
Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties.
A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)
Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.
The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
A SMN complex protein that is essential for the function of the SMN protein complex. In humans the protein is encoded by a single gene found near the inversion telomere of a large inverted region of CHROMOSOME 5. Mutations in the gene coding for survival of motor neuron 1 protein may result in SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD.
The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.
Products in capsule, tablet or liquid form that provide dietary ingredients, and that are intended to be taken by mouth to increase the intake of nutrients. Dietary supplements can include macronutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates, and fats; and/or MICRONUTRIENTS, such as VITAMINS; MINERALS; and PHYTOCHEMICALS.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.
Organized services to provide health care for children.
A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the administrative, intellectual, social, and cultural domination of the Arab empire. The Arab world, under the impetus of Islam, by the eighth century A.D., extended from Arabia in the Middle East to all of northern Africa, southern Spain, Sardinia, and Sicily. Close contact was maintained with Greek and Jewish culture. While the principal service of the Arabs to medicine was the preservation of Greek culture, the Arabs themselves were the originators of algebra, chemistry, geology, and many of the refinements of civilization. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, p260; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p126)
Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.
Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.
The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.
The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
A geographical area of the United States with no definite boundaries but comprising northeastern Alabama, northwestern Georgia, northwestern South Carolina, western North Carolina, eastern Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western Virginia, West Virginia, western Maryland, southwestern Pennsylvania, southern Ohio, and southern New York.
A republic in the north of South America, bordered on the west by GUYANA (British Guiana) and on the east by FRENCH GUIANA. Its capital is Paramaribo. It was formerly called Netherlands Guiana or Dutch Guiana or Surinam. Suriname was first settled by the English in 1651 but was ceded to the Dutch by treaty in 1667. It became an autonomous territory under the Dutch crown in 1954 and gained independence in 1975. The country was named for the Surinam River but the meaning of that name is uncertain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1167 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p526)
To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.
A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.
The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
A complex body of social, cultural, and religious beliefs and practices evolved in and largely confined to the Indian subcontinent and marked by a caste system, an outlook tending to view all forms and theories as aspects of one eternal being and truth, and the practice of the way of works, the way of knowledge, or the way of devotion as a means of release from the round of rebirths. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The number of males per 100 females.
Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
Five individuals derived from five FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother.
The event that a FETUS is born alive with heartbeats or RESPIRATION regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE. Such liveborn is called a newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN).
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.

Detection of transposition of the great arteries in fetuses reduces neonatal morbidity and mortality. (1/2151)

BACKGROUND: Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a life-threatening malformation in neonates, but it is amenable to complete repair. Prenatal detection, diagnosis, and early management may modify neonatal mortality and mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Preoperative and postoperative morbidity and mortality were compared in 68 neonates with prenatal diagnosis and in 250 neonates with a postnatal diagnosis of TGA over a period of 10 years. The delay between birth and admission was 2+/-2.8 hours in the prenatal group and 73+/-210 hours in the neonatal group (P<0.01). Clinical condition at arrival, including metabolic acidosis and multiorgan failure, was worse in the neonatal group (P<0.01). Once in the pediatric cardiology unit, the management was identical in the 2 groups (atrioseptostomy, PGE1 infusion, operation date). Preoperative mortality was 15 of 250 (6%; 95% CI, 3% to 9%) in the neonatal group and 0 of 68 in the prenatal group (P<0.05). Postoperative morbidity was not different (25 of 235 versus 6 of 68), but hospital stay was longer in the neonatal group (30+/-17 versus 24+/-11 days, P<0.01). In addition, postoperative mortality was significantly higher in the neonatal group (20 of 235 versus 0 of 68, P<0.01); however, the known risk factors for operative mortality were identical in the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal diagnosis reduces mortality and morbidity in TGA. Prenatal detection of this cardiac defect must be increased to improve early neonatal management. In utero transfer of fetuses with prenatal diagnosis of TGA in an appropriate unit is mandatory.  (+info)

Low-weight neonatal survival paradox in the Czech Republic. (2/2151)

Analysis of vital statistics for the Czech Republic between 1986 and 1993, including 3,254 infant deaths from 350,978 first births to married and single women who conceived at ages 18-29 years, revealed a neonatal survival advantage for low-weight infants born to disadvantaged (single, less educated) women, particularly for deaths from congenital anomalies. This advantage largely disappeared after the neonatal period. The same patterns have been observed for low-weight infants born to black women in the United States. Since the Czech Republic had an ethnically homogenous population, virtually universal prenatal care, and uniform institutional conditions for delivery, Czech results must be attributed to social rather than to biologic or medical circumstances. This strengthens the contention that in the United States, the black neonatal survival paradox may be due as much to race-related social stigmatization and consequent disadvantage as to any hypothesized hereditary influences on birth-weight-specific survival.  (+info)

Light on population health status. (3/2151)

A new approach to illustrating and analysing health status is presented which allows comparisons of various aspects of health in a population at different times and in different populations during given periods. Both quantitative and qualitative elements can be represented, the impact of interventions can be monitored, and the extent to which objectives are achieved can be assessed. The practical application of the approach is demonstrated with reference to the health profiles to Tunisia in 1966 and 1994.  (+info)

Influence of maternal ethnicity on infant mortality in Chicago, 1989-1996. (4/2151)

This study compared infant mortality rates between large ethnic groups in Chicago from 1989-1996. Infant mortality information about ethnic groups was compared using data from annual reports published by the Epidemiology Program, Department of Public Health, City of Chicago and vital statistics documents in Illinois, which include information on ethnicity. Chi-squared analysis was used to evaluate the differences between the proportions. A P value of < .05 was considered significant. During the study period, there were 461,974 births and 6407 infant deaths in Chicago. African Americans contributed 212,924 (46.1%) births and 4387 (68.5%) deaths; Hispanics 132,787 (28.7%) births and 1166 (18.2%) deaths; and whites 99,532 (21.6%) births and 780 (12.2%) infant deaths. Compared with the other groups. African Americans suffered a twofold increased mortality (P < .00001) for five of the six most common causes of infant mortality. Deaths from congenital malformations, although significant, were not excessively increased among African Americans (P = .014). Hispanics demonstrated a higher mortality rate than whites (P = .01), especially for postnatal mortality and respiratory distress syndrome. These data confirm excessive infant mortality among African Americans. Further studies are needed to evaluate the apparent low mortality among some Hispanics compared with the other groups studied.  (+info)

Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage. (5/2151)

The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001). There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor which distinguishes babies dying with GLH and IVH from other groups of babies with HMD. Although the causal nature of this association remains unproved, it seems justifiable to lrge caution in alkali usage.  (+info)

Changes of neonatal mortality rate between 'pre' and 'post' surfactant period. (6/2151)

The objective of this study was to determine how the neonatal mortality rate has changed since surfactant (S) therapy was introduced in our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and to evaluate the efficacy of surfactant therapy in respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) patients. Incidences of risk babies such as outborns, prematurity, low birth weight infants and RDS, and neonatal mortality rates were compared between 'pre' (control, 1988 to 1991, n=4,861) and 'post' S period (study, 1993 to 1996, n=5,430). In RDS patients of 'post' S period, neonatal mortality rate was compared between S-treated and non-treated patients, and chest X-ray and ventilatory parameters were compared between pre- and post-72 hr of surfactant treatment. Surfactant therapy showed short term effects, judging by the decrease of early neonatal deaths and improvement of chest X-ray and ventilatory parameters in RDS patients. The overall neonatal mortality rate had a tendency to decrease in spite of increased incidences of risk babies in 'post' S period but it was less than expected. The reasons were thought to be that we had a high proportion of risk babies, and there was some bias in patient selection for surfactant therapy and its use. In conclusion, with the active prevention of risk baby delivery and appropriate use of surfactant, better results could be expected.  (+info)

Narrowing social inequalities in health? Analysis of trends in mortality among babies of lone mothers (abridged version 1). (7/2151)

OBJECTIVES: To examine trends in mortality among babies registered solely by their mother (lone mothers) and to compare these with trends in infant mortality for couple registrations overall and couple registrations subdivided by social class of father. DESIGN: Analysis of trends in infant death rates from 1975 to 1996 for the three groups. The data source was the national linked infant mortality file, containing all records of infant death in England and Wales linked to the respective birth records. SETTING: England and Wales. PARTICIPANTS: All live births (n=14.3 million) from 1975 to 1996; all deaths of infants from birth to 12 months of age over the same period (n=135 800). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death rates in the perinatal, neonatal, and postneonatal periods and for infancy overall. RESULTS: For the babies of lone mothers infant mortality has fallen to less than a third of the 1975 level, with a clear reduction in the gap between the mortality in these babies compared with all couple registrations: the excess mortality in solely registered births was 79% in 1975 reducing to 33% in 1996. Most of the narrowing of the sole-couple differential was associated with the neonatal period, for which there is now no appreciable gap. For couple registrations analysed by social class of father, infant death rates have more than halved in each social class from 1975 to 1996. The reductions in mortality were greater in the late 1970s and early 1990s. Infant death rates in classes IV-V remained between 50% and 65% higher than in classes I-II. Differentials between social classes were largest in the postneonatal period and smallest in the perinatal and neonatal periods. The gap in perinatal and neonatal mortality between the babies of lone mothers and couple parents in social classes IV-V has disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: The differential in infant mortality between social classes still exists, whereas the differential between sole and couple registrations has decreased, showing positive progress in the reduction of inequalities. As the reduction in the differential was confined to the neonatal period these improvements may be more a reflection of healthcare factors than of factors associated with lone mothers' social and economic circumstances.  (+info)

The determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania. (8/2151)

This paper investigates the determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania using the 1991/92 Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey. A hazards model is used to assess the relative effect of the variables hypothesized to influence under-five mortality. Short birth intervals, teenage pregnancies and previous child deaths are associated with increased risk of death. The Government of the United Republic of Tanzania should therefore maintain its commitment to encouraging women to space their births at least two years apart and delay childbearing beyond the teenage years. Further, this study shows that there is a remarkable lack of infant and child mortality differentials by socioeconomic subgroups of the population, which may reflect post-independence health policy and development strategies. Whilst lack of socioeconomic differentials can be considered an achievement of government policies, mortality remains high so there is still a long way to go before Tanzania achieves its stated goal of 'Health for All'.  (+info)

