Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.
A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.
Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.
The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.
Polypeptide chains, consisting of 211 to 217 amino acid residues and having a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa. There are two major types of light chains, kappa and lambda. Two Ig light chains and two Ig heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) make one immunoglobulin molecule.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).
Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.
Partial immunoglobulin molecules resulting from selective cleavage by proteolytic enzymes or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
Crystallizable fragments composed of the carboxy-terminal halves of both IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fc fragments contain the carboxy-terminal parts of the heavy chain constant regions that are responsible for the effector functions of an immunoglobulin (COMPLEMENT fixation, binding to the cell membrane via FC RECEPTORS, and placental transport). This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.
One of the types of light chains of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.
That region of the immunoglobulin molecule that varies in its amino acid sequence and composition, and comprises the binding site for a specific antigen. It is located at the N-terminus of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. It includes hypervariable regions (COMPLEMENTARITY DETERMINING REGIONS) and framework regions.
Local surface sites on antibodies which react with antigen determinant sites on antigens (EPITOPES.) They are formed from parts of the variable regions of FAB FRAGMENTS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.
One of the types of light chain subunits of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.
The principle immunoglobulin in exocrine secretions such as milk, respiratory and intestinal mucin, saliva and tears. The complete molecule (around 400 kD) is composed of two four-chain units of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, one SECRETORY COMPONENT and one J chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN J-CHAINS).
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.
The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN M. They have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa and they contain about 57 amino acid residues arranged in five domains and have more oligosaccharide branches and a higher carbohydrate content than the heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
The classes of immunoglobulins found in any species of animal. In man there are nine classes that migrate in five different groups in electrophoresis; they each consist of two light and two heavy protein chains, and each group has distinguishing structural and functional properties.
Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.
Antibodies which react with the individual structural determinants (idiotopes) on the variable region of other antibodies.
An immunoglobulin which accounts for less than 1% of plasma immunoglobulin. It is found on the membrane of many circulating B LYMPHOCYTES.
The domains of the immunoglobulin molecules that are invariable in their amino acid sequence within any class or subclass of immunoglobulin. They confer biological as well as structural functions to immunoglobulins. One each on both the light chains and the heavy chains comprises the C-terminus half of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FAB FRAGMENT and two or three of them make up the rest of the heavy chains (all of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FC FRAGMENT)
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
A measure of the binding strength between antibody and a simple hapten or antigen determinant. It depends on the closeness of stereochemical fit between antibody combining sites and antigen determinants, on the size of the area of contact between them, and on the distribution of charged and hydrophobic groups. It includes the concept of "avidity," which refers to the strength of the antigen-antibody bond after formation of reversible complexes.
The processes triggered by interactions of ANTIBODIES with their ANTIGENS.
Abnormal immunoglobulins characteristic of MULTIPLE MYELOMA.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.
Heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G having a molecular weight of approximately 51 kDa. They contain about 450 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region. The gamma heavy chain subclasses (for example, gamma 1, gamma 2a, and gamma 2b) of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN G isotype subclasses (IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B) resemble each other more closely than the heavy chains of the other IMMUNOGLOBULIN ISOTYPES.
Gene rearrangement of the B-lymphocyte which results in a substitution in the type of heavy-chain constant region that is expressed. This allows the effector response to change while the antigen binding specificity (variable region) remains the same. The majority of class switching occurs by a DNA recombination event but it also can take place at the level of RNA processing.
A 15 kD "joining" peptide that forms one of the linkages between monomers of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or IMMUNOGLOBULIN M in the formation of polymeric immunoglobulins. There is one J chain per one IgA dimer or one IgM pentamer. It is also involved in binding the polymeric immunoglobulins to POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR which is necessary for their transcytosis to the lumen. It is distinguished from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN JOINING REGION which is part of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
Allelic variants of the immunoglobulin light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) or heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES.
Molecules found on the surface of some, but not all, B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, and macrophages, which recognize and combine with the Fc (crystallizable) portion of immunoglobulin molecules.
Unique genetically-controlled determinants present on ANTIBODIES whose specificity is limited to a single group of proteins (e.g., another antibody molecule or an individual myeloma protein). The idiotype appears to represent the antigenicity of the antigen-binding site of the antibody and to be genetically codetermined with it. The idiotypic determinants have been precisely located to the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION of both immunoglobin polypeptide chains.
The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.
Cells artificially created by fusion of activated lymphocytes with neoplastic cells. The resulting hybrid cells are cloned and produce pure MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES or T-cell products, identical to those produced by the immunologically competent parent cell.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Specialized Fc receptors (RECEPTORS, FC) for polymeric immunoglobulins, which mediate transcytosis of polymeric IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN M into external secretions. They are found on the surfaces of epithelial cells and hepatocytes. After binding to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, the receptor-ligand complex undergoes endocytosis, transport by vesicle, and secretion into the lumen by exocytosis. Before release, the part of the receptor (SECRETORY COMPONENT) that is bound to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A is proteolytically cleaved from its transmembrane tail. (From Rosen et al., The Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Antibodies that can catalyze a wide variety of chemical reactions. They are characterized by high substrate specificity and share many mechanistic features with enzymes.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
A segment of the immunoglobulin heavy chains, encoded by the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES in the J segment where, during the maturation of B-LYMPHOCYTES; the gene segment for the variable region upstream is joined to a constant region gene segment downstream. The exact position of joining of the two gene segments is variable and contributes to ANTIBODY DIVERSITY. It is distinguished from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN J CHAINS; a separate polypeptide that serves as a linkage piece in polymeric IGA or IGM.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Small antigenic determinants capable of eliciting an immune response only when coupled to a carrier. Haptens bind to antibodies but by themselves cannot elicit an antibody response.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.
Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.
A collection of cloned peptides, or chemically synthesized peptides, frequently consisting of all possible combinations of amino acids making up an n-amino acid peptide.
A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.
A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
IMMUNOGLOBULINS on the surface of B-LYMPHOCYTES. Their MESSENGER RNA contains an EXON with a membrane spanning sequence, producing immunoglobulins in the form of type I transmembrane proteins as opposed to secreted immunoglobulins (ANTIBODIES) which do not contain the membrane spanning segment.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).
A protein present in the cell wall of most Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein selectively binds to the Fc region of human normal and myeloma-derived IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. It elicits antibody activity and may cause hypersensitivity reactions due to histamine release; has also been used as cell surface antigen marker and in the clinical assessment of B lymphocyte function.
Any discrete, presumably solitary, mass of neoplastic PLASMA CELLS either in BONE MARROW or various extramedullary sites.
The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.
Genes and gene segments encoding the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS. Gene segments of the heavy chain genes are symbolized V (variable), D (diversity), J (joining), and C (constant).
A programmed mutation process whereby changes are introduced to the nucleotide sequence of immunoglobulin gene DNA during development.
Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.
A cardiac glycoside sometimes used in place of DIGOXIN. It has a longer half-life than digoxin; toxic effects, which are similar to those of digoxin, are longer lasting. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p665)
The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN D. They have a molecular weight of approximately 64 kDa and they contain about 500 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Methods used for studying the interactions of antibodies with specific regions of protein antigens. Important applications of epitope mapping are found within the area of immunochemistry.
A proteolytic enzyme obtained from Carica papaya. It is also the name used for a purified mixture of papain and CHYMOPAPAIN that is used as a topical enzymatic debriding agent. EC 3.4.22.2.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
A site located in the INTRONS at the 5' end of each constant region segment of a immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene where recombination (or rearrangement) occur during IMMUNOGLOBULIN CLASS SWITCHING. Ig switch regions are found on genes encoding all five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN ISOTYPES) of IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS.
The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN A. They have a molecular weight of approximately 58 kDa and contain about 470 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component bound covalently to their Fc fragment constant region.
Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).
Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.
Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.
The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The extracellular moiety of the POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR found alone or complexed with IGA or IGM, in a variety of external secretions (tears, bile, colostrum.) Secretory component is derived by proteolytic cleavage of the receptor during transcytosis. When immunoglobulins IgA and IgM are bound to the receptor, during their transcytosis secretory component becomes covalently attached to them generating SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or secretory IMMUNOGLOBULIN M.
A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.
Techniques used to demonstrate or measure an immune response, and to identify or measure antigens using antibodies.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
An immunologic deficiency state characterized by an extremely low level of generally all classes of gamma-globulin in the blood.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
Serum glycoproteins participating in the host defense mechanism of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION that creates the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX. Included are glycoproteins in the various pathways of complement activation (CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; ALTERNATIVE COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; and LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY).
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
A glycoprotein that is central in both the classical and the alternative pathway of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION. C3 can be cleaved into COMPLEMENT C3A and COMPLEMENT C3B, spontaneously at low level or by C3 CONVERTASE at high level. The smaller fragment C3a is an ANAPHYLATOXIN and mediator of local inflammatory process. The larger fragment C3b binds with C3 convertase to form C5 convertase.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
Allelic variants of the gamma-immunoglobulin heavy chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN GAMMA-CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).
The thin, yellow, serous fluid secreted by the mammary glands during pregnancy and immediately postpartum before lactation begins. It consists of immunologically active substances, white blood cells, water, protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
A chromatographic technique that utilizes the ability of biological molecules to bind to certain ligands specifically and reversibly. It is used in protein biochemistry. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Chromatography on non-ionic gels without regard to the mechanism of solute discrimination.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A technology, in which sets of reactions for solution or solid-phase synthesis, is used to create molecular libraries for analysis of compounds on a large scale.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
An alpha-2 selective adrenergic agonist used as an antihypertensive agent.
Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the first stage of differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.
Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the IMMUNOGLOBULIN CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.
A genus in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE causing influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. It contains many strains as well as antigenic subtypes of the integral membrane proteins hemagglutinin (HEMAGGLUTININS) and NEURAMINIDASE. The type species is INFLUENZA A VIRUS.
Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes.
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
A specific immune response elicited by a specific dose of an immunologically active substance or cell in an organism, tissue, or cell.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Specific molecular sites on the surface of B- and T-lymphocytes which combine with IgEs. Two subclasses exist: low affinity receptors (Fc epsilon RII) and high affinity receptors (Fc epsilon RI).
Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.
Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.
A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.
Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
Cell surface molecules on cells of the immune system that specifically bind surface molecules or messenger molecules and trigger changes in the behavior of cells. Although these receptors were first identified in the immune system, many have important functions elsewhere.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
Three regions (CDR1; CDR2 and CDR3) of amino acid sequence in the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION that are highly divergent. Together the CDRs from the light and heavy immunoglobulin chains form a surface that is complementary to the antigen. These regions are also present in other members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, for example, T-cell receptors (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL).
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
Antibodies, often monoclonal, in which the two antigen-binding sites are specific for separate ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS. They are artificial antibodies produced by chemical crosslinking, fusion of HYBRIDOMA cells, or by molecular genetic techniques. They function as the main mediators of targeted cellular cytotoxicity and have been shown to be efficient in the targeting of drugs, toxins, radiolabeled haptens, and effector cells to diseased tissue, primarily tumors.
The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.

Interaction of inflammatory cells and oral microorganisms. III. Modulation of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte hydrolase release response to Actinomyces viscosus and Streptococcus mutans by immunoglobulins and complement. (1/2903)

In the absence of antiserum, rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) released lysosomal enzymes in response to Actinomyces viscosus (19246) but not to Streptococcus mutans (6715). Antibodies had a marked modulating influence on these reactions. PMN hydrolase release was significantly enhanced to both organisms when specific rabbit antiserum and isolated immunoglobulin G (IgG) were included in the incubations. Immune complex F(ab')2 fragments of IgG directed against S. mutans agglutinated bacteria. Immune complexes consisting of S. mutans and F(ab')2 fragments of IgG directed against this organism were not effective as bacteria-IgG complexes in stimulating PMN release. The intensity of the release response to bacteria-IgG complexes was also diminished when PMNs were preincubated with isolated Fc fragments derived from IgG. Fresh serum as a source of complement components had no demonstrable effect on PMN release either alone or in conjuction with antiserum in these experiments. These data may be relevant to the mechanisms and consequences of the interaction of PMNs and plaque bacteria in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.  (+info)

Labeling of the internal pool of GP IIb-IIIa in platelets by c7E3 Fab fragments (abciximab): flow and endocytic mechanisms contribute to the transport. (2/2903)

Abciximab is a new antiplatelet therapeutic in ischemic cardiovascular disease. The drug, chimeric Fab fragments of a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (c7E3), blocks GP IIb-IIIa function. However, its capacity to reach all receptor pools in platelets is unknown. Electron microscopy and immunogold labeling were used to localize abciximab in platelets of patients receiving the drug for up to 24 hours. Studies on frozen-thin sections showed that c7E3 Fab, in addition to the surface pool, also labeled the surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS) and alpha-granules. Analysis of gold particle distribution showed that intraplatelet labeling was not accumulative and in equilibrium with the surface pool. After short-term incubations of platelets with c7E3 Fab in vitro, gold particles were often seen in lines within thin elements of the SCCS, some of which appeared in contact with alpha-granules. Little labeling was associated with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia platelets, confirming that the channels contained bound and not free c7E3 Fab. Endocytosis of abciximab in clathrin-containing vesicles was visualized by double staining and constitutes an alternative mechanism of transport. The remaining free pool of GP IIb-IIIa was evaluated with the MoAb AP-2; flow cytometry showed it to be about 9% on the surface of nonstimulated platelets but 33% on thrombin-activated platelets. The ability of drugs to block all pools of GP IIb-IIIa and then to be associated with secretion-dependent residual aggregation must be considered when evaluating their efficiency in a clinical context.  (+info)

