A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
RNA, usually prepared by transcription from cloned DNA, which complements a specific mRNA or DNA and is generally used for studies of virus genes, distribution of specific RNA in tissues and cells, integration of viral DNA into genomes, transcription, etc. Whereas DNA PROBES are preferred for use at a more macroscopic level for detection of the presence of DNA/RNA from specific species or subspecies, RNA probes are preferred for genetic studies. Conventional labels for the RNA probe include radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. RNA probes may be further divided by category into plus-sense RNA probes, minus-sense RNA probes, and antisense RNA probes.
The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
3 beta,12 beta,14-Trihydroxy-5 beta-card-20(22)-enolide. A cardenolide which is the aglycon of digoxin. Can be obtained by hydrolysis of digoxin or from Digitalis orientalis L. and Digitalis lanata Ehrh.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.
Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.
Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A method for comparing two sets of chromosomal DNA by analyzing differences in the copy number and location of specific sequences. It is used to look for large sequence changes such as deletions, duplications, amplifications, or translocations.
A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.
Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.
A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.
A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
A technique that labels specific sequences in whole chromosomes by in situ DNA chain elongation or PCR (polymerase chain reaction).
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.
A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.
The infiltrating of tissue specimens with paraffin, as a supporting substance, to prepare for sectioning with a microtome.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Nucleic acid which complements a specific mRNA or DNA molecule, or fragment thereof; used for hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms and for genetic studies.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.
A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.
Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
DNA analogs containing neutral amide backbone linkages composed of aminoethyl glycine units instead of the usual phosphodiester linkage of deoxyribose groups. Peptide nucleic acids have high biological stability and higher affinity for complementary DNA or RNA sequences than analogous DNA oligomers.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
The erbB-2 gene is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 receptor (RECEPTOR, ERBB-2), a protein with structural features similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor. Its name originates from the viral oncogene homolog (v-erbB) which is a truncated form of the chicken erbB gene found in the avian erythroblastosis virus. Overexpression and amplification of the gene is associated with a significant number of adenocarcinomas. The human c-erbB-2 gene is located at 17q21.2.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
The male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans and in some other male-heterogametic species in which the homologue of the X chromosome has been retained.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).
Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.
A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.
The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.
The use of devices which use detector molecules to detect, investigate, or analyze other molecules, macromolecules, molecular aggregates, or organisms.
A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.
The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.
A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.
A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.
Nucleic acids which hybridize to complementary sequences in other target nucleic acids causing the function of the latter to be affected.
The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.
The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.
The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.
The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.
A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).
The female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in human and other male-heterogametic species.
Any cell, other than a ZYGOTE, that contains elements (such as NUCLEI and CYTOPLASM) from two or more different cells, usually produced by artificial CELL FUSION.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.
Plasmids containing at least one cos (cohesive-end site) of PHAGE LAMBDA. They are used as cloning vehicles.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.
A type of chromosomal aberration involving DNA BREAKS. Chromosome breakage can result in CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; or SEQUENCE DELETION.
Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of PLANTS.
Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).
The most abundant form of RNA. Together with proteins, it forms the ribosomes, playing a structural role and also a role in ribosomal binding of mRNA and tRNAs. Individual chains are conventionally designated by their sedimentation coefficients. In eukaryotes, four large chains exist, synthesized in the nucleolus and constituting about 50% of the ribosome. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.
Infections produced by oncogenic viruses. The infections caused by DNA viruses are less numerous but more diverse than those caused by the RNA oncogenic viruses.
A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.
A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A water-soluble, enzyme co-factor present in minute amounts in every living cell. It occurs mainly bound to proteins or polypeptides and is abundant in liver, kidney, pancreas, yeast, and milk.
The chromosomal constitution of a cell containing multiples of the normal number of CHROMOSOMES; includes triploidy (symbol: 3N), tetraploidy (symbol: 4N), etc.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
Constituent of the 40S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 18S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.
Chromosomes in which fragments of exogenous DNA ranging in length up to several hundred kilobase pairs have been cloned into yeast through ligation to vector sequences. These artificial chromosomes are used extensively in molecular biology for the construction of comprehensive genomic libraries of higher organisms.
The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.
RNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.
Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.
One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).
A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Mapping of the linear order of genes on a chromosome with units indicating their distances by using methods other than genetic recombination. These methods include nucleotide sequencing, overlapping deletions in polytene chromosomes, and electron micrography of heteroduplex DNA. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 5th ed)
A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.
DNA probes specific for the identification of human papilloma virus.
A terminal section of a chromosome which has a specialized structure and which is involved in chromosomal replication and stability. Its length is believed to be a few hundred base pairs.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
The use of silver, usually silver nitrate, as a reagent for producing contrast or coloration in tissue specimens.
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.
The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.
The simultaneous identification of all chromosomes from a cell by fluorescence in situ hybridization (IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION, FLUORESCENCE) with chromosome-specific florescent probes that are discerned by their different emission spectra.
Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.
Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.
A form of GENE LIBRARY containing the complete DNA sequences present in the genome of a given organism. It contrasts with a cDNA library which contains only sequences utilized in protein coding (lacking introns).
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in enzyme synthesis.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.
The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.
The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.
The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.
The GENETIC TRANSLATION products of the fusion between an ONCOGENE and another gene. The latter may be of viral or cellular origin.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
Mature male germ cells derived from SPERMATIDS. As spermatids move toward the lumen of the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES, they undergo extensive structural changes including the loss of cytoplasm, condensation of CHROMATIN into the SPERM HEAD, formation of the ACROSOME cap, the SPERM MIDPIECE and the SPERM TAIL that provides motility.
Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.

The surface ectoderm is essential for nephric duct formation in intermediate mesoderm. (1/18351)

The nephric duct is the first epithelial tubule to differentiate from intermediate mesoderm that is essential for all further urogenital development. In this study we identify the domain of intermediate mesoderm that gives rise to the nephric duct and demonstrate that the surface ectoderm is required for its differentiation. Removal of the surface ectoderm resulted in decreased levels of Sim-1 and Pax-2 mRNA expression in mesenchymal nephric duct progenitors, and caused inhibition of nephric duct formation and subsequent kidney development. The surface ectoderm expresses BMP-4 and we show that it is required for the maintenance of high-level BMP-4 expression in lateral plate mesoderm. Addition of a BMP-4-coated bead to embryos lacking the surface ectoderm restored normal levels of Sim-1 and Pax-2 mRNA expression in nephric duct progenitors, nephric duct formation and the initiation of nephrogenesis. Thus, BMP-4 signaling can substitute for the surface ectoderm in supporting nephric duct morphogenesis. Collectively, these data suggest that inductive interactions between the surface ectoderm, lateral mesoderm and intermediate mesoderm are essential for nephric duct formation and the initiation of urogenital development.  (+info)

Ultrabithorax function in butterfly wings and the evolution of insect wing patterns. (2/18351)

BACKGROUND: . The morphological and functional evolution of appendages has played a critical role in animal evolution, but the developmental genetic mechanisms underlying appendage diversity are not understood. Given that homologous appendage development is controlled by the same Hox gene in different organisms, and that Hox genes are transcription factors, diversity may evolve from changes in the regulation of Hox target genes. Two impediments to understanding the role of Hox genes in morphological evolution have been the limited number of organisms in which Hox gene function can be studied and the paucity of known Hox-regulated target genes. We have therefore analyzed a butterfly homeotic mutant 'Hindsight', in which portions of the ventral hindwing pattern are transformed to ventral forewing identity, and we have compared the regulation of target genes by the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene product in Lepidopteran and Dipteran hindwings. RESULTS: . We show that Ubx gene expression is lost from patches of cells in developing Hindsight hindwings, correlating with changes in wing pigmentation, color pattern elements, and scale morphology. We use this mutant to study how regulation of target genes by Ubx protein differs between species. We find that several Ubx-regulated genes in the Drosophila haltere are not repressed by Ubx in butterfly hindwings, but that Distal-less (Dll) expression is regulated by Ubx in a unique manner in butterflies. CONCLUSIONS: . The morphological diversification of insect hindwings has involved the acquisition of different sets of target genes by Ubx in different lineages. Changes in Hox-regulated target gene sets are, in general, likely to underlie the morphological divergence of homologous structures between animals.  (+info)

Association of snRNA genes with coiled bodies is mediated by nascent snRNA transcripts. (3/18351)

BACKGROUND: Coiled bodies are nuclear organelles that are highly enriched in small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and certain basal transcription factors. Surprisingly, coiled bodies not only contain mature U snRNPs but also associate with specific chromosomal loci, including gene clusters that encode U snRNAs and histone messenger RNAs. The mechanism(s) by which coiled bodies associate with these genes is completely unknown. RESULTS: Using stable cell lines, we show that artificial tandem arrays of human U1 and U2 snRNA genes colocalize with coiled bodies and that the frequency of the colocalization depends directly on the transcriptional activity of the array. Association of the genes with coiled bodies was abolished when the artificial U2 arrays contained promoter mutations that prevent transcription or when RNA polymerase II transcription was globally inhibited by alpha-amanitin. Remarkably, the association was also abolished when the U2 snRNA coding regions were replaced by heterologous sequences. CONCLUSIONS: The requirement for the U2 snRNA coding region indicates that association of snRNA genes with coiled bodies is mediated by the nascent U2 RNA itself, not by DNA or DNA-bound proteins. Our data provide the first evidence that association of genes with a nuclear organelle can be directed by an RNA and suggest an autogenous feedback regulation model.  (+info)

Deletion analysis of the Drosophila Inscuteable protein reveals domains for cortical localization and asymmetric localization. (4/18351)

The Drosophila Inscuteable protein acts as a key regulator of asymmetric cell division during the development of the nervous system [1] [2]. In neuroblasts, Inscuteable localizes into an apical cortical crescent during late interphase and most of mitosis. During mitosis, Inscuteable is required for the correct apical-basal orientation of the mitotic spindle and for the asymmetric segregation of the proteins Numb [3] [4] [5], Prospero [5] [6] [7] and Miranda [8] [9] into the basal daughter cell. When Inscuteable is ectopically expressed in epidermal cells, which normally orient their mitotic spindle parallel to the embryo surface, these cells reorient their mitotic spindle and divide perpendicularly to the surface [1]. Like the Inscuteable protein, the inscuteable RNA is asymmetrically localized [10]. We show here that inscuteable RNA localization is not required for Inscuteable protein localization. We found that a central 364 amino acid domain - the Inscuteable asymmetry domain - was necessary and sufficient for Inscuteable localization and function. Within this domain, a separate 100 amino acid region was required for asymmetric localization along the cortex, whereas a 158 amino acid region directed localization to the cell cortex. The same 158 amino acid fragment could localize asymmetrically when coexpressed with the full-length protein, however, and could bind to Inscuteable in vitro, suggesting that this domain may be involved in the self-association of Inscuteable in vivo.  (+info)

The role of RBF in the introduction of G1 regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis. (5/18351)

The first appearance of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis, at cell cycle 17, is accompanied by the down-regulation of E2F-dependent transcription. Mutant alleles of rbf were generated and analyzed to determine the role of RBF in this process. Embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic RBF products show constitutive expression of PCNA and RNR2, two E2F-regulated genes, indicating that RBF is required for their transcriptional repression. Despite the ubiquitous expression of E2F target genes, most epidermal cells enter G1 normally. Rather than pausing in G1 until the appropriate time for cell cycle progression, many of these cells enter an ectopic S-phase. These results indicate that the repression of E2F target genes by RBF is necessary for the maintenance but not the initiation of a G1 phase. The phenotype of RBF-deficient embryos suggests that rbf has a function that is complementary to the roles of dacapo and fizzy-related in the introduction of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis.  (+info)