In this paper, we investigated inequalities in the distribution of neonatal and postneonatal mortality in rural areas of Iran over the course of 16 years. Our findings showed that despite notable decreases in neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates over the study period, inequalities in distribution of these measures in Iran persisted, and higher neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates were still reported in areas of lower socioeconomic status.. The regression models built to evaluate neonatal mortality rates showed that the proportions of births occurring in hospitals and literate women of reproductive age were associated with lower mortality rates; additionally, higher neonatal mortality rates were observed in areas with a higher proportion of infants classified as having low birth weight. Moreover, in the evaluation of postneonatal mortality rates, the proportion of births occurring in hospitals and to younger mothers were associated with lower mortality rates.. We also evaluated ...
Editor-In 1994 Sheffield had the highest infant mortality rate in England and Wales.1 The impact of neonatal care in Sheffield immediately came under the spotlight. An investigation led by the Public Health Department of Sheffield Health took place to establish the reasons for the high infant mortality rate.2 It is well known that factors affecting infant mortality and morbidity may operate in the antenatal, as well as the postnatal period.3 The Sheffield Health led investigation consequently included the antenatal period. Similar to Spenceret al, the investigation found that increased social deprivation as indicated by the Townsend Deprivation Index was related to a higher proportion of very low birth weight (less than 1500 g) infants.4 Furthermore, a higher proportion of very low birth weight (less than 1500 g) infants was related to a higher infant mortality rate. The investigation found that the infant mortality rate in Sheffield was not significantly different to other areas of England and ...
Downloadable! This paper examines the relationship between health aid and infant mortality, using data from in total 135 countries (for the purposes of this study, developing countries), between 1975 and 2010. Utilizing both conventional Instrumental Variable and System GMM approaches, a tentative conclusion can be drawn that aid comes to have a statistically significant and positive effect on infant mortality rate, as doubling of aid leads to an approximately 1.3% reduction in infant mortality rates. Thus for an average aid recipient country, doubling per capita aid leads to a reduction of about 790 deaths per million live births in a particular year. This effect, in comparison to the set goals of the Millennium Development Goals, is small and may not be enough to ensure that the MDG targets are met by 2015.
Preface This report presents data from the National Infant Mortality Surveillance (NIMS) project. The NIMS project was a collaborative effort between the Public Health Service and states to address the issue of infant mortality. Factors that affected the risk of infant mortality for single-born infants included birthweight, race, sex, gestation, birth order, maternal age and education, and prenatal care. The most important predictor for infant survival was birthweight, with improved survival for both blacks and whites associated with increased birthweights. Overall, black infants had twice the mortality risk of white infants. The higher risk for blacks was related to higher prevalence of low birthweight and to higher mortality risks in both the neonatal and postneonatal periods. In general, the black-white differential exists regardless of other infant and maternal characteristics. Findings from NIMS have been published in a special section of Public Health Reports (March-April 1987) and ...
September is dedicated to raising awareness about infant mortality in order to help expecting mothers seek out the best possible pre-natal care. Infant mortality refers to the death of a baby before it reaches its first birthday. Though infant mortality continues to decline in the United States, the U.S. still ranks 23rd among industrialized nations in the world in infant mortality. Although its difficult to draw comparisons with other countries, its evident that the high rate of low birth weight in the U.S. is the major reason for the country?s unrelenting high rate of infant mortality. In particular, its a critical public health issue for African American families, as well as for Native Americans and Hispanics.. To align your organization with this cause, show your support with an infant mortality awareness promotion. You can organize special programs for the parents-to-be at your company, encouraging quality pre-natal and healthy behavior during the gestation period, which spans from ...
Downloadable (with restrictions)! Foreign aid is used by recipient economies to ease the otherwise existing resource constraints. One of the areas to which aid has been directed is the health sector. To name a few, health-aid is used to provide basic health infrastructure, basic nutrition, infectious disease control, health education, and health personnel development. However, not enough attention has been paid to health-aids effectiveness on health outcomes. Our findings suggest that health-aid does not have a significant impact on infant mortality - one of the major health indicators for the developing countries. We however, find that gross domestic product per capita and primary levels of education are both important determinants of infant mortality. Physician stock to some extent also does influence.
We use cookies to collect information from your browser to personalize content and perform site analytics. Black neonatal CDC. She developed high blood pressure and had frequent nosebleeds and headaches. In 2017, 53206 had the highest infant mortality rate-29.1 percent. objective. Infant mortality is the death of young children under the age of 1. April 11-17 is Black Maternal Health Week, organized by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance. MMWR SEARCH , Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health black infants with birthweights 2,500g. neonatal Can you talk more about the racial difference in maternal mortality in the U.S.? by single-delivery black compared with white infants occurred among To describe the causes of death among black compared with white Washington, DC: National Academy Press, In the NIMS study, 75% of the excess deaths Statement on infant mortality. Public Health National Center for Health Statistics. Black babies in our region die at a rate three times that of their white peers. ...
Data & statistics on Infant mortality rate in London Bills: The infant mortality rate (up to 12 months of age) for Croydon for 2007-2009 was 5 deaths of children aged under one year per 1,000 live births. This was higher than the rate for London and England., Croydon London England, Profile of children subject to a CPP...
The purpose of this study was to identify disparities in neonatal, post-neonatal, and overall infant mortality rates among infants born late preterm (34-36 weeks gestation) and early term (37-38 weeks gestation) by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality. In analyses of 2003-2005 data from US period linked birth/infant death datasets, we compared infant mortality rates by race/ethnicity, maternal age, and plurality among infants born late preterm or early term and also determined the leading causes of death among these infants. Among infants born late preterm, infants born to American Indian/Alaskan Native, non-Hispanic black, or teenage mothers had the highest infant mortality rates per 1,000 live births (14.85, 9.90, and 11.88 respectively). Among infants born early term, corresponding mortality rates were 5.69, 4.49, and 4.82, respectively. Among infants born late preterm, singletons had a higher infant mortality rate than twins (8.59 vs. 5.62), whereas among infants born early term, the ...
reports that infant mortality dropped from 6.7 to 5.9 per thousand live births between 1995 and 1996, a 12% drop. Infant mortality nationwide dropped five percent in the same period, from 7.6 to 7.2 per thousand live births.According to Dr. Irwin Silberman, county director of Family Health Programs, part of the reason the countys rate is better than the national average is because of its high percentage of Hispanic and Asian women who do better than non-Hispanic Caucasians when it comes to infant mortality. He said, These are women who are survivors. They are strong and well-nourished, and they live in families with strong support systems. Silberman cited other factors contributing to the infant mortality decline, including better access to health care, improved public health efforts, advances in medical sciences and technology, and lower rates of substance abuse, crime and violence. He said, You have to look at it as a package of good things that have been happening to women. Dr. ...
According to the NCHS Data Brief (10/08), the infant mortality rate declined during the 20th century but has not declined significantly since 2000. Researchers, policy makers, and parents are concerned about the historically recent stagnation in the infant mortality rate. This fact in and of itself does not concern me - the rate that is.…
Objective. In recent years, gains in neonatal survival have been most evident among very low birth weight, preterm, and low birth weight (LBW) infants. Most of the improvement in neonatal survival since the early 1980s seems to be the consequence of decreasing birth weight-specific mortality rates, which occurred during a period of increasing preterm and LBW rates. Although the decline in neonatal mortality has been widely publicized in the United States, research suggests that clinicians may still underestimate the chances of survival of an infant who is born too early or too small and may overestimate the eventuality of serious disability. So that clinicians may have current and needed ethnic- and race-specific estimates of the chances of early survival for newborn infants, we examined birth weight/gestational age-specific neonatal mortality rates for the 3 largest ethnic/racial groups in the United States: non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic blacks. Marked racial variation in ...
A new county-wide initiative led by the Guilford County Coalition on Infant Mortality - in partnership with Ready for School, Ready for Life - is being implemented to see that more babies are born healthy and enjoy a healthy beginning to their lives.. Guilford County announced the program on Tuesday, Sept. 1 and said in a statement that this is being done to create a collective action approach for eliminating the systemic racism that causes babies born to African American mothers to experience pre-term births, low birth rates, and infant mortality at higher rates than babies born to white mothers.. Guilford Countys infant mortality rate is just over 8 deaths per 1,000 live births - with the two leading causes of infant mortality in the county being premature births and a low birth weight.. Both of those problems are more prevalent in African-American babies and thats one reason that population is currently experiencing an infant mortality rate thats more than five times higher than the ...
Background Infant mortality can be an essential signal of people wellness within a nation. HA14-1 using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. Simulation-based Bayesian kriging was used HA14-1 to produce maps of all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. Results Infant mortality increased significantly over the study period, mainly due to the effect of the HIV epidemic. There was a high burden of neonatal mortality (especially perinatal) with several hot spots observed in close proximity to health facilities. Significant risk factors for all-cause infant mortality were mothers death in first 12 months (most commonly due to HIV), death of earlier sibling and increasing quantity of household deaths. Becoming given birth to to a Mozambican mother posed a significant risk for infectious and parasitic deaths, particularly acute diarrhoea and malnutrition. Conclusions This study demonstrates the use of Bayesian geostatistical models in assessing risk factors and producing clean maps of infant ...
The Commission was charged with conducting an inventory of all state programs that may impact infant mortality and their available funding streams, as well as to evaluate each programs performance in improving the infant mortality rate in this state.. The Commission considered a variety of approaches including developing better data practices, cultivating collaboration between state and local initiatives, conducting public awareness campaigns, developing screening tools to focus resources on areas with the most pressing need, and addressing the social determinants of health. Furthermore, the Commission was clear in all its discussions that successes in reducing the overall rate of infant mortality without also favorably impacting the disparity between white and black babies would be nothing more than a hollow victory.. The recommendations recognize that changes are needed inside and outside the health care system and at the state and local levels to address and remove barriers that prevent too ...
A Milwaukee ad agency is using a different approach than the Nationwide ad seen during the Super Bowl to draw attention to infant mortality.
The following question crossed my mind recently: how many lives are lost from excess infant mortality?. I asked this question because I wondered if anti-abortion activists couldnt better spend their time saving the lives of children that died in their first year of life, rather than protesting at abortion clinics. Saving the life of a child who has been born seems like an easier political task, and will almost certainly be more effective.. We have a pretty good sense that this is theoretically possible because of the considerable variation in infant mortality that exists worldwide. Most poor countries have high infant mortality rates (IMR), and most rich countries have low infant mortality rates. There are a number of countries in Africa with IMR above 50 per 1000 live births (meaning 50 children die in their first year for every 1000 live births). There are rich countries with IMR below 5. The difference between these numbers-roughly 45 per 1000 births-tells us that preventing infant death ...
While earlier parts of this article have addressed the racial differences in infant deaths, a closer look into the effects of racial differences within the country is necessary to view discrepancies. Non-Hispanic Black women lead all other racial groups in IMR with a rate of 11.3, while the Infant Mortality Rate among white women is 5.1.[117] Black women in the United States experience a shorter life expectancy than white women, so while a higher IMR amongst black women is not necessarily out of line, it is still rather disturbing.[118] While the popular argument leads to the idea that due to the trend of a lower socio-economic status had by black women there is in an increased likelihood of a child suffering. While this does correlate, the theory that it is the contributing factor falls apart when we look at Latino IMR in the United States. Latino people are almost just as likely to experience poverty as blacks in the U.S., however, the Infant Mortality Rate of Latinos is much closer to white ...
An estimated 2 maternal deaths occur daily among black women in the U.S. This is linked to poor health care options for American-Americans.
OBJECTIVE: The rate of preterm births has been increasing in the United States, especially for births 34 to 36 weeks of gestation (late preterm), which now constitute 71% of all preterm births. The causes for these trends remain unclear. We characterized the delivery indications for late preterm births and their potential impact on neonatal and infant mortality rates.. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using the 2001 US Birth Cohort Linked birth/death files of 3 483 496 singleton births, we categorized delivery indications as follows: (1) maternal medical conditions; (2) obstetric complications; (3) major congenital anomalies; (4) isolated spontaneous labor: vaginal delivery without induction and without associated medical/obstetric factors; and (5) no recorded indication.. RESULTS: Of the 292 627 late-preterm births, the first 4 categories (those with indications and isolated spontaneous labor) accounted for 76.8%. The remaining 23.2% (67 909) were classified as deliveries with no recorded indication. ...
Despite ranking first in per capita health care spending, the United States ranks only 55th out of 225 countries (in order of low to high) for infant mortality rates, with 5.8 deaths per 1,000 live births. Moreover, this rank hides large racial disparities. Black infants die twice as often (11.1 deaths per 1,000 live births) as non-Hispanic white infants (4.8 deaths per 1,000 live…
TY - JOUR. T1 - Rapid Protective Effects of Early BCG on Neonatal Mortality Among Low Birth Weight Boys: Observations From Randomized Trials. AU - Biering-Sorensen, Sofie. AU - Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov. AU - Monterio, Ivan. AU - Ravn, Henrik AU - Aaby, Peter. AU - Benn, Christine Stabell. N1 - © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact [email protected] PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Background. Three randomized trials (RCTs) in low-weight (,2.5 kg) infants have shown that Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine ...
The infant mortality rate in Franklin County, Ohio, has reached 8.2 deaths per 1,000 live births, with black babies at three times the risk of white infants.
Sir, - Dr James Deeney, chief medical officer at the Department of Health in the 1940s, wrote a memoir, To Cure and to Care. In it he mentions the very high infant mortality rate in Bessborough mother and baby home in Cork. He described how the Department of Health closed it down until the source of the infection was identified and addressed. This led to a real and dramatic reduction in the number of infant deaths. - Yours, etc,. CILIAN Ó SÚILLEABHÁIN,. Cork. ...
New state figures show a slight drop in Ohios overall infant mortality rate, though the rate for black infants is nearly three times that of whites.
Premature births are the main reason that the U.S. infant mortality rate is higher than in most European countries, according to a government report issued November 3. In the U.S. one in eight births is premature. These births are much less common in Europe, and in Ireland and Finland only one in eighteen babies is premature.
Infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births and is a good indicator of a countrys health and economic status.
The purpose of this research was to study infant mortality and their rates in Duval County, Florida. Infant mortality rate is the estimate of infant deaths per 1,000 li..
Which country requires the most infant vaccine doses and yet has the highest infant mortality rate? Yes, that would be the United States, based on new rese
In an attempt to check infant mortality rate, Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) programme was launched in city on Thursday with an objective to train basic health workers including ANMs and ASHAs to provide better medical care to newborn to save their lives ...
Infant mortality rate is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year.. ...
The disturbing high infant mortality rate in South Africa is highlighted through awareness campaigns such as Pregnancy Week, held from 12 - 18 February this year.
Center for Health Reporting, Analysis, John Gonzales, Posted: January 2, 2013. A consistent theme has emerged from the federal Healthy Start program since its founding in 1991: Infant mortality is not tackled during the 9 months of a womans pregnancy alone.. If we really want to improve pregnancy outcomes and reduce infant mortality in this country, we need to start improving womens health before pregnancy, said Dr. Michael Lu, the programs director.. Accordingly, Lu is listening to program managers nationwide to chart a course for the third major reboot of the program, Healthy Start 3.0.. Healthy Start is the federal governments signature program focused on reducing infant mortality. Not to be confused with the state education program of the same name, it is funded at just under $105 million nationwide and was reauthorized through 2013 with solid bipartisan support.. Lu, a medical doctor and former UCLA professor who has been a leading researcher on infant mortality, says much of the ...
Fewer babies are dying in the United States than a decade ago, according to NBC News. The U.S. infant mortality rate, which is higher than in other developed countries, is down 15 percent over the last...
After holding steady from 2000 through 2005, the US infant mortality rate dropped 12% from 2005 through 2011, according to a new CDC report . In 2011, the rate was 6.05 deaths of babies less than a year... Health News Summaries. | Newser