Recognition of polynucleotides by antibodies to poly(I), poly(C). (3/2903)

The binding of anti poly(I). poly (C) Fab fragments to double or triple stranded polynucletides has been studied by fluorescence. Association constants were deduced from competition experiments. The comparison of the association constants leads to the conclusion that several atoms of the base residues do not interact with the amino acid residues of the binding site of Fab fragment while the hydroxyl groups of furanose rings interact. These results suggest that the Fab fragments do not bind to the major groove of the double stranded polynucleotides. An interaction between the C(2)O group of pyrimidine residues and Fab fragments cannot be excluded. Circular dichroism of poly(I). poly(C) or poly(I). poly(br5C)-Fab fragments complexes are very different from the circular dichroism of free polynucleotides which suggests a deformation of the polynucleotides bound to the Fab fragments.  (+info)

Efficient IgG-mediated suppression of primary antibody responses in Fcgamma receptor-deficient mice. (4/2903)

IgG antibodies can suppress more than 99% of the antibody response against the antigen to which they bind. This is used clinically to prevent rhesus-negative (Rh-) women from becoming immunized against Rh+ erythrocytes from their fetuses. The suppressive mechanism is poorly understood, but it has been proposed that IgG/erythrocyte complexes bind to the inhibitory Fc receptor for IgG (FcgammaRIIB) on the B cell surface, thereby triggering negative signals that turn off the B cell. We show that IgG induces the same degree of suppression of the response to sheep erythrocytes in animals lacking the known IgG-binding receptors FcgammaRIIB, FcgammaRI + III, FcgammaRI + IIB + III, and FcRn (the neonatal Fc receptor) as in wild-type animals. Reinvestigation of the ability of F(ab')2 fragments to suppress antibody responses demonstrated that they were nearly as efficient as intact IgG. In addition, monoclonal IgE also was shown to be suppressive. These findings suggest that IgG inhibits antibody responses through Fc-independent mechanisms, most likely by masking of antigenic epitopes, thereby preventing B cells from binding and responding to antigen. In agreement with this, we show that T cell priming is not abolished by passively administered IgG. The results have implications for the understanding of in vivo regulation of antibody responses and Rh prophylaxis.  (+info)

Head-to-tail dimers and interdomain flexibility revealed by the crystal structure of HIV-1 capsid protein (p24) complexed with a monoclonal antibody Fab. (5/2903)

The crystal structure of an intact molecule of HIV-1 capsid protein (p24) in complex with a monoclonal antibody fragment recognizing an epitope on the C-terminal domain has been determined at 3 A resolution. The helical N- and C-terminal domains of p24 are linked by an extended peptide forming a flexibly linked dumb-bell-shaped molecule 75 A in overall length. The p24 construct used is a variant with an N-terminal extension that mimics to some extent the Gag context of p24. We observed a novel head-to-tail dimer of p24 molecules which occurs through the formation of a substantial intermolecular interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. Comparison with previously observed p24 dimers shows that the same residues and secondary structural elements can partake in different interfaces revealing a remarkable stickiness and plasticity of the p24 molecule, properties which, combined with the inter-domain flexibility, are presumably important in the assembly and maturation of viral particles. Previous mutagenesis studies designed to test specific N-N and C-C homodimer interfaces do not discriminate fully against the possibility of the observed N-C interface.  (+info)

Flexibility of the major antigenic loop of foot-and-mouth disease virus bound to a Fab fragment of a neutralising antibody: structure and neutralisation. (6/2903)

The interaction of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype C (clone C-S8c1) with a strongly neutralising monoclonal antibody (MAb) 4C4 has been studied by combining data from cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystallography. The MAb 4C4 binds to the exposed flexible GH-loop of viral protein 1 (VP1), which appears to retain its flexibility, allowing movement of the bound Fab. This is in striking contrast to MAb SD6, which binds to the same GH-loop of VP1 but exhibits no movement of the bound Fab when observed under identical conditions. However, MAbs 4C4 and SD6 have very similar neutralisation characteristics. The known atomic structure of FMDV C-S8c1 and that of the 4C4 Fab cocrystallised with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the GH-loop of VP1 were fitted to the cryoelectron microscope density map. The best fit of the 4C4 Fab is compatible only with monovalent binding of the MAb in agreement with the neutralisation data on 4C4 MAbs, Fab2s, and Fabs. The position of the bound GH-loop is related to other known positions of this loop by a hinge rotation about the base of the loop. The 4C4 Fab appears to interact almost exclusively with the G-H loop of VP1, making no other contacts with the viral capsid.  (+info)

Analysis of the interaction of monoclonal antibodies with surface IgM on neoplastic B-cells. (7/2903)

In vitro studies identified three Burkitts lymphoma cell lines, Ramos, MUTU-I and Daudi, that were growth inhibited by anti-IgM antibody. However, only Ramos and MUTU-I were sensitive to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing the Fc region of surface IgM (anti-Fc mu). Experiments using anti-Fc mu mAb (single or non-crossblocking pairs), polyclonal anti-mu Ab, and hyper-crosslinking with a secondary layer of Ab, showed that growth inhibition of B-cell lines was highly dependent on the extent of IgM crosslinking. This was confirmed by using Fab', F(ab')2 and F(ab')3 derivatives from anti-Fc mu mAb, where increasing valency caused corresponding increases in growth arrest and apoptosis, presumably as a result of more efficient BCR-crosslinking on the cell surface. The ability of a single mAb to induce growth arrest was highly dependent on epitope specificity, with mAb specific for the Fc region (C mu2-C mu4 domains) being much more effective than those recognizing the Fab region (anti-L chain, anti-Id and anti-Fd mu, or C mu1). Only when hyper-crosslinked with polyclonal anti-mouse IgG did the latter result in appreciable growth inhibition. Binding studies showed that these differences in function were not related to differences in the affinity, but probably related to intrinsic crosslinking capacity of mAb.  (+info)

Structural details of proteinase entrapment by human alpha2-macroglobulin emerge from three-dimensional reconstructions of Fab labeled native, half-transformed, and transformed molecules. (8/2903)

Three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstructions of native, half-transformed, and transformed alpha2-macroglobulins (alpha2Ms) labeled with a monoclonal Fab Fab offer new insight into the mechanism of its proteinase entrapment. Each alpha2M binds four Fabs, two at either end of its dimeric protomers approximately 145 A apart. In the native structure, the epitopes are near the base of its two chisel-like features, laterally separated by 120 A, whereas in the methylamine-transformed alpha2M, the epitopes are at the base of its four arms, laterally separated by 160 A. Upon thiol ester cleavage, the chisels on the native alpha2M appear to split with a separation and rotation to give the four arm-like extensions on transformed alpha2M. Thus, the receptor binding domains previously enclosed within the chisels are exposed. The labeled structures further indicate that the two protomeric strands that constitute the native and transformed molecules are related and reside one on each side of the major axes of these structures. The half-transformed structure shows that the two Fabs at one end of the molecule have an arrangement similar to those on the native alpha2M, whereas on its transformed end, they have rotated. The rotation is associated with a partial untwisting of the strands and an enlargement of the openings to the cavity. We propose that the enlarged openings permit the entrance of the proteinase. Then cleavage of the remaining bait domains by a second proteinase occurs with its entrance into the cavity. This is followed by a retwisting of the strands to encapsulate the proteinases and expose the receptor binding domains associated with the transformed alpha2M.  (+info)

Immunoglobulin (Ig) Fab fragments are the antigen-binding portions of an antibody that result from the digestion of the whole antibody molecule by enzymes such as papain. An antibody, also known as an immunoglobulin, is a Y-shaped protein produced by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign substances like bacteria, viruses, or toxins. The antibody has two identical antigen-binding sites, located at the tips of the two shorter arms, which can bind specifically to a target antigen.

Fab fragments are formed when an antibody is cleaved by papain, resulting in two Fab fragments and one Fc fragment. Each Fab fragment contains one antigen-binding site, composed of a variable region (Fv) and a constant region (C). The Fv region is responsible for the specificity and affinity of the antigen binding, while the C region contributes to the effector functions of the antibody.

Fab fragments are often used in various medical applications, such as immunodiagnostics and targeted therapies, due to their ability to bind specifically to target antigens without triggering an immune response or other effector functions associated with the Fc region.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a type of antibody, which is a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to foreign substances like bacteria or viruses. IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human blood, making up about 75-80% of all antibodies. It is found in all body fluids and plays a crucial role in fighting infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and toxins.

IgG has several important functions:

1. Neutralization: IgG can bind to the surface of bacteria or viruses, preventing them from attaching to and infecting human cells.
2. Opsonization: IgG coats the surface of pathogens, making them more recognizable and easier for immune cells like neutrophils and macrophages to phagocytose (engulf and destroy) them.
3. Complement activation: IgG can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to help eliminate pathogens from the body. Activation of the complement system leads to the formation of the membrane attack complex, which creates holes in the cell membranes of bacteria, leading to their lysis (destruction).
4. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG can bind to immune cells like natural killer (NK) cells and trigger them to release substances that cause target cells (such as virus-infected or cancerous cells) to undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death).
5. Immune complex formation: IgG can form immune complexes with antigens, which can then be removed from the body through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis by immune cells or excretion in urine.

IgG is a critical component of adaptive immunity and provides long-lasting protection against reinfection with many pathogens. It has four subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their structure, function, and distribution in the body.

Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are glycoprotein molecules produced by the immune system's B cells in response to the presence of foreign substances, such as bacteria, viruses, and toxins. These Y-shaped proteins play a crucial role in identifying and neutralizing pathogens and other antigens, thereby protecting the body against infection and disease.

Immunoglobulins are composed of four polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two identical light chains, held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of these chains form the antigen-binding sites, which recognize and bind to specific epitopes on antigens. Based on their heavy chain type, immunoglobulins are classified into five main isotypes or classes: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has distinct functions in the immune response, such as providing protection in different body fluids and tissues, mediating hypersensitivity reactions, and aiding in the development of immunological memory.

In medical settings, immunoglobulins can be administered therapeutically to provide passive immunity against certain diseases or to treat immune deficiencies, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions that may benefit from immunomodulation.

Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid. It is the first antibody to be produced in response to an initial exposure to an antigen, making it an important part of the body's primary immune response. IgM antibodies are large molecules that are composed of five basic units, giving them a pentameric structure. They are primarily found on the surface of B cells as membrane-bound immunoglobulins (mlgM), where they function as receptors for antigens. Once an mlgM receptor binds to an antigen, it triggers the activation and differentiation of the B cell into a plasma cell that produces and secretes large amounts of soluble IgM antibodies.

IgM antibodies are particularly effective at agglutination (clumping) and complement activation, which makes them important in the early stages of an immune response to help clear pathogens from the bloodstream. However, they are not as stable or long-lived as other types of antibodies, such as IgG, and their levels tend to decline after the initial immune response has occurred.

In summary, Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the primary immune response to antigens by agglutination and complement activation. It is primarily found in the blood and lymph fluid, and it is produced by B cells after they are activated by an antigen.

Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune function of the human body. It is primarily found in external secretions, such as saliva, tears, breast milk, and sweat, as well as in mucous membranes lining the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. IgA exists in two forms: a monomeric form found in serum and a polymeric form found in secretions.

The primary function of IgA is to provide immune protection at mucosal surfaces, which are exposed to various environmental antigens, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and allergens. By doing so, it helps prevent the entry and colonization of pathogens into the body, reducing the risk of infections and inflammation.

IgA functions by binding to antigens present on the surface of pathogens or allergens, forming immune complexes that can neutralize their activity. These complexes are then transported across the epithelial cells lining mucosal surfaces and released into the lumen, where they prevent the adherence and invasion of pathogens.

In summary, Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a vital antibody that provides immune defense at mucosal surfaces by neutralizing and preventing the entry of harmful antigens into the body.

Immunoglobulin heavy chains are proteins that make up the framework of antibodies, which are Y-shaped immune proteins. These heavy chains, along with light chains, form the antigen-binding sites of an antibody, which recognize and bind to specific foreign substances (antigens) in order to neutralize or remove them from the body.

The heavy chain is composed of a variable region, which contains the antigen-binding site, and constant regions that determine the class and function of the antibody. There are five classes of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM) that differ in their heavy chain constant regions and therefore have different functions in the immune response.

Immunoglobulin heavy chains are synthesized by B cells, a type of white blood cell involved in the adaptive immune response. The genetic rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes during B cell development results in the production of a vast array of different antibodies with unique antigen-binding sites, allowing for the recognition and elimination of a wide variety of pathogens.