JunB is essential for mammalian placentation. (6/18351)

Lack of JunB, an immediate early gene product and member of the AP-1 transcription factor family causes embryonic lethality between E8.5 and E10.0. Although mutant embryos are severely retarded in growth and development, cellular proliferation is apparently not impaired. Retardation and embryonic death are caused by the inability of JunB-deficient embryos to establish proper vascular interactions with the maternal circulation due to multiple defects in extra-embryonic tissues. The onset of the phenotypic defects correlates well with high expression of junB in wild-type extra-embryonic tissues. In trophoblasts, the lack of JunB causes a deregulation of proliferin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) gene expression, resulting in a defective neovascularization of the decidua. As a result of downregulation of the VEGF-receptor 1 (flt-1), blood vessels in the yolk sac mesoderm appeared dilated. Mutant embryos which escape these initial defects finally die from a non-vascularized placental labyrinth. Injection of junB-/- embryonic stem (ES) cells into tetraploid wild-type blastocysts resulted in a partial rescue, in which the ES cell-derived fetuses were no longer growth retarded and displayed a normal placental labyrinth. Therefore, JunB appears to be involved in multiple signaling pathways regulating genes involved in the establishment of a proper feto-maternal circulatory system.  (+info)

Loss-of-function mutations in the rice homeobox gene OSH15 affect the architecture of internodes resulting in dwarf plants. (7/18351)

The rice homeobox gene OSH15 (Oryza sativa homeobox) is a member of the knotted1-type homeobox gene family. We report here on the identification and characterization of a loss-of-function mutation in OSH15 from a library of retrotransposon-tagged lines of rice. Based on the phenotype and map position, we have identified three independent deletion alleles of the locus among conventional morphological mutants. All of these recessive mutations, which are considered to be null alleles, exhibit defects in internode elongation. Introduction of a 14 kbp genomic DNA fragment that includes all exons, introns and 5'- and 3'- flanking sequences of OSH15 complemented the defects in internode elongation, confirming that they were caused by the loss-of-function of OSH15. Internodes of the mutants had abnormal-shaped epidermal and hypodermal cells and showed an unusual arrangement of small vascular bundles. These mutations demonstrate a role for OSH15 in the development of rice internodes. This is the first evidence that the knotted1-type homeobox genes have roles other than shoot apical meristem formation and/or maintenance in plant development.  (+info)

The mouse Aire gene: comparative genomic sequencing, gene organization, and expression. (8/18351)

Mutations in the human AIRE gene (hAIRE) result in the development of an autoimmune disease named APECED (autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy; OMIM 240300). Previously, we have cloned hAIRE and shown that it codes for a putative transcription-associated factor. Here we report the cloning and characterization of Aire, the murine ortholog of hAIRE. Comparative genomic sequencing revealed that the structure of the AIRE gene is highly conserved between human and mouse. The conceptual proteins share 73% homology and feature the same typical functional domains in both species. RT-PCR analysis detected three splice variant isoforms in various mouse tissues, and interestingly one isoform was conserved in human, suggesting potential biological relevance of this product. In situ hybridization on mouse and human histological sections showed that AIRE expression pattern was mainly restricted to a few cells in the thymus, calling for a tissue-specific function of the gene product.  (+info)