Today in Boston, black infants such as Destiny are more likely to celebrate their first birthdays than ever before. A report scheduled to be released Friday shows that infant mortality -- the measure of how many babies die during the first year of life -- has reached a historic low for black children.
This study estimated time trends in the deprivation gap in neonatal mortality by cause of death, for which limited data have been published. Neonatal mortality rates were more than twice as high in the most deprived areas of England than in the least deprived areas, and the relative gap widened over time before a slight narrowing in recent years. Neonatal deaths would be 39% lower if all areas had the same neonatal mortality rates as the least deprived areas. This widening relative deprivation gap in all cause neonatal mortality is particularly associated with an increase in the proportion of deaths associated with immaturity at less than 24 weeks gestation, for which the deprivation gap in mortality is widest, and differential falls in mortality by deprivation over time for congenital anomalies and immaturity at 24-27 weeks and 28-36 weeks gestation. Wide socioeconomic inequalities existed in deaths due to congenital anomalies and immaturity, as seen previously,6 and these causes accounted ...
The Bronx has the highest rate of infant mortality with eight of the eleven Bronx community districts having higher infant mortality rates than the NYC average.
Aaron Carroll: So why is our infant mortality so bad?: ...Everyone knows that in international comparisons, the infant mortality rate in the US is terrible. Some people think its because we code things differently and try harder to save premature...
The overall infant mortality rate in the U.S. in 1993 was 8.4 deaths per 1, 000 live births, a new low. Provisional data for 1994 show the infant mortality rate dropping to 7.9. In 1993 for white infants the rate was 6.8, while for black infants the rate was 16.5. Although significant gaps in infant mortality remain between the black and white population, there was a larger decline in mortality for black infants from 1992 to 1993 than for white infants ...
Background The Programme for the Awareness and Elimination of Diarrhoea (PAED) was a pilot comprehensive diarrhoea prevention and control programme aimed to reduce post-neonatal, all-cause under-five mortality by 15?% in Lusaka Province. probability of dying after the 28th day and before the fifth birthday among children aged 1C59 months. The Kaplan-Meier time to event analysis was used to estimate the probability of death; multiplying this probability by 1000 to yield the post-neonatal mortality rate. Survival-time inverse probability weighting model was used to estimate Average Treatment Effect (ATE). Results The percentage of children under age 5 who had diarrhoea in the last 2?weeks preceding the survey declined from 15.8?% (95?% CI: 15.2?%, 16.4?%) in 2012 to 12.7?% (95?% CI: 12.3?%, 13.2?%) in 2015. Over the same period, mortality in post-neonatal children under 5?years of age declined by 34?%, from an estimated rate of 29 deaths per 1000 live births (95 % CI: (26, 32) death per 1000 live ...
Acknowledging the high infant mortality was an immense health concern for the nation, Health Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad informed the parliament of Indian scenario which is worse than its neighbours.
A series of in-depth articles appeared in The Commercial Appeal in 2005 about infant mortality in Shelby County, Tennessee and was followed by the 2006 Governors Summit, which was focused on the problem statewide. These events became the catalysts for increasing awareness of infant mortality and its associated disparities in Shelby County. This growing awareness…
The plan includes not only goals but also outlines the efforts and progress made during the 2012-2015 Infant Mortality Reduction Plan. According to the 2014 estimate, the state rate is currently down to 6.75 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, nearing the Healthy People 2020 goal of six infant deaths per 1,000 live births ...
A shocking research study published on May 4, 2011, shows a link between the number of vaccinations given to infants and an increase in infant mortality rate, (IMR). The study, published in the peer reviewed international journal, Human & Experimental Toxicology, looked at the infant mortality rate (IMR) for 34 nations including the United States, and compared that to the number of vaccinations given in the first year of life. In the studys introduction, the authors note that infant mortality rate (IMR) is one of the most important measures of childrens health and overall development in countries. In developing nations, IMRs are higher because the basic necessities, such as clean water, good nutrition, good sanitation, and easy access to health care, are lacking or unevenly distributed. In developed nations, such as the US, these factors do not come into play and are not primarily responsible for IMR statistics. n this study, a literature review was conducted to compare the immunization schedules
I have a question regarding the following: *Excluded are congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities from the hospital group. This may not include all lethal anomalies, as some may be labeled as something else, like cardiac disease, for example. Were these excluded in the MANA study also? I only ask because I wonder if its a possibility that some of the deaths among the homebirths in the MANA study were attributed to any of these. I see this as a possibility because there are women who homebirth who choose to forego the screens and tests that would detect these anomalies, which would then include the baby in the neonatal mortality rates among homebirth but not have been a result of the decision to have a home birth. If they are included in the MANA study, and not in the hospital numbers used to compare to, how can we be sure there is an actual increase in neonatal mortality in homebirth? Especially since there are studies that show little to no significant difference ...
Among the possible causes of the decline are various targeted new public health initiatives and improved access to water and sanitation. A Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition using Demographic and Health Survey data shows that the increased ownership of insecticide-treated bednets in endemic malaria zones explains 39 percent of the decline in postneonatal mortality and 58 percent of the decline in infant mortality. Changes in other observable candidate factors do not explain substantial portions of the decline. The portion of the decline not explained may be associated with generalized trends such as the overall improvement in living standards that has taken place with economic growth ...
Each September marks National Infant Mortality Awareness Month. At KID, we take this opportunity to spread awareness about common hazards that contribute to the infant mortality in the U.S. The CDC defines infant mortality as the death of an infant before the age of one. As weve mentioned in previous blogs, the infant mortality rate in the U.S. still varies based on racial and geographic differences.. One of the leading causes of infant mortality is Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID), which includes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and accidental suffocation or strangulation. Although progress has been made, and the infant mortality rate has decreased in recent years, certain safety precautions can further reduce these risks.. Safe Sleep: Follow these recommendations to create a safe sleep environment for children.. ...
Data & statistics on infant mortality rates spokane county and healthy people goal: Infant Mortality Rates, Spokane County 1990-1999 and Healthy People 2010 Goal. Source: Death Certificate Data. Washington Department of Health, Center for Health Statistics., Youth Involved in a Physical Fight on School Property During Past 12 Months, Spokane County, Washington State, and US 1999. Source: Spokane County Youth Risk Behavior Survey 1999; Washington State Youth Risk Behavior Survey 1999, Early, Adequate Prenatal Care Received by Age Group, Spokane County 1984-1999 and Healthy People 2010 Goal. Source...
By Daniel K. Benjamin. Anyone who has experienced the summer smog of a major city has some sense of the costs of air pollution. As I have reported before in this column (March 2004), more precise estimates of these costs are scarce, but are slowly accumulating. Recent research by Janet Currie and Matthew Neidell (2005) adds significantly to our stock of knowledge, showing that some of the costs of pollution can come in the form of elevated infant mortality.. Currie and Neidell use data from California for the 1990s to investigate the impact of three key pollutants on infant mortality rates: carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10), and ozone (O3). They find that although particulate matter and ozone have no discernible impact on infant deaths, exposure to higher levels of ambient carbon monoxide does elevate the infant mortality rate. Or, to consider the process in reverse: During the 1990s, emissions of CO in California were cut about 40 percent. ...
Improving Infant Outcomes Infant Mortality Data What is infant mortality? Infant mortality is defined as the death of a baby that is less than one year old. Infant deaths are typically classified as neonatal or postneonatal. Neonatal deaths are those to infants who die before 28 complete days of life; postneonatal deaths are defined as deaths to infants at least 28 days but less than 365 days old. How does Oklahoma compare to the rest of the United States regarding infant mortality rates? One of the factors in considering a nations health status compared to other countries is its infant mortality rate (IMR), which is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. The United States ranks 31st among the 34 industrialized countries in infant mortality. Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). OECD Health Data 2010 - Version October 2010. In 2007, Oklahoma ranked 46th in the United States with an IMR of 8.5. Oklahomas IMR has consistently remained above the ...
Improving Infant Outcomes Infant Mortality Data What is infant mortality? Infant mortality is defined as the death of a baby that is less than one year old. Infant deaths are typically classified as neonatal or postneonatal. Neonatal deaths are those to infants who die before 28 complete days of life; postneonatal deaths are defined as deaths to infants at least 28 days but less than 365 days old. How does Oklahoma compare to the rest of the United States regarding infant mortality rates? One of the factors in considering a nations health status compared to other countries is its infant mortality rate (IMR), which is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. The United States ranks 31st among the 34 industrialized countries in infant mortality. Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). OECD Health Data 2010 - Version October 2010. In 2007, Oklahoma ranked 46th in the United States with an IMR of 8.5. Oklahomas IMR has consistently remained above the ...
Improving Infant Outcomes Infant Mortality Data What is infant mortality? Infant mortality is defined as the death of a baby that is less than one year old. Infant deaths are typically classified as neonatal or postneonatal. Neonatal deaths are those to infants who die before 28 complete days of life; postneonatal deaths are defined as deaths to infants at least 28 days but less than 365 days old. How does Oklahoma compare to the rest of the United States regarding infant mortality rates? One of the factors in considering a nations health status compared to other countries is its infant mortality rate (IMR), which is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. The United States ranks 31st among the 34 industrialized countries in infant mortality. Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). OECD Health Data 2010 - Version October 2010. In 2007, Oklahoma ranked 46th in the United States with an IMR of 8.5. Oklahomas IMR has consistently remained above the ...
Improving Infant Outcomes Infant Mortality Data What is infant mortality? Infant mortality is defined as the death of a baby that is less than one year old. Infant deaths are typically classified as neonatal or postneonatal. Neonatal deaths are those to infants who die before 28 complete days of life; postneonatal deaths are defined as deaths to infants at least 28 days but less than 365 days old. How does Oklahoma compare to the rest of the United States regarding infant mortality rates? One of the factors in considering a nations health status compared to other countries is its infant mortality rate (IMR), which is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. The United States ranks 31st among the 34 industrialized countries in infant mortality. Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). OECD Health Data 2010 - Version October 2010. In 2007, Oklahoma ranked 46th in the United States with an IMR of 8.5. Oklahomas IMR has consistently remained above the ...
Infant mortality rates remained high in late nineteenth century cities. Industries and residences tended to locate near one another in these cities creating a complex mixture of land uses throughout much of the city. A lack of regulation, beyond nuisance codes, allowed the dumping of household and industrial wastes into street gutters only to have those wastes wash away to the nearest waterway or seep into the groundwater supply. This paper asks if land use is a factor affecting infant mortality patterns in 1880 Baltimore, MD. Using 1880 Vital Statistics Death Records, the 1876 Hopkins Atlas, and the 1890 Sanborn Fire Insurance Atlas, the geographic information system constructed displays the spatial distribution of individual infant deaths and laud use at the block level. The analysis of the resulting infant death and land use data uses spatial statistics, grid, and visual analysis. Industrial land uses in 1880 Baltimore do not appear to significantly affect the infant mortality patterns. The ...
MIAMI - Announcing that more infant lives are being saved than ever before, and the Healthy Start Coalition of Miami-Dade (HSCMD) will host its Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, Dec. 13, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Treetop Ballroom at Jungle Island, 1111 Parrot Jungle Trail. This years theme is Celebrating 10 Years of Accomplishments, which include 2010 marking Miami-Dade Countys lowest infant mortality rates on record. The event will also recognize Champions of Change, local hospitals for their evidence-based maternity care. We are ecstatic to mark 10 years of accomplishments in the field of maternal, infant and child health, said Manuel Fermin, CEO of HSCMD. We are leading the charge to save our young childrens lives by raising infant mortality awareness, educating parents and providing much-needed services to the community.. Highlights of the Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony include reviewing 10 years of achievement countywide. Chief among them is the declining local ...
In 2014, more than 23,000 infants in the U.S. died before their first birthday. That means for every 1,000 live births, 6 babies died in their first year of life. The U.S. ranks among the worst compared to other developed nations, and ranked 27 out of the 34 nations comprising the Organization for Economic Cooperation. Compared to the national average infant mortality rate, Ohio ranked near the bottom of the 50 states, with an infant mortality rate of 6.8 per 1,000 live births, more than 13% higher than the national rate. The statistics are even worse for African American babies; while the rate of infant deaths was 11.2 infant deaths per 1,000 live births for Black babies nationwide in 2013, the latest year for which comparable data are available, in Ohio there were a staggering 13.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, and the statewide figure increased in 2014. When Troy Chaffin, Director of Finance, Administration, Grants and Accreditation at Erie County Community Health Center learned how ...
Hertel-Fernandez, Alexander Warren, Giusti, Alejandro Esteban & Sotelo, Juan Manuel. (‎2007)‎. The Chilean infant mortality decline: improvement for whom? Socioeconomic and geographic inequalities in infant mortality, 1990-2005. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 85 (‎10)‎, 798 - 804. World Health Organization. http://dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.06.041848 ...
During the webcast, leaders of the Baltimore City Health Department will discuss how their Bmore for Healthy Babies program has worked to change policies and improve services for expectant and new mothers who need help caring for their babies.. In 2009, at a time when Baltimore City had the fourth-highest infant mortality rate in the nation, CareFirst partnered with the Baltimore City Health Department and the Family League of Baltimore to launch Bmore for Healthy Babies (BHB). Together with more than 150 organizations, BHB works to decrease the three leading causes of infant death, address racial disparities in birth outcomes, and reduce the incidence of teen birth.. BHB announced the citys latest infant mortality rate statistics earlier this month.. For years, CareFirst has been committed to improving maternal and child health in the region, targeting communities where the need for access to pre- and post-natal care is greatest. Since 2007, CareFirst has committed more than $17 million to ...
Infant mortality in Northeast Florida continues to be a major health issue affecting families. The rate increased from 7.3 to 7.9 deaths per 1000 live births in 2018, according to data recently released from the Florida Department of Health. There were 147 babies who died before their first birthday during the year, the equivalent of eight classes of kindergarteners. The regional rate remains higher than the state (6 deaths) and nation (5.8 deaths).. The Healthy Start Coalitions Fetal & Infant Mortality Review project will release a review of all 2018 infant deaths this fall - the first full, in-depth review of deaths since the local FIMR project began in 1995. The leading causes of death in 2018 were:. ...
Africa has many of the highest infant mortality rates in the world, with an overall average of 53 deaths per 1,000 births. However, in Senegal, the infant mortality rate is much lower, thanks to targeted interventions and a unique approach to low-resource neonatal care.. Zaira Gasanova, a second-year medical student, investigated the effectiveness of these interventions for her Area of Scholarly Concentration (AOSC) research project. She was analyzing patterns of success, part of a larger effort to identify countries that improve their neonatal and child mortality, and presented her findings at a recent AOSC poster session.. Read a Q&A with Gasanova below.. Why did you choose Feinberg?. I chose Feinberg because I connected with all of the faculty and students during my time spent interviewing here, and I felt like my goals aligned with the mission of the school. I was impressed by how there seems to be a specialist for absolutely anything here, as well as the devotion that Feinberg has to ...
Q: If socialized medicine is so bad, why are infant mortality rates higher in the U.S. than in other developed nations with government or single-payer health care? A: U.S. infant mortality rates (deaths of infants <1 year of age per 1,000 live births) are sometimes cited as evidence of the fai...
There are three main service delivery channels: clinical services, outreach, and family and community. To determine which delivery channels are associated with the greatest reductions in under-5 mortality rates (U5MR), we used data from sequential population-based surveys to examine the correlation between changes in coverage of clinical, outreach, and family and community services and in U5MR for 27 high-burden countries. Household survey data were abstracted from serial surveys in 27 countries. Average annual changes (AAC) between the most recent and penultimate survey were calculated for under-five mortality rates and for 22 variables in the domains of clinical, outreach, and family- and community-based services. For all 27 countries and a subset of 19 African countries, we conducted principal component analysis to reduce the variables into a few components in each domain and applied linear regression to assess the correlation between changes in the principal components and changes in under-five
Data on non-specific effects of BCG vaccination in well described, general population African cohorts is scanty. We report the effects of BCG vaccination on post-neonatal infant and post-infancy mortality in a cohort of children in Mbale, Eastern Uganda. A community-based prospective cohort study was conducted between January 2006 and February 2014. A total of 819 eligible pregnant women were followed up for pregnancy outcomes and survival of their children up to 5 years of age. Data on the childrens BCG vaccination status was collected from child health cards at multiple visits between 3 weeks and 7 years of age. Data was also collected on mothers residence, age, parity, household income, self-reported HIV status as well as place of birth. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models taking into account potential confounders were used to estimate the association between BCG vaccination and child survival. The neonatal mortality risk was 22 (95% CI: 13, 35), post-neonatal infant mortality