Immunoglobulin light chains are the smaller protein subunits of an immunoglobulin, also known as an antibody. They are composed of two polypeptide chains, called kappa (κ) and lambda (λ), which are produced by B cells during the immune response. Each immunoglobulin molecule contains either two kappa or two lambda light chains, in association with two heavy chains.

Light chains play a crucial role in the antigen-binding site of an antibody, where they contribute to the specificity and affinity of the interaction between the antibody and its target antigen. In addition to their role in immune function, abnormal production or accumulation of light chains can lead to various diseases, such as multiple myeloma and amyloidosis.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

A peptide fragment is a short chain of amino acids that is derived from a larger peptide or protein through various biological or chemical processes. These fragments can result from the natural breakdown of proteins in the body during regular physiological processes, such as digestion, or they can be produced experimentally in a laboratory setting for research or therapeutic purposes.

Peptide fragments are often used in research to map the structure and function of larger peptides and proteins, as well as to study their interactions with other molecules. In some cases, peptide fragments may also have biological activity of their own and can be developed into drugs or diagnostic tools. For example, certain peptide fragments derived from hormones or neurotransmitters may bind to receptors in the body and mimic or block the effects of the full-length molecule.

Immunoglobulins (Igs), also known as antibodies, are proteins produced by the immune system to recognize and neutralize foreign substances such as pathogens or toxins. They are composed of four polypeptide chains: two heavy chains and two light chains, which are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains contain loops that form the antigen-binding site, allowing each Ig molecule to recognize a specific epitope (antigenic determinant) on an antigen.

Genes encoding immunoglobulins are located on chromosome 14 (light chain genes) and chromosomes 22 and 2 (heavy chain genes). The diversity of the immune system is generated through a process called V(D)J recombination, where variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments are randomly selected and assembled to form the variable regions of the heavy and light chains. This results in an enormous number of possible combinations, allowing the immune system to recognize and respond to a vast array of potential threats.

There are five classes of immunoglobulins: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with distinct functions and structures. For example, IgG is the most abundant class in serum and provides long-term protection against pathogens, while IgA is found on mucosal surfaces and helps prevent the entry of pathogens into the body.

Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IVIG) are a preparation of antibodies, specifically immunoglobulins, that are derived from the plasma of healthy donors. They are administered intravenously to provide passive immunity and help boost the immune system's response in individuals with weakened or compromised immune systems. IVIG can be used for various medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, secondary immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases. The administration of IVIG can help prevent infections, reduce the severity and frequency of infections, and manage the symptoms of certain autoimmune disorders. It is important to note that while IVIG provides temporary immunity, it does not replace a person's own immune system.

Immunoglobulin fragments refer to the smaller protein units that are formed by the digestion or break-down of an intact immunoglobulin, also known as an antibody. Immunoglobulins are large Y-shaped proteins produced by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign substances such as pathogens or toxins. They consist of two heavy chains and two light chains, held together by disulfide bonds.

The digestion or break-down of an immunoglobulin can occur through enzymatic cleavage, which results in the formation of distinct fragments. The most common immunoglobulin fragments are:

1. Fab (Fragment, antigen binding) fragments: These are formed by the digestion of an intact immunoglobulin using the enzyme papain. Each Fab fragment contains a single antigen-binding site, consisting of a portion of one heavy chain and one light chain. The Fab fragments retain their ability to bind to specific antigens.
2. Fc (Fragment, crystallizable) fragments: These are formed by the digestion of an intact immunoglobulin using the enzyme pepsin or through the natural breakdown process in the body. The Fc fragment contains the constant region of both heavy chains and is responsible for effector functions such as complement activation, binding to Fc receptors on immune cells, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

These immunoglobulin fragments play crucial roles in various immune responses and diagnostic applications. For example, Fab fragments can be used in immunoassays for the detection of specific antigens, while Fc fragments can mediate effector functions that help eliminate pathogens or damaged cells from the body.

Immunoglobulin Fc fragments are the crystallizable fragment of an antibody that is responsible for effector functions such as engagement with Fc receptors on immune cells, activation of the complement system, and neutralization of toxins. The Fc region is located at the tail end of the Y-shaped immunoglobulin molecule, and it is made up of constant regions of the heavy chains of the antibody.

When an antibody binds to its target antigen, the Fc region can interact with other proteins in the immune system, leading to a variety of responses such as phagocytosis, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and complement activation. These effector functions help to eliminate pathogens and infected cells from the body.

Immunoglobulin Fc fragments can be produced artificially through enzymatic digestion of intact antibodies, resulting in a fragment that retains the ability to interact with Fc receptors and other proteins involved in immune responses. These fragments have potential therapeutic applications in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune disorders, inflammatory conditions, and cancer.

Immunoglobulin kappa-chains are one of the two types of light chains (the other being lambda-chains) that make up an immunoglobulin molecule, also known as an antibody. These light chains combine with heavy chains to form the antigen-binding site of an antibody, which is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific antigens or foreign substances in the body.

Kappa-chains contain a variable region that differs between different antibodies and contributes to the diversity of the immune system's response to various antigens. They also have a constant region, which is consistent across all kappa-chains. Approximately 60% of all human antibodies contain kappa-chains, while the remaining 40% contain lambda-chains. The relative proportions of kappa and lambda chains can be used in diagnostic tests to identify clonal expansions of B cells, which may indicate a malignancy such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma.

The Immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region is the antigen-binding part of an antibody, which is highly variable in its amino acid sequence and therefore specific to a particular epitope (the site on an antigen that is recognized by the antigen-binding site of an antibody). This variability is generated during the process of V(D)J recombination in the maturation of B cells, allowing for a diverse repertoire of antibodies to be produced and recognizing a wide range of potential pathogens.

The variable region is composed of several sub-regions including:

1. The heavy chain variable region (VH)
2. The light chain variable region (VL)
3. The heavy chain joining region (JH)
4. The light chain joining region (JL)

These regions are further divided into framework regions and complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). The CDRs, particularly CDR3, contain the most variability and are primarily responsible for antigen recognition.

A binding site on an antibody refers to the specific region on the surface of the antibody molecule that can recognize and bind to a specific antigen. Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of foreign substances called antigens. They have two main functions: to neutralize the harmful effects of antigens and to help eliminate them from the body.

The binding site of an antibody is located at the tips of its Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of the antibody molecule. These regions contain unique amino acid sequences that determine the specificity of the antibody for a particular antigen. The binding site can recognize and bind to a specific epitope or region on the antigen, forming an antigen-antibody complex.

The binding between the antibody and antigen is highly specific and depends on non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and electrostatic attractions. This interaction plays a crucial role in the immune response, as it allows the immune system to recognize and eliminate pathogens and other foreign substances from the body.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a key role in the immune response to parasitic infections and allergies. It is produced by B cells in response to stimulation by antigens, such as pollen, pet dander, or certain foods. Once produced, IgE binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, which are immune cells found in tissues and blood respectively. When an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, the cross-linking of IgE molecules bound to the FcεRI receptor triggers the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and various cytokines from these cells. These mediators cause the symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as itching, swelling, and redness. IgE also plays a role in protecting against certain parasitic infections by activating eosinophils, which can kill the parasites.

In summary, Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune response to allergens and parasitic infections, it binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, when an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, it triggers the release of mediators from these cells causing the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Antibody specificity refers to the ability of an antibody to bind to a specific epitope or antigenic determinant on an antigen. Each antibody has a unique structure that allows it to recognize and bind to a specific region of an antigen, typically a small portion of the antigen's surface made up of amino acids or sugar residues. This highly specific binding is mediated by the variable regions of the antibody's heavy and light chains, which form a pocket that recognizes and binds to the epitope.

The specificity of an antibody is determined by its unique complementarity-determining regions (CDRs), which are loops of amino acids located in the variable domains of both the heavy and light chains. The CDRs form a binding site that recognizes and interacts with the epitope on the antigen. The precise fit between the antibody's binding site and the epitope is critical for specificity, as even small changes in the structure of either can prevent binding.

Antibody specificity is important in immune responses because it allows the immune system to distinguish between self and non-self antigens. This helps to prevent autoimmune reactions where the immune system attacks the body's own cells and tissues. Antibody specificity also plays a crucial role in diagnostic tests, such as ELISA assays, where antibodies are used to detect the presence of specific antigens in biological samples.

Immunoglobulin lambda-chains (Igλ) are one type of light chain found in the immunoglobulins, also known as antibodies. Antibodies are proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system's response to foreign substances, such as bacteria and viruses.

Immunoglobulins are composed of two heavy chains and two light chains, which are interconnected by disulfide bonds. There are two types of light chains: kappa (κ) and lambda (λ). Igλ chains are one type of light chain that can be found in association with heavy chains to form functional antibodies.

Igλ chains contain a variable region, which is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific antigens, and a constant region, which determines the class of the immunoglobulin (e.g., IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, or IgM).

In humans, approximately 60% of all antibodies contain Igλ chains, while the remaining 40% contain Igκ chains. The ratio of Igλ to Igκ chains can vary depending on the type of immunoglobulin and its function in the immune response.

Immunoglobulin A (IgA), Secretory is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune function of mucous membranes. These membranes line various body openings, such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and serve to protect the body from potential pathogens by producing mucus.

Secretory IgA (SIgA) is the primary immunoglobulin found in secretions of the mucous membranes, and it is produced by a special type of immune cell called plasma cells located in the lamina propria, a layer of tissue beneath the epithelial cells that line the mucosal surfaces.

SIgA exists as a dimer, consisting of two IgA molecules linked together by a protein called the J chain. This complex is then transported across the epithelial cell layer to the luminal surface, where it becomes associated with another protein called the secretory component (SC). The SC protects the SIgA from degradation by enzymes and helps it maintain its function in the harsh environment of the mucosal surfaces.

SIgA functions by preventing the attachment and entry of pathogens into the body, thereby neutralizing their infectivity. It can also agglutinate (clump together) microorganisms, making them more susceptible to removal by mucociliary clearance or peristalsis. Furthermore, SIgA can modulate immune responses and contribute to the development of oral tolerance, which is important for maintaining immune homeostasis in the gut.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

An antigen-antibody complex is a type of immune complex that forms when an antibody binds to a specific antigen. An antigen is any substance that triggers an immune response, while an antibody is a protein produced by the immune system to neutralize or destroy foreign substances like antigens.

When an antibody binds to an antigen, it forms a complex that can be either soluble or insoluble. Soluble complexes are formed when the antigen is small and can move freely through the bloodstream. Insoluble complexes, on the other hand, are formed when the antigen is too large to move freely, such as when it is part of a bacterium or virus.

The formation of antigen-antibody complexes plays an important role in the immune response. Once formed, these complexes can be recognized and cleared by other components of the immune system, such as phagocytes, which help to prevent further damage to the body. However, in some cases, the formation of large numbers of antigen-antibody complexes can lead to inflammation and tissue damage, contributing to the development of certain autoimmune diseases.

Immunoglobulin mu-chains (IgM) are a type of heavy chain found in immunoglobulins, also known as antibodies. IgM is the first antibody to be produced in response to an initial exposure to an antigen and plays a crucial role in the early stages of the immune response.

IgM antibodies are composed of four monomeric units, each consisting of two heavy chains and two light chains. The heavy chains in IgM are called mu-chains, which have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa. Each mu-chain contains five domains: one variable (V) domain at the N-terminus, four constant (C) domains (Cμ1-4), and a membrane-spanning region followed by a short cytoplasmic tail.

IgM antibodies are primarily found on the surface of B cells as part of the B cell receptor (BCR). When a B cell encounters an antigen, the BCR binds to it, triggering a series of intracellular signaling events that lead to B cell activation and differentiation into plasma cells. In response to activation, the B cell begins to secrete IgM antibodies into the bloodstream.

IgM antibodies have several unique features that make them effective in the early stages of an immune response. They are highly efficient at agglutination, or clumping together, of pathogens and antigens, which helps to neutralize them. IgM antibodies also activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to destroy pathogens.

Overall, Immunoglobulin mu-chains are an essential component of the immune system, providing early protection against pathogens and initiating the adaptive immune response.

An epitope is a specific region on the surface of an antigen (a molecule that can trigger an immune response) that is recognized by an antibody, B-cell receptor, or T-cell receptor. It is also commonly referred to as an antigenic determinant. Epitopes are typically composed of linear amino acid sequences or conformational structures made up of discontinuous amino acids in the antigen. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between self and non-self molecules, leading to the targeted destruction of foreign substances like viruses and bacteria. Understanding epitopes is essential for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Immunoglobulins, also known as antibodies, are proteins produced by the immune system to recognize and neutralize foreign substances like pathogens or antigens. The term "immunoglobulin isotypes" refers to the different classes of immunoglobulins that share a similar structure but have distinct functions and properties.

There are five main isotypes of immunoglobulins in humans, namely IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each isotype has a unique heavy chain constant region (CH) that determines its effector functions, such as binding to Fc receptors, complement activation, or protection against pathogens.

IgA is primarily found in external secretions like tears, saliva, and breast milk, providing localized immunity at mucosal surfaces. IgD is expressed on the surface of B cells and plays a role in their activation and differentiation. IgE is associated with allergic responses and binds to mast cells and basophils, triggering the release of histamine and other mediators of inflammation.