Abstract MOTIVATION: RNA molecules specifically enriched in the neuropil of neuronal cells and in particular in dendritic spines are of great interest for neurobiology in virtue of their involvement in synaptic structure and plasticity. The systematic recognition of such molecules is therefore a very important task. High resolution images of RNA in situ hybridization experiments contained in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) represent a very rich resource to identify them and have been so far exploited for this task through human-expert analysis. However, software tools that may automatically address the same objective are not very well developed. RESULTS: In this study we describe an automatic method for exploring in situ hybridization data and discover neuropil-enriched RNAs in the mouse hippocampus. We called it Hippo-ATESC (Automatic Texture Extraction from the Hippocampal region using Soft Computing). Bioinformatic validation showed that the Hippo-ATESC is very efficient in the recognition of ...
In the past two decades, the biological and medical fields have seen great advances in the development of biosensors and biochips capable of characterizing and quantifying biomolecules. To understand the important relationship between the biosensor and nano structure we introduce this proposal to fabricate and characterize the nanogap using size reduction technique for ss-DNA immobilization and hybridization detection . In this review, 2 masks designs are proposed. The first mask is the lateral nanogap with gold electrode and the second mask is for pad gold electrode pattern. Lateral nanogap is introduced in the fabrication process using silicon for nanogap and gold for electrode. Conventional photolithography and E- Beam lithography techniques are used to fabricate this nanogap (NG) based on the standard CMOS technology and the characterization of its conductivity together with its effect during sensing is investigated in this research ...
Introduction: HER2 gene amplification or overexpression occurs in 15% to 25% of breast cancers and has implications for treatment and prognosis. The most commonly used methods for HER2 testing are fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry. FISH is considered to be the reference standard and more accurately predicts response to trastuzumab, but is technically demanding, expensive, and requires specialized equipment. In situ hybridization is required to be eligible for adjuvant treatment with trastuzumab in Australia. Bright-field in situ hybridization is an alternative to FISH and uses a combination of in situ methodology and a peroxidase-mediated chromogenic substrate such as diaminobenzidine [chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH)] or multimer technology coupled with enzyme metallography [silver-enhanced in situ hybridization (SISH)] to create a marker visible under bright-field microscopy. CISH was introduced into diagnostic testing in Australia in October 2006. SISH ...
We have developed a non-radioactive in situ hybridization technique for the localization of RNA in whole mount Drosophila embryos. After fixation, whole embryos are hybridized in situ with a DNA probe which has been labeled with digoxygenin. The hybridization products are detected by using a phospha …
Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
TY - JOUR. T1 - A double labeling technique for performing immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization in virus infected cell cultures and tissues. AU - Gendelman, Howard E.. AU - Moench, Thomas R.. AU - Narayan, Opendra. AU - Griffin, Diane E.. AU - Clements, Janice E.. PY - 1985/1/1. Y1 - 1985/1/1. N2 - This report describes a combined immunocytochemical and in situ hybridization procedure which allows visualization of cellular or viral antigens and viral RNA in the same cell. Cultures infected with visna or measles virus were fixed in periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde, stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique using antibodies to viral or cellular proteins and then incubated with radiolabeled specific DNA probes (in situ hybridization). The immunoperoxidase stain was preserved through the hybridization procedure. Nonspecific sticking of probes over peroxidase stained cells was prevented by incorporation of 0.1% Triton X-100 into the hybridization solution and the ...
We examined the expression level of several genes that regulate different steps of metastasis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival specimens of primary human colon carcinomas from patients with at least 5 years of follow-up. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, basic fibrobla …
In situ hybridization allows us to learn more about the geographical location of, for example, the messenger RNA (mRNA) in a cell or tissue. It can also tell us where a gene is located on a chromosome. Obviously, a detection system must be built into the technique to allow the cytochemist to visualize and map the geography of these molecules in the cells in question.. When in situ hybridization was first introduced, it was applied to isolated cell nuclei to detect specific DNA sequences. Early users applied the techniques to isolated chromosomal preparations in order to map the location of genes in those chromosomes. The technique has also been used to detect viral DNA in an infected cell. In situ hybridization of RNA has also been used to show that RNA synthesis (transcription) occurs in the nucleus, while protein synthesis (translation) occurs in the cytoplasm.. ...
Visualize Gene Expression & Genetic Variations in Tissues:. Applications of RNAscope® and BaseScopeTM ISH technology. The nervous system consists of numerous specialized cell types that remain to fully cataloged and characterized at the molecular level. Due to the high degree of structural and functional heterogeneity and the intricate spatial organization of these cells, it is of special importance to analyze gene expression in the presence of full morphological and spatial contexts. Due to the lack of specific antibody reagents, especially for lncRNAs, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and ion channels, mapping of specific transcripts by in situ hybridization offers an excellent alternative approach. The RNAscope® assay provides a powerful method to detect gene expression within the spatial and morphological tissue context. BaseScopeTM is a novel in situ hybridization technology that allows visualization of splice junctions between adjacent exons and/or retained introns in highly specific ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
I am trying to set up doing in situ hybridization on paraformaldehyde fixed sections from mouse embryos using a 24mer oligonucleotide. I would appreciate tips on the best way to do this: end labelling or A-tailing. 3H or 35S as label. Also the best way to work out hybridization and washing conditions. All recipes gratefully received. Kathy Cheah HRMBDKC at HKUCC.BITNET ...
I need some help. I am trying to do in situ hybridization on parrafin embedded sections with a viral RNA target. I have used cRNA probes 300 900 + 1400 bas and oligo probes. These probes work fine in other systems but connot get a positive signal in the above system. Has anyone else experienced this problem and what did you do? Any suggestions would be welcome. Please respond by email. Thanks, Mary Downes Ottawa, Canada ...
In Situ Hybridization for mRNA Localization Purpose: In Situ hybridization for mRNA localization is used to identify the position of target mRNA in the cell or tissues being examined(Smith, 2001).Methods: In order for in situ hybridization for localiza...
The global in situ hybridization market is segmented on the basis of technique, application, and end user. By technique, the market is categorized into fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). The FISH segment is expected to command the largest share of the global market, by technique in 2016. This segment is also projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period (2016-2021). This can be attributed to factors such as like high resolution of this technique, rising adoption in research activities & laboratories to diagnose cancer, chromosomal abnormalities, and infectious diseases, among others.. By application, the in situ hybridization market is categorized into cancer diagnosis, cytology, neuroscience, immunology, and infectious diseases. The cancer diagnosis segment is expected to command the largest share of the global market, by application in 2016. This segment is also projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast ...
Expression of Raldh1. In situ hybridisation was performed on wholemount embryos with DIG- or fluorescein-labelled riboprobes. Unless otherwise stated, rostral i
ACD congratulates the team of scientists, led by Jacob D. Estes on their publication Defining HIV and SIV Reservoirs in Lymphoid Tissues DOI 10.20411/pai.v1i1.100.. The authors aimed to track and discriminate HIV-1/SIV viral reservoirs within tissue compartments and thus applied a specific and sensitive next-generation in situ hybridization approach. The authors demonstrated:. 1) that an optimized next-generation ISH platform RNAscope Assay for the rapid detection of vRNA (with results obtained within 1 day) has sufficient sensitivity to reliably detect single virions in B cell follicles (BCF) in FFPE tissue sections,. 2) that an approach for the detection of vDNA in situ (referred to as DNAscope) reliably and readily detects vDNA+ cells, and. 3) that they have developed an in situ method to simultaneously visualize vRNA and vDNA in the same tissue section and thereby identify transcriptionally latent infections (vDNA+/vRNA- cells) in lymphoid tissues.. The team of researchers then applied ...
BioGenex will be holding a few workshops next year. These will deal with immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization detection and will be presented as hands-on wet labs interspersed with lectures. The target audience is beginners who want to bring IHC and ISH to their labs ...
The in situ hybridization (ISH) market is poised to grow by USD 346.61 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about 7%.
原位雜交技術(In Situ Hybridization, ISH)是結合分子生物學、細胞學以及組織化學的一門新興技術。此技術始於1969年,耶魯大學的Gall等人首先將爪蟾核醣體基因探針與其母卵細胞
I have an In Situ Hybridization question for you guys and gals. Im currently performing In Situ HPV and EBV tests using an automated machine called the XT by Ventana. The tissue is parrifin embedded, cut at 4 microns and place on charged slides. NBT/ BCIP is used as our chromogen. I am beginning to notice some background staining that varies in intensity. When it occurs on our QC slide, it can be strong enough to fail a run. The background resembles a blue haze that can cover the tissue making interpretation difficult. At other times the blue haze surrounds the tissue rather than covering it which makes me believe that there could be some sort of hydrophobic or other chemical rxn taking place to shield the tissue. Im not certain if these two problems are related, but both occur completely random and always vary in intensity. If I can find the culprit of this problem it would lead to cleaner slides and more conclusive resulting. If anybody can help it would be much appreciated. Thanks P.S. ...
In situ hybridization In situ hybridization (ISH) is a type of hybridization that uses a labeled complementary DNA or RNA strand (i.e., probe) to localize a
Our detection reagents are ideal for in situ hybridization (ISH) applications due to their high affinity, and high sensitivity. Click here to learn more.
简介荧光原位杂交(fluorescence in situ hybridization,FISH)是在20世纪80年代末在放射性原位杂交技术的基础上发展起来的一种非放射性分子细胞遗传技术,以荧光标记取代同位素标记而形成的一种新的原位杂交方法。探针首先与某种介导分子(reporter molecule)结合,杂交后再通过免疫细胞化学过程连接上荧光染料。FISH的基本原理是将DNA(或RNA)探针用特
In this study we used quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) in a large panel of adult rat brain and peripheral tissues (Figure 1), to further refine the expression profile of the Slc6a17 gene. The highest expression levels of Slc6a17 mRNA were found in hindbrain, various brain cross sections, cerebellum, spinal cord, brain stem and hypothalamus, while very low or no expression was seen in the peripheral tissues with the exception of epididymis. Consequently, the Slc6a17 transporter is highly and selectively expressed in the CNS of adult rat.. Abundant mRNA expression of Slc6a17 in adult and embryonic rat CNS has previously been shown using in situ hybridization. Consistent results indicated restricted expression exclusively in neurons, both glutamatergic and subsets of GABAergic [4, 9, 15-17]. Our results from in situ hybridization (Figure 3) shows that the mouse Slc6a17 gene has similar expression pattern as previously seen in rat, with high expression in mouse forebrain and midbrain and lower expression ...
Creative Bioarray provides functions for tissue processing, embedding, slicing and staining. In addition to providing histological examinations of all major organs/tissues, including immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), in situ hybridization (ISH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy. Since the preparation of tissue samples is a time-consuming process, Creative Bioarray has prepared a tissue biobank to save time and significantly reduce costs. In addition, Creative Bioarray accepts fresh tissues, cells, paraffin-embedded tissues, unstained glass slides and any other types of tissues/samples. Furthermore, specific testing methods can be selected according to customer requirements.. With experienced and professional scientists, Creative Bioarray provides a complete customized on-site hybridization (ISH) service, covering every step required for ISH, including probe design, tissue procurement, and gene expression research. It also provides ...
AP Buffer 1 M Tris pH 9.5 100 mM 5 ml 1 M MgCl2 50 mM 2.5 ml 0.5 M NaCl 100 mM 10 ml Tween 20 0.1% 50 μl Levamisol 5 mM 60 mg ddH2O to 50 ml - 5 min @ RT in AP Buffer Staining: - Add 1-2 ml BM Purple AP Substrate (Roche 1442074) - KEEP IN THE DARK UNTIL BLEACHING STEP BELOW TO AVOID BACKGROUND STAINING!! - Let stain anywhere from 1 to 8 hours until stain is at desired level - Rinse with PBS - 5 min @ RT in PBS - 5 min @ RT in PBS - 5 min @ RT in PBS - 1hr @ RT in MEMFA - 1 hr in MeOH (can be stored @ 4°C here) ...
Distributor of Immunohistochemistry IHC antibodies, Flow Cytometry, Molecular Biology, Staining Kits, Reagents, Detection Systems Ancillary reagents
Distributor of Immunohistochemistry IHC antibodies, Flow Cytometry, Molecular Biology, Staining Kits, Reagents, Detection Systems Ancillary reagents
About the cover: Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis to determine the chromosomal location of the CYP2C18/19 transgene. See article by Löfgren et al. on page 955 of this issue. ...
J:92177 Powles N, Babbs C, Ficker M, Schimmang T, Maconochie M, Identification and analysis of genes from the mouse otic vesicle and their association with developmental subprocesses through in situ hybridization. Dev Biol. 2004 Apr 1;268(1):24-38 ...
Additional developmental defects resulting from amphimedine treatment. In situ hybridization was performed on control (A, C, E, G, I, K, M, O, Q) and treated (B
The amplicon on 8p11.2 is reported to be found in up to 10% of breast carcinomas. It has been demonstrated recently that this amplicon has four separate cores. The second core encompasses important oncogene candidates, including the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene. Recent studies have demonstrated that specific FGFR1 amplification correlates with gene expression and that FGFR1 activity is required for the survival of a FGFR1 amplified breast cancer cell line. FGFR1 amplification was analysed in tissue microarrays comprising a cohort of 880 unselected breast tumours by means of chromogenic in situ hybridisation using inhouse-generated FGFR1-specific probes. Chromogenic in situ hybridisation signals were counted in a minimum 30 morphologically unequivocal neoplastic cells. Amplification was defined as |5 signals per nucleus in more than 50% of cancer cells or when large gene copy clusters were seen. FGFR1 amplification was observed in 8.7% of the tumours and was significantly more