isolated communities,Intestinal diseases,infant mortality rate,average life expectancy,live births,Mexicans,private care,public facilities,citizens,constitution,hospital care,medical services,health care,parts of Mexico,nation,United States,children,women,addition,program,world,years,access
View Notes - 020110 from SOC 200 at SUNY Stony Brook. Soc 200 Feb.1st 2010 ALE (average life expectancy) and its correlation with IMR ( Infant mortality rates) Health outcomes- take measurements
Chicago health officials Tuesday predicted a drop in the city`s infant mortality rate based on preliminary data.James Masterson, deputy commissioner of the Chicago Department of Health, said the
This project evaluates the relationships among public health, primary care, and policy intermediaries who work collaboratively to reduce injury-related infant mortality rates in U.S. communities. By identifying the characteristics of Arkansas partnerships that can more effectively and efficiently mobilize injury prevention strategies and reduce injury-related infant mortality, this study helps determine how to maximize resource sharing and promote enhanced learning among collaborative partners. ...
METHODS: Using the United States Period Linked Birth/Infant Death data for 2007-2010, a retrospective case-control study was conducted to determine infant and maternal risk factors for pneumonia-associated infant death among singleton infants born in the United States. A pneumonia-associated death was defined by the presence of an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code for pneumonia (J12 - J18). Infants who survived their first year were randomly selected as controls to obtain a 1 to 4 ratio of cases to controls. Risk factors for pneumonia-associated infant death were determined using multivariable logistic regression modeling.. RESULTS: The infant mortality rate for pneumonia-associated infant death during 2007-2010 in the United States was 10.7. Male sex was associated with higher odds of pneumonia-associated death (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.28-1.64) compared to females, infants with a 5-minute Apgar score ,7 had higher odds (OR 7.41, 95% CI 5.53-10.01) of ...
3^/ No. 83 April 1994 INFANT DEATH: SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC AND MEDICAL RISK FACTOR ANALYSES FOR NORTH CAROLINA by Kathryn B. Surles Paul A. Buescher Robert E. Meyer ABSTRACT N.C. DOCUMENTS CLEAR MAY 20 1994 N.C. STATE LfBRARY RALEIGH Between 1977-81 and 1988-91, reductions in fetal and neonatal mortality were greater for whites than nonwhites, while nonwhites experienced a greater decline in postneonatal death. This occurred as whites experienced a 26 percent increase in the postneonatal death rate of infants weighing 1 500-2499 grams at birth. The size and mix ofNorth Carolinas birth population also changed considerably during those years with large increases in the numbers of unmarried and older mothers. Simultaneously, shifts occurred in the relative risks associated with several sociodemographic factors. As a result of the 1988 expansion of data gathered on the North Carolina birth certificate, this report examines associations between a poor pregnancy outcome and selected medical conditions of ...
120 hours revision of 500 Video Lectures Crash Course on Ophthalmology,ENT,Preventive and Social Medicine based on University Previous Exam Question Papers.
Babies are much more likely to die in their first few weeks of life if their mothers live close to the site of an oil spill, according to new research. Scientists studied data on infant mortality and oil spills in Nigerias Niger Delta region - and describe their results as shocking. Its estimated that 240,000 barrels of crude oil are spilled into the Niger Delta every year.. The environmental effects are clear to see - waterways running thick with the choking, black liquid; suffocated wildlife; dying mangroves. The effect on the people living in the delta is slowly coming to light. The study by scientists at Switzerlands University of Saint Gallen is shocking: babies born in the delta are twice as likely to die in the first month of life if their mothers were living close to an oil spill before they became pregnant. Roland Hodler is lead researcher. We looked at the birth histories of more than 2,500 Nigerian mothers, Holder said. And we compared siblings, some conceived before and some ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Comparisons of infant mortality using a percentile-based method of standardization for birthweight or gestational age. AU - Hertz-Picciotto, Irva. AU - Din-Dzietham, Rebeca. PY - 1998/1. Y1 - 1998/1. N2 - Comparisons of infant, perinatal, or neonatal mortality across populations with different birthweight or gestational age distributions are problematic. Summary measures with adjustment for birthweight or gestational age frequently are invalid or lack interpretability. We propose a percentile- based method of standardization for comparing infant, perinatal, or neonatal mortality across populations that have different distributions of birthweight and/or gestational age. The underlying concept is a simple one: comparable health for two population groups will be expressed as equal rates of disease or mortality at equal quantiles in the two distributions of birthweight or gestational age. We describe this method mathematically and present an example comparing mortality rates for ...
The Indiana Youth Institute says many factors contributing to high infant mortality are preventable, including smoking and obesity.
You will immediately see that for the various groupings of European countries the post-1950 under-5 infant mortality is on the average about 3-7% of the total mortality within each group and less than 4% of the current population. However for the non-European world the post-1950 under-5 infant mortality is on average about 32-53% of total mortality and 10-29% of total current population for the various regional groupings.. Thus in European countries post-1950 under-5 infant mortality has been a very small proportion of deaths whereas in non-European countries it represents a very high proportion. Similarly, in European countries on average only several under-5 infant deaths have occurred for every 100 people alive today - whereas on average such infant death has been tragically commonplace in the various regions of the non-European world.. At this point a European neo-con will declare that surely such elevated infant mortality is only to be expected for non-European countries that are typically ...
New estimates of child mortality were released today by the UN Inter-Agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME), and show the global child (under-five) mortality rate has dropped 47 percent since 1990 - from 90 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990, to 48 in 2012. This decline represents substantial progress, but the rate of decline remains insufficient to reach Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) of a two-thirds reduction in 1990 levels by 2015.. But a closer look at the data show that just looking at the average trend hides the accelerated decline in rates in recent years. The average decline in rates was just 1.2 percent per year between 1990 and 1995, but between 2005 and 2012 there has been average annual reduction in child mortality rates of 3.9 percent. This recent progress is close to the average rate needed to be on track to meet MDG 4, since under-five mortality rates needs to be going down by at least 4 percent annually. ...
The under five mortality rate in India stands at 50 per 1000 live births down from 74 in the 10 years between 2005-06 and 2015-16.
Just look at the immunization schedules in Finland, Portugal, and other countries.. What about autism?. Rates of autism have increased in Japan, just as they have in other countries. So much for the idea that the MMR vaccine is associated with autism, right?. It should be obvious now that if anti-vaccine folks did any research at all, they wouldnt use Japan as an example when they talk about vaccines.. With higher rates of vaccine-preventable disease and deaths from vaccine-preventable diseases, especially right after they impulsively halt a vaccine, Japans vaccine history simply demonstrates that vaccines work and that they are still very necessary.. One thing is true though. Japans infant mortality rate has been dropping, but then so has the infant mortality rate in almost all other countries, including the United States, which is at record low levels.. It certainly isnt true that Japans infant mortality rate started to drop following a ban on mandatory vaccinations. How do we know that? ...
Male: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. In 2020, infant mortality rate for Germany was 2.67 deaths per thousand live births. And they are among the indicators most frequently used to compare socioeconomic development across countries. Dataset Details. ( 2 ) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, ( 3 ) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, ( 4 ) United Nations Statistical Division. United Nations projections are also included through the year 2100. Moreover, they are among the indicators most frequently used to compare socioeconomic development ac, Note: This page was last updated on December 28, 2019, Home , About , Search , Site Map , Blog , Indicadores en Español. Data in the tables are those available to the Human Development Report Office as of 15 November, 2013, unless otherwise specified. ...
STATISTICS ON infant deaths fly in the Madhya Pradesh Government?s face. The State accounts for the highest infant mortality rate (IMR)? 79 per 1000 ? in the country. Only Orissa...
The neonatal period is only the first 28 days of life and yet accounts for 40% of all deaths in children under-five. Globally, neonatal conditions accounted for 3 072 000 deaths in 2010 alone. Although the number of neonatal deaths has decreased since 1990, all regions have seen slower reductions in neonatal mortality compared to under-five mortality resulting in an increased share of neonatal deaths among total under-five deaths. In order to achieve the Millennium Development Goal 4 in reducing the under-five mortality rate by two-thirds by 2015, neonatal conditions need to be addressed immediately.. Among many neonatal conditions; 1) premature birth, 2) neonatal infections, and 3) birth asphyxia, were identified as major contributors to the global burden of disease. Due to the complex etiology of these conditions, preventive methods, diagnostic tools, and treatments remain limited. Many of the current preventive approaches focus on maternal health prior to the newborns arrival such as ...
Bulletin Board: A Post From the Community | Each year, numerous vaccine-preventable illnesses are reported in Illinois. Certain diseases, such as measles, are making a comeback as some parents choose to either delay or decline vaccinations for their children. In observance of National Infant Immunizations Week, April 26 to May 3, the Lake County Health Department/Community Health Center is reminding parents to follow the recommended immunization schedule to protect their infants and children by providing immunity early in life. Babies need to visit a doctor or clinic for vaccinations at least five times by the age of 2 for protection against serious childhood diseases, said Tony Beltran, the ...
Read Race/Ethnicity/Nativity Differentials and Changes in Cause-Specific Infant Deaths in the Context of Declining Infant Mortality in the U.S.: 1989-2001, Population Research and Policy Review on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
The 2010 Australian National Infant Feeding Survey is the first specialised national survey of infant feeding practices in Australia. The survey also collected information on attitudes towards, and...
The health model calculates the mortality distribution by country/region, age category, sex, and cause of death (modmordstdet). This distribution allows the specification of key variables in the population model, including life expectancy (LIFEXP) and infant mortality (INFMOR). Life Expectancy is computed as a mean average number of years of life given the survival rates in each age group. First we find total mortality by country/region (r), age (c) and gender (p) by adding all 15 types of mortality (d) using modmordstdet (c,a,g,t). (Note with respect to model code: we actually combine the gender and mortality type subscript into one, with the odd type values representing males and the even type values for females). Second we find the average years lived (nax), within the age group, by those who die (per Coale and Demeny 1983, using parameters that came from the arithmetic mean of the separate male and female parameters shown in Preston, Heuveline, and Guillot 2001):. Infants with mortality ,= ...
Infant mortality rate[edit]. The infant mortality rate in Estonia has decreased considerably during the past decades. In 1970 ... The lowest infant mortality rate was recorded in 2011: 2.6. Life expectancy at birth[edit]. Life expectancy in Estonia is lower ...
Reduction in Infant Mortality Rate[edit]. When the couple started holding people[17] health assemblies they found that ... Home Based Neonatal Care (HBNC) model developed by Bang has resulted in reduction in infant mortality in the study villages of ... This approach, which brought down the infant mortality rate in rural Gadchiroli from 121 per 1000 live births to 30, was ... Infant and child mortality, Elizabeth Day - The Observer, Sunday 20 March 2011 Dr Abhay Bang: the revolutionary pediatrician ( ...
Infant mortality rate[edit]. total: 53.5 deaths/1,000 live births (2018 est.). male: 58.3 deaths/1,000 live births (2018 est.) ... CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality ...
Infant mortality rate[edit]. 39.01 deaths/1,000 live births (2013 est.). Dependency ratios[edit]. total dependency ratio: 73 ( ...
Infant mortality. 7.7 per 1,000 (5th). • Literacy. 98.3% (1st). Time zone. UTC-03 (BRT). ...
Infant mortality. 36.9 per 1,000 (1st). • Literacy. 79.3% (5th). Time zone. UTC-03 (BRT). ...
Infant mortality rate. 44.0 (2011). Net migration rate. 84 (2009). Age structure. ... "Vital Statistics - Deaths/Mortality". Nauru Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 14 July 2014.. ...
Infant mortality rate 1990 579,400 10,622 4,844 5,778 18.3 8.4 10.0 2.42 11.0 ...
5,000 fewer infant deaths, and the infant mortality rate would have been 10% lower.[5] ... Greater infant mortality.[5][18] If all sexually active couples in the US had routinely used effective contraception in 1980, ... In the 19th and 20th centuries, the desired number of pregnancies has declined as reductions in infant and childhood mortality ... Unintended pregnancies often result in an adoption of the infant, where the biological parents (or birth parents) transfer ...
... infant mortality rate per 1000 births Fertility and Births[edit]. Total Fertility Rate (TFR) (Wanted Fertility Rate) and Crude ...
... infant mortality rate per 1000 births. Sample Vital Registration System[14][15][edit]. Year. Population (x 1000). Live births. ...
Infant mortality rate: *total: 4.34 deaths/1,000 live births. *country comparison to the world: 203 ...
Infant mortality rate: deaths/1,000 live births 42.65 40 39 (2005) 15.4 ... infant mortality rate per 1000 births Registered births and deaths[edit]. Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths ... Mortality under age 5: deaths/1,000 n.a. 55 49 (2005) 22 ... Infant mortality rate. 36 deaths/1,000 live births[4] (2012 est ...
infant mortality rate3 1950-1955 933,000 529,000 404,000 50.6 28.7 21.9 6.93 262.1 ...
... infant mortality rate). Major causes of infant mortality include dehydration, infection, congenital malformation and SIDS.[12] ... infant mortality rates are especially high in minority groups. For instance, non-Hispanic black women have an infant mortality ... Infant mortality is the death of an infant in the first year of life, often expressed as the number of deaths per 1000 live ... infant mortality, and maternal mortality rates: results of a cross-national comparison". Soc Sci Med. 39 (1): 105-14. doi: ...
Lower rates of infant mortality are observed in breastfed babies in addition to lower rates of sudden infant death syndrome ( ... "Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System , Maternal and Infant Health , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2020-02-04. Retrieved 2020-04-24.. ... Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 68 (35): 762-765. doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6835a3. PMC 6730892. PMID 31487273.. ... Field TM (2007). The amazing infant. Malden, MA: Blackwell.. *^ Meyer KD, Zhang L (February 2009). "Short- and long-term ...
Infant mortality has plummeted.[103] Cuban medical internationalism as a policy has seen the Cuban government sent doctors as a ... "Decline of Infant Mortality in England and Wales, 1871-1948 : a Medical Conundrum". Retrieved 2012-12-17.. ... "The declines in infant mortality and fertility: Evidence from British cities in demographic transition". Retrieved 2012-12-17. ... In Britain, the infant mortality rate fell from over 15% in 1870 to 7% by 1930.[78] ...
Infant mortality[edit]. Infant mortality was the major component of life expectancy. Infant mortality was lower in America ... Mortality was high for infants and small children, especially from diphtheria, yellow fever, and malaria. Most sick people turn ... Mortality was very high for new arrivals, and high for children in the colonial era.[3][4] Malaria was deadly to many new ... Dobson, Mary J. "Mortality Gradients and Disease Exchanges: Comparisons from Old England and Colonial America," Social History ...
Infant mortality rate: 1990-35.4; 2000-20.9. *Higher education: Faculdade Cidade de Aparecida de Goiânia - FACCIDADE; Faculdade ...
2) Find the infant mortality rate. (out of 1000 births) INDEXED Infant Mortality Rate = (166 - infant mortality) × 0.625 ... The value is the average of three statistics: basic literacy rate, infant mortality, and life expectancy at age one, all ... It has also been criticized because there is considerable overlap between infant mortality and life expectancy.[1] ... Literacy Rate + INDEXED Infant Mortality Rate + INDEXED Life Expectancy ...
CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality ... Motherhood mortality: about 73.1 deaths per 100,000 born children in 2002.. *Mortality by non-transmissible illness: 151.7 ... Childhood mortality: about 2.51% of childhood mortality, reaching 3.77% in the northeast region. ... Mortality caused by external causes (transportation, violence and suicide): 71.7 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants (14.9% of all ...
"Cuban infant mortality and longevity: health care or repression?". Health Policy and Planning. doi:10.1093/heapol/czy033.. ... Other campaigns included a program to reduce the infant mortality rate in 1970 directed at maternal and prenatal care.[19] As ... Following the Revolution and the subsequent United States embargo against Cuba, an increase in disease and infant mortality ... A 2018 paper using a synthetic control method found that infant mortality increased in the first years of the Castro regime ...
CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality ...
The shadowy goddess Mana Genita was likewise concerned with both birth and mortality, particularly of infants, as was Hecate.[ ... But childbirth in antiquity remained a life-threatening experience for both the woman and her newborn, with infant mortality as ... Her infant died a few days later, severing the family ties between her father and husband and hastening the Caesar's Civil War ... A grandmother or maternal aunt next cradled the infant in her arms; with a finger covered in lustral saliva, she massaged the ...
CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality ... "3. Live births, deaths, and infant deaths, latest available year (2002 - 2016)" (PDF). Unstats.un.org. Retrieved 3 October 2017 ...
The infant mortality rate was almost 58 deaths per 1,000 live births. The rate was estimated to be higher for males than for ...
... infant mortality; health; and levels of education and employment. Civil and political rights Protests of 1968 Timeline of the ...
"Infant Mortality , Maternal and Infant Health , Reproductive Health , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 3 August 2018. Collins JW, David RJ, ... Low birth weight is associated with neonatal infection and infant mortality. A low birth weight can be caused either by a ... Non-Hispanic Blacks have the highest infant mortality rate in the United States (11.4 deaths per 1,000 live births compared to ... Infant mortality Low birth-weight paradox MOMO syndrome Prenatal nutrition Thrifty phenotype "Definitions". Georgia Department ...
CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) Chitrakar, Anil (30 July 2010). "Infant Mortality". ECS NEPAL. Kathmandu. Retrieved 7 ...