IgG is the most abundant isotype in serum and has several subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) that differ in their effector functions. IgG can cross the placenta, providing passive immunity to the fetus. IgM is the first antibody produced during an immune response and is primarily found in the bloodstream, where it forms large pentameric complexes that are effective at agglutination and complement activation.

Overall, immunoglobulin isotypes play a crucial role in the adaptive immune response, providing specific and diverse mechanisms for recognizing and neutralizing foreign substances.

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system's response to infection. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters a pathogen, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigens on the surface of the pathogen. These antibodies bind to the pathogen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

B-lymphocytes also have a role in presenting antigens to T-lymphocytes, another type of white blood cell involved in the immune response. This helps to stimulate the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes, which can then go on to destroy infected cells or help to coordinate the overall immune response.

Overall, B-lymphocytes are an essential part of the adaptive immune system, providing long-lasting immunity to previously encountered pathogens and helping to protect against future infections.

Anti-idiotypic antibodies are a type of immune protein that recognizes and binds to the unique identifying region (idiotype) of another antibody. These antibodies are produced by the immune system as part of a regulatory feedback mechanism, where they can modulate or inhibit the activity of the original antibody. They have been studied for their potential use in immunotherapy and vaccine development.

Immunoglobulin D (IgD) is a type of antibody that is present in the blood and other bodily fluids. It is one of the five classes of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM) found in humans and plays a role in the immune response.

IgD is produced by B cells, a type of white blood cell that is responsible for producing antibodies. It is primarily found on the surface of mature B cells, where it functions as a receptor for antigens (foreign substances that trigger an immune response). When an antigen binds to IgD on the surface of a B cell, it activates the B cell and stimulates it to produce and secrete antibodies specific to that antigen.

IgD is found in relatively low concentrations in the blood compared to other immunoglobulins, and its precise functions are not fully understood. However, it is thought to play a role in the regulation of B cell activation and the immune response. Additionally, some research suggests that IgD may have a direct role in protecting against certain types of infections.

It's worth noting that genetic deficiencies in IgD are not typically associated with any significant immunological abnormalities or increased susceptibility to infection.

Immunoglobulin constant regions are the invariant portions of antibody molecules (immunoglobulins) that are identical in all antibodies of the same isotype. These regions are responsible for effector functions such as complement activation, binding to Fc receptors, and initiating immune responses. They are composed of amino acid sequences that remain unchanged during antigen-driven somatic hypermutation, allowing them to interact with various components of the immune system. The constant regions are found in the heavy chains (CH) and light chains (CL) of an immunoglobulin molecule. In contrast, the variable regions are responsible for recognizing and binding to specific antigens.

An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is a type of analytical biochemistry assay used to detect and quantify the presence of a substance, typically a protein or peptide, in a liquid sample. It takes its name from the enzyme-linked antibodies used in the assay.

In an ELISA, the sample is added to a well containing a surface that has been treated to capture the target substance. If the target substance is present in the sample, it will bind to the surface. Next, an enzyme-linked antibody specific to the target substance is added. This antibody will bind to the captured target substance if it is present. After washing away any unbound material, a substrate for the enzyme is added. If the enzyme is present due to its linkage to the antibody, it will catalyze a reaction that produces a detectable signal, such as a color change or fluorescence. The intensity of this signal is proportional to the amount of target substance present in the sample, allowing for quantification.

ELISAs are widely used in research and clinical settings to detect and measure various substances, including hormones, viruses, and bacteria. They offer high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, making them a reliable choice for many applications.

Antibody affinity refers to the strength and specificity of the interaction between an antibody and its corresponding antigen at a molecular level. It is a measure of how strongly and selectively an antibody binds to its target antigen. A higher affinity indicates a more stable and specific binding, while a lower affinity suggests weaker and less specific interactions. Affinity is typically measured in terms of the dissociation constant (Kd), which describes the concentration of antigen needed to achieve half-maximal binding to an antibody. Generally, a smaller Kd value corresponds to a higher affinity, indicating a tighter and more selective bond. This parameter is crucial in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as immunoassays and targeted therapies, where high-affinity antibodies are preferred for improved sensitivity and specificity.

An antigen-antibody reaction is a specific immune response that occurs when an antigen (a foreign substance, such as a protein or polysaccharide on the surface of a bacterium or virus) comes into contact with a corresponding antibody (a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to the antigen). The antigen and antibody bind together, forming an antigen-antibody complex. This interaction can neutralize the harmful effects of the antigen, mark it for destruction by other immune cells, or activate complement proteins to help eliminate the antigen from the body. Antigen-antibody reactions are a crucial part of the adaptive immune response and play a key role in the body's defense against infection and disease.

Myeloma proteins, also known as monoclonal immunoglobulins or M-proteins, are entire or abnormal immunoglobulin (antibody) molecules produced by a single clone of plasma cells, which are malignant in the case of multiple myeloma and some related disorders. These proteins accumulate in the blood and/or urine and can cause damage to various organs and tissues.

In multiple myeloma, the excessive proliferation of these plasma cells leads to the overproduction of a single type of immunoglobulin or its fragments, which can be detected and quantified in serum and/or urine electrophoresis. The most common types of myeloma proteins are IgG and IgA, followed by light chains (Bence Jones proteins) and, less frequently, IgD and IgM.

The presence and levels of myeloma proteins are important diagnostic markers for multiple myeloma and related disorders, such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Regular monitoring of these proteins helps assess the disease's activity, response to treatment, and potential complications like kidney dysfunction or amyloidosis.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, such as a bacterium or virus. They are capable of identifying and binding to specific antigens (foreign substances) on the surface of these invaders, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Antibodies are also known as immunoglobulins and come in several different types, including IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM, each with a unique function in the immune response. They are composed of four polypeptide chains, two heavy chains and two light chains, that are held together by disulfide bonds. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains form the antigen-binding site, which is specific to a particular antigen.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Bacterial antibodies are a type of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to an infection caused by bacteria. These antibodies are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the bacterial cells, marking them for destruction by other immune cells. Bacterial antibodies can be classified into several types based on their structure and function, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE. They play a crucial role in the body's defense against bacterial infections and provide immunity to future infections with the same bacteria.

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. It refers to the presence of variations in DNA sequences among individuals, which can be detected by restriction enzymes. These enzymes cut DNA at specific sites, creating fragments of different lengths.

In RFLP analysis, DNA is isolated from an individual and treated with a specific restriction enzyme that cuts the DNA at particular recognition sites. The resulting fragments are then separated by size using gel electrophoresis, creating a pattern unique to that individual's DNA. If there are variations in the DNA sequence between individuals, the restriction enzyme may cut the DNA at different sites, leading to differences in the length of the fragments and thus, a different pattern on the gel.

These variations can be used for various purposes, such as identifying individuals, diagnosing genetic diseases, or studying evolutionary relationships between species. However, RFLP analysis has largely been replaced by more modern techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods and DNA sequencing, which offer higher resolution and throughput.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) gamma chains are the heavy, constant region proteins found in IgG immunoglobulins, which are a type of antibody. These gamma chains are composed of four subunits - two heavy chains and two light chains - and play a crucial role in the immune response by recognizing and binding to specific antigens, such as pathogens or foreign substances.

IgG is the most abundant type of antibody in human serum and provides long-term immunity against bacterial and viral infections. The gamma chains contain a region that binds to Fc receptors found on various immune cells, which facilitates the destruction of pathogens or foreign substances. Additionally, IgG can cross the placenta, providing passive immunity to the fetus.

Abnormalities in the production or function of IgG gamma chains can lead to various immunodeficiency disorders, such as X-linked agammaglobulinemia, which is characterized by a lack of functional B cells and low levels of IgG antibodies.

Immunoglobulin class switching, also known as isotype switching or class switch recombination (CSR), is a biological process that occurs in B lymphocytes as part of the adaptive immune response. This mechanism allows a mature B cell to change the type of antibody it produces from one class to another (e.g., from IgM to IgG, IgA, or IgE) while keeping the same antigen-binding specificity.

During immunoglobulin class switching, the constant region genes of the heavy chain undergo a DNA recombination event, which results in the deletion of the original constant region exons and the addition of new constant region exons downstream. This switch allows the B cell to express different effector functions through the production of antibodies with distinct constant regions, tailoring the immune response to eliminate pathogens more effectively. The process is regulated by various cytokines and signals from T cells and is critical for mounting an effective humoral immune response.

Immunoglobulin J-chains are small protein structures that play a role in the assembly and structure of certain types of antibodies, specifically IgM and IgA. The J-chain is a polypeptide chain that contains multiple cysteine residues, which allow it to form disulfide bonds with the heavy chains of IgM and IgA molecules.

In IgM antibodies, the J-chain helps to link the five identical heavy chain units together to form a pentameric structure. In IgA antibodies, the J-chain links two dimeric structures together to form a tetrameric structure. This polymerization of IgM and IgA molecules is important for their function in the immune system, as it allows them to form large complexes that can effectively agglutinate and neutralize pathogens.

The J-chain is synthesized by a specialized group of B cells called plasma cells, which are responsible for producing and secreting antibodies. Once synthesized, the J-chain is covalently linked to the heavy chains of IgM or IgA molecules during their assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum of the plasma cell.

Overall, the Immunoglobulin J-chain plays a crucial role in the structure and function of certain classes of antibodies, contributing to their ability to effectively combat pathogens and protect the body from infection.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

Immunoglobulin allotypes refer to the genetic variations in the constant region of immunoglobulins (antibodies) that are caused by differences in the amino acid sequences. These variations are determined by specific alleles at polymorphic loci on chromosome 14 and 22, which are inherited in a Mendelian fashion.

Immunoglobulin allotypes can be used as markers for ancestry, immune response, and the identification of tissue types in transplantation. They also play a role in the regulation of the immune response and can affect the affinity and specificity of antibodies.

It's important to note that while immunoglobulin allotypes are inherited and do not change over an individual's lifetime, they should not be confused with immunoglobulin isotypes (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM) which refer to the different classes of antibodies that have distinct structures and functions.

Fc receptors (FcRs) are specialized proteins found on the surface of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, and B lymphocytes. They play a crucial role in the immune response by recognizing and binding to the Fc region of antibodies (IgG, IgA, and IgE) after they have interacted with their specific antigens.

FcRs can be classified into several types based on the class of antibody they bind:

1. FcγRs - bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies
2. FcαRs - bind to the Fc region of IgA antibodies
3. FcεRs - bind to the Fc region of IgE antibodies

The binding of antibodies to Fc receptors triggers various cellular responses, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which contribute to the elimination of pathogens, immune complexes, and other foreign substances. Dysregulation of Fc receptor function has been implicated in several diseases, including autoimmune disorders and allergies.

Immunoglobulin idiotypes refer to the unique antigenic determinants found on the variable regions of an immunoglobulin (antibody) molecule. These determinants are specific to each individual antibody and can be used to distinguish between different antibodies produced by a single individual or between antibodies produced by different individuals.

The variable region of an antibody is responsible for recognizing and binding to a specific antigen. The amino acid sequence in this region varies between different antibodies, and it is these variations that give rise to the unique idiotypes. Idiotypes can be used as markers to study the immune response, including the clonal selection and affinity maturation of B cells during an immune response.

Immunoglobulin idiotypes are also important in the development of monoclonal antibodies for therapeutic use. By identifying and isolating a specific antibody with the desired idiotype, it is possible to produce large quantities of identical antibodies that can be used to treat various diseases, including cancer and autoimmune disorders.

Neutralization tests are a type of laboratory assay used in microbiology and immunology to measure the ability of a substance, such as an antibody or antitoxin, to neutralize the activity of a toxin or infectious agent. In these tests, the substance to be tested is mixed with a known quantity of the toxin or infectious agent, and the mixture is then incubated under controlled conditions. After incubation, the mixture is tested for residual toxicity or infectivity using a variety of methods, such as cell culture assays, animal models, or biochemical assays.

The neutralization titer is then calculated based on the highest dilution of the test substance that completely neutralizes the toxin or infectious agent. Neutralization tests are commonly used in the diagnosis and evaluation of immune responses to vaccines, as well as in the detection and quantification of toxins and other harmful substances.

Examples of neutralization tests include the serum neutralization test for measles antibodies, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) for dengue virus antibodies, and the cytotoxicity neutralization assay for botulinum neurotoxins.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Gamma-globulins are a type of protein found in the blood serum, specifically a class of immunoglobulins (antibodies) known as IgG. They are the most abundant type of antibody and provide long-term defense against bacterial and viral infections. Gamma-globulins can also be referred to as "gamma globulin" or "gamma immune globulins."

These proteins are produced by B cells, a type of white blood cell, in response to an antigen (a foreign substance that triggers an immune response). IgG gamma-globulins have the ability to cross the placenta and provide passive immunity to the fetus. They can be measured through various medical tests such as serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) or immunoelectrophoresis, which are used to diagnose and monitor conditions related to immune system disorders, such as multiple myeloma or primary immunodeficiency diseases.

In addition, gamma-globulins can be administered therapeutically in the form of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) to provide passive immunity for patients with immunodeficiencies, autoimmune disorders, or infectious diseases.