The purpose was to evaluate and compare 5 different HER2 genetic assays with different characteristics that could affect the performance to analyze the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) gene copy number under low and high throughput conditions. The study included 108 tissue samples from breast cancer patients with HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results scored as 0/1+, 2+, and 3+. HER2 genetic status was analysed using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Scoring results were documented through digital image analysis. The cancer region of interest was identified from a serial H&E stained slide following tissue cores were transferred to a tissue microarrays (TMA). When using TMA in a routine flow, all patients will be tested for HER2 status with IHC followed by CISH or FISH, thereby providing individual HER2 results. In conclusion, our results show that the differences between the HER2 genetic assays do not have an effect on the analytic ...
Fig. 6. Spatial expression profile of enpp1, 4, 6 and 7 during development. Whole mount in situ hybridisation with DIG-labelled antisense RNA probes was performed on embryos from stages 5-41 for enpp1, 4, 6 and stages 32-45 for enpp7. All embryos were analysed from the same experimental set. The differences in colours result from clearing the embryos and photographing them against a white background to visualise staining. (A) Whole-mount in situ hybridisation analysis of enpp1 expression. Lateral view at stages 28 (i), 35/36 (ii) and 37/38 (iii). Detail of the fin at stage 41 (iv) and dorsal view of a stage 41 embryo (v). Anterior is right and dorsal is up, except in (v). da, dorsal aorta; dc, duct of cuvier; dlav, dorsal longitudinal anastomosing vessel; h, heart; pcv, posterior cardinal vein; ps, pronephric sinus; vbi, ventral blood island. (B) Whole-mount in situ hybridisation analysis of enpp4 expression. Animal view at stage 5 (i), anterior view at stage 22 (ii), lateral view at stages 32 ...
Yes, human tissue samples treated with the PAXgene Tissue System were successfully used for Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). However, specimens treated with the PAXgene Tissue System are more sensitive to enzyme digestion compared to formalin-fixed samples. Enzyme digestion and other pretreatment steps may need to be optimized. ...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), developed in 1980s, is a cytogenetic technique ... transcripts within tissue sections or whole mounts.
A new method for gene mapping at the chromosome level using in situ hybridization and scanning electron microscopy is described and has been applied to mapping the rRNA genes of Drosophila melanogaster.. ...
Order Gene Specific Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) Probes that have been designed and optimized for the gene of your specific research.
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) uses fluorescent molecules to vividly paint genes or chromosomes. This technique is particularly useful for gene mapping and for identifying chromosomal abnormalities.
DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. To address this limitation, we have d
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Comparison of formaldehyde-preperfused frozen and freshly frozen tissue preparation for the in situ hybridization for alpha-tubulin messenger RNA in the rat brain. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
The global FISH imaging systems market size was estimated at USD 704.5 million in 2016 and is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 8.1% over the forecast period. Growing prevalence of target diseases leads to clinical urgency for adoption of rapid diagnostic alternatives such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) imaging systems, which is anticipated to fuel demand in the coming years
Figure 1. HCN4 expression during embryogenesis (A) In situ hybridization analysis reveals HCN4 is expressed in the developing head and along the dorsal midline at the completion of neurulation embryos (NF stage 21 lateral and frontal views). At early tailbud stages, HCN4 expression is observed primarily in the craniofacial region, in 2 stripes along the neural tube, and in the developing somites. This expression pattern is maintained as development progresses (NF stage 25, lateral and anterior/ventral views). At NF stage 26, HCN4 mRNA begins to be expressed on the left side of the developing heart field (arrow; lateral and ventral views). Expression becomes bilateral beginning at NF stage 27/28 (arrows; lateral and ventral views) but remains more highly expressed on the left side of the body. Scale bars = 200μm. (B) As cardiogenesis progresses during tadpole stages (NF stages 29-39, lateral and ventral views, arrows denote heart), HCN4 expression is diffusely present in the developing ...
The in situ hybridization market is projected to reach USD 739.9 million by 2021 from USD 557.1 million in 2016, at a CAGR of 5.8% in the next five years (2016 to 2021).. Increasing diagnosis and growing incidence & prevalence of cancer, technology advancements in therapeutics, increasing government initiatives globally are some factors expected to drive the growth of the global in situ hybridization market in the coming years.. In 2016, North America is expected to account for the largest share of the global in situ hybridization market, followed by Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Rest of the World (RoW). This can be attributed to growing clinical and research in cancer by biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, government initiatives, increasing prevalence and diagnosis of cancer in the U.S. and Canada, and increasing adoption of companion diagnostics. Increased adoption of companion diagnostics is attributed to the development and launch of newer therapeutic agents.. In the coming years, ...
We describe a fluorescence in situ hybridization method that permits detection of the localization and abundance of single mRNAs (smFISH) in cleared whole-mount adult Drosophila brains. The approach is rapid and multiplexable and does not require molecular amplification; it allows facile quantification of mRNA expression with subcellular resolution on a standard confocal microscope. We further demonstrate single-mRNA detection across the entire brain using a custom Bessel beam structured illumination microscope (BB-SIM). ...
We describe a fluorescence in situ hybridization method that permits detection of the localization and abundance of single mRNAs (smFISH) in cleared whole-mount adult Drosophila brains. The approach is rapid and multiplexable and does not require molecular amplification; it allows facile quantification of mRNA expression with subcellular resolution on a standard confocal microscope. We further demonstrate single-mRNA detection across the entire brain using a custom Bessel beam structured illumination microscope (BB-SIM). ...
MarketStudyReport.com presents latest report on global In-situ Hybridization (ISH) Market, which evaluates the growth trends of the industry through historical study and estimates future prospects based on comprehensive research. The report extensively provides the market share, growth, trends and forecasts for the period 2021-2026.
Hybridization bags are used for membrane incubation steps in southern, northern, and western blotting protocols for such applications as hybridizations and washes, antibody and conjugate incubations, substrate application, and film exposure. Hybridization bags are 8 X 10 inch, 4 mil thick, clear polyethylene bags. They are heat-sealable, resistant to temperatures up to at least 65 C, and do not curl when cut ...
Aperio Image Analysis offers solutions for automated detection and counting of target signals, with options for brightfield and fluorescence.
(KudoZ) Russian to English translation of блоттинг-гибридизация: blot hybridization [Biology (-tech,-chem,micro-) (Medical)].
A Design of an Autonomous Molecule Loading-Transporting-Unloading System Using DNA Hybridization and Biomolecular Linear Motors. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Mice, Animals, Brain, Cells, Central Nervous System, Concentration, Gene, Gene Expression, Hippocampus, Immunocytochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, Knockout Mice, Liver, Mouse, mRNA, Nervous System, Neurons, PCR, Populations, Rat
Previously, we have shown by in situ hybridization that the expression of IGFBP-4, a potential IGF-I inhibitor, correlates to the expression pattern described
The cDNA and in situ hybridizations for Fast Release clones (high throughput analysis) have not been double checked. Mistakes may occur. Please contact C and B Thisse if you detect anything wrong. PCR protocol available on the probe details page ...
The cDNA and in situ hybridizations for Fast Release clones (high throughput analysis) have not been double checked. Mistakes may occur. Please contact C and B Thisse if you detect anything wrong. PCR protocol available on the probe details page ...
In situ hybridization: detects the presence of a transcript. *MS2 tagging: by incorporating RNA stem loops, such as MS2, into a ... Transcription factories can also be localized using fluorescence in situ hybridization or marked by antibodies directed against ... With the notable exception of in situ techniques, most other methods provide cell population averages, and are not capable of ...
In situ hybridization: detects the presence of a transcript. *MS2 tagging: by incorporating RNA stem loops, such as MS2, into a ... Transcription factories can also be localized using fluorescence in situ hybridization or marked by antibodies directed against ... With the notable exception of in situ techniques, most other methods provide cell population averages, and are not capable of ... "Kethoxal-assisted single-stranded DNA sequencing captures global transcription dynamics and enhancer activity in situ". Nature ...
... in situ hybridization; functional analysis; SNP detection and use as antigens and many others nucleotide base applications.[ ... enhances base stacking and pre-organizes the backbone of the oligonucleotide significantly increasing their hybridization ...
... in situ hybridization https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iRynlXIJw0 A detailed description of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)is the most widely used riboprobe technique. A target sequence and a probe are ... RNA probes were proved to be able to perform the same function and also used with in situ hybridization. Fluorescent dyed ... There are two kinds of probes used during in situ hybridization: Riboprobes and DNA oligonucleotides probes. Riboprobes are ...
They are microdissection techniques, Fluorescent in situ hybridization methods, in situ sequencing, in situ capture protocols ... in situ hybridization was developed in the late 60's and saw major developments in the 80's (smFISH) and 10's (RNAscope, ... Thus, this in situ hybridization (ISH) technique spots spatial localization of RNA expression via direct imaging of individual ... Another in situ hybridization technique termed RNAscope employs probes of the specific Z-shaped design to simultaneously ...
... inventor of in situ hybridization; and early champion of women in science.[39] ... Development of two powerful technologies-Southern hybridization and DNA fingerprinting-that together revolutionized human ...
FISH chromosome in-situ hybridization allows the study cytogenetics in pre- and postnatal samples and is also widely used in ... Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization maps out single copy or repetitive DNA sequences through localization labeling of specific ... It includes a series of techniques referred to as fluorescence in situ hybridization, or FISH, in which DNA probes are labeled ... O'Connor C (2008). "Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH)". Nature Education. 1 (1): 171. Martin EA, McFerran TA, eds. ( ...
Nilaver, Gajanan (1986). In Situ Hybridization Histochemistry as a Supplement to Immunohistochemistry. In Situ Hybridization in ... in situ hybridization or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A neuronal lineage marker can be a neuronal antigen that is ... This technique is called in situ Hybridization and it is used in a large variety of studies but mainly used in developmental ... This technique is known as in situ hybridization. Its application have been carried out in all different tissues, but ...
... q24 by in situ hybridization". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 88 (3-4): 197-9. doi:10.1159/000015545. PMID 10828584. S2CID 45527362. " ...
1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Genomics. 40 (1): 213-5. doi:10.1006/geno.1996.4540. PMID 9070952. Ladner RD, ...
... to band 15q22 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 69 (1-2): 15-17. doi:10.1159/000133928. PMID ... to band 9p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 71 (1): 94-95. doi:10.1159/000134070. PMID 7606936. ... to band 19p13.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 72 (4): 294-296. doi:10.1159/000134206. PMID ... q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 68 (1-2): 122-124. doi:10.1159/000133905. PMID 7956350. ...
Jin L, Lloyd RV (1997). "In situ hybridization: methods and applications". J Clin Lab Anal. 11 (1): 2-9. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1098 ... is called in situ hybridization histochemistry. Radioactive precursors of DNA and RNA, [3H]-thymidine and [3H]-uridine ...
Evidence from genomic in situ hybridization". Annals of Botany. 104 (4): 681-688. doi:10.1093/aob/mcp161. PMC 2729636. PMID ... For example, homoploid hybridization is hybridization where the offspring have the same ploidy level as the two parental ... This contrasts with a common situation in plants where chromosome doubling accompanies or occurs soon after hybridization. ... Allopolyploids are formed from the hybridization of two separate species. In plants, this probably most often occurs from the ...
In Situ Hybridization, including tissue sectioning, slide mounting, and hybridization histochemistry; Mouse Genome Manipulation ... "RPA/In Situ Hybridization Research Core". Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. Archived from the original on May 23, 2005. ...
"A new method of in situ hybridization". Chromosoma. 53 (2): 107-117. doi:10.1007/bf00333039. PMID 172297. S2CID 29595419. ...
... this was done using fluorescence in situ hybridization. BLVRB encodes a protein that is a 206-residue monomeric enzyme. The ... q13.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. 71 (2): 179-81. doi:10.1159/000134102. PMID ...
... in situ hybridization analysis for human papillomavirus". Primary Care Update for OB/GYNS. Elsevier Science Inc. 5 (4): 152. ...
In situ hybridization experiments done by Mclean et al. by fusion of mouse constructs fused to basal promoter with LacZ ...
Quantitative Fluorescent in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) is a cytogenetic technique based on the traditional FISH methodology. ... and Lansdorp, PM (2001) "Quantitative Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization." Current Protocols in Cell Biology (University of ... Following hybridization, thousands of cells can be analyzed on a flow cytometer in a relatively short time. However, Flow-FISH ... A small volume of the hybridization mixture is placed onto a coverslip and then placed gently onto the microscope slide which ...
In situ sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) do not require that cells be isolated and are increasingly ... Lubeck E, Coskun AF, Zhiyentayev T, Ahmad M, Cai L (April 2014). "Single-cell in situ RNA profiling by sequential hybridization ... October 2014). "In situ metabolic analysis of single plant cells by capillary microsampling and electrospray ionization mass ... uses sequencing techniques similar to single cell genomics or direct detection using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The ...