infant mortality. Lower infant mortality, were generally more stable was also positively associated with stability. This is ... explained as the infant mortality measures for standard of living; therefore countries with low infant mortality rate have more ... Thus partial democracies with low involvement in international trade and with high infant mortality are most prone to ... and found that partial democracies with low involvement in international trade and with high infant mortality are most prone to ...
They survive solely on breast milk or formula.[12] Small amounts of pureed food are sometimes fed to young infants as young as ... "Ability to sit and rise from the floor as a predictor of all-cause mortality". European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 21 ... two or three months old, but most infants do not eat adult food until they are between six and eight months old. Young babies ...
"Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 44 (19): 381-2. PMID 7739512. Archived from the original on 25 June 2017.. ... "Recommendations for Breastfeeding/Infant Feeding in the Context of Ebola". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 19 ... 25-90% mortality[1]. The virus spreads through direct contact with body fluids, such as blood from infected humans or other ... Ebola has a high mortality rate among primates.[241] Frequent outbreaks of Ebola may have resulted in the deaths of 5,000 ...
... reduced infant and child mortality in the 1960s and 1970s.[98] The decline in the mortality rate for nonwhite children ... HIV-related mortality (affected by the recent introduction of antiretrovirals) accounted for 20% of the effect. Mortality ... "Medicaid Expansion and Infant Mortality in the United States". American Journal of Public Health. 108 (4): 565-7. doi:10.2105/ ... A 2018 study in the American Journal of Public Health found that the infant mortality rate declined in states that had Medicaid ...
... late weaning of infants, and a nomadic lifestyle.[3] Like contemporary hunter-gatherers, Paleolithic humans enjoyed an ... Use of fire reduced mortality rates and provided protection against predators.[34] Early hominins may have begun to cook their ...
Single injection of ceftriaxone IM or IV should be given to infants born to mothers with untreated gonococcal infection. ... Infants with chlamydia pneumonitis should be treated with oral erythromycin for 10-14 days.[6] ...
Under-five mortality:From 136.9 per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 39.5 in 2015. Infant Mortality: From 97.70 to 29.40 in 2015. ... of the infant mortality rate (IMR) and 58% of the under 5 mortality rate (U5MR) in 2015 and is one of its challenges going ... over time have shown that neonatal mortality in Nepal has been decreasing at a slower rate than infant and child mortality. The ... to reduce child mortality) and #5A (to reduce maternal mortality). This review provided an opportunity for the MoHP and other ...
Mortality for allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be estimated using the prediction model created by Sorror et al.,[41] ... Umbilical cord blood is obtained when a mother donates her infant's umbilical cord and placenta after birth. Cord blood has a ... HSCT is associated with a high treatment-related mortality in the recipient (38 percent or higher),[32] which limits its use to ... However, for other cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia, the reduced mortality of the autogenous relative to allogeneic HSCT ...
No clear differences in cerebral palsy, infant mortality or other standard measures of neonatal wellbeing, neither on any ...
While a minimal amount of thyroid hormones are found in breast milk, the amount does not influence infant plasma thyroid levels ... As it is a medical emergency with a high mortality rate, it should be treated in the intensive care unit[11] with thyroid ... 15] Furthermore, levothyroxine was not found to cause any adverse events to the infant or mother during breastfeeding.[15] As ...
Less commonly, and seen usually in infants, are teratomas and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors.[65] Germ cell tumors, ... GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death, Collaborators. (8 October 2016). "Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all- ... cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden ... and there was no coincident jump in mortality. The central nervous system cancer survival rate in children is approximately 60 ...
The overall mortality rate is estimated to be 1%, but during epidemics, mortality can climb as high as 50%. The mortality rate ... The "Swollen baby syndrome" occurs in newborns, infants and toddlers with pitting edema, abdominal distension and hemorrhage.[6 ...
Regional differences in mortality rates were influenced by the effects of migration,[217] and of natural disasters.[218] In ... although the rate of female infant death was higher than for males, perhaps reflecting a discriminatory bias.[215] A relatively ... Though excess mortality due to malarial deaths peaked in December 1943, rates remained high throughout the following year.[224] ... Sen, Amartya (1980). "Famine Mortality: A Study of the Bengal Famine of 1943". In Eric J. Hobsbawm. Peasants in History: Essays ...
Higher infant mortality and child mortality[29]. *Smaller adult size. *Loss of immune system function ... A consequence from inbreeding for this species has been high juvenile mortality, low fecundity, and poor breeding success.[40] ... Wielebnowski, Nadja (1996). "Reassessing the relationship between juvenile mortality and genetic monomorphism in captive ... Some of the most harmful effects known from such breeding includes its effects on the mortality rate as well as on the general ...
Garenne M; Ronsmans C, Campbell H (1992). "The magnitude of mortality from acute respiratory infections in children under 5 ... "The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines ...
In her role as global patron of The White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood, and chair of the Maternal Mortality Campaign, ... Infant and Young Child Nutrition. Retrieved 9 April 2014. ...
... infant mortality) and the end (wear-out) of the lifecycle."(Schroeder et al. 2007) ...
Another critical factor for such an estimate is the question of pre-modern infant mortality rates; these figures are very ... A number of factors contributed to this increase, including the lessening of the mortality rate in many countries by improved ...
Life expectancy at birth was 42 for males in 2004; for females it was 47.[101] Infant mortality was 118 of 1000 live births.[ ... "Country Comparison :: Maternal Mortality Rate". The World Factbook. CIA.gov. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. ... Ivory Coast has the 27th-highest maternal mortality rate in the world.[104] The HIV/AIDS rate was 19th-highest in the world, ...
While reducing the radioactive intake of their infants is an important preventative measure, it denies women the opportunity to ... This places the cancer mortality rate for the 220 primary cast and crew quite near the expected average.[12] ... the authors conclude that women have a 48 percent higher radionuclide-related cancer mortality risk than men. Further evidence ...
20.0 20.1 Lewington S, Whitlock G, Clarke R, et al (December 2007). "Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and ... "Lipids of human milk and infant formulas: a review" (PDF). Am J Clin Nutr 31 (6): 990-1016. PMID 352132. http://www.ajcn.org/ ... Anderson KM., Castelli WP, Levy D. (1987). "Cholesterol and mortality. 30 years of follow-up from the Framingham study". JAMA ... increase in CVD mortality per 1 mg/dL per year drop in cholesterol levels. In the Framingham Heart Study, the researchers ...
In fact, the mortality rate of the Varoiola Minor form of smallpox then found in Europe was 1-3% as opposed to 30-50% for the ... Nuorti, J.P.; Whitney, C.G. (December 10, 2010). Prevention of Pneumococcal Disease Among Infants and Children - Use of 13- ...
... impact of extreme prematurity and congenital anomalies on the interpretation of international comparisons of infant mortality. ... impact of extreme prematurity and congenital anomalies on the interpretation of international comparisons of infant mortality ...
Since these symptoms are quite common among all infants, they are not likely to lead a doctor to make a diagnosis of Hunter ... However, even for attenuated patients, it is a major intervention with significant mortality risks and potential for life- ...
CRT devices have been shown to reduce mortality and improve quality of life in patients with heart failure symptoms; a LV ... the apparatus was used to revive a stillborn infant at Crown Street Women's Hospital, Sydney whose heart continued "to beat on ... "The effect of cardiac resynchronization on morbidity and mortality in heart failure". N. Engl. J. Med. 352 (15): 1539-49. doi ... to advanced cardiovascular technologies is one of the major contributors to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in ...
The under five mortality and infant mortality rates have been declining, from 202 and 190 deaths per thousand live births ... Infant mortality in Kerala is 12 per thousand live births, but in Assam it is 56. According to World Bank, the total ... Maternal Mortality : Indian maternal mortality rates in rural areas are one of the highest in the world. Rural India contains ... diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections also contribute to the high infant mortality rate. Diseases such as dengue ...
Abulof, Uriel (2015). The Mortality and Morality of Nations. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 26. ISBN 9781107097070.. ... Research upon adolescents who as infants had been highly apprehensive, vigilant, and fearful finds that their nucleus accumbens ...
Henry V's son, Henry VI, became king in 1422 as an infant. His reign was marked by constant turmoil due to his political ... The consequent overcrowding into areas with little supporting infrastructure saw dramatic increases in mortality, crime, and ...
Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Infant_mortality&oldid=192042083" ...
Washington Offices and Barbara Jordan Conference Center: 1330 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005 , Phone 202-347-5270 www.kff.org , Email Alerts: kff.org/email , facebook.com/KaiserFamilyFoundation , twitter.com/kff. Filling the need for trusted information on national health issues, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco, California. ...
Infant Mortality, by Birthweight and Race: Multiple Birth Infants, 1980 Birth Cohort, United States 13. Infant Mortality, by ... within 0.1/1,000 of the 1980 infant mortality rate. Factors that increased the risk of infant mortality for single-born infants ... The infant mortality risk is the number of infant deaths/1,000 live births. MORTALITY RISKS--Risks for the totals of all ... National Infant Mortality Surveillance (NIMS) 1980 Preface This report presents data from the National Infant Mortality ...
1The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. 2019 infant mortality rates on map are crude death rates per 1,000. ... by state do not take into account other state specific population characteristics that may affect the level of mortality. When ...
Infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births and is a good indicator of a countrys health and ... Infant Mortality Rate. Infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births and is a good indicator of a ... What is the infant mortality rate in Hermosillo Sonora. ?. Asked by Wiki User ... What is the infant mortality rate in East Timor. ?. Asked by Wiki User ...
... areas with more beds and doctors dont have lower infant-mortality rates. The authors ominously suggest that "infants might be ... To reduce infant mortality, then, we need to prevent premature births, and if that fails, improve care of premature babies once ... Comparing infant mortality rates between countries is fraught with uncertainty-after all, its hard to argue that every ... According to a 2002 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least a third of all infant mortality in the ...
INFANT MORTALITY AND STILLBIRTHS. Br Med J 1912; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.2696.500 (Published 31 August 1912) Cite ...
Influenza and Infant Mortality. Br Med J 1972; 4 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.4.5837.430-c (Published 18 November 1972) ...
Sofas and Infant Mortality. Lauren R. Rechtman, Jeffrey D. Colvin, Peter S. Blair, Rachel Y. Moon ... It is said that the baby box has helped Finland achieve one of the worlds lowest infant mortality rates( Helena Lee, BBC news ... Interestingly, in Finland a country with one of the lowest infant mortality rates, expectant mothers receive from the state a ... Rechtman et al report in October Pediatrics the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome in babies who were put to sleep ...
... infant mortality there is rising fast at a time when it is falling in almost every other part of the world. ... Infant Mortality Soars in Venezuela With hospitals suffering a catastrophic lack of supplies, the countrys babies are dying at ... CUMANÁ, Venezuela-Medical staff at the University Hospital in this eastern Venezuelan city delivered two premature infants that ...
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of infant mortality after the first 30 days of life in the United ... Sleep environment and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome in an urban population: the Chicago Infant Mortality Study. ... Infant sleep location: associated maternal and infant characteristics with sudden infant death syndrome prevention ... Sofas and Infant Mortality. Lauren R. Rechtman, Jeffrey D. Colvin, Peter S. Blair, Rachel Y. Moon ...
The American health care system needs to do better to improve the nations infant mortality rate, which is ranked nearly 29th ... The infant mortality rate in this country declined sharply in the 20th century but then plateaued from 2000 to 2005. The ... Infant mortality is associated with many factors, including the health and economic status of the mother, her race or ethnicity ... After five years of stagnation, the United States has managed to cut its infant mortality a bit. That is no great cause for ...
HRSA Infant Mortality. AMCHP Infant Mortality. NGA Learning Network Improving Birth Outcomes-Virginia CDC Infant Mortality. ... Infant Mortality Definition: Infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of the health of a state, as it is ... Infant Mortality Strategic Plan for Virginia Partners Health Commissioner Infant Mortality Workgroup Resource for Parents and ... Goal: Decreasing the infant mortality rate from 6.7 to 5.7 deaths per 1000 live births by 2018 in Virginia. ...
Infant Mortality in Rochester, New York An on-the-ground report from Rochester, New York, where an alarming number of Latino ...
As to the children who are born, in the 1980s child mortality went down. Lately the rate has held steady or even risen in some ... And in others, child mortality rates have not changed in the last 50 years, especially in African countries such as Lesotho, ... Experts say maternal health and mortality are directly related to access to health services. In turn, that is strongly related ...
Service will end with a lantern release in the infant area of Greenlawn Memorial Gardens. ... We want to take this time during National Infant Mortality Awareness Month to honor all of those children and their families. ... 2018-09-27T18:00:00-0500 2018-09-27T19:00:00-0500 Infant Mortality Awareness & Remembrance Service 2300 N University Ave., ... This very special service will end with a lantern release in the infant area of Greenlawn Memorial Gardens. If you would like ...
1977)‎. SEA/RC30/10 - Infant mortality. WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/129919 ...
... was 51 Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births. Discover more data with NationMaster! ... How does Mozambique rank in Infant Mortality Rate?. #. 193 Countries. Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births. Last. YoY. 5‑ ... Since 2014, Mozambique Infant Mortality Rate decreased by 3.5% year on year. In 2019, the country was number 16 comparing other ... Mozambique - Infant Mortality Rate Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births - 1964 to 2019 ...
... was 7 Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births. Discover more data with NationMaster! ... How does Kazakhstan rank in Infant Mortality Rate?. #. 193 Countries. Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births. Last. YoY. 5‑ ... Since 2014, Kazakhstan Infant Mortality Rate decreased by 8.8% year on year. At 7.4 Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births in ... Kazakhstan - Infant Mortality Rate Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births - 1971 to 2019 ...
... this was equivalent to an infant mortality rate of 3.6... ... Infant mortality halved between 1997 and 2017. Back Infant ... During the 10 years from 2007 to 2017, the infant mortality rate in the EU fell from 4.4 deaths per 1 000 live births to 3.6 ... In the EU-28 in 2017, around 18 200 children died before reaching one year of age; this was equivalent to an infant mortality ... In 2017, the highest infant mortality rates in the EU were registered in Malta and Romania (both 6.7 deaths per 1 000 live ...
In 2018, infant mortality reduction stakeholders met to update the Infant Mortality Strategic Plan. The new updated plan from ... Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) is an action-oriented evidence based community review process that reviews fetal and ... This puts infant at higher risk for death and disabilities. Preventing preterm births is critical for the long term health of ... Ensuring that all babies are placed Alone, on their Backs and in a Crib is one small step that can be taken to ensure infants ...
A doctor in Nigeria and a professor at Michigan State University have teamed up to reduce infant mortality in the African ... In developing nations, however, lack of infant screening leads to unusually high rates of infant mortality. In the current ... Reducing infant mortality in Nigeria. Michigan State University. Journal. Clinical Microbiology and Infection. Keywords. * ... IMAGE: A doctor in Nigeria and a professor at Michigan State University have teamed up to reduce infant mortality in the ...
The State accounts for the highest infant mortality rate (IMR)? 79 per 1000 ? in the country. Only Orissa... ... STATISTICS ON infant deaths fly in the Madhya Pradesh Government?s face. ... MP tops infant mortality list STATISTICS ON infant deaths fly in the Madhya Pradesh Government?s face. The State accounts for ... STATISTICS ON infant deaths fly in the Madhya Pradesh Governments face. The State accounts for the highest infant mortality ...
The United States ranks 30th in terms of infant mortality, an important measure of the quality of healthcare, according to a ... "Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health of a nation, and the recent stagnation (since 2000) in the U.S. infant ... WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States ranks 30th in terms of infant mortality, an important measure of the quality of ... Public health experts look at infant mortality in calculating the quality of a countrys healthcare system. The United States ...
Statistical bulletin: Gestation-specific infant mortality, 2013 Part of Gestation-specific infant mortality in England and ... The rate of infant mortality of pre-term babies was significantly higher than the overall infant mortality rate (3.8 deaths per ... Infant and Perinatal Mortality in England and Wales, 2013 (CIPM). The infant mortality rate presented in DR, 2013 (4.4 deaths ... 2009) Inequalities in infant mortality project briefing paper 3. Towards an understanding of variations in infant mortality ...
Neonatal intensive care units critical to infant survival. September 1, 2010. WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., Sept. 1, 2010 -- Very low ... birthweight and very preterm infants are more likely to die if they are not born at hospitals with neonatal intensive care ...
Last week, Reuters reported a story with this headline "Prenatal Arsenic Exposure Quadruples Infant Death Risk". As the opening ...
In 2017, feto-infant mortality, which is the sum of infant deaths and stillbirths, amounted to 1,062 deaths for the whole ... The infant mortality rate is the ratio between the number of deaths of children less than one year of age during the year and ... The infant mortality rate amounts to 3.6 per mille in 2017 compared to 4.8 at the beginning of the century. ... This puts a stop to the decrease of infant mortality, with 41 more cases than in 2016. ...
Infant mortality continues to decline at national level, with a decrease of 30 % since 2000 and an infant mortality rate of 3.2 ... The infant mortality rate is the ratio between the number of deaths of children less than one year of age during the year and ... In the short term, there are marked differences in regional trends, with a substantial increase of the number of infant deaths ...