A hybridoma is a type of hybrid cell that is created in a laboratory by fusing a cancer cell (usually a B cell) with a normal immune cell. The resulting hybrid cell combines the ability of the cancer cell to grow and divide indefinitely with the ability of the immune cell to produce antibodies, which are proteins that help the body fight infection.

Hybridomas are commonly used to produce monoclonal antibodies, which are identical copies of a single antibody produced by a single clone of cells. These antibodies can be used for a variety of purposes, including diagnostic tests and treatments for diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders.

To create hybridomas, B cells are first isolated from the spleen or blood of an animal that has been immunized with a specific antigen (a substance that triggers an immune response). The B cells are then fused with cancer cells using a chemical agent such as polyethylene glycol. The resulting hybrid cells are called hybridomas and are grown in culture medium, where they can be selected for their ability to produce antibodies specific to the antigen of interest. These antibody-producing hybridomas can then be cloned to produce large quantities of monoclonal antibodies.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Polymeric immunoglobulin receptors (pIgRs) are specialized cell surface receptors found on the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells, particularly in mucosal surfaces. They play a crucial role in the transport of polymeric immunoglobulins, specifically IgA and IgM, from the bloodstream to external secretions like saliva, tears, breast milk, and gut fluids. This process is known as transcytosis.

The pIgR is composed of a large extracellular domain that binds to the J chain present in polymeric immunoglobulins, a single transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic tail. After binding to the polymeric immunoglobulin, the receptor-immunoglobulin complex is endocytosed, transported across the cell, and then released at the apical surface of the epithelial cells after cleavage by proteases. This results in the secretion of dimeric IgA or pentameric IgM, along with a smaller fragment of the receptor called the secretory component (SC). The SC protects the immunoglobulins from degradation and helps maintain their function in external secretions.

In summary, polymeric immunoglobulin receptors are essential for the protection of mucosal surfaces by facilitating the transport and secretion of polymeric immunoglobulins, primarily IgA and IgM, to maintain immune function and provide a first line of defense against pathogens.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Catalytic antibodies, also known as abzymes or catalytic immune proteins, are a type of antibody that possesses enzymatic activity. They are capable of accelerating specific chemical reactions in a manner similar to traditional enzymes. This unique property arises from the ability of certain antibodies to bind substrates and promote their conversion into products through a series of chemical transformations.

Catalytic antibodies are generated by immunizing an organism with a transition state analogue, a molecule that mimics the high-energy, transient structure of a substrate during a chemical reaction. The immune system recognizes this analogue as foreign and produces antibodies against it. Some of these antibodies will bind to the transition state analogue in a way that stabilizes its geometry and lowers the energy barrier for the conversion of the substrate into the product. This results in the formation of a catalytic antibody, which can then accelerate this specific chemical reaction when presented with the appropriate substrate.

These specialized antibodies have attracted significant interest in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and immunology due to their potential applications in various areas, including drug design, diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. However, it is important to note that catalytic antibodies are still a subject of ongoing research, and their use as practical tools in these applications is not yet widespread.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

'Immune sera' refers to the serum fraction of blood that contains antibodies produced in response to an antigenic stimulus, such as a vaccine or an infection. These antibodies are proteins known as immunoglobulins, which are secreted by B cells (a type of white blood cell) and can recognize and bind to specific antigens. Immune sera can be collected from an immunized individual and used as a source of passive immunity to protect against infection or disease. It is often used in research and diagnostic settings to identify or measure the presence of specific antigens or antibodies.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

The Immunoglobulin Joining Region (IgJ or J chain) is a polypeptide chain that is a component of certain immunoglobulins, specifically IgM and IgA. The J chain plays a crucial role in the polymerization of these immunoglobulins, allowing them to form higher-order structures such as pentamers (in the case of IgM) or dimers (in the case of IgA). This polymerization is important for the functioning of these immunoglobulins in the immune response. The J chain contains multiple cysteine residues that form disulfide bonds with each other and with the heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecules, helping to stabilize the polymeric structure.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

A hapten is a small molecule that can elicit an immune response only when it is attached to a larger carrier protein. On its own, a hapten is too small to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign substance. However, when it binds to a carrier protein, it creates a new antigenic site that can be detected by the immune system. This process is known as haptenization.

Haptens are important in the study of immunology and allergies because they can cause an allergic response when they bind to proteins in the body. For example, certain chemicals found in cosmetics, drugs, or industrial products can act as haptens and trigger an allergic reaction when they come into contact with the skin or mucous membranes. The resulting immune response can cause symptoms such as rash, itching, or inflammation.

Haptens can also be used in the development of vaccines and diagnostic tests, where they are attached to carrier proteins to stimulate an immune response and produce specific antibodies that can be measured or used for therapy.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Electrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel (EPG) is a laboratory technique used to separate and analyze complex mixtures of proteins or nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) based on their size and electrical charge. This technique utilizes a matrix made of cross-linked polyacrylamide, a type of gel, which provides a stable and uniform environment for the separation of molecules.

In this process:

1. The polyacrylamide gel is prepared by mixing acrylamide monomers with a cross-linking agent (bis-acrylamide) and a catalyst (ammonium persulfate) in the presence of a buffer solution.
2. The gel is then poured into a mold and allowed to polymerize, forming a solid matrix with uniform pore sizes that depend on the concentration of acrylamide used. Higher concentrations result in smaller pores, providing better resolution for separating smaller molecules.
3. Once the gel has set, it is placed in an electrophoresis apparatus containing a buffer solution. Samples containing the mixture of proteins or nucleic acids are loaded into wells on the top of the gel.
4. An electric field is applied across the gel, causing the negatively charged molecules to migrate towards the positive electrode (anode) while positively charged molecules move toward the negative electrode (cathode). The rate of migration depends on the size, charge, and shape of the molecules.
5. Smaller molecules move faster through the gel matrix and will migrate farther from the origin compared to larger molecules, resulting in separation based on size. Proteins and nucleic acids can be selectively stained after electrophoresis to visualize the separated bands.

EPG is widely used in various research fields, including molecular biology, genetics, proteomics, and forensic science, for applications such as protein characterization, DNA fragment analysis, cloning, mutation detection, and quality control of nucleic acid or protein samples.

Cross reactions, in the context of medical diagnostics and immunology, refer to a situation where an antibody or a immune response directed against one antigen also reacts with a different antigen due to similarities in their molecular structure. This can occur in allergy testing, where a person who is allergic to a particular substance may have a positive test result for a different but related substance because of cross-reactivity between them. For example, some individuals who are allergic to birch pollen may also have symptoms when eating certain fruits, such as apples, due to cross-reactive proteins present in both.

Surface antigens are molecules found on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system as being foreign or different from the host's own cells. Antigens are typically proteins or polysaccharides that are capable of stimulating an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies and activation of immune cells such as T-cells.

Surface antigens are important in the context of infectious diseases because they allow the immune system to identify and target infected cells for destruction. For example, viruses and bacteria often display surface antigens that are distinct from those found on host cells, allowing the immune system to recognize and attack them. In some cases, these surface antigens can also be used as targets for vaccines or other immunotherapies.

In addition to their role in infectious diseases, surface antigens are also important in the context of cancer. Tumor cells often display abnormal surface antigens that differ from those found on normal cells, allowing the immune system to potentially recognize and attack them. However, tumors can also develop mechanisms to evade the immune system, making it difficult to mount an effective response.

Overall, understanding the properties and behavior of surface antigens is crucial for developing effective immunotherapies and vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer.

A peptide library is a collection of a large number of peptides, which are short chains of amino acids. Each peptide in the library is typically composed of a defined length and sequence, and may contain a variety of different amino acids. Peptide libraries can be synthesized using automated techniques and are often used in scientific research to identify potential ligands (molecules that bind to specific targets) or to study the interactions between peptides and other molecules.

In a peptide library, each peptide is usually attached to a solid support, such as a resin bead, and the entire library can be created using split-and-pool synthesis techniques. This allows for the rapid and efficient synthesis of a large number of unique peptides, which can then be screened for specific activities or properties.

Peptide libraries are used in various fields such as drug discovery, proteomics, and molecular biology to identify potential therapeutic targets, understand protein-protein interactions, and develop new diagnostic tools.

Immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) is a laboratory technique used in the field of clinical pathology and immunology. It is a method for separating and identifying proteins, particularly immunoglobulins or antibodies, in a sample. This technique combines the principles of electrophoresis, which separates proteins based on their electric charge and size, with immunological reactions, which detect specific proteins using antigen-antibody interactions.

In IEP, a protein sample is first separated by electrophoresis in an agarose or agar gel matrix on a glass slide or in a test tube. After separation, an antibody specific to the protein of interest is layered on top of the gel and allowed to diffuse towards the separated proteins. This creates a reaction between the antigen (protein) and the antibody, forming a visible precipitate at the point where they meet. The precipitate line's position and intensity can then be analyzed to identify and quantify the protein of interest.

Immunoelectrophoresis is particularly useful in diagnosing various medical conditions, such as immunodeficiency disorders, monoclonal gammopathies (like multiple myeloma), and other plasma cell dyscrasias. It can help detect abnormal protein patterns, quantify specific immunoglobulins, and identify the presence of M-proteins or Bence Jones proteins, which are indicative of monoclonal gammopathies.

Digoxin is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called cardiac glycosides. It is used to treat various heart conditions, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation, by helping the heart beat stronger and more regularly. Digoxin works by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump in heart muscle cells, which leads to an increase in intracellular calcium and a strengthening of heart contractions. It is important to monitor digoxin levels closely, as too much can lead to toxicity and serious side effects.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. These interactions can trigger a variety of responses within the cell, such as starting a signaling cascade or changing the cell's metabolism. Receptors play crucial roles in various biological processes, including communication between cells, regulation of immune responses, and perception of senses.

2. Antigen: An antigen is any substance (usually a protein) that can be recognized by the adaptive immune system, specifically by B-cells and T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, such as microorganisms (like bacteria, viruses, or fungi), pollen, dust mites, or even components of our own cells (for instance, in autoimmune diseases). An antigen's ability to stimulate an immune response is determined by its molecular structure and whether it can be recognized by the receptors on immune cells.

3. B-Cell: B-cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a critical role in the adaptive immune system, particularly in humoral immunity. They originate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that recognize and bind to specific antigens. Each B-cell has receptors on its surface called B-cell receptors (BCRs) that can recognize a unique antigen. When a B-cell encounters its specific antigen, it becomes activated, undergoes proliferation, and differentiates into plasma cells that secrete large amounts of antibodies to neutralize or eliminate the antigen.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT) is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory medicine and pathology for the detection and localization of specific antigens or antibodies in tissues, cells, or microorganisms. In this technique, a fluorescein-labeled antibody is used to selectively bind to the target antigen or antibody, forming an immune complex. When excited by light of a specific wavelength, the fluorescein label emits light at a longer wavelength, typically visualized as green fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope.

The FAT is widely used in diagnostic microbiology for the identification and characterization of various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It has also been applied in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases and certain cancers by detecting specific antibodies or antigens in patient samples. The main advantage of FAT is its high sensitivity and specificity, allowing for accurate detection and differentiation of various pathogens and disease markers. However, it requires specialized equipment and trained personnel to perform and interpret the results.

Passive immunization is a type of temporary immunity that is transferred to an individual through the injection of antibodies produced outside of the body, rather than through the active production of antibodies in the body in response to vaccination or infection. This can be done through the administration of preformed antibodies, such as immune globulins, which contain a mixture of antibodies that provide immediate protection against specific diseases.

Passive immunization is often used in situations where individuals have been exposed to a disease and do not have time to develop their own active immune response, or in cases where individuals are unable to produce an adequate immune response due to certain medical conditions. It can also be used as a short-term measure to provide protection until an individual can receive a vaccination that will confer long-term immunity.

Passive immunization provides immediate protection against disease, but the protection is typically short-lived, lasting only a few weeks or months. This is because the transferred antibodies are gradually broken down and eliminated by the body over time. In contrast, active immunization confers long-term immunity through the production of memory cells that can mount a rapid and effective immune response upon re-exposure to the same pathogen in the future.

Staphylococcal Protein A (SpA) is a cell wall-associated protein found on many strains of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections. SpA has several domains that allow it to bind to various host proteins, including immunoglobulins (Igs), complement components, and fibrinogen.

The protein A's ability to bind to the Fc region of Igs, particularly IgG, enables it to inhibit phagocytosis by masking the antibodies' binding sites, thus helping the bacterium evade the host immune system. Additionally, SpA can activate complement component C1 and initiate the classical complement pathway, leading to the release of anaphylatoxins and the formation of the membrane attack complex, which can cause tissue damage.

Furthermore, SpA's binding to fibrinogen promotes bacterial adherence and colonization of host tissues, contributing to the establishment of infection. Overall, Staphylococcal Protein A is a crucial virulence factor in S. aureus infections, making it an important target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

A plasmacytoma is a discrete tumor mass that is composed of neoplastic plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow. Plasmacytomas can be solitary (a single tumor) or multiple (many tumors), and they can develop in various locations throughout the body.