"Subregional mapping of 8 single copy loci to chromosome 6 by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 66 (4 ... in vivo studies using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry". Int. J. Cancer. 50 (2): 215-22. doi:10.1002/ijc. ...
Detection is done by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Larger chromosomal deletion syndromes are detectable using ...
Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in Situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas. 4. Elsevier. pp. 23-32. doi:10.1016/s1874-5784( ... Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in Situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas. 4. Elsevier. pp. 23-32. doi:10.1016/s1874-5784( ...
Shaffer LG (15 May 2001). "Diagnosis of Microdeletion Syndromes by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)". Current ... Like other chromosomal microdeletions, 17q12 microdeletion syndrome is diagnosed via fluorescence in situ hybridization. ...
Wendeberg A (January 2010). "Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of environmental microbes". Cold Spring ...
1998). "Regional mapping of the human MP70 (Cx50; connexin 50) gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 1q21.1". Mol. Vis ...
Finally, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), Kashuba et al. were able to map the RAB7A gene to 3q21 in 1997. RAB7a ...
3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid mapping". Genomics. 50 (1): 112-4. doi:10.1006/geno.1998.5227. ...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA clones (BAC and YAC clones, cosmids) allowed the construction of chromosome ... Homologies can be identified with high accuracy using molecularly defined DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization ( ... "Molecular cytotaxonomy of primates by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization". Genomics. 8 (2): 347-350. doi:10.1016/ ... A limitation is that hybridization efficiencies decrease with increasing phylogenetic distance. Radiation hybrid (RH) genome ...
alboglabra by fluorescence in situ hybridization" - Nature "Chromonema and chromomere" - Springerlink. ...
Chromosomal assignment of human nuclear envelope protein genes LMNA, LMNB1, and LBR by fluorescence in situ hybridization. ...
... gene rearrangements studies and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) fall within the territory of pathology. ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fluorescence in situ hybridization.. *Fluorescent+in+Situ+Hybridization at the US ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular cytogenetic technique that uses fluorescent probes that bind to only ... 2016-01-01). Feng, Yi; Zhang, Lin (eds.). Stellaris® RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization for the Simultaneous Detection of ... Fluorescence in situ Hybridization Photos of bacteria. *Rational design of polynucleotide probe mixes to identify particular ...
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: In situ conservation of livestock and poultry, 1992. (Inggeris) ... In: Tiews, K. (Ed.), Proceedings ofWorld Symposium on Selection,Hybridization, and Genetic Engineering in Aquaculture, Bordeaux ...
Olshen, A. B.; Venkatraman, E. S. (2002). "Change-point analysis of array-based comparative genomic hybridization data". ... ou diversas aplicacións de hibridación in situ. Todas estas técnicas son extremadamente propensas ao ruído e/ou suxeitas a ... "Array comparative genomic hybridization and its applications in cancer" (PDF). Nature Genetics 37. Páxs. S11-S17. ...
Gilligan DM, Lieman J, Bennett V (1996). "Assignment of the human beta-adducin gene (ADD2) to 2p13-p14 by in situ hybridization ...
Harmful effects of hybridization have led to a decline and even extinction of native species.[67][68] For example, ... it is difficult to predict the nature of temperature-based success of non-native species in-situ. Since some studies have ... Rhymer, J. M.; Simberloff, D. (1996). "Extinction by hybridization and introgression". Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics ... Rhymer, Judith M.; Simberloff, Daniel (1996). "Extinction by Hybridization and Introgression". Annual Review of Ecology and ...
... can also be conjugated to nucleoside triphosphates and incorporated into a probe enzymatically for in situ hybridisation. The ...
There are multiple sites of hybridisation between the closely related species Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus and Mytilus ... Hybrid zones can form in situ due to the evolution of a new lineage[1] but generally they result from secondary contact of the ... However, blue mussel populations show extensive hybridisation worldwide and are a well studied example of a marine hybrid zone ... hybridization takes place and a hybrid zone arises. Secondary hybrid zones in turn arise from secondary contact between two ...
Direct hybridizations between coyotes and gray wolves was never explicitly observed. Nevertheless, in a study that analyzed the ... Ex-situ conservation. *Endangered Wolf Center. *Mexicanwolves.org. References[edit]. *^ Guertin, Stephen (January 16, 2015). " ... Hailer, Frank; Leonard, Jennifer A. (2008). "Hybridization among Three Native North American Canis Species in a Region of ... This study suggested that although the Mexican gray wolf is generally less prone to hybridizations with coyotes compared to the ...
... to human chromosome band 2q35 by fluorescent in situ hybridization". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 89 (3-4): 160-1. doi:10.1159/ ...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clinical pathology. *Clinical chemistry. *Hematopathology. *Transfusion medicine. *Medical ...
... by fluorescence in situ hybridization". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 57 (2-3): 109-11. PMID 1914517. doi:10.1159/000133124. CS1 ...
... is mapped to human chromosome 20p11.2 by in situ hybridization (ISH and FISH)". Genomics. 14 (3): 740-4. doi:10.1016/S0888-7543 ...
"Detection of c-sis proto-oncogene transcripts by direct enzyme-labeled cDNA probes and in situ hybridization". In Vitro Cell ...
D. Golberg, X.D. Bai, M. Mitome, C.C. Tang, C.Y. Zhi and Y. Bando : «Structural peculiarities of in situ deformation of a multi ... Y. IDE, F. LIU, J. Zhang, N. Kawamoto, K. Komaguchi, Y. Bando, D. Golberg : «Hybridization of Au nanoparticle-loaded TiO2 with ... Z. Xu, Y. Bando, W. Wang, X. Bai and D. Golberg : " Real-Time In Situ HRTEM-Resolved Resistance Switching of Ag 2 S Nanoscale ... C. Tang, Y. Bando, D. Golberg, X. Ding and S. Qi : " Boron Nitride Nanotubes Filled with Ni and NiSi 2 Nanowires in Situ " J. ...
... fluorescent in situ hybridization, methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes, DNA adenine methyltransferase identification ( ...
... study of chromosomes to detect gains or losses of chromosomes or chromosome segments using fluorescent in situ hybridization ( ... FISH) and/or comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Direct gene testing uses blood, hair, skin, amniotic fluid, or other ...
SNRPN-methylation is used to detect uniparental disomy of chromosome 15.[6] After fluorescent-in-situ-hybridization has ...
Mapping the human acetylcholinesterase gene to chromosome 7q22 by fluorescent in situ hybridization coupled with selective PCR ...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) involves fluorescent labeling of probes that bind to specific DNA sequences, used for ... Array comparative genomic hybridization is a new molecular technique that involves hybridization of an individual DNA sample to ... and comparative genomic hybridization tests. Some Clinical Geneticists are also board certified in Cytogenetics.. College (4 ... new molecular technologies such as array comparative genomic hybridization are now becoming widely used. Examples of chromosome ...
... by employing fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or post-sequencing confirmation.[10] The bias of MDA against high %GC ...
... q23 by in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis". Cytogenet Cell Genet. 81 (1): 89-90. PMID 9691185. doi:10.1159/ ...
... fluorescent in situ hybridization). The characteristic micro-deletion was sometimes overlooked in a standard FISH test, leading ...
... by in situ hybridization.". Genomics. 26 (1): 168-70. PMID 7782081. doi:10.1016/0888-7543(95)80101-Q.. ...
... fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microsatellite analysis". Conservation Genetics. 6 (1): 141-145. doi:10.1007/ ... Interspecific hybridisation of black and white rhinoceros has also been confirmed.[9] ... Robinson, Terry J.; V. Trifonov; I. Espie; E.H. Harley (January 2005). "Interspecific hybridization in rhinoceroses: ...
Like the sweet orange, it is a pomelo x mandarin hybrid, but arose from a distinct hybridization event.[22] ... "In-situ Measurement of the Actual Detachment Force of Oranges Harvested by a Canopy Shaker Harvesting Machine". Abstracts for ...
... q33 by in situ hybridization. Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. December 1997, 78 (2): 133-4. PMID 9371406. doi:10.1159/000134646 ...
... to human chromosome band 10q26 by in situ hybridisation". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 83 (1-2): 74-5. doi:10.1159/000015130. PMID ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fluorescence in situ hybridization.. *Fluorescent+in+Situ+Hybridization at the US ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular cytogenetic technique that uses fluorescent probes that bind to only ... 2016-01-01). Feng, Yi; Zhang, Lin (eds.). Stellaris® RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization for the Simultaneous Detection of ... Fluorescence in situ Hybridization Photos of bacteria. *Rational design of polynucleotide probe mixes to identify particular ...
Source for information on Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization: Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic Disorders dictionary. ... hybridization) of fluorescent DNA probes to available chromosomal DNA. The fluorescent DNA sequence used to attach to the ... Fluorescent in Situ HybridizationDefinitionFluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful technique used to identify ... Fluorescent in Situ Hybridization. Definition. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful technique used to ...
... Phonetic. ,b,kro,/b,-mo-,b,JEN,/b,-ick in ,b,sy,/b,-too ,b,hi,/b,-brid-ih-,b,ZA,/b,- ...
... Dr. Stanislav Kopriva stanislav.kopriva at pfp.unibe.ch Mon Dec 14 10:56:14 EST 1998 *Previous message: ... Dear netters Does anyone have a good fixation protocol for in situ of maize leaves ? We have tried 4% formaldehyde/ 0.25% ...
... Uwe Harmening Harmening at cellbiology.uni-frankfurt.d400.de Wed Aug 16 04:00:17 EST 1995 *Previous ... Hi hybridizers, i am trying to find the best method of fixation for plant cell culture material in in situ hybridization ... so that the preservation survives all the high temperature inkubations of in situ experiments? Any suggestions welcome! Thank ...
... YMMCS010 at TWNMOE10.Edu.TW YMMCS010 at TWNMOE10.Edu.TW Thu Dec 23 12:48:04 EST 1993 * ...
Here, we detail a robust method for in situhybridization of RNA probes to... ... Wilkinson D. G. (1992) Whole mount in situ hybridization of vertebrate embryos, in In Situ Hybridization: A Practical Approach ... In Situ Hybridization of Whole-Mount Embryos. In: Darby I.A., Hewitson T.D. (eds) In Situ Hybridization Protocols. Methods in ... Here, we detail a robust method for in situ hybridization of RNA probes to whole pieces of fixed tissue. This method has been ...
Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) Fluorescence in situ hybridization OConnor, Clare. "Fluorescence In Situ ... In Situ Hybridization of RNA and miRNA Probes to cells, CTCs, and tissues Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization of RNA Probes to ... In situ hybridization was invented by French biologist Mary-Lou Pardue and Joseph G. Gall. In situ hybridization is a powerful ... whole mount in situ hybridization, double detection of RNAs and RNA plus protein, and fluorescent in situ hybridization to ...
... MBYFTSAY at CCVAX.SINICA.EDU.TW MBYFTSAY at CCVAX.SINICA.EDU.TW Sat Sep 17 02:12:07 EST ... Dear Netters Following is a summary of the responses I received about DIG in situ hybridization. Thank everyone who share me ... We are currently using DIG labeled probes for in situ hybridization. For Arabidopsis this has worked very well on sections for ... It works well for in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. We have published a short technical paper on this: ...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides researchers with a way to visualize and map the genetic material in an ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides researchers with a way to visualize and map the genetic material in an ...
Purchase In Situ Hybridization Protocols for the Brain, Volume 47 - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780123668479, ... In Situ Hybridization Protocols for the Brain, Volume 47 2nd Edition. Write a review ... "In situ Hybridization Protocols for the Brain is aimed at first time users, although the experienced user will also find tons ... It contains all the information required for newcomers to achieve successful in situ hybridization results, and methods for ...
... Prospects 2017 - 2025 - published on openPR.com ... In Situ Hybridization Market highly promising pace 2025 Global In Situ Hybridization Market: Snapshot In situ hybridization ( ... In Situ Hybridization Market To Observer Major Growth By 2025 Global In Situ Hybridization Market: Snapshot In situ ... In Situ Hybridization Market foregather Progressive technology 2025 Global In Situ Hybridization Market: Snapshot In situ ...
... can be used to identify as many labeled features as there are different fluorophores used in the hybridization. ... Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in its simplest form, ... Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Hardware and Software Implications in the Research Laboratory. Nearly a quarter-century has ... Tkachuk, D., Pinkel, D., Kuo, W.-L., Weier, H.-U., and Gray, J., Clinical applications of fluorescence in situhybridization, ...
Detection of Bladder Cancer in Urine Sediments by a Novel Multicolor Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (Quartet) Test. Bladder ... We aimed to design a multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test referred to as the quartet test for the ... The aim of the present study was to estimate the diagnostic value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of ... We evaluated the use of UroVysion fluorescence in situ hybridization tests to detect the intravesical recurrence of bladder ...
Purchase Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ... In situ Hybridization for Bcl-2 mRNA Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2 Oncoprotein Statistical Analysis Discussion References 7 ... In situ Hybridization for Bcl-2 mRNA Detection Materials Preparation of the Reagents According to Manufacturers Instructions( ... Handbook of Immunohistochemistry and in situ Hybridization of Human Carcinomas 1st Edition. Molecular Genetics: Liver and ...
If you are a society or association member and require assistance with obtaining online access instructions please contact our Journal Customer Services team ...
The in situ hybridization (ISH) technique allows the sites of expression of particular genes to be detected. This protocol ... High-resolution in situ hybridization to whole-mount zebrafish embryos.. Thisse C1, Thisse B. ... We use conditions that favor specific hybridization to complementary mRNA sequences in the tissue(s) expressing the ...