... An alumnas drive to end disparities. Masters-degree alumna Nicole Smith seeks to understand ... "I didnt initially ask participants about how racism impacts infant mortality, but the providers I spoke with believe it plays ... Across the board, the interviewees admitted they lacked current information and training on infant mortality, disparities and ... "What struck me was participants felt that social factors superseded biological factors as contributors to infant mortality," ...
  • and infant mortality risk = number of deaths of infants less than 1 year of age/1,000 live births. (cdc.gov)
  • 1 The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. (cdc.gov)
  • Infant mortality rate is the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births and is a good indicator of a country's health and economic status. (answers.com)
  • The mortality rate in Derbyshire was 68.7 per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • The infant mortality rate of Austria is 4.16 deaths per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • The World Bank says the infant mortality rate in East Timor is 44.46 deaths per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • Philadelphia's maternal mortality rate 23.8 deaths per 100,000 live births compared to the US rate of 15.2 and Pennsylvania rate of 9.01. (answers.com)
  • The infant mortality rate was 11.5 deaths per 100 live births in Saudi Arabia. (answers.com)
  • The infant mortality rate in Japan is 2 deaths per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • In 2013, the infant mortality rate in Argentina was 12 deaths per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • The infant mortality rates for Brazil is 12 deaths per 1000 live births. (answers.com)
  • Last year, a widely distributed report from the group Save the Children , funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, tied the United States with Malta and Slovakia for the second-worst infant-mortality rate among developed nations (at about six per 1,000 live births). (slate.com)
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of infant mortality after the first 30 days of life in the United States, with a rate of 53.9 deaths per 100 000 live births. (aappublications.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week that in 2006 the rate of infant deaths in the United States fell to 6.71 per 1,000 live births, down from 6.86 the previous year. (nytimes.com)
  • Decreasing the infant mortality rate from 6.7 to 5.7 deaths per 1000 live births by 2018 in Virginia. (virginia.gov)
  • In 2019, the country was number 16 comparing other countries in Infant Mortality Rate with 51.3 Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births. (nationmaster.com)
  • At 7.4 Units (Deaths) Per Thousand Live Births in 2019, the country was number 128 comparing other countries in Infant Mortality Rate. (nationmaster.com)
  • this was equivalent to an infant mortality rate of 3.6 deaths per 1 000 live births. (europa.eu)
  • In 2017, the highest infant mortality rates in the EU were registered in Malta and Romania (both 6.7 deaths per 1 000 live births) and Bulgaria (6.4 deaths), and the lowest in Cyprus (1.3 deaths) and Finland (2.0 deaths). (europa.eu)
  • Babies born in 2013 had an infant mortality rate of 3.8 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared to 3.9 deaths per 1,000 live births for babies born in 2012. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Term babies had a significantly lower infant mortality rate (1.4 deaths per 1,000 live births) and pre-term babies had a significantly higher rate (21.1 deaths per 1,000 live births) compared to the overall rate. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Pakistani, Black Caribbean and Black African babies (6.7, 6.6 and 6.3 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively) had the highest infant mortality rates. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • The infant mortality rate presented in DR, 2013 (4.4 deaths per 1,000 live births) was based on deaths that were registered in 2013. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • The infant mortality rate is the ratio between the number of deaths of children less than one year of age during the year and the live births of that same year (in per mille). (fgov.be)
  • In India, the infant mortality rate (IMR) is 47 per thousand live births which translates into 12.5 lakh infant deaths per year," Azad said while replying to supplementaries in Rajya Sabha. (medindia.net)
  • The IMR in West Bengal is 32 per thousand live births which translates into 47,000 infant deaths per year. (medindia.net)
  • This death toll is measured by the infant mortality rate ( IMR ), which is the number of deaths of children under one year of age per 1000 live births. (wikipedia.org)
  • [9] This study was conducted across 135 countries over the course of 11 years, with the continent of Africa having the highest infant mortality rate of any other region studied with 68 deaths per 1,000 live births. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nation's infant-mortality rate has seen a steady decline: From 1950 to1997, the rate dropped from 29.2 deaths per 1,000 live births to 7.1, the Washington-based CWLA says. (edweek.org)
  • During that period, infant-mortality rates for both groups decreased from 20 per 1,000 live births to 7.7. (edweek.org)
  • According to latest statistics published by the United Nations Statistics Division South Africa's infant mortality rate is 43.2 deaths for every 1 000 live births which is noticeably higher than the rate of other countries with similar developing economies (e.g. (health24.com)
  • There are 3.8 infant deaths per 1,000 live births here compared to the OECD average of 4.4. (jpost.com)
  • Data released Friday from the Ohio Department of Health shows the state's overall infant mortality rate ticked down to 6.8 deaths per 1,000 live births last year, compared with 7.4 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2013. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The non-Hispanic black infant mortality rate in Nassau County was 8.7 per 1,000 live births in 2014-16, compared with about 2.5 each for whites, Hispanics and Asians, according to the New York State Department of Health. (newsday.com)
  • Madhya Pradesh topped the country in infant mortality rate (IMR) with 52 deaths of children less than one year of age per 1,000 live births. (hindustantimes.com)
  • The average infant mortality rate among women giving birth in their 40s-94 per 1,000 live births-is much higher than the rate among women in their 20s and 30s and almost as high as the rate among teenage mothers. (guttmacher.org)
  • Full-term infant mortality rate (FTIMR) was 2.2 per 1,000 live births overall, and ranged between 1.29 (Connecticut, 95% confidence interval 1.08, 1.53) and 3.77 (Mississippi, 95% CI 3.39, 4.19) at the state level. (eurekalert.org)
  • The 2013 numbers from the state's Department of Health show Ohio's overall infant mortality rate was 7.4 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared with 7.6 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2012. (wlwt.com)
  • Infant mortality rate is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year. (indexmundi.com)
  • The map below shows how Mortality rate, infant (per 1,000 live births) varies by country. (indexmundi.com)
  • The infant mortality rate (IMR) in Chandigarh has declined from 23 to 21 deaths per 1,000 live births, as per the 2015 sample registration system(SRS) bulletin, which is prepared by the census department. (indianexpress.com)
  • Over the last three years, Milwaukee's infant mortality rate for black babies was 15 deaths per 1,000 live births, three times the rate of white babies. (wpr.org)
  • Despite the fact that it administers the most vaccines, the United States has the highest infant mortality rate of all developed countries, with an average of 6.22 deaths per 1000 live births. (prisonplanet.com)
  • The under-5 mortality (U5MR) measure captures the number of children per 1000 live births who die before their 5th birthday. (worldbank.org)
  • Over the same period, the infant mortality rate declined from 65 deaths per 1,000 live births to 29 deaths per 1,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2019 infant mortality rates on map are crude death rates per 1,000. (cdc.gov)
  • The infant mortality rate in the US currently stands at 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000. (pbs.org)
  • Its goal: cutting Virginia's infant mortality rate, the 30th highest in the country, from 7.7 deaths to 7.0 deaths per 1,000 babies per year by the end of 2010. (aarp.org)
  • The infant mortality rate averages 100 deaths per 1,000 births among mothers younger than 20, compared with 72-74 deaths per 1,000 births among mothers 20-29 and 30-39. (guttmacher.org)
  • Its 2010 infant mortality rate (7.1 deaths per 1,000 births) ranked 37th among the states. (milhs.org)
  • Overall, 5.7 of every 1,000 infants born alive died before the age of 1 in the United States in 2018. (rand.org)
  • In contrast, European countries with similar levels of GDP per capita-such countries as Germany and the Netherlands-have much lower rates of infant mortality, around 3.2 per 1,000 births. (rand.org)
  • In some neighborhoods of Allegheny County in southwest Pennsylvania, for instance, the rate of infant mortality is more than 20 per 1,000 births, on par with such developing countries as Nicaragua and the Philippines. (rand.org)
  • In 2012, the most recent year for which data exists, there were 6.5 deaths among every 1,000 black infants born in Boston, the same rate as for Latino babies, according to the report. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Rechtman et al report in October Pediatrics the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome in babies who were put to sleep on sofas. (aappublications.org)
  • Sleeping on sofas increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome and other sleep-related deaths. (aappublications.org)
  • Deaths on sofas are associated with surface sharing, being found on the side, changing sleep location, and experiencing prenatal tobacco exposure, which are all risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome and sleep-related deaths. (aappublications.org)
  • Deaths from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) declined in the U.S., but mortality rates rose for suffocation and strangulation in bed, the analysis found. (reuters.com)
  • The major contributors to postneonatal death are malnutrition, infectious disease, troubled pregnancy, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and problems with the home environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Causes of infant mortality that are related to medical conditions include: low birth weight, sudden infant death syndrome , malnutrition,congenital malformations, and infectious diseases, including neglected tropical diseases . (wikipedia.org)
  • The release of the CWLA report coincides with a recent Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Report that highlights the decrease in infant mortality and sudden infant death syndrome among Northwest American Indians and Alaskan natives. (edweek.org)
  • Read 'Decrease in Infant Mortality and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Among Northwest American Indians and Alaskan Natives -- Pacific Northwest, 1985-1996,' from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . (edweek.org)
  • A persistent, significant racial disparity exists in infant mortality rates attributable to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other types of sleep-related sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), such as suffocation and undetermined causes of death. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The study, conducted by Neha Bairoliya of Harvard University and Gunther Fink of the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, found that very low rates of SUDI--which includes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), accidental or abuse-related death, and sudden death from ill-defined causes--have been achieved in a few states while rates remain high in most others. (eurekalert.org)
  • The largest mortality differentials between states with good and states with poor FTIMR were found for SUDI, with particularly large risk differentials for deaths due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) (odds ratio [OR] 2.52, 95% CI 1.86, 3.42) and suffocation (OR 4.40, 95% CI 3.71, 5.21). (eurekalert.org)
  • The infant deaths caused in the 19th century, which had been attributed to smothering and overlaying by either a co-sleeper or bedding, were actually crib deaths or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), according to an expert. (medindia.net)
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is death of a baby, under one year of age that occurs in sleep and cannot be explained. (medindia.net)
  • British researchers say they have found strains of germs that appear to play a stealthy role in the rare but mysterious disorder known as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). (medindia.net)
  • This disparity is largely related to the greater incidence among black infants of prematurity and low birth weight, congenital malformations, sudden infant death syndrome, and unintentional injuries. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The Mississippi State Department of Health said the top causes of infant mortality are premature birth or low birth weight, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, birth defects, accidents or maternal difficulties. (wapt.com)
  • Factors that affected the risk of infant mortality for single-born infants included birthweight, race, sex, gestation, birth order, maternal age and education, and prenatal care. (cdc.gov)
  • Even more disturbing is that essentially no progress has been made in reducing the twofold risk of infant mortality among blacks as compared with whites. (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, a primary determinant of infant mortality risk is infant birth weight with lower birth weights increasing the risk of infant mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research team designed and implemented machine learning algorithms and causal inference models to predict which women and their children were at highest risk of infant mortality, the interventions that women were most likely to use, and which interventions would most effectively reduce the risks for each woman and child. (rand.org)
  • Providers of health care and community-based social services can use the models with their patients or clients at high risk of infant mortality to tailor intervention options to their needs. (rand.org)
  • Overall, black infants had twice the mortality risk of white infants. (cdc.gov)
  • A slowdown in the decline of infant mortality in the United States and a continuing high risk of death among black infants (twice that of white infants) prompted a consortium of Public Health Service agencies, in collaboration with all states, to develop a national data base of linked birth and infant death certificates for the 1980 birth cohort. (cdc.gov)
  • African-American babies born in the United States are more than twice as likely as white infants to die within the first year. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Although the mortality rates for African American infants and American Indian infants remain higher than the mortality rate for white infants, the disparity between the groups has been reduced. (wa.gov)
  • Trends in Differences in U.S. Mortality Rates Between Black and White Infants , 2017, JAMA Pediatrics, Riddell, C. A., et al. (kidsdata.org)
  • But the new numbers continue to show that black infants die at more than twice the rate of white infants in Ohio. (wlwt.com)
  • Despite national priorities to eliminate these disparities, black infants are 2.5 times more likely to die in infancy compared with non-Hispanic white infants. (biomedsearch.com)
  • And the study shows that the persistent gap in infant mortality rates between black and white infants has narrowed significantly over the past dozen years. (bostonglobe.com)
  • While the gap between black and white infants remains unsettling, the city has made significant strides in addressing infant morality, said Barbara Ferrer, executive director of the Boston Public Health Commission. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Better and more affordable medical care actually has worsened the rate of prematurity, and likely the rate of infant mortality, by making fertility treatment widespread. (slate.com)
  • In terms of the zip code, why choose that zip code, it was the one that stood out as having the highest rate of infant mortality. (wkar.org)
  • This analysis considered the impact of widespread expansion of natural gas services for residential and commercial use on the rate of infant mortality in Turkey. (nih.gov)
  • These findings indicate that the expansion of natural gas infrastructure has resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of infant mortality. (nih.gov)
  • Could an individualized approach of predicting risk and offering personalized intervention recommendations reduce the rate of infant mortality? (rand.org)
  • A high rate of infant deaths, which indicates overall poor health of many members of our community, and very high smoking rates, as well as opiate addiction," are among her top concerns. (journal-news.com)
  • African Americans in Denver and Aurora have a significantly higher rate of pre-term births and thus, a higher rate of infant mortality. (nichq.org)
  • To reduce infant mortality, then, we need to prevent premature births, and if that fails, improve care of premature babies once born. (slate.com)
  • Preventing preterm births is critical for the long term health of infants. (tn.gov)
  • Most of the deaths are among pre-term infants and the United States has a very high rate of pre-term births, according to the report from the National Center for Health Statistics. (reuters.com)
  • If the United States had Sweden's distribution of births by gestational age, nearly 8,000 infant deaths would be averted each year and the U.S. infant mortality rate would be one-third lower. (reuters.com)
  • This bulletin presents figures on all births and infant deaths in England and Wales in 2013. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • This birth cohort allows births and infant deaths to be reported by gestational age and ethnicity. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • The findings reported in this bulletin can help in understanding how these important factors relate to births and infant deaths. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • 99% of infant deaths occur in developing countries, and 86% of these deaths are due to infections , premature births , complications during delivery, and perinatal asphyxia and birth injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Statewide, the black maternal mortality rate was 15.9 for white women per 100,000 births and 51.6 for black women. (newsday.com)
  • This Issues in Brief presents the most recent survey data on the relationships between high-risk births and infant mortality, and examines whether earlier conclusions about the potentially beneficial links between family planning and the survival of infants are still valid. (guttmacher.org)
  • Premature births are the main reason that the U.S. infant mortality rate is higher than in most European countries, according to a government report issued November 3. (empowher.com)
  • The report said that premature births are the main reason the U.S. ranks number 30 in the world in infant mortality. (empowher.com)
  • Bairoliya N, Fink G (2018) Causes of death and infant mortality rates among full-term births in the United States between 2010 and 2012: An observational study. (eurekalert.org)
  • There was also a reduction in premature and underweight births among black infants. (bostonglobe.com)
  • When compared to peer countries, the United States was the absolute worst with respect to still births, infant mortality, and low birth weight. (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • The leading causes of infant death in Ohio are prematurity and preterm births, sleep-related deaths and birth defects. (cleveland.com)
  • The United States, which administers the highest number of vaccines to children in the developed world, also has the highest number of infant deaths per 1000 births in the developed world. (prisonplanet.com)
  • It is said that the baby box has helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates( Helena Lee, BBC news: Why do Finnish Babies Sleep in Cardboard Boxes? (aappublications.org)
  • Ensuring that all babies are placed Alone, on their Backs and in a Crib is one small step that can be taken to ensure infants sleep safely. (tn.gov)