Solitary plasmacytoma is a rare cancer that typically affects older adults, and it usually involves a single bone lesion, most commonly found in the vertebrae, ribs, or pelvis. In some cases, solitary plasmacytomas can also occur outside of the bone (extramedullary plasmacytoma), which can affect soft tissues such as the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or skin.

Multiple myeloma is a more common and aggressive cancer that involves multiple plasmacytomas in the bone marrow, leading to the replacement of normal bone marrow cells with malignant plasma cells. This can result in various symptoms such as bone pain, anemia, infections, and kidney damage.

The diagnosis of plasmacytoma typically involves a combination of imaging studies, biopsy, and laboratory tests to assess the extent of the disease and determine the appropriate treatment plan. Treatment options for solitary plasmacytoma may include surgery or radiation therapy, while multiple myeloma is usually treated with chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and/or stem cell transplantation.

Antibody formation, also known as humoral immune response, is the process by which the immune system produces proteins called antibodies in response to the presence of a foreign substance (antigen) in the body. This process involves several steps:

1. Recognition: The antigen is recognized and bound by a type of white blood cell called a B lymphocyte or B cell, which then becomes activated.
2. Differentiation: The activated B cell undergoes differentiation to become a plasma cell, which is a type of cell that produces and secretes large amounts of antibodies.
3. Antibody production: The plasma cells produce and release antibodies, which are proteins made up of four polypeptide chains (two heavy chains and two light chains) arranged in a Y-shape. Each antibody has two binding sites that can recognize and bind to specific regions on the antigen called epitopes.
4. Neutralization or elimination: The antibodies bind to the antigens, neutralizing them or marking them for destruction by other immune cells. This helps to prevent the spread of infection and protect the body from harmful substances.

Antibody formation is an important part of the adaptive immune response, which allows the body to specifically recognize and respond to a wide variety of pathogens and foreign substances.

Immunoglobulin heavy chains (IgH) are proteins that make up the framework of antibodies, which are crucial components of the adaptive immune system. These heavy chains are produced by B cells and plasma cells, and they contain variable regions that can bind to specific antigens, as well as constant regions that determine the effector functions of the antibody.

The genes that encode for immunoglobulin heavy chains are located on chromosome 14 in humans, within a region known as the IgH locus. These genes undergo a complex process of rearrangement during B cell development, whereby different gene segments (V, D, and J) are joined together to create a unique variable region that can recognize a specific antigen. This process of gene rearrangement is critical for the diversity and specificity of the antibody response.

Therefore, the medical definition of 'Genes, Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain' refers to the set of genetic elements that encode for the immunoglobulin heavy chain proteins, and their complex process of rearrangement during B cell development.

Somatic hypermutation is a process that occurs in the immune system, specifically within B cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies. This process involves the introduction of point mutations into the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes, which encode for the variable regions of antibodies.

Somatic hypermutation occurs in the germinal centers of lymphoid follicles in response to antigen stimulation. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) enzyme is responsible for initiating this process by deaminating cytosines to uracils in the Ig genes. This leads to the introduction of point mutations during DNA replication and repair, which can result in changes to the antibody's binding affinity for the antigen.

The somatic hypermutation process allows for the selection of B cells with higher affinity antibodies that can better recognize and neutralize pathogens. This is an important mechanism for the development of humoral immunity and the generation of long-lived memory B cells. However, excessive or aberrant somatic hypermutation can also contribute to the development of certain types of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas and leukemias.

An antigen is a substance (usually a protein) that is recognized as foreign by the immune system and stimulates an immune response, leading to the production of antibodies or activation of T-cells. Antigens can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and tumor cells. They can also come from non-living substances such as pollen, dust mites, or chemicals.

Antigens contain epitopes, which are specific regions on the antigen molecule that are recognized by the immune system. The immune system's response to an antigen depends on several factors, including the type of antigen, its size, and its location in the body.

In general, antigens can be classified into two main categories:

1. T-dependent antigens: These require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are typically larger, more complex molecules that contain multiple epitopes capable of binding to both MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells and T-cell receptors on CD4+ T-cells.
2. T-independent antigens: These do not require the help of T-cells to stimulate an immune response. They are usually smaller, simpler molecules that contain repetitive epitopes capable of cross-linking B-cell receptors and activating them directly.

Understanding antigens and their properties is crucial for developing vaccines, diagnostic tests, and immunotherapies.

Digitoxin is a cardiac glycoside drug that is derived from the foxglove plant (Digitalis lanata). It is used in the treatment of various heart conditions, particularly congestive heart failure and certain types of arrhythmias. Digitoxin works by increasing the force of heart muscle contractions and slowing the heart rate, which helps to improve the efficiency of the heart's pumping action.

Like other cardiac glycosides, digitoxin inhibits the sodium-potassium pump in heart muscle cells, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and a strengthening of heart muscle contractions. However, digitoxin has a longer half-life than other cardiac glycosides such as digoxin, which means that it stays in the body for a longer period of time and may require less frequent dosing.

Digitoxin is available in tablet form and is typically prescribed at a low dose, with regular monitoring of blood levels to ensure safe and effective use. Common side effects of digitoxin include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness. In rare cases, it can cause more serious side effects such as arrhythmias or toxicity, which may require hospitalization and treatment with medications or other interventions.

Immunoglobulin delta-chains (IgD) are a type of heavy chain found in immunoglobulins, which are also known as antibodies. Antibodies are proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system's response to foreign substances, such as bacteria and viruses.

The heavy chains of an antibody consist of four polypeptide regions: the variable region, which varies between different antibodies and is responsible for recognizing and binding to specific antigens; and three constant regions, known as Cμ, Cγ, Cα, or Cδ, which determine the class of the antibody and its effector functions.

IgD heavy chains contain a single Cδ region and are found only in a small subset of antibodies, primarily located on the surface of mature B cells. IgD is co-expressed with IgM on the surface of naive B cells and plays a role in activating the immune response by binding to antigens and initiating signal transduction pathways that lead to B cell activation and differentiation into antibody-secreting plasma cells.

While the function of IgD is not fully understood, it is thought to play a role in regulating the immune response, including modulating allergic reactions and protecting against autoimmunity. Additionally, IgD has been found to have a role in the development and survival of B cells, as well as in the regulation of calcium signaling in B cells.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Epitope mapping is a technique used in immunology to identify the specific portion or regions (called epitopes) on an antigen that are recognized and bind to antibodies or T-cell receptors. This process helps to understand the molecular basis of immune responses against various pathogens, allergens, or transplanted tissues.

Epitope mapping can be performed using different methods such as:

1. Peptide scanning: In this method, a series of overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the antigen are synthesized and tested for their ability to bind to antibodies or T-cell receptors. The peptide that shows binding is considered to contain the epitope.
2. Site-directed mutagenesis: In this approach, specific amino acids within the antigen are altered, and the modified antigens are tested for their ability to bind to antibodies or T-cell receptors. This helps in identifying the critical residues within the epitope.
3. X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy: These techniques provide detailed information about the three-dimensional structure of antigen-antibody complexes, allowing for accurate identification of epitopes at an atomic level.

The results from epitope mapping can be useful in various applications, including vaccine design, diagnostic test development, and understanding the basis of autoimmune diseases.

Papain is defined as a proteolytic enzyme that is derived from the latex of the papaya tree (Carica papaya). It has the ability to break down other proteins into smaller peptides or individual amino acids. Papain is widely used in various industries, including the food industry for tenderizing meat and brewing beer, as well as in the medical field for its digestive and anti-inflammatory properties.

In medicine, papain is sometimes used topically to help heal burns, wounds, and skin ulcers. It can also be taken orally to treat indigestion, parasitic infections, and other gastrointestinal disorders. However, its use as a medical treatment is not widely accepted and more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Autoantibodies are defined as antibodies that are produced by the immune system and target the body's own cells, tissues, or organs. These antibodies mistakenly identify certain proteins or molecules in the body as foreign invaders and attack them, leading to an autoimmune response. Autoantibodies can be found in various autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and thyroiditis. The presence of autoantibodies can also be used as a diagnostic marker for certain conditions.

The Immunoglobulin (Ig) switch region, also known as the switch (S) region or switch area, is a segment of DNA located within the heavy chain constant region (Cμ, Cδ, Cγ, Cε, and Cα) genes of the immunoglobulin locus. These regions are found in chromosome 14 in humans.

The Ig switch regions are crucial for antibody class switching, a process that allows B cells to change the type of heavy chain constant region (Cμ, Cδ, Cγ, Cε, or Cα) expressed in their immunoglobulin, thus modifying the effector functions of the antibodies they produce without altering their antigen specificity. This mechanism enables the immune system to generate a more diverse response against various pathogens and adapt to new challenges.

The switch regions are composed of repetitive DNA sequences that vary in length and sequence between different immunoglobulin isotypes (IgM, IgD, IgG, IgA, and IgE). During class switching, an activated B cell utilizes the enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to introduce DNA double-strand breaks within a specific switch region. The broken ends of the DNA are then joined together through a process called class switch recombination (CSR), resulting in the deletion of the intervening DNA and the fusion of the upstream V(D)J region with a new downstream constant region gene, thereby altering the isotype of the expressed antibody.

Crystallization is a process in which a substance transitions from a liquid or dissolved state to a solid state, forming a crystal lattice. In the medical context, crystallization can refer to the formation of crystals within the body, which can occur under certain conditions such as changes in pH, temperature, or concentration of solutes. These crystals can deposit in various tissues and organs, leading to the formation of crystal-induced diseases or disorders.

For example, in patients with gout, uric acid crystals can accumulate in joints, causing inflammation, pain, and swelling. Similarly, in nephrolithiasis (kidney stones), minerals in the urine can crystallize and form stones that can obstruct the urinary tract. Crystallization can also occur in other medical contexts, such as in the formation of dental calculus or plaque, and in the development of cataracts in the eye.

Immunoglobulin alpha-chains (IgA) are a type of immunoglobulin or antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune system. They are composed of two heavy chains, known as alpha-chains, and two light chains. IgA is primarily found in secretions such as tears, saliva, breast milk, and respiratory and intestinal mucus, where they provide protection against pathogens that enter the body through these surfaces.

IgA can exist in two forms: a monomeric form, which consists of a single IgA molecule, and a polymeric form, which consists of several IgA molecules joined together by a J chain. The polymeric form is more common in secretions, where it provides an effective barrier against pathogens.

IgA functions by binding to antigens on the surface of pathogens, preventing them from attaching to and infecting host cells. It can also neutralize toxins produced by some bacteria and viruses. Additionally, IgA can activate the complement system, a group of proteins that work together to destroy pathogens, and initiate an immune response by recruiting other immune cells to the site of infection.

Deficiencies in IgA are relatively common and usually do not cause any significant health problems. However, in some cases, people with IgA deficiency may develop recurrent infections or allergies.

IgG receptors, also known as Fcγ receptors (Fc gamma receptors), are specialized protein molecules found on the surface of various immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and some lymphocytes. These receptors recognize and bind to the Fc region of IgG antibodies, one of the five classes of immunoglobulins in the human body.

IgG receptors play a crucial role in immune responses by mediating different effector functions, including:

1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC): IgG receptors on natural killer (NK) cells and other immune cells bind to IgG antibodies coated on the surface of virus-infected or cancer cells, leading to their destruction.
2. Phagocytosis: When IgG antibodies tag pathogens or foreign particles, phagocytes like neutrophils and macrophages recognize and bind to these immune complexes via IgG receptors, facilitating the engulfment and removal of the targeted particles.
3. Antigen presentation: IgG receptors on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) can internalize immune complexes, process the antigens, and present them to T cells, thereby initiating adaptive immune responses.
4. Inflammatory response regulation: IgG receptors can modulate inflammation by activating or inhibiting downstream signaling pathways in immune cells, depending on the specific type of Fcγ receptor and its activation state.

There are several types of IgG receptors (FcγRI, FcγRII, FcγRIII, and FcγRIV) with varying affinities for different subclasses of IgG antibodies (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4). The distinct functions and expression patterns of these receptors contribute to the complexity and fine-tuning of immune responses in the human body.

Immunodiffusion is a laboratory technique used in immunology to detect and measure the presence of specific antibodies or antigens in a sample. It is based on the principle of diffusion, where molecules move from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until they reach equilibrium. In this technique, a sample containing an unknown quantity of antigen or antibody is placed in a gel or agar medium that contains a known quantity of antibody or antigen, respectively.

The two substances then diffuse towards each other and form a visible precipitate at the point where they meet and reach equivalence, which indicates the presence and quantity of the specific antigen or antibody in the sample. There are several types of immunodiffusion techniques, including radial immunodiffusion (RID) and double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony technique). These techniques are widely used in diagnostic laboratories to identify and measure various antigens and antibodies, such as those found in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and allergic reactions.

DNA restriction enzymes, also known as restriction endonucleases, are a type of enzyme that cut double-stranded DNA at specific recognition sites. These enzymes are produced by bacteria and archaea as a defense mechanism against foreign DNA, such as that found in bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria).