A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you ... A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean. Seth D. Findley, Steven Cannon, Kranthi Varala, Jianchang ... A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean. Seth D. Findley, Steven Cannon, Kranthi Varala, Jianchang ... A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean. Seth D. Findley, Steven Cannon, Kranthi Varala, Jianchang ...
A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you ... Griffor, M. C., L. O. Vodkin, R. J. Singh and T. Hymowitz, 1991 Fluorescent in situ hybridization to soybean metaphase ... Schubert, I., and U. Wobus, 1985 In situ hybridization confirms jumping nucleolus organizing regions in Allium. Chromosoma 92: ... A Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization System for Karyotyping Soybean. Seth D. Findley, Steven Cannon, Kranthi Varala, Jianchang ...
Agilent Expands Portfolio of Probes for In Situ Hybridization - read this article along with other careers information, tips ... Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE: A) today announced the release of a range of new probes for in situ hybridization, a technique ... The new probes address the need to cleanly and accurately interpret data from both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) ... Vijay noted that Agilents new probes will bring the precision of oligonucleotide-based in situ hybridization into more ...
An in situ hybridization approach to labeling DNA and RNA targets in the specimen using oligonucleotide-based fluorescent ... An in situ hybridization approach to labeling DNA and RNA targets in the specimen using oligonucleotide-based fluorescent ... Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Referred to as FISH, the technique is used primarily for chromosomal analysis. ...
Genomic in situhybridization (GISH) demonstrates the high level of overall similarity... ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to analyse the structure of the rye B chromosome. ... Fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to analyse the structure of the rye B chromosome. Genomicin situ ... B chromosome DNA sequence composition fluorescencein situ hybridization repetitive sequence Secale cereale translocations ...
The whole-mount in situ hybridization process has revolutionized the study of gene expression in the embryo. This procedure ... Combined whole-mount in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in avian embryos Methods. 2001 Apr;23(4):339-44. doi: ... The whole-mount in situ hybridization process has revolutionized the study of gene expression in the embryo. This procedure ... While antisense RNA probes are extremely useful and methods for two-color in situ hybridization are available, antibodies ...
J. M. Levsky and R. H. Singer, "Fluorescence in situ hybridization: past, present and future," Journal of Cell Science, vol. ... R. M. Harland, "In situ hybridization: an improved whole-mount method for Xenopus embryos," Methods in Cell Biology, vol. 36, ... T. Jowett and Y. L. Yan, "Double fluorescent in situ hybridization to zebrafish embryos," Trends in Genetics, vol. 12, no. 10, ... High-Resolution Whole-Mount In Situ Hybridization Using Quantum Dot Nanocrystals. Andriani Ioannou, Iro Eleftheriou, Andrea ...
Summary: Multiplexed in situ hybridisation chain reaction allows visualisation of multiple mRNAs in a single sample with ...
The in situ hybridization (ISH) market is poised to grow by USD 346.61 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about ... Global In Situ Hybridization (ISH) Market 2020-2024 , Evolving Opportunities with Abbott. ... report/in-situ-. hybridization-. ma.... Major Five In Situ Hybridization (ISH) Market Companies:. Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. ... ELMHURST, Ill. - July 22, 2020 - PRLog -- The in situ hybridization (ISH) market is poised to grow by USD 346.61 million during ...
... Xingwei Wang,1 Xiaodong ... Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably ...
The Report Global In-situ Hybridization (ISH) Market 2017-2021 provides information on pricing, market analysis, shares, ... Emergence of In-situ Hybridization (ISH) Market Analysis To Grow At CAGR Of 6.59% during the period 2017-2021 Press Release • ... About In-Situ Hybridization (ISH). ISH is a technique for localizing specific nucleic acid targets within fixed tissues and ... Technavios analysts forecast the global in-situ hybridization (ISH) market to grow at a CAGR of 6.59% during the period 2017- ...
Buy Introduction to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization by Michael Andreeff, Daniel Pinkel from Waterstones today! Click and ... Introduction to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Principles and Clinical Applications (Hardback). Michael Andreeff (editor) ... Introduction to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization provides a solid groundwork in the basic principles and techniques of FISH ... Introduction to Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Principles and Clinical Applications Edited by Michael Andreeff, M.D., PH.D ...
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH ) is a molecular cytogenetic technique that uses fluorescent probes that bind to only those parts of a nucleic acid sequence with a high degree of sequence complementarity . (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) provides researchers with a way to visualize and map the genetic material in an individual's cells, including specific genes or portions of genes. (genome.gov)
  • Human DNA and RNA can be visualized with the help of in situ hybridization in two major ways, chromogenic (CISH) and fluorescence (FISH) detection. (openpr.com)
  • Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization ( FISH ), in its simplest form, can be used to identify as many labeled features as there are different fluorophores used in the hybridization. (microscopyu.com)
  • To study their prognostic impact and association with kidney cancer phenotype, a tissue microarray with 1,809 cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization for 8p21 copy numbers. (urotoday.com)
  • Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization in the detection of bladder transitional-cell carcinoma: A multi-center clinical study based on Chinese population. (urotoday.com)
  • To evaluate the diagnostic value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in bladder cancer. (urotoday.com)
  • Clinical evaluation of two consecutive UroVysion fluorescence in situ hybridization tests to detect intravesical recurrence of bladder cancer: a prospective blinded comparative study in Japan. (urotoday.com)
  • We evaluated the use of UroVysion fluorescence in situ hybridization tests to detect the intravesical recurrence of bladder cancer during follow-up after a transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). (urotoday.com)
  • Detection of Bladder Cancer in Urine Sediments by a Novel Multicolor Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (Quartet) Test. (urotoday.com)
  • We aimed to design a multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test referred to as the quartet test for the detection of bladder cancer in urine. (urotoday.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to estimate the diagnostic value of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of tumor cells in voided urine specimens for detecting upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). (urotoday.com)
  • We compared PTEN immunohistochemistry (IHC) and PTEN fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the largest existing radical prostatectomy cohort with clinical follow-up data. (urotoday.com)
  • The new probes address the need to cleanly and accurately interpret data from both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). (biospace.com)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to analyse the structure of the rye B chromosome. (springer.com)
  • Cuadrado A, Jouve N (1994) Highly repetitive sequences in B-chromosomes of Secale cereale revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. (springer.com)
  • Direct visualization of dispersed 11q13 chromosomal translocations in mantle cell lymphoma by multicolor DNA fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization," Blood , vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 1177-1182, 1996. (hindawi.com)
  • FISHing for chick genes: triple-label whole-mount fluorescence in situ hybridization detects simultaneous and overlapping gene expression in avian embryos," Developmental Dynamics , vol. 229, no. 3, pp. 651-657, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. (hindawi.com)
  • Introduction to Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Principles and Clinical Applications Edited by Michael Andreeff, M.D., PH.D., and Daniel Pinkel, PH.D. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of a variety of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting, as well as an aid in the identification of particular genetic disorders. (waterstones.com)
  • Introduction to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization provides a solid groundwork in the basic principles and techniques of FISH and covers in detail the applications of this technology to cancer in humans, including tumorigenesis, prostate and breast tumors, myeloid leukemias, and lymphoproliferative malignancies. (waterstones.com)
  • Edited by two leading basic and clinical investigators in the field, with state-of-the-art contributions from expert subspecialists, and featuring over 200 color illustrations, Introduction to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization is an essential reference for clinicians and investigators in oncology, genetics, and cytometry. (waterstones.com)
  • Due to their high affinity, high sensitivity, and low background, fluorescence- and enzyme-based detection reagents from Vector Laboratories are ideal for in situ hybridization (ISH) applications. (vectorlabs.com)
  • Our approach relies on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and integrated structural genomic resources, including large-insert genomic clones in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. (nih.gov)
  • Commonly called FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization is a laboratory-based test that helps build out the full picture of a cancer diagnosis by zooming in on the genetic material in the cell - known as chromosomes. (mdanderson.org)
  • To understand fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it's important to review the basics of how our cells work. (mdanderson.org)
  • How does fluorescence in situ hybridization work? (mdanderson.org)
  • Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resource-limited malaria endemic countries. (plos.org)
  • Real-Time Monitoring of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) Kinetics. (bioportfolio.com)
  • A comprehensive comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and cytology for the detection of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To compare the relative effectiveness of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and cytology in diagnosing upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUT-UC) and to evaluate the advantages and poten. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Graphene oxide-quenching-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (G-FISH) to detect RNA in tissue: Simple and fast tissue RNA diagnostics. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Direct detection of Staphylococcus aureus in positive blood cultures through molecular beacon-based fluorescence in situ hybridization. (bioportfolio.com)
  • An activatable organic semiconducting nanoprobe that specifically turns on its second near-infrared window fluorescence upon being exposed to nitric oxide stimuli was developed for in vivo, in situ, r. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In this study, investigators assess, using Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) and Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) arrays for Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS), the inc. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Even im working on FISH and also quite new to this technique and i hope the link that i have will help you out,I know its very late to reply you.If you have finished working on FISH please do share the information that you have regarding Fluorescence in situ hybridization. (protocol-online.org)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization assays using a multiprobe set consisting of centromeric probes for chromosomes 3, 7 and 17 and p16 gene can be used as a diagnostic tool in detecting the genetic alterations in cholangiocarcinoma. (sgh.com.sg)
  • Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization using direct-labelled FISH DNA probes are hybridized to target loci and analyzed under fluorescence microscopy. (sgh.com.sg)
  • Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enables you to assay multiple targets and visualize colocalized signals in a single specimen. (thermofisher.com)
  • Four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on a Drosophila embryo. (thermofisher.com)
  • Also analogous to fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of HER-2 gene amplification. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We evaluated a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, which has previously been shown to be of value for the diagnosis of melanocytic nevi and melanomas of the skin, using probes targeting 6p25 (RREB1), 6q23 (MYB), 11q13 (CCND1) and centromere 6 (CEP6), for its potential to assist in the distinction of conjunctival melanocytic nevi from melanomas. (wiley.com)
  • [email protected] wrote: Hello Histonetters, I would like to do fluorescence in situ hybridization on paraffin embedded sections using RNA probes. (histosearch.com)
  • Yes, human tissue samples treated with the PAXgene Tissue System were successfully used for Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). (qiagen.com)
  • Visualization of mitotic chromosomes in filamentous fungi by fluorescence staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was also successfully applied to the specimens, revealing one ribosomal RNA gene cluster, or nucleolus organizer region (NOR) in the genome of each fungus. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Growing prevalence of target diseases leads to clinical urgency for adoption of rapid diagnostic alternatives such as Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) imaging systems, which is anticipated to fuel demand in the coming years. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • This report describes the fluorescence hybridization of DNA sequence probes to interphase nuclei in suspension and the quantification of bound probe by dual beam flow cytometry. (sciencemag.org)
  • Towards a cellular multi-parameter analysis platform: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on microhole-array chips. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Therefore we improved our previously developed chip platform for another additional analysis method, the fluorescence in situ hybridization. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a technique used in the diagnostics to determine the localization and the presence or absence of specific DNA sequence. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • T. Iman, S. Amani and A. Mona, "Detection of HER-2/neu Amplification on Fine Needle Aspirates of Breast Cancer Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization," Journal of Cancer Therapy , Vol. 4 No. 7A, 2013, pp. 41-48. (scirp.org)
  • Multiple colors by fluorescence in situ hybridization using ratio‐labelled DNA probes create a molecular karyotype. (currentprotocols.com)
  • The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization to identify human chromosomal anomalies. (currentprotocols.com)