  • There is interest in infant deaths statistics from policymakers, those responsible for managing services for mothers and babies, charities and academics interested in research into causes of infant death. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • In the U.S., black babies had the highest infant mortality rates, at 1,128 per 100,000, followed by 968 per 100,000 for American Indian/Alaskan Natives. (reuters.com)
  • By contrast, infant mortality rates were 498 per 100,000 white babies and 466 per 100,000 Latino babies in the U.S. (reuters.com)
  • Among infants, declines in SIDS-related deaths have been attributed to public health efforts focused on promoting placing babies on their backs while sleeping," Shiels said. (reuters.com)
  • Disparities in mortality rates may begin in infancy in the U.S., at least in part because black families are more likely to have parents and caregivers share beds with babies, increasing the risk of SIDS, said Dr. Anna Pease, a researcher at the University of Bristol in the U.K. who wasn't involved in the study. (reuters.com)
  • Healthier mothers make healthy babies, and this will reduce the infant mortality rate," Dei said. (aarp.org)
  • Infant mortality is measured as deaths of live-born babies before their first birthdays. (washingtontimes.com)
  • But the rate for black infants went up to 14.3, significantly exceeding last year's 5.3 rate for white babies. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The babies from birth to the age of two months are called newborn whereas infants are the babies with an age of one year. (selfgrowth.com)
  • High infant mortality is, therefore, clearly a function of poverty, which creates conditions-for example, the lack of clean water, poor sanitation, malnutrition, endemic infections, poor or nonexistent primary health care services and low levels of spending on health care-in which babies who are not robust at birth do not receive the health care they need to overcome their vulnerability. (guttmacher.org)
  • Teenage mothers also have an increased risk of giving birth to an infant who is premature or low-birth-weight-conditions that reduce the resilience and stamina babies need to overcome infection or trauma early in life. (guttmacher.org)
  • As with adolescent mothers, high infant mortality rates among babies born to women in their 40s occur in countries at every income level. (guttmacher.org)
  • The U.S. infant mortality rate among African-Americans is more than twice as high as it is for white babies. (governing.com)
  • Doula-assisted mothers are less likely to deliver babies with low birth weights or with birth complications and more likely to breast-feed their infants, a 2013 study found. (governing.com)
  • Such deaths were more likely in the late winter months and amongst boys, and there were more infant deaths among black babies. (medindia.net)
  • Helping black babies survive: New Jersey gives $4.3 million to address infant mortality The state will award grants to revamp prenatal care and make home visits to high-risk pregnant women in effort to lower the black infant mortality rate. (thedailyjournal.com)
  • With the nation's highest racial gap in infant mortality, New Jersey is trying to help more African-American babies survive by investing in childbirth coaches, one-to-one outreach to pregnant black women, and a different approach to prenatal care. (thedailyjournal.com)
  • Too many Michigan infants are dying: Roughly 800 Michigan babies died in 2010. (milhs.org)
  • A report scheduled to be released Friday shows that infant mortality - the measure of how many babies die during the first year of life - has reached a historic low for black children. (bostonglobe.com)
  • The Journal-News has been putting a spotlight on the high infant mortality rate in the Butler County area, especially among black babies, which is among the 10 worst in the country. (journal-news.com)
  • Mississippi has the nation's highest infant mortality rate, and experts are trying to change that by teaching people about healthy pregnancies and proper sleep conditions for babies. (wapt.com)
  • By addressing the underlying causes of infant mortality, in particular, stress, teams hope to reduce infant deaths overall, as well as close the disparity gap between white and black babies. (nichq.org)
  • For healthy late pre-term infants, a slightly increased risk for developmental delay and school-related problems persisted for the first five years of life, and their reading and math skills were worse than those of term infants, according to several studies involving a total of more than 160,000 babies. (health24.com)
  • Data on more than 600,000 children showed that late pre-term infants were also less likely than full-term babies to finish high school or to complete university. (health24.com)
  • You mention that this infant mortality rate with babies who are born to women who were at some earlier point exposed to these oils spills - but not women exposed to them while they are pregnant. (cbc.ca)
  • Race and infant mortality: Why are black babies in Northeast Ohio dying more? (cleveland.com)
  • Why is Northeast Ohio's infant mortality rate so high for black babies compared to white babies? (cleveland.com)
  • Preliminary infant mortality figures from Milwaukee show 84 babies died last year, a drop from the previous two years. (wpr.org)
  • In 2017, feto-infant mortality, which is the sum of infant deaths and stillbirths, amounted to 1,062 deaths for the whole country. (fgov.be)
  • The infant mortality rate amounts to 3.6 per mille in 2017 compared to 4.8 at the beginning of the century. (fgov.be)
  • The report also ranked the states based on th e disparity in infant mortality rates between those mothers with college degrees and those without. (pbs.org)
  • The impetus for this program is the huge disparity in infant mortality between blacks and whites born in this city," said Stacey Tuck, maternal and child health director at the department. (governing.com)
  • After controlling for poverty, the disparity in SIDS rates has been eliminated for African American infants and reduced for American Indian infants. (wa.gov)
  • Thus, to influence the persistent racial disparity in infant mortality, a highly integrated approach is needed, with interventions adapted along a continuum from childhood through the periods of young adulthood, pregnancy, postpartum and beyond. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The NIMS data provide a valuable baseline for the systematic and regular monitoring and evaluation of program effectiveness, while the new system will supply the data for continuous measurement of our progress toward achieving the Year 2000 Objectives for Mothers and Infants. (cdc.gov)
  • Interestingly, in Finland a country with one of the lowest infant mortality rates, expectant mothers receive from the state a cardboard box fitted with a firm mattress. (aappublications.org)
  • Nigeria has one of the highest rates of mortality of pregnant mothers, and GBS and other pathogens contribute to these deaths," Manning said. (eurekalert.org)
  • Infant mortality is 40 percent higher among mothers with 13 to 15 years of schooling, compared with mothers with at least 16 years of school (i.e. a college degree). (pbs.org)
  • Tennessee and the District of Columbia had the highest discrepancy in infant mortality rates between college and non-college educated mothers. (pbs.org)
  • New research has found a link between an elevated infant death rate and mothers who are grieving over the death of a loved one in the months before conception. (psychcentral.com)
  • The results of the analysis showed increased mortality for infants born to mothers who experienced the death of a family member in the months before conception. (psychcentral.com)
  • Why so many mothers and infants have to die here? (hindustantimes.com)
  • He told Rachel Martin, guest host of weekends on All Things Considered , that there are clear correlations between infant mortality and "mothers who live with chronic anxiety, financial stress, evictions. (wkar.org)
  • But three months into her pregnancy, a cousin told her about city health department nurses who help mothers navigate pregnancy and the months that follow, part of a campaign to reduce the troubling infant mortality rate among black women. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Undesiredness can explain a larger share of infant mortality among mothers with lower fertility desires and a larger share of female than male infant mortality for children of women who desire 1-3 children. (springer.com)
  • A new study finds that infants in Nigeria are at double the risk of dying before they reach a month old if mothers lived near the scene of an oil spill before conceiving. (cbc.ca)
  • Professor Roland Hodler led a study that discovered infants in the Niger Delta are twice as likely to die in their first month of life if their mothers were living near an oil spill before becoming pregnant. (cbc.ca)
  • The infant mortality rate among black mothers in some Cleveland neighborhoods is the same as in developing countries where women lack access to regular prenatal care. (cleveland.com)
  • Thus-at the risk of oversimplifying-infant mortality in the United States principally is a problem of premature birth, which today complicates just over one in 10 pregnancies. (slate.com)
  • CUMANÁ, Venezuela-Medical staff at the University Hospital in this eastern Venezuelan city delivered two premature infants that needed incubation earlier this year. (wsj.com)
  • Most extremely low birth weight infants are also the youngest of premature newborns, usually born at 27 weeks' gestational age or younger. (medscape.com)
  • [ 2 ] Infants with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are more susceptible to all complications of premature birth, both in the immediate neonatal period and after discharge from the nursery. (medscape.com)
  • KALAMAZOO, MI - Two Western Michigan University students have won another award for their low-cost ventilator for premature infants in developing countries. (wmuk.org)
  • In developing nations, however, lack of infant screening leads to unusually high rates of infant mortality. (eurekalert.org)
  • [6] Improving sanitation , access to clean drinking water, immunization against infectious diseases , and other public health measures can help reduce high rates of infant mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • [10] Greatest percentage reduction of infant mortality occurs in countries that already have low rates of infant mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • It operates in the six ZIP codes in Brooklyn with the highest rates of infant mortality. (governing.com)
  • Such efforts include public awareness campaigns, smoking cessation programs and improved tracking to identify communities with the highest rates of infant mortality. (wlwt.com)
  • However, a deeper look at certain places and among some groups shows that some U.S. communities have substantially higher rates of infant mortality. (rand.org)
  • With high rates of infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, investments in infant health are subject to tough prioritizations within the household, in which maternal preferences may play a part. (springer.com)
  • Infant mortality in the United States declined by 2 percent in 2006 according to a report issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week. (pbs.org)
  • Infant mortality is considered a basic measure of public health for countries around the world," wrote Anne Driscoll and T.J. Mathews of the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (nbcsandiego.com)
  • In 2018, infant mortality reduction stakeholders met to update the Infant Mortality Strategic Plan. (tn.gov)
  • The higher risk for blacks was related to higher prevalence of low birthweight and to higher mortality risks in both the neonatal and postneonatal periods. (cdc.gov)
  • This project, referred to as National Infant Mortality Surveillance (NIMS), provides neonatal, postneonatal, and infant mortality risks for blacks, whites, and all races in 12 categories of birthweights. (cdc.gov)
  • WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., Sept. 1, 2010 -- Very low birthweight and very preterm infants are more likely to die if they are not born at hospitals with neonatal intensive care units specially equipped to care for seriously ill newborns, in contrast to sim. (scienceblog.com)
  • [2] Other leading causes of infant mortality are birth asphyxia, pneumonia, congenital malformations, term birth complications such as abnormal presentation of the foetus umbilical cord prolapse, or prolonged labor, [3] neonatal infection , diarrhea, malaria, measles and malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neonatal mortality is newborn death occurring within 28 days postpartum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimates of neonatal, infant, and child mortality tend to vary by source and method for a given time and place. (indexmundi.com)
  • To make neonatal, infant, and child mortality estimates comparable and to ensure consistency across estimates by different agencies, the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UN IGME), which comprises the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Bank, the United Nations Population Division, and other universities and research institutes, developed and adopted a statistical method that uses all available information to reconcile differences. (indexmundi.com)
  • The absolute incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in late pre-term infants (i.e., born before the end of 37 weeks) is low, but it's still significantly higher than in full-term infants, say the authors of the review. (health24.com)
  • This study investigated whether the proportion of black very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants treated by hospitals is associated with neonatal mortality for black and white VLBW infants. (rwjf.org)
  • Higher neonatal mortality in minority-serving hospitals was not explained by either hospital or treatment variables. (rwjf.org)
  • Because VLBW black infants are disproportionately treated by minority-serving hospitals, higher neonatal mortality rates at these hospitals may contribute to racial disparities in infant mortality in the U.S. (rwjf.org)
  • The infant mortality rate in this country declined sharply in the 20th century but then plateaued from 2000 to 2005. (nytimes.com)
  • Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health of a nation, and the recent stagnation (since 2000) in the U.S. infant mortality rate has generated concern among researchers and policy makers," the NCHS report said. (reuters.com)
  • Infant mortality continues to decline at national level, with a decrease of 30 % since 2000 and an infant mortality rate of 3.2 per mille. (fgov.be)
  • Newser) - After holding steady from 2000 through 2005, the US infant mortality rate dropped 12% from 2005 through 2011, according to a new CDC report . (newser.com)
  • The authors analyzed medical records linked to secondary data sources for 74,050 black and white VLBW infants (501 g to 1500 g) treated by 332 hospitals participating in the Vermont Oxford Network from 1995 to 2000. (rwjf.org)
  • In 1960, the United States ranked 12th lowest in the world in infant mortality. (nytimes.com)
  • [16] congenital malformations have had a significant impact on infant mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our findings suggest that health-aid does not have a significant impact on infant mortality - one of the major health indicators for the developing countries. (repec.org)
  • It's too early to tell if the program has had any impact on infant mortality rates in Philadelphia. (governing.com)
  • A Stanford-led study focuses on this dust, which travels thousands of miles from the Sahara Desert, to paint a clearer picture than ever before of air pollution's impact on infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. (enn.com)
  • So that there will be a solid basis for making and justifying our decisions, this assessment requires good information that links infant health outcomes with the use of the programs. (cdc.gov)
  • Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) is an action-oriented evidence based community review process that reviews fetal and infant deaths, works at the community level to formulate programs and influence policy that will lead to improving birth outcomes. (tn.gov)
  • 2009), and low gestational age is strongly linked to poor health (or mortality outcomes) (Kurinczuk et al. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • I didn't initially ask participants about how racism impacts infant mortality, but the providers I spoke with believe it plays a major role in why we're seeing disparities that lead to negative outcomes. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Of the infants whose outcomes were known at 18-22 months, 49% died, 61% died or had profound impairment, and 73% died or had impairment. (medscape.com)
  • Africa and other developing regions have made remarkable strides overall in improving child health in recent decades, but key negative outcomes such as infant mortality remain stubbornly high in some places," said study senior author Marshall Burke, an associate professor of Earth system science in Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. (enn.com)
  • The high rate of adverse birth outcomes in the United States does not appear to be a statistical artifact, such as a difference in coding practices for very small infants who die soon after birth (MacDorman and Mathews, 2009). (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • Participants in the Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network to Reduce Infant Mortality ( Infant Mortality CoIIN ) are working to reduce the U.S.'s infant mortality rate and improve birth outcomes. (nichq.org)
  • Late pre-term infants also had higher rates of mechanical ventilation, respiratory distress syndrome, narcotising enterocolitis, intraventricular haemorrhage, and other adverse outcomes. (health24.com)
  • By linking the 3 data sources, figures can be reported for infant mortality by gestational age and ethnicity, as well as other risk factors including: birthweight, mother's age at birth of child, marital status and socio-economic status (based on the most advantaged parent's occupation). (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • Infants whose weight is appropriate for their gestational ages are termed appropriate for gestational age (AGA). (medscape.com)
  • Survival correlates with gestational age for infants who are appropriate for gestational age (AGA). (medscape.com)
  • The risk of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths can be affected by an infant's sleep environment. (aappublications.org)
  • The number of infants who die of SIDS has been dropping nationally, partly because of the Back to Sleep campaign that encourages parents to put infants to sleep on their backs, the report says. (edweek.org)
  • African-American parents of newborn, healthy term infants will be randomized to receive either a standard message to avoid bedsharing, eliminate use of soft bedding and soft sleep surfaces, and to place infants in the supine position for sleep to reduce the risk of SIDS or an enhanced message to avoid these behaviors to both reduce the risk of SIDS and to prevent infant suffocation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Infant mortality rates and Sudden Infant Death (SIDS) rates for all racial/ethnic groups in Washington have decreased considerably since 1988. (wa.gov)
  • The authors state, "[g]iven the high mortality burden due to SIDS and suffocation, policy efforts to promote compliance with recommended sleeping arrangements could be an effective first step in this direction. (eurekalert.org)
  • SIDS is the third most prominent cause of death among infants under a year old, accounting for 30-55 percent of infant deaths during their first year. (medindia.net)
  • Kemkes investigated if 19th century infant deaths attributed to smothering or overlaying shared the same characteristics as known SIDS cases. (medindia.net)
  • The study strongly supports the hypothesis that these infant deaths represent empirical evidence of 19th century SIDS mortality," concluded Kemkes. (medindia.net)
  • The NIMS project was a collaborative effort between the Public Health Service and states to address the issue of infant mortality. (cdc.gov)
  • The nation is mounting new efforts to regain the momentum toward achieving our maternal and infant health objectives. (cdc.gov)
  • Before the National Infant Mortality Surveillance (NIMS) project, the most recent national linkage of birth and infant death records had been done in 1960 by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). (cdc.gov)
  • High infant mortality rate is associated with poverty and poor health care. (answers.com)
  • Defined as death before one year of age, infant mortality frequently gets framed in the United States as a problem of insufficient health-care funding. (slate.com)
  • Infant mortality is associated with many factors, including the health and economic status of the mother, her race or ethnicity, access to quality medical care, and such cultural problems as rising obesity and drug use. (nytimes.com)
  • Infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of the health of a state, as it is associated with a variety of factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, and public health practices. (virginia.gov)
  • Experts say maternal health and mortality are directly related to access to health services. (voanews.com)
  • Public health experts look at infant mortality in calculating the quality of a country's healthcare system. (reuters.com)
  • Disparities in health care stem from a racial division that begins at birth and can have a significant effect on the future of infants. (ucdavis.edu)
  • An issue that warrants their attention is infant mortality, a key indicator of the well-being and effectiveness of a country's health care system. (pbs.org)
  • Reuters Health) - Mortality rates for infants, children, and young adults have fallen in the U.S., Canada, England and Wales, but death rates in a new study were still higher for American youth than for young people in other countries. (reuters.com)
  • Acknowledging the high infant mortality was an immense health concern for the nation, Health Minister Ghulam Nabi Azad informed the parliament on Tuesday that Indian scenario is worse than most of its neighbours. (medindia.net)
  • Throughout the world, infant mortality rate (IMR) fluctuates drastically, and according to Biotechnology and Health Sciences, education and life expectancy in the country is the leading indicator of IMR. (wikipedia.org)
  • We use infant mortality as a health status indicator and ?nd a signi?cant and positive link between infant mortality and income inequality using cross-national data for 98 countries. (repec.org)
  • CARACAS (Reuters) - Venezuela's infant mortality rose 30 percent last year, maternal mortality shot up 65 percent and cases of malaria jumped 76 percent, according to government data, sharp increases reflecting how the country's deep economic crisis has hammered at citizens' health. (reuters.com)
  • The striking part is turmoil in almost all the categories that this bulletin addresses, with particularly significant increases in the infant and maternal health categories," said Dr. Julio Castro, an infectious disease specialist and an outspoken critic of the government's health policies. (reuters.com)
  • Infant mortality must be a high priority not only for the Department of Health but also the healthcare industry. (health24.com)
  • This article is part of "Birthing Inequity," an Oakland North project on maternal and infant health disparities in Oakland. (oaklandnorth.net)
  • An Islandwide Health Equity Task Force launched Saturday morning in Amityville to discuss maternal mortality rates among minority women on Long Island. (newsday.com)
  • Aggressive action is needed to bring down black infant and maternal mortality rates that are far higher than the white rates, activists said Saturday during the launch of the Health Equity Task Force of Long Island. (newsday.com)
  • If the people in power are not going to do it, then we have the power to be able to make this happen," said Martine Hackett, an associate professor of public health at Hofstra University and co-founder of Birth Justice Warriors, an education and advocacy group that works on infant and maternal mortality. (newsday.com)
  • Andrea Ault-Brutus, director of health equity for Nassau, said in an interview that since she began her position in November, infant and maternal mortality have been among her top priorities, and she has been working with community groups, meeting with black women and learning about best practices from Suffolk, New York City and elsewhere. (newsday.com)
  • This study emphasizes that the preconception period should not be overlooked when it comes to promoting infant health," she said. (psychcentral.com)
  • Health Aid and Infant Mortality ," IMF Working Papers 07/100, International Monetary Fund. (repec.org)
  • The doula initiative is the latest salvo in the Baltimore City Health Department's 7-year-old program to combat high infant mortality rates among black newborns. (governing.com)
  • Schmid normally reports on the economy, but there is a direct link between a city's infant mortality and its economic health. (wkar.org)
  • Those tragic statistics led Detroit's health commissioner, Abdul El-Sayed, to think outside the box -- almost literally -- and adopt a strategy that has helped Finland keep infant mortality rates down: baby boxes. (governing.com)
  • Health experts consider it to be a major reason the country has one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the world. (governing.com)
  • Ohio's infant mortality rate declined slightly in 2013, though it continues to far exceed the national average, according to state health data released Monday. (wlwt.com)
  • Health officials expect to release 2014 infant mortality data this fall. (wlwt.com)
  • Dawn Shanafelt, of Saginaw County Public Health Department, is mapping infant death rates by US census tract as reported in Saginaw News, 27 April 2009. (medindia.net)
  • In response to high levels of maternal deaths and child mortality, Plan International Nigeria has improved the nutrition and health related behaviours of community members in 5 states. (plan-international.org)
  • Mortality rates for different age groups (infants, children, and adults) and overall mortality indicators (life expectancy at birth or survival to a given age) are important indicators of health status in a country. (indexmundi.com)
  • The health model calculates the mortality distribution by country/region, age category, sex, and cause of death (modmordstdet). (du.edu)
  • This week, Tammy Murphy, the wife of Gov. Phil Murphy, announced $4.3 million in grants to address that gap, saying it is "shameful that race persists as a factor in maternal health and infant mortality rates in New Jersey. (thedailyjournal.com)
  • We obtained details of infant deaths and cardiovascular malformations from the population of one health region for 1987-2006. (nih.gov)
  • The interventions found to be most effective-broad preconception care, frequent prenatal care, doula support, and home visiting-aim to improve the health of the mother and result in lower mortality risk for the infant, especially when initiated before or early in pregnancy. (rand.org)
  • Infant mortality rates-indicators of population health-typically vary by level of economic development. (rand.org)
  • Infant mortality is regarded as a bellwether of a community's well-being, making such racial disparities particularly troubling in a city such as Boston, which hosts a range of world-renowned health centers, specialists say. (bostonglobe.com)
  • Chandigarh, Aug 26 (PTI) Haryana Health Minister Anil Vij on Wednesday said the state has recorded a decline of 4.6 per cent in the infant mortality rate from April to June this year as compared to the corresponding period of 2019. (yahoo.com)
  • Using data from 79 Demographic and Health Surveys, I find that a child being undesired according to the mother is associated with a differential mortality that is not due to constant maternal factors, family composition, or factors that are correlated with maternal preferences and vary continuously across siblings. (springer.com)
  • Butler County Health Commissioner Jennifer Bailer, who served as the nursing director at the Butler County Health Department and co-lead of the Partnership to Reduce Infant Mortality (PRIM) for the past six years, believes that the fight against infant mortality is one of the top health issues facing the county. (journal-news.com)
  • In particular, the paper describes the growth process of the US Department of Health and Human Services Infant Mortality CoIIN (Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network), applying both improvement and innovation concepts to reducing infant mortality among disadvantaged families in the US. (springer.com)
  • If ignorance and neglect of the laws of health increase largely the general death rate, how much more destructive of life must these agencies prove in the case of the infant population! (neonatology.org)
  • Dr. Yvonne Maddox of the National Institutes of Health says it's important for infants to sleep on their backs in cribs without blankets, pillows or stuffed animals, which can cause accidental suffocation. (wapt.com)
  • Another major gauge of health is infant mortality. (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • Adriana Zarrelli, UNICEF's Chief of Health and Nutrition in Afghanistan feels that the international community can play an important role in helping reduce the numbers of infant and maternal mortality in Daikundi. (unicef.org)
  • The US has a far higher infant mortality rate than the likes of Cuba or Slovenia despite spending vastly more on health care. (prisonplanet.com)
  • However, a closer look reveals the counterintuitive possibility that high infant mortality in the United States might be the unintended side effect of increased spending on medical care. (slate.com)
  • The disturbing high infant mortality rate in South Africa is highlighted through awareness campaigns such as Pregnancy Week, held from 12 - 18 February this year. (health24.com)
  • Medicaid expansion could help reduce Michigan's high infant mortality rate. (milhs.org)
  • Ohio has given more than $41 million over the past five years to state and local programs aimed at reducing the high infant mortality rate, including smoking cessation efforts, public awareness campaigns about infant safe-sleep practices, nurse and other home visiting programs, and efforts to increase the number of women who receive hormone therapy to help prevent women from going into labor too early. (cleveland.com)
  • Child mortality is the death of a child before the child's fifth birthday, measured as the under-5 child mortality rate (U5MR). (wikipedia.org)
  • The under-five mortality rate, which is referred to as the child mortality rate, is also an important statistic, considering the infant mortality rate focuses only on children under one year of age. (wikipedia.org)
  • She said Nassau officials have expressed concern about racial disparities in infant and maternal mortality, the latter of which is the pregnancy or childbirth-related death of a woman. (newsday.com)
  • Although the infant mortality rate in New Jersey has declined steadily over the years, the racial gap has persisted despite two decades of attention. (thedailyjournal.com)
  • Racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality in the United States seem to defy all attempts at elimination. (biomedsearch.com)
  • And why is this racial gap widening despite overall improvements in the infant mortality rate statewide? (cleveland.com)
  • Although the mortality rate has greatly diminished with the use of surfactants, the proportion of surviving infants with severe sequelae, such as chronic lung disease, cognitive delays, cerebral palsy, and neurosensory deficits (ie, deafness and blindness), has not improved as significantly. (medscape.com)
  • The state's black infant mortality rate has decreased significantly from 1990 to 2013. (wlwt.com)
  • The deepening global economic crisis could significantly raise infant mortality and malnutrition rates, a UN official said Tuesday, urging Asian governments to protect millions of vulnerable children. (medindia.net)
  • The study of sub-Saharan Africa finds that a relatively small increase in airborne particles significantly increases infant mortality rates. (enn.com)
  • A doctor in Nigeria and a professor at Michigan State University have teamed up to reduce infant mortality in the African nation. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gabriela Ammann, director of the By My Side Birth Support Doula Program, which seeks to reduce infant mortality in Brooklyn, helped start the program. (governing.com)
  • A team is notified of a fetal or infant death through either hospital notification or vital records. (tn.gov)
  • Perinatal mortality is late fetal death (22 weeks gestation to birth), or death of a newborn up to one week postpartum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Race and ethnic disparities in fetal mortality, preterm birth, and infant mortality in the United St. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The Colorado IM CoIIN team is focused on reducing African American infant mortality. (nichq.org)
  • The goal we are not on track to meet is for our African-American infant mortality rate. (wpr.org)
  • Infants born at or before 25 weeks gestation have the highest mortality rate (about 50 percent) and if they survive, are at the greatest risk for severe impairment. (uptodate.com)
  • [ 3 ] The study reported that 83% of infants born at 22-25 weeks' gestation received intensive care (consisting of mechanical ventilation). (medscape.com)
  • According to data from a 2011 cohort study, infants born at 23-25 weeks' gestation who received antenatal exposure to corticosteroids had a lower rate of mortality and complications compared with those who did not have such exposure to corticosteroids. (medscape.com)
  • For more than 20 years, preterm birth, or delivery prior to 37 weeks gestation, has been the biggest contributor to infant deaths in the county. (cleveland.com)
  • National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality publishes 34-page report providing recommendations for reducing infant mortality. (ire.org)
  • For example, the two developed countries that require children be immunized with the least amount of vaccines, Japan and Sweden, also top the table for the lowest infant mortality rates. (prisonplanet.com)
  • Of the top ten developed countries with the lowest infant mortality rates, seven of the ten also appear in the top ten table of countries that administer the least vaccines. (prisonplanet.com)
  • Effect of Home Visiting by Nurses on Maternal and Child Mortality: Results of a Two-Decade Follow-Up of a Randomized Clinical Trial , 2014, JAMA Pediatrics, Olds, D. L., et al. (kidsdata.org)
  • COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - New state figures show a slight drop in Ohio's overall infant mortality rate, though the rate for black infants is nearly three times that of whites. (washingtontimes.com)
  • We are the only source of National Statistics on gestation-specific infant mortality with ethnicity in England and Wales. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • The incidence and mortality rate of preterm birth will be reviewed here. (uptodate.com)
  • See 'Preterm birth: Risk factors and interventions for risk reduction' and 'Pathogenesis of spontaneous preterm birth' and 'Short-term complications of the preterm infant' . (uptodate.com)
  • What is Infant and what's the difference between infant, newborn and baby? (selfgrowth.com)
  • After adjusting for other factors, the risk of infant death during the newborn period (before one month) was more than 80 percent higher for women with preconception bereavement, the study found. (psychcentral.com)
  • The state's infant mortality rate has been higher than the national average for two decades. (milhs.org)
  • In three years of reporting on this problem, I've heard almost every expert come to the same conclusion: If we don't address infant mortality in the black community, we will never solve our city's, county's or state's infant mortality crisis. (cleveland.com)
  • A leading cause of infant deaths is low birth weight. (aarp.org)
  • Cardiovascular malformations are an important cause of infant death and the major cause of death due to malformation. (nih.gov)
  • One underlying cause of infant mortality is stress. (nichq.org)
  • In 2013, the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States was birth defects. (wikipedia.org)
  • After two decades of consistent, gratifying improvements in levels of infant mortality in the United States, progress has slowed substantially during the 1980s. (cdc.gov)
  • The highest levels of infant mortality happen where you'd think they'd happen: in poor developing countries - Afghanistan, Haiti, Sub-Saharan Africa. (wkar.org)
  • Our results imply that a one percentage point decrease in the income share of the richest quintile correlates with a decrease in infant mortality by nearly two percent. (repec.org)
  • The results suggest potential for a major reduction in infant mortality through interventions to reduce SUDI risk. (eurekalert.org)
  • Evidence shows that a 1-percent increase in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita correlates with a 20-percent reduction in infant mortality. (rand.org)
  • [5] Many factors contribute to infant mortality, such as the mother's level of education, environmental conditions, and political and medical infrastructure. (wikipedia.org)
  • What struck me was participants felt that social factors superseded biological factors as contributors to infant mortality," Smith explained. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The idea is now starting to catch on across America, where unsafe sleep is one of the largest contributors to infant mortality. (governing.com)
  • The most important predictor for infant survival was birthweight, with improved survival for both blacks and whites associated with increased birthweights. (cdc.gov)
  • In Texas, the infant mortality rate is 5.5 for whites, 10.9 for Blacks and 5.5 for Hispanics in 2010. (answers.com)
  • Southern states have higher populations of blacks so it makes sense they also have higher mortality. (newser.com)
  • The latest statewide data from 2013 indicates there were 414 infant deaths in Wisconsin with a wide gap between blacks and whites. (wpr.org)
  • Infant mortality rate was an indicator used to monitor progress towards the Fourth Goal of the Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations for the year 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • The infant mortality rate is an overall indicator of the quality of life in Michigan because it represents the well-being for the state's youngest and most vulnerable citizens-infants. (milhs.org)
  • This puts infant at higher risk for death and disabilities. (tn.gov)
  • But the U.S. had higher mortality rates for all age groups than Canada or England and Wales. (reuters.com)
  • Holding constant the income of each of the three poorest quintiles of a country's population, we ?nd that an increase in the income of the upper 20% of the income distribution is associated with higher, not lower infant mortality. (repec.org)
  • For infant death between one month and one year, risk was about 50 percent higher for women with bereavement before conception. (psychcentral.com)
  • In countries where per capital income is higher, infant mortality rates are substantially lower. (guttmacher.org)
  • Earlier this year, Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, which has a higher-than-average infant mortality rate, started a universal baby box program. (governing.com)
  • Released earlier this week, the report which is based between 2013-15, reveals that of the 21 infant mortality deaths, the number of deaths in Chandigarh were higher in urban (22) areas then the rural areas which was only 10. (indianexpress.com)
  • The U.S. infant mortality rate, which is higher than in other developed countries, is down 15 percent over the last 10 years, federal researchers reported Tuesday. (nbcsandiego.com)
  • Late pre-term infants have higher risks for death in the first month or first year of life, and for cerebral palsy, according to a systematic review. (health24.com)
  • Death rates in the first 28 days were nearly six times higher for late pre-term infants than for term infants (0.38 vs 0.07%), and the risk of death in the first year was almost four times higher (0.83% vs 0.27%), the researchers reported online in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology . (health24.com)
  • Infants born late pre-term seem to have a higher risk for long-term problems, so we have to take this information into account when weighing the risks and benefits to mother and child to determine the optimal obstetrical management. (health24.com)
  • Then an oil spill happens and we compare the siblings that were born and conceived before the oil spill and those afterwards and we see that those born afterwards have these much higher mortality rates. (cbc.ca)
  • We think that it partly implies that the negative effects in the parents build up over time and there's also some evidence that actually the father's exposure to crude oil could increase the risk of genetic malformations in the unborn, which then could contribute to higher infant mortality rates. (cbc.ca)
  • Despite the fact that the United States administers the highest number of vaccine doses to children in the entire developed world, 26 before infants reach the age of one, its infant mortality rate is higher than 33 other nations, all of which administer less vaccines. (prisonplanet.com)
  • The correlation between higher numbers of vaccines and infant mortality figures takes on an altogether more sinister context when we consider the fact that during the February 2010 TED conference, Bill Gates, an enthusiastic proponent of vaccination programs, openly stated that vaccines should be used to lower global population in the pursuit of reducing CO2 emissions. (prisonplanet.com)