Restriction enzymes recognize specific sequences of nucleotides (the building blocks of DNA) and cleave the phosphodiester bonds between them. The recognition sites for these enzymes are usually palindromic, meaning that the sequence reads the same in both directions when facing the opposite strands of DNA.

Restriction enzymes are widely used in molecular biology research for various applications such as genetic engineering, genome mapping, and DNA fingerprinting. They allow scientists to cut DNA at specific sites, creating precise fragments that can be manipulated and analyzed. The use of restriction enzymes has been instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology and the Human Genome Project.

"Competitive binding" is a term used in pharmacology and biochemistry to describe the behavior of two or more molecules (ligands) competing for the same binding site on a target protein or receptor. In this context, "binding" refers to the physical interaction between a ligand and its target.

When a ligand binds to a receptor, it can alter the receptor's function, either activating or inhibiting it. If multiple ligands compete for the same binding site, they will compete to bind to the receptor. The ability of each ligand to bind to the receptor is influenced by its affinity for the receptor, which is a measure of how strongly and specifically the ligand binds to the receptor.

In competitive binding, if one ligand is present in high concentrations, it can prevent other ligands with lower affinity from binding to the receptor. This is because the higher-affinity ligand will have a greater probability of occupying the binding site and blocking access to the other ligands. The competition between ligands can be described mathematically using equations such as the Langmuir isotherm, which describes the relationship between the concentration of ligand and the fraction of receptors that are occupied by the ligand.

Competitive binding is an important concept in drug development, as it can be used to predict how different drugs will interact with their targets and how they may affect each other's activity. By understanding the competitive binding properties of a drug, researchers can optimize its dosage and delivery to maximize its therapeutic effect while minimizing unwanted side effects.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

An immunoassay is a biochemical test that measures the presence or concentration of a specific protein, antibody, or antigen in a sample using the principles of antibody-antigen reactions. It is commonly used in clinical laboratories to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions such as infections, hormonal disorders, allergies, and cancer.

Immunoassays typically involve the use of labeled reagents, such as enzymes, radioisotopes, or fluorescent dyes, that bind specifically to the target molecule. The amount of label detected is proportional to the concentration of the target molecule in the sample, allowing for quantitative analysis.

There are several types of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioimmunoassay (RIA), fluorescence immunoassay (FIA), and chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Each type has its own advantages and limitations, depending on the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput required for a particular application.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

The Secretory Component (SC) is the receptor protein for the Fc region of IgA immunoglobulins. It is also known as the transporter protein, which helps in the transport of polymeric IgA and pentameric IgM across the epithelial cells and into various secretions such as saliva, tears, and milk. The SC plays a crucial role in mucosal immunity by facilitating the local immune defense against pathogens. It is produced by the epithelial cells and can be cleaved from the polymeric IgA to become the free SC, which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties.

A "gene library" is not a recognized term in medical genetics or molecular biology. However, the closest concept that might be referred to by this term is a "genomic library," which is a collection of DNA clones that represent the entire genetic material of an organism. These libraries are used for various research purposes, such as identifying and studying specific genes or gene functions.

Immunologic techniques are a group of laboratory methods that utilize the immune system's ability to recognize and respond to specific molecules, known as antigens. These techniques are widely used in medicine, biology, and research to detect, measure, or identify various substances, including proteins, hormones, viruses, bacteria, and other antigens.

Some common immunologic techniques include:

1. Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A sensitive assay used to detect and quantify antigens or antibodies in a sample. This technique uses an enzyme linked to an antibody or antigen, which reacts with a substrate to produce a colored product that can be measured and quantified.
2. Immunofluorescence: A microscopic technique used to visualize the location of antigens or antibodies in tissues or cells. This technique uses fluorescent dyes conjugated to antibodies, which bind to specific antigens and emit light when excited by a specific wavelength of light.
3. Western Blotting: A laboratory technique used to detect and identify specific proteins in a sample. This technique involves separating proteins based on their size using electrophoresis, transferring them to a membrane, and then probing the membrane with antibodies that recognize the protein of interest.
4. Immunoprecipitation: A laboratory technique used to isolate and purify specific antigens or antibodies from a complex mixture. This technique involves incubating the mixture with an antibody that recognizes the antigen or antibody of interest, followed by precipitation of the antigen-antibody complex using a variety of methods.
5. Radioimmunoassay (RIA): A sensitive assay used to detect and quantify antigens or antibodies in a sample. This technique uses radioactively labeled antigens or antibodies, which bind to specific antigens or antibodies in the sample, allowing for detection and quantification using a scintillation counter.

These techniques are important tools in medical diagnosis, research, and forensic science.

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Agammaglobulinemia is a medical condition characterized by a severe deficiency or complete absence of gamma globulins (a type of antibodies) in the blood. This deficiency results from a lack of functional B cells, which are a type of white blood cell that produces antibodies to help fight off infections.

There are two main types of agammaglobulinemia: X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) and autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia (ARA). XLA is caused by mutations in the BTK gene and primarily affects males, while ARA is caused by mutations in other genes and can affect both males and females.

People with agammaglobulinemia are at increased risk for recurrent bacterial infections, particularly respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and sinusitis. They may also be more susceptible to certain viral and parasitic infections. Treatment typically involves replacement therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) to provide the patient with functional antibodies.

Bacterial antigens are substances found on the surface or produced by bacteria that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. These antigens can be proteins, polysaccharides, teichoic acids, lipopolysaccharides, or other molecules that are recognized as foreign by the host's immune system.

When a bacterial antigen is encountered by the host's immune system, it triggers a series of responses aimed at eliminating the bacteria and preventing infection. The host's immune system recognizes the antigen as foreign through the use of specialized receptors called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are found on various immune cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and neutrophils.

Once a bacterial antigen is recognized by the host's immune system, it can stimulate both the innate and adaptive immune responses. The innate immune response involves the activation of inflammatory pathways, the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection, and the production of antimicrobial peptides.

The adaptive immune response, on the other hand, involves the activation of T cells and B cells, which are specific to the bacterial antigen. These cells can recognize and remember the antigen, allowing for a more rapid and effective response upon subsequent exposures.

Bacterial antigens are important in the development of vaccines, as they can be used to stimulate an immune response without causing disease. By identifying specific bacterial antigens that are associated with virulence or pathogenicity, researchers can develop vaccines that target these antigens and provide protection against infection.

The complement system is a group of proteins found in the blood and on the surface of cells that when activated, work together to help eliminate pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi from the body. The proteins are normally inactive in the bloodstream. When they encounter an invading microorganism or foreign substance, a series of reactions take place leading to the activation of the complement system. Activation results in the production of effector molecules that can punch holes in the cell membranes of pathogens, recruit and activate immune cells, and help remove debris and dead cells from the body.

There are three main pathways that can lead to complement activation: the classical pathway, the lectin pathway, and the alternative pathway. Each pathway involves a series of proteins that work together in a cascade-like manner to amplify the response and generate effector molecules. The three main effector molecules produced by the complement system are C3b, C4b, and C5b. These molecules can bind to the surface of pathogens, marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

Complement proteins also play a role in the regulation of the immune response. They help to prevent excessive activation of the complement system, which could damage host tissues. Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated in a number of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

In summary, Complement System Proteins are a group of proteins that play a crucial role in the immune response by helping to eliminate pathogens and regulate the immune response. They can be activated through three different pathways, leading to the production of effector molecules that mark pathogens for destruction. Dysregulation of the complement system has been linked to various diseases.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Complement C3 is a protein that plays a central role in the complement system, which is a part of the immune system that helps to clear pathogens and damaged cells from the body. Complement C3 can be activated through three different pathways: the classical pathway, the lectin pathway, and the alternative pathway. Once activated, it breaks down into two fragments, C3a and C3b.

C3a is an anaphylatoxin that helps to recruit immune cells to the site of infection or injury, while C3b plays a role in opsonization, which is the process of coating pathogens or damaged cells with proteins to make them more recognizable to the immune system. Additionally, C3b can also activate the membrane attack complex (MAC), which forms a pore in the membrane of target cells leading to their lysis or destruction.

In summary, Complement C3 is an important protein in the complement system that helps to identify and eliminate pathogens and damaged cells from the body through various mechanisms.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Peptides are short chains of amino acid residues linked by covalent bonds, known as peptide bonds. They are formed when two or more amino acids are joined together through a condensation reaction, which results in the elimination of a water molecule and the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another.

Peptides can vary in length from two to about fifty amino acids, and they are often classified based on their size. For example, dipeptides contain two amino acids, tripeptides contain three, and so on. Oligopeptides typically contain up to ten amino acids, while polypeptides can contain dozens or even hundreds of amino acids.

Peptides play many important roles in the body, including serving as hormones, neurotransmitters, enzymes, and antibiotics. They are also used in medical research and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.

Iodine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, which decays and emits radiation in the form of gamma rays. Some commonly used iodine radioisotopes include I-123, I-125, I-131. These radioisotopes have various medical applications such as in diagnostic imaging, therapy for thyroid disorders, and cancer treatment.

For example, I-131 is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer due to its ability to destroy thyroid tissue. On the other hand, I-123 is often used in nuclear medicine scans of the thyroid gland because it emits gamma rays that can be detected by a gamma camera, allowing for detailed images of the gland's structure and function.

It is important to note that handling and administering radioisotopes require specialized training and safety precautions due to their radiation-emitting properties.

Restriction mapping is a technique used in molecular biology to identify the location and arrangement of specific restriction endonuclease recognition sites within a DNA molecule. Restriction endonucleases are enzymes that cut double-stranded DNA at specific sequences, producing fragments of various lengths. By digesting the DNA with different combinations of these enzymes and analyzing the resulting fragment sizes through techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, researchers can generate a restriction map - a visual representation of the locations and distances between recognition sites on the DNA molecule. This information is crucial for various applications, including cloning, genome analysis, and genetic engineering.

A gene is a specific sequence of nucleotides in DNA that carries genetic information. Genes are the fundamental units of heredity and are responsible for the development and function of all living organisms. They code for proteins or RNA molecules, which carry out various functions within cells and are essential for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

Each gene has a specific location on a chromosome, and each person inherits two copies of every gene, one from each parent. Variations in the sequence of nucleotides in a gene can lead to differences in traits between individuals, including physical characteristics, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental factors.

Medical genetics is the study of genes and their role in health and disease. It involves understanding how genes contribute to the development and progression of various medical conditions, as well as identifying genetic risk factors and developing strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Antibodies, protozoan, refer to the immune system's response to an infection caused by a protozoan organism. Protozoa are single-celled microorganisms that can cause various diseases in humans, such as malaria, giardiasis, and toxoplasmosis.

When the body is infected with a protozoan, the immune system responds by producing specific proteins called antibodies. Antibodies are produced by a type of white blood cell called a B-cell, and they recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the protozoan organism.

There are five main types of antibodies: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each type of antibody has a different role in the immune response. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody and provides long-term immunity to previously encountered pathogens. IgM is the first antibody produced in response to an infection and is important for activating the complement system, which helps to destroy the protozoan organism.

Overall, the production of antibodies against protozoan organisms is a critical part of the immune response and helps to protect the body from further infection.

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) allotypes refer to the genetic variations in the constant region of the IgG heavy chain that are caused by differences in amino acid sequences. These variations are inherited and can be used to identify an individual's immune response genes. There are several different IgG allotypes, which are designated as G1m, G2m, G3m, etc., based on the specific antigenic markers present on the heavy chain.

The IgG allotypes play a role in the immune response to infections and immunizations, and they can also influence the development of autoimmune diseases. Some allotypes have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain diseases, while others may provide protection against infection or disease progression.

IgG allotypes are important in forensic science for identification purposes, as well as in transplantation medicine to match donors and recipients. They can also be used in research to study the genetic basis of immune responses and diseases.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

Nucleic acid hybridization is a process in molecular biology where two single-stranded nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) with complementary sequences pair together to form a double-stranded molecule through hydrogen bonding. The strands can be from the same type of nucleic acid or different types (i.e., DNA-RNA or DNA-cDNA). This process is commonly used in various laboratory techniques, such as Southern blotting, Northern blotting, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and microarray analysis, to detect, isolate, and analyze specific nucleic acid sequences. The hybridization temperature and conditions are critical to ensure the specificity of the interaction between the two strands.

Immunization is defined medically as the process where an individual is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically through the administration of a vaccine. The vaccine stimulates the body's own immune system to recognize and fight off the specific disease-causing organism, thereby preventing or reducing the severity of future infections with that organism.

Immunization can be achieved actively, where the person is given a vaccine to trigger an immune response, or passively, where antibodies are transferred to the person through immunoglobulin therapy. Immunizations are an important part of preventive healthcare and have been successful in controlling and eliminating many infectious diseases worldwide.

Colostrum is the first type of milk produced by the mammary glands of mammals (including humans) after giving birth. It is a yellowish, sticky fluid that contains a higher concentration of nutrients, antibodies, and immune-boosting components compared to mature milk. Colostrum provides essential protection and nourishment for newborns during their most vulnerable period, helping them establish a healthy immune system and promoting optimal growth and development. It is rich in proteins, vitamins, minerals, and growth factors that support the baby's gut health, brain development, and overall well-being. In humans, colostrum is usually produced in small quantities during the first few days after delivery, and its consumption by newborns is crucial for setting a strong foundation for their health.