  • To investigate cytogenetic evolution after upfront autologous stem cell transplantation for newly diagnosed myeloma we retrospectively analyzed fluorescence in situ hybridization results of 128 patients with paired bone marrow samples from the time of primary diagnosis and at relapse. (haematologica.org)
  • Here, we used histology and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect and localize bacteria in the tissues of P. clavata. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic assay, but conventional sample-preparation methods for FISH do not support large-scale high-throughput data acquisition and analysis, which are potentially useful for several biomedical applications. (rsc.org)
  • If combined with phylogenetic staining (fluorescence in situ hybridization, FISH) it allows to specifically sort defined genotypic microbial populations from complex natural samples. (frontiersin.org)
  • The ratios of median fluorescence signal to background ranged around 20, and hybridization rates determined by flow cytometry were comparable to those obtained by fluorescence microscopy. (frontiersin.org)
  • Cultivation independent staining protocols such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can overcome this limitation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Advances in both immunohistochemical markers as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization and epigenetic markers have proven helpful. (frontiersin.org)
  • Immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and various other molecular markers (including epigenetic markers) have sufficient evidence behind their use however, some are still in their research stages, or yet to be used widely in clinical diagnosis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful technique used to identify the presence of specific chromosomes or parts of chromosomes through the attachment (hybridization) of fluorescent DNA probes to available chromosomal DNA. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Here, we detail a robust method for in situ hybridization of RNA probes to whole pieces of fixed tissue. (springer.com)
  • Jowett T. and Lettice L. (1994) Whole-mount in situ hybridizations on zebrafish embryos using a mixture of digoxigenin-and fluorescein-labelled probes. (springer.com)
  • Neil Butt Biochemistry Department University of Sussex Brighton, BN1 9QG U.K ============================================================ Dear Yi-Fang, I'm actually doing the hybridization on my first attempt at whole mount in situs with DIG labelled probes right now. (bio.net)
  • The key techniques currently in use include in situ hybridization to mRNA with oligonucleotide and RNA probes (both radio-labeled and hapten-labeled), analysis with light and electron microscopes, whole mount in situ hybridization, double detection of RNAs and RNA plus protein, and fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequent signal amplification is predicated on specific hybridization of adjacent probes (individual oligonucleotides [oligos] that bind side by side on RNA targets). (wikipedia.org)
  • To overcome this obstacle, we screened soybean repetitive DNA to develop a cocktail of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes that could differentially label mitotic chromosomes in root tip preparations. (genetics.org)
  • To resolve these potential problems and to provide a useful resource for correlating physical soybean chromosomes to the other available soybean mapping resources, we undertook efforts to generate a soybean karyotype map using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific, pseudomolecule- and repeat-derived DNA probes. (genetics.org)
  • Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE: A) today announced the release of a range of new probes for in situ hybridization, a technique used in pathology laboratories to obtain information about gene expression. (biospace.com)
  • Vijay noted that Agilent's new probes will bring the precision of oligonucleotide-based in situ hybridization into more laboratories. (biospace.com)
  • An in situ hybridization approach to labeling DNA and RNA targets in the specimen using oligonucleotide-based fluorescent probes. (microscopyu.com)
  • While antisense RNA probes are extremely useful and methods for two-color in situ hybridization are available, antibodies recognizing specific protein species can help to expand the range of markers detected. (nih.gov)
  • Biotin- and digoxygenin-labeled probes were made directly from the BAC clones and hybridized in situ to chromosomes without using suppressive unlabelled C0t-1 DNA. (nih.gov)
  • Chromogenic in situ hybridization with in-house-generated probes for PPM1D was performed. (nature.com)
  • The detection of DNA or RNA sequences in cells in interphase or metaphase can readily be achieved by in situ hybridization procedures based on the specific annealing of sequences (probes), previously labeled with appropriate reporter molecules, to their corresponding genomic DNA or RNA regions. (springer.com)
  • We anticipate that this pipeline will make the FISH probe design process much more accessible and will more broadly facilitate the design of pools of hybridization probes for a variety of applications. (pnas.org)
  • Localization in situ of specific mRNA using thymine-thymine dimerized DNA probes. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The approach was to extract the follicle cells with Triton X-100 and determine whether mRNA persisted in the insoluble residue by two methods, in situ hybridization with poly(U) and actin DNA probes and the incorporation of radioactive isotopes into RNA. (rupress.org)
  • This protocol is designed for In Situ Hybridization and colorimetric detection of digoxigenin-labeled RNA probes on paraformaldehyde fixed cryosectioned tissue. (openwetware.org)
  • Here, with third-generation in situ HCR, we augment these capabilities using probes and amplifiers that combine to provide automatic background suppression throughout the protocol, ensuring that reagents will not generate amplified background even if they bind non-specifically within the sample. (biologists.org)
  • In situ HCR v3.0 using split-initiator probes. (biologists.org)
  • As this technique is simple yet effective, FISH will ensure the growth of the global in situ hybridization market. (openpr.com)
  • The global in-situ hybridization market was valued at $554.4 Million 2014, and is estimated to reach $681.0 Million by 2019, at a CAGR of 4.2% from 2014 to 2019. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Major players operating in the global in-situ hybridization market are Abbott (U.S.), F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd (Switzerland), Affymetrix, Inc. (U.S.), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc. (U.S.), and Agilent Technologies, Inc. (U.S. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Abbott (U.S.) contributed the largest share to the global in-situ hybridization market in 2014. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. (Switzerland) is another major player operational in the global in-situ hybridization market. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The mergers & acquisitions and new product development by both the key players, Abbott (U.S.) and F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. (Switzerland) will help boost the growth of the global in-situ hybridization market during forecast period. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The report " In situ Hybridization Market by Technique (FISH, CISH), Application (Cancer Diagnosis, Neuroscience, Cytology, Infectious Disease), & End User (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories, Academic And Research Institutions) - Global Forecast to 2021" , This report studies the global in situ hybridization market for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The global in situ hybridization market is segmented on the basis of technique, application, end user, and region. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The cancer diagnosis segment is expected to command the largest share of the global in situ hybridization market, by application in 2016. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • On the basis of end users, the global in situ hybridization market is segmented into molecular diagnostic laboratories, academic & research institutes, contract research organizations, and pharmaceutical & biotechnology companies. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • In 2016, the molecular diagnostic laboratories segment is estimated to account for the largest share of the global in situ hybridization market, by end user. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Increasing diagnosis and growing incidence & prevalence of cancer, technology advancements in therapeutics, increasing government initiatives globally are some of the pivotal factors driving the growth of the global in situ hybridization market. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • This report studies the global in situ hybridization market for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. (emailwire.com)
  • Immunohistochemistry is the use of specific antibodies to stain particular molecular species in situ. (elsevier.com)
  • This book discusses all aspects of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization technologies and the important role they play in reaching a cancer diagnosis. (elsevier.com)
  • Histology, Immunohistochemistry and In Situ Hybridisation, Lab Protocols. (lulu.com)
  • Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RNA in situ Hybridization are widely used technologies sharing the unique capacity to analyze a marker at the single cell level while preserving the morphological context. (reportlinker.com)
  • Biological techniques such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and those used in immunohistochemistry (IHC) are time-consuming with many liquid handling steps that put samples at risk for pipetting errors or contamination. (cem.com)
  • We evaluate an RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) method using branch chain technology to detect HR-HPV and compare its results with DNA ISH, p16 immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Wilkinson D. G. and Nieto M. A. (1993) Detection of messenger RNA by in situ hybridization to tissue sections and whole mounts. (springer.com)
  • Jowett T., Mancera M., Amores A., and Yan Y. (1996) In situ hybridization to embryo whole mounts and tissue sections: mRNA detection and application to developmental studies, in In Situ Hybridization (Clark M., ed. (springer.com)
  • In situ hybridization (ISH) refers to a well-established set of methods for the visualization and detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in whole organisms, cytological preparations, and tissue sections. (openpr.com)
  • Advancements in the past few years have led to the development of a number of strategies to help improve the sensitivity of ISH techniques by signal detection after the hybridization is completed or by the amplification of the target nucleic acid sequence before the ISH begins. (openpr.com)
  • Florescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used in the detection of genetic abnormalities such as aneuploidy, characteristic gene fusion, or loss of a chromosomal region. (openpr.com)
  • Improved methodologies for in-situ hybridization and non-isotopic detection of nucleic acid sequences are provided which offer major increases of resolution, sensitivity, and simplicity unavailable in previously known techniques. (google.com)
  • Originally introduced as a radioactive in situ hybridization method in the late 1960s ( 1 ⇓ - 3 ), FISH has undergone a series of optimizations that have improved its detection efficiency and sensitivity ( 4 ⇓ ⇓ - 7 ). (pnas.org)
  • Advances in RNA in situ hybridization transform molecular detection with morphological context enabling new applications. (reportlinker.com)
  • We present a method based on a cyanine dye 3.18-labeled in situ hybridization probe targeting 16S rRNA to allow specific detection of bacteria belonging to the genus Gallibacterium . (asm.org)
  • The probe was further evaluated by hybridization to formalin-fixed spleen and liver tissues from experimentally infected chickens, in which it proved to be useful for the detection of Gallibacterium . (asm.org)
  • PCR in situ hybridization allows the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences and their distribution in the cell. (ellibs.com)
  • Detection of chimeric BCR‐ABL genes on bone marrow samples and blood smears in chronic myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia by in situ hybridization. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Detection of chromosome aberrations in the human interphase nucleus by visualization of specific target DNAs with radioactive and non‐radioactive in situ hybridization techniques: Diagnosis of trisomy 18 with probe L1.84. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Detection of complete and partial chromosome gains and losses by comparative genomic in situ hybridization. (currentprotocols.com)
  • During the last decade, several strategies have been developed to improve the detection sensitivity ofin situ hybridization (ISH) by amplification of either target nucleic acid sequences prior to ISH (e.g.,in situ PCR), or the detection signals after the hybridization procedures (signal amplification). (uzh.ch)
  • Performance of a Branch Chain RNA In Situ Hybridization Assay for the Detection of High-risk Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In situ is Latin for "in the original place," which, in the case of FISH, means inside a human cell or tissue. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Primary objective of the study is to evaluate the correlation between level of HER2-neu gene amplification evalued by dual-color Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) test and time to p. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) can effectively detect this translocation and achieve high accuracy in disease diagnosis and prognosis assessment. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • Among these new methods, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been approved as a relatively simple, reliable, and robust method that has attracted great research interests in clinical applications. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • In this study, two dechlorinating mixed cultures will be characterized and compared by a combination of 16S rDNA-based molecular methods: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP), RFLP and sequencing of individual clones from clone libraries constructed from amplified community DNA, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). (epa.gov)
  • Furthermore, FISH on FNAs gave us better hybridization signals than their corresponding FFPE tissue sections. (scirp.org)
  • To compare the results of karyotyping using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) upon diagnosis and 1 year after bone marrow transplantation in 12 patients. (scielo.br)
  • Half of the remaining patients may present the rearrangement by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). (scielo.br)
  • [9] The hybridization signals for each probe when a nucleic abnormality is detected. (wikipedia.org)
  • The probe must be large enough to hybridize specifically with its target but not so large as to impede the hybridization process. (wikipedia.org)
  • In situ hybridization (ISH) is the attachment of a very specifically designed DNA probe to cellular DNA (the original place). (encyclopedia.com)
  • A specific chemical hybridization solution containing the probe is applied to the slide so that the probe can hybridize with cellular DNA. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This hybridization solution controls the degree of specificity to which the probe hybridizes to the target sequence. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In situ hybridization (ISH) is a type of hybridization that uses a labeled complementary DNA, RNA or modified nucleic acids strand (i.e., probe) to localize a specific DNA or RNA sequence in a portion or section of tissue (in situ) or if the tissue is small enough (e.g., plant seeds, Drosophila embryos), in the entire tissue (whole mount ISH), in cells, and in circulating tumor cells (CTCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in situ hybridization requires that many steps be taken with precise optimization for each tissue examined and for each probe used. (wikipedia.org)
  • For hybridization histochemistry, sample cells and tissues are usually treated to fix the target transcripts in place and to increase access of the probe. (wikipedia.org)
  • A type of hybridization that detects and localizes the presence of specific DNA sequence within tissue samples (''in situ'') when a labeled DNA or RNA probe binds with it by complementary base pairing. (biology-online.org)
  • Our streamlined method uses standard bioinformatic file formats, allowing users to seamlessly integrate new and existing utilities into the pipeline as desired, and introduces a method for evaluating the specificity of each probe molecule that connects simulated hybridization energetics to rapidly generated sequence alignments using supervised machine learning. (pnas.org)
  • Using spectrally distinct fluorophore labels for each hybridization probe, this approach gives you the power to resolve several genetic elements or multiple gene expression patterns through multicolor visual display. (thermofisher.com)
  • 48 hours postfertilization zebrafish embryo stained by in situ hybridization using an mRNA probe directed against atp2a1, which encodes a muscle specific calcium pump. (umass.edu)
  • The probe, GAN850, showed no cross-reactivity to 25 other poultry-associated bacterial species, including members of the families Pasteurellaceae , Enterobacteriaceae , and Flavobacteriaceae , when cross-reactivities were evaluated by whole-cell hybridization. (asm.org)
  • To demonstrate that in situ hybridization can be performed in suspension, stabilized mouse thymocyte nuclei were hybridized with a probe for mouse satellite DNA sequences. (sciencemag.org)
  • Agilent's miRNA complete labeling and hybridization kit combines a unique miRNA direct labeling method with our innovative microarray probe design for selective labeling and hybridization of mature miRNAs. (selectscience.net)
  • An alternative technology, branched DNA assay, can be used for RNA (mRNA, lncRNA, and miRNA ) in situ hybridization assays with single molecule sensitivity without the use of radioactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hybridization and incubation Seals ad Chambers from Grace Bio-Labs are ideally suited for in situ-hybridization assays. (gracebio.com)
  • Different HPV DNA testing assays in FFPE cervical tissue specimens have been used, such as PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH). (asm.org)
  • Tuatz D. and Pfiefle C. (1989) A non-radioactive in situ hybridization method for the localization of specific RNAs in Drosophila embryos reveals translational control of the segmentation gene hunchback. (springer.com)
  • Wilkinson D. G. (1992) Whole mount in situ hybridization of vertebrate embryos, in In Situ Hybridization: A Practical Approach (Wilkinson D. G., ed. (springer.com)
  • Hauptmann G. and Gerster T. (1994) Two-color whole-mount in situ hybridization to vertebrate and Drosophila embryos. (springer.com)
  • Hargrave M., Bowles J., Koopman P. (2006) In Situ Hybridization of Whole-Mount Embryos. (springer.com)
  • High-resolution in situ hybridization to whole-mount zebrafish embryos. (nih.gov)
  • Diagnosis of sex in preimplantation embryos by fluorescent in situ hybridisation. (bmj.com)
  • Traditionelle in Situ Hybridisierung Techniken erfordern die Vorbereitung der Gewebeschnitte eines Embryos, die Aufdeckung der internen Strukturen zu erleichtern. (jove.com)
  • Distribution of type II collagen mRNA in Xenopus embryos visualized by whole-mount in situ hybridization. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Fluorescent in situ hybridization can be used as a complementary assay for the diagnosis of Tropheryma whipplei infection. (bioportfolio.com)
  • and fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal sequences. (wn.com)
  • and PRINS (primed in situ synthesis) for chromosomal analysis in interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosome spreads. (ellibs.com)
  • In situ hybridization is known to effectively allow for the cytologic and histologic localization of the specific nucleic acid of interest. (openpr.com)
  • In situ hybridization is used for specific mRNA localization in tissue and a method of tissue specific expression for a gene. (protocol-online.org)
  • Localization of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mRNA in the human gastrointestinal tract by in situ hybridization. (jci.org)
  • 100 of these genes were subsequently analyzed using in situ hybridization to obtain cellular-level localization of their transcripts. (jneurosci.org)
  • It combines two powerful techniquesin situ hybridization (ISH), which allows cellular localization of DNA and RNA sequences in cells and tissues, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which allows reproducible amplification of rare nucleic acid sequences. (ellibs.com)
  • The combined technique and its variants greatly enhance the sensitivity of in situ hybridization and add morphological localization to the sensitivity of PCR. (ellibs.com)
  • Signal amplification is achieved via series of sequential hybridization steps. (wikipedia.org)
  • The global market for in situ hybridization is projected to expand at a phenomenal rate, with the cancer diagnosis segment at the forefront. (openpr.com)
  • By application, the in situ hybridization market is categorized into cancer diagnosis, cytology, neuroscience, immunology and infectious diseases. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Factors such as growing presence of international players in China and India, increasing cancer prevalence and diagnosis, and increased healthcare expenditure across the Asia-Pacific region are drivers for the in situ hybridization market in this region. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Nearly a quarter-century has passed since the first research articles introducing in situ hybridization as a method of detecting and studying DNA sequences in chromosomes and cells appeared in the literature. (microscopyu.com)
  • The hybridization reaction identifies, or labels, target genomic sequences so their location and size can be studied. (microscopyu.com)
  • In situ hybridization is used to reveal the location of specific nucleic acid sequences on chromosomes or in tissues, a crucial step for understanding the organization, regulation, and function of genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • We use conditions that favor specific hybridization to complementary mRNA sequences in the tissue(s) expressing the corresponding gene. (nih.gov)
  • Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) demonstrates the high level of overall similarity between A and B chromosomes of rye, as well as the presence of a number of specific sequences. (springer.com)
  • In situ hybridization has developed as a means of localizing specific DNA and RNA sequences within tissues. (booktopia.com.au)
  • After hybridization, an indirect immunofluorescent labeling procedure was used to visualize the target sequences. (sciencemag.org)
  • A case report with immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization study. (labome.org)
  • RNA ISH (hybridization histochemistry) is used to measure and localize mRNAs and other transcripts within tissue sections or whole mounts. (biology-online.org)
  • The whole-mount in situ hybridization process has revolutionized the study of gene expression in the embryo. (nih.gov)
  • Comparative genomic hybridization for molecular cytogenetic analysis of solid tumors. (currentprotocols.com)
  • While the techniques have significantly matured in the present-day scenario, the application of most in situ hybridization techniques was limited to a large extent owing to their inability to detect samples with low copies of DNA and RNA. (openpr.com)
  • In: Darby I.A., Hewitson T.D. (eds) In Situ Hybridization Protocols. (springer.com)
  • This volume of the International Review of Neurobiology was written to assist researchers without any previous experience with in situ hybridization, allowing them to follow the protocols and expect good results. (elsevier.com)
  • In situ Hybridization Protocols for the Brain is aimed at first time users, although the experienced user will also find tons of information and useful know-hows in this book. (elsevier.com)
  • PCR In Situ Hybridization is a unique and timely collection of well-tested protocols for the amplification of DNA and RNA in cells and tissues, drawing on the accumulated knowledge and experience of leading exponents of these techniques. (ellibs.com)
  • The market is witnessing advancements at a highly promising pace with the view of increasing sensitivity of in situ hybridization methods. (openpr.com)
  • In situ hybridization based on the mechanism of the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) has addressed multi-decade challenges that impeded imaging of mRNA expression in diverse organisms, offering a unique combination of multiplexing, quantitation, sensitivity, resolution and versatility. (biologists.org)
  • Recent developments such as strand displacement amplification and molecular beacons to continue to expand the scope of application of in situ hybridization techniques. (openpr.com)
  • There are further chapters on fixation of tissues for PCR, selective ultraviolet radiation fractionation (SURF), application of in situ PCR to human tissues, applications and modifications of PCR-ISH, and automation of in situ amplification. (ellibs.com)
  • RNA ISH (RNA in situ hybridization) is used to measure and localize RNAs (mRNAs, lncRNAs, and miRNAs) within tissue sections, cells, whole mounts, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). (wikipedia.org)
  • We have used in situ hybridization to localize expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene in the human gastrointestinal tract and associated organs. (jci.org)
  • Technological advancements in the field of in situ hybridization, such as development of the cytogenetic technique, is one of the key factors driving the market. (openpr.com)
  • It contains all the information required for newcomers to achieve successful in situ hybridization results, and methods for improving the technique of those already utilizing it. (elsevier.com)
  • Common methods of preparing tissue sections for in-situ hybridization processing include cutting specimens with a cryostat or a Compresstome tissue slicer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, the specificity of DNA hybridization can be combined with the speed and quantitative analysis provided by flow cytometry. (sciencemag.org)
  • In situ hybridization whole mount gene expression. (springer.com)
  • Furthermore, the extremely high correlation between microarray data and in situ expression demonstrates the great utility of using DNA microarrays to genetically profile discrete brain regions. (jneurosci.org)
  • Agilent's Microarray Hybridization Ovens is designed for the optimal hybridization performance of the Agilent microarray workflow. (selectscience.net)
  • Maluszynska J, Schweitzer D (1989) Ribosomal RNA genes in B-chromosomes of Crepis capillaris detected by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. (springer.com)
  • The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global in-situ hybridization (ISH) market for 2017-2021. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Technavio's report, Global In-situ Hybridization (ISH) Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • The global market for In Situ Hybridization (ISH) at $4.3 billion in 2017 is anticipated to reach $7.8 billion by 2024 2017. (reportlinker.com)
  • The report, Global In-situ Hybridization (ISH) Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. (sbwire.com)
  • The application of some of these novel techniques has helped significantly extend the scope of utility of in situ hybridization in the fields of research and diagnostic pathology owing to their capability of detecting targets with low copy numbers of nucleic acids in samples. (openpr.com)
  • In situ hybridization (ISH) is a powerful technique for localizing specific nucleic acid targets within fixed tissues and cells, allowing users to obtain temporal and spatial information about gene expression and genetic loci. (reportlinker.com)
  • (d) Gene-expression patterns that are distributed in a graded manner through the developmental stages become discrete in (e) the 'digital in situ ' representation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The in situ hybridization (ISH) technique allows the sites of expression of particular genes to be detected. (nih.gov)
  • ELMHURST, Ill. - July 22, 2020 - PRLog -- The in situ hybridization (ISH) market is poised to grow by USD 346.61 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of about 7% during the forecast period. (prlog.org)
  • To prepare the tissue on the slide for hybridization, it is treated with chemicals to permeabilize (open up) the cells and expose the DNA. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In situ hybridization is a powerful method for localizing specific nucleic acid targets in cells and tissues, thereby allowing access to the temporal and spatial information about genetic loci and structure. (openpr.com)
  • In situ hybridization is a powerful technique for identifying specific mRNA species within individual cells in tissue sections, providing insights into physiological processes and disease pathogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Worldwide markets are poised to achieve continuing growth as In Situ Hybridization is used in diagnostic situations to analyze single cells inside tissue. (reportlinker.com)
  • In addition, in-situ hybridization on tissue sections require that tissue slices be very thin, usually 3 µm to 7 µm in thickness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Can PAXgene Tissue fixed, paraffin-embedded (PFPE) tissue be used for in situ hybridization? (qiagen.com)
  • With regards to non-radioactive in situ protocol. (bio.net)
  • C) Two-stage in situ HCR protocol. (biologists.org)
  • Hi hybridizers, i am trying to find the best method of fixation for plant cell culture material in in situ hybridization experiments with Dig-labeled riboprobes. (bio.net)
  • 11. The method according to claim 1, wherein the non-radioactively labelled fragments are present in the hybridization fluid at a concentration of not less than 0.2 μg/ml. (google.com)
  • 12. The method according to claim 1, wherein the method further comprises a post-hybridization rinsing step consisting of three separate rinses, each having a duration of between 5 and 30 minutes. (google.com)
  • Our method provides a framework with which to design oligo-based hybridization experiments. (pnas.org)
  • Results: In this study we describe an automatic method for exploring in situ hybridization data and discover neuropil-enriched RNAs in the mouse hippocampus. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Factors such as the temperature, pH, and salt concentration can be changed to control the specificity of the hybridization. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In conclusion, the in situ hybridization technique described may be of use as a diagnostic tool as well as for studies to elucidate the pathogenesis of Gallibacterium infections in chickens. (asm.org)
  • The distribution of neurones expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA in the brain of the goldfish was investigated using a non-radioactive in situ hybridization technique. (lu.se)