Affinity chromatography is a type of chromatography technique used in biochemistry and molecular biology to separate and purify proteins based on their biological characteristics, such as their ability to bind specifically to certain ligands or molecules. This method utilizes a stationary phase that is coated with a specific ligand (e.g., an antibody, antigen, receptor, or enzyme) that selectively interacts with the target protein in a sample.

The process typically involves the following steps:

1. Preparation of the affinity chromatography column: The stationary phase, usually a solid matrix such as agarose beads or magnetic beads, is modified by covalently attaching the ligand to its surface.
2. Application of the sample: The protein mixture is applied to the top of the affinity chromatography column, allowing it to flow through the stationary phase under gravity or pressure.
3. Binding and washing: As the sample flows through the column, the target protein selectively binds to the ligand on the stationary phase, while other proteins and impurities pass through. The column is then washed with a suitable buffer to remove any unbound proteins and contaminants.
4. Elution of the bound protein: The target protein can be eluted from the column using various methods, such as changing the pH, ionic strength, or polarity of the buffer, or by introducing a competitive ligand that displaces the bound protein.
5. Collection and analysis: The eluted protein fraction is collected and analyzed for purity and identity, often through techniques like SDS-PAGE or mass spectrometry.

Affinity chromatography is a powerful tool in biochemistry and molecular biology due to its high selectivity and specificity, enabling the efficient isolation of target proteins from complex mixtures. However, it requires careful consideration of the binding affinity between the ligand and the protein, as well as optimization of the elution conditions to minimize potential damage or denaturation of the purified protein.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Gel chromatography is a type of liquid chromatography that separates molecules based on their size or molecular weight. It uses a stationary phase that consists of a gel matrix made up of cross-linked polymers, such as dextran, agarose, or polyacrylamide. The gel matrix contains pores of various sizes, which allow smaller molecules to penetrate deeper into the matrix while larger molecules are excluded.

In gel chromatography, a mixture of molecules is loaded onto the top of the gel column and eluted with a solvent that moves down the column by gravity or pressure. As the sample components move down the column, they interact with the gel matrix and get separated based on their size. Smaller molecules can enter the pores of the gel and take longer to elute, while larger molecules are excluded from the pores and elute more quickly.

Gel chromatography is commonly used to separate and purify proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules based on their size and molecular weight. It is also used in the analysis of polymers, colloids, and other materials with a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Combinatorial chemistry techniques are a group of methods used in the field of chemistry to synthesize and optimize large libraries of chemical compounds in a rapid and efficient manner. These techniques involve the systematic combination of different building blocks, or reagents, in various arrangements to generate a diverse array of molecules. This approach allows chemists to quickly explore a wide chemical space and identify potential lead compounds for drug discovery, materials science, and other applications.

There are several common combinatorial chemistry techniques, including:

1. **Split-Pool Synthesis:** In this method, a large collection of starting materials is divided into smaller groups, and each group undergoes a series of chemical reactions with different reagents. The resulting products from each group are then pooled together and redistributed for additional rounds of reactions. This process creates a vast number of unique compounds through the iterative combination of building blocks.
2. **Parallel Synthesis:** In parallel synthesis, multiple reactions are carried out simultaneously in separate reaction vessels. Each vessel contains a distinct set of starting materials and reagents, allowing for the efficient generation of a series of related compounds. This method is particularly useful when exploring structure-activity relationships (SAR) or optimizing lead compounds.
3. **Encoded Libraries:** To facilitate the rapid identification of active compounds within large libraries, encoded library techniques incorporate unique tags or barcodes into each molecule. These tags allow for the simultaneous synthesis and screening of compounds, as the identity of an active compound can be determined by decoding its corresponding tag.
4. **DNA-Encoded Libraries (DELs):** DELs are a specific type of encoded library that uses DNA molecules to encode and track chemical compounds. In this approach, each unique compound is linked to a distinct DNA sequence, enabling the rapid identification of active compounds through DNA sequencing techniques.
5. **Solid-Phase Synthesis:** This technique involves the attachment of starting materials to a solid support, such as beads or resins, allowing for the stepwise addition of reagents and building blocks. The solid support facilitates easy separation, purification, and screening of compounds, making it an ideal method for combinatorial chemistry applications.

Combinatorial chemistry techniques have revolutionized drug discovery and development by enabling the rapid synthesis, screening, and optimization of large libraries of chemical compounds. These methods continue to play a crucial role in modern medicinal chemistry and materials science research.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Sequence homology in nucleic acids refers to the similarity or identity between the nucleotide sequences of two or more DNA or RNA molecules. It is often used as a measure of biological relationship between genes, organisms, or populations. High sequence homology suggests a recent common ancestry or functional constraint, while low sequence homology may indicate a more distant relationship or different functions.

Nucleic acid sequence homology can be determined by various methods such as pairwise alignment, multiple sequence alignment, and statistical analysis. The degree of homology is typically expressed as a percentage of identical or similar nucleotides in a given window of comparison.

It's important to note that the interpretation of sequence homology depends on the biological context and the evolutionary distance between the sequences compared. Therefore, functional and experimental validation is often necessary to confirm the significance of sequence homology.

Guanabenz is not a medical condition, it's a medication. Here's the definition:

Guanabenz (brand name Wytensin) is a centrally acting antihypertensive agent, primarily used for the treatment of hypertension. It belongs to the class of drugs known as "central alpha-2 adrenergic agonists." Guanabenz works by mimicking the effects of natural neurotransmitters in your body to reduce nerve impulses that cause blood vessels to constrict, thereby promoting vasodilation and lowering blood pressure.

Please consult a healthcare professional or refer to medical resources for more detailed information about specific medications and their uses, side effects, and interactions.

'Gene rearrangement in B-lymphocytes, heavy chain' refers to the biological process that occurs during the development of B-lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow. This process involves the rearrangement of genetic material on chromosome 14, specifically within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus.

During B-cell maturation, the variable region of the heavy chain gene is assembled from several gene segments, including the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments. Through a series of genetic recombination events, these segments are randomly selected and joined together to form a unique V(D)J exon that encodes the variable region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain protein.

This gene rearrangement process allows for the generation of a diverse repertoire of antibodies with different specificities, enabling B-lymphocytes to recognize and respond to a wide range of foreign antigens. However, if errors occur during this process, it can lead to the production of autoantibodies that target the body's own cells and tissues, contributing to the development of certain immune disorders such as autoimmune diseases.

B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement is a fundamental biological process that occurs during the development of B-lymphocytes (also known as B cells), which are a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies to help fight infections. This process involves the rearrangement of genetic material within the B-lymphocyte's immunoglobulin genes, specifically the heavy chain (IgH) and light chain (IgL) genes, to create a diverse repertoire of antibodies with unique specificities.

During B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement, large segments of DNA are cut, deleted, or inverted, and then rejoined to form a functional IgH or IgL gene that encodes an antigen-binding site on the antibody molecule. The process occurs in two main steps:

1. Variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments are rearranged to form the heavy chain gene, which is located on chromosome 14. This results in a vast array of possible combinations, allowing for the generation of a diverse set of antibody molecules.
2. A separate variable (V) and joining (J) gene segment rearrangement occurs to form the light chain gene, which can be either kappa or lambda type, located on chromosomes 2 and 22, respectively.

Once the heavy and light chain genes are successfully rearranged, they are transcribed into mRNA and translated into immunoglobulin proteins, forming a functional antibody molecule. If the initial gene rearrangement fails to produce a functional antibody, additional attempts at rearrangement can occur, involving different combinations of V, D, and J segments or the use of alternative reading frames.

Errors in B-lymphocyte gene rearrangement can lead to various genetic disorders, such as lymphomas and leukemias, due to the production of aberrant antibodies or uncontrolled cell growth.

Influenza A Virus: According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Influenza A virus is an orthomyxovirus that causes respiratory illness in humans and many other animal species. It can be found in birds, pigs, horses, and humans. The viral genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA segments enclosed within a lipid membrane derived from the host cell. Two surface glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are used to classify Influenza A virus into subtypes based on antigenic properties. There are 18 different HA subtypes and 11 NA subtypes, but only H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 have caused widespread human disease since the 1900s.

Influenza A viruses can be further divided into strains based on differences in their internal proteins. The most common cause of seasonal flu epidemics in humans is Influenza A (H3N2) and Influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, the latter of which caused the 2009 pandemic. Wild aquatic birds are the natural hosts for a large variety of influenza A viruses, and they are also responsible for the emergence of new subtypes.

These viruses can occasionally cause outbreaks in domestic poultry and, more rarely, in humans. Avian influenza A (H5N1), avian influenza A (H7N9), and avian influenza A (H1N1) are some examples of zoonotic influenza viruses that have caused severe disease and death in humans. However, sustained human-to-human transmission has not been observed with these subtypes, except for the 2009 H1N1 pandemic strain, which was a reassortant virus containing genes from both avian and swine influenza A viruses.

Fibrinogen is a soluble protein present in plasma, synthesized by the liver. It plays an essential role in blood coagulation. When an injury occurs, fibrinogen gets converted into insoluble fibrin by the action of thrombin, forming a fibrin clot that helps to stop bleeding from the injured site. Therefore, fibrinogen is crucial for hemostasis, which is the process of stopping bleeding and starting the healing process after an injury.

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

Platelet membrane glycoproteins are specialized proteins found on the surface of platelets, which are small blood cells responsible for clotting. These glycoproteins play crucial roles in various processes related to hemostasis and thrombosis, including platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation.

There are several key platelet membrane glycoproteins, such as:

1. Glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa (also known as integrin α2β1): This glycoprotein mediates the binding of platelets to collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix, facilitating platelet adhesion and activation.
2. GP IIb/IIIa (also known as integrin αIIbβ3): This is the most abundant glycoprotein on the platelet surface and functions as a receptor for fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Upon activation, GP IIb/IIIa undergoes conformational changes that enable it to bind these ligands, leading to platelet aggregation and clot formation.
3. GPIb-IX-V: This glycoprotein complex is involved in the initial tethering and adhesion of platelets to von Willebrand factor (vWF) in damaged blood vessels. It consists of four subunits: GPIbα, GPIbβ, GPIX, and GPV.
4. GPVI: This glycoprotein is essential for platelet activation upon contact with collagen. It associates with the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ) to form a signaling complex that triggers intracellular signaling pathways, leading to platelet activation and aggregation.

Abnormalities in these platelet membrane glycoproteins can lead to bleeding disorders or thrombotic conditions. For example, mutations in GPIIb/IIIa can result in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a severe bleeding disorder characterized by impaired platelet aggregation. On the other hand, increased expression or activation of these glycoproteins may contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Macromolecular substances, also known as macromolecules, are large, complex molecules made up of repeating subunits called monomers. These substances are formed through polymerization, a process in which many small molecules combine to form a larger one. Macromolecular substances can be naturally occurring, such as proteins, DNA, and carbohydrates, or synthetic, such as plastics and synthetic fibers.

In the context of medicine, macromolecular substances are often used in the development of drugs and medical devices. For example, some drugs are designed to bind to specific macromolecules in the body, such as proteins or DNA, in order to alter their function and produce a therapeutic effect. Additionally, macromolecular substances may be used in the creation of medical implants, such as artificial joints and heart valves, due to their strength and durability.

It is important for healthcare professionals to have an understanding of macromolecular substances and how they function in the body, as this knowledge can inform the development and use of medical treatments.

Protein engineering is a branch of molecular biology that involves the modification of proteins to achieve desired changes in their structure and function. This can be accomplished through various techniques, including site-directed mutagenesis, gene shuffling, directed evolution, and rational design. The goal of protein engineering may be to improve the stability, activity, specificity, or other properties of a protein for therapeutic, diagnostic, industrial, or research purposes. It is an interdisciplinary field that combines knowledge from genetics, biochemistry, structural biology, and computational modeling.

Glycoproteins are complex proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. These glycans are linked to the protein through asparagine residues (N-linked) or serine/threonine residues (O-linked). Glycoproteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found on the outer surface of cell membranes, in extracellular fluids, and as components of the extracellular matrix. The structure and composition of glycoproteins can vary significantly depending on their function and location within an organism.

A dose-response relationship in immunology refers to the quantitative relationship between the dose or amount of an antigen (a substance that triggers an immune response) and the magnitude or strength of the resulting immune response. Generally, as the dose of an antigen increases, the intensity and/or duration of the immune response also increase, up to a certain point. This relationship helps in determining the optimal dosage for vaccines and immunotherapies, ensuring sufficient immune activation while minimizing potential adverse effects.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

X-ray diffraction (XRD) is not strictly a medical definition, but it is a technique commonly used in the field of medical research and diagnostics. XRD is a form of analytical spectroscopy that uses the phenomenon of X-ray diffraction to investigate the crystallographic structure of materials. When a beam of X-rays strikes a crystal, it is scattered in specific directions and with specific intensities that are determined by the arrangement of atoms within the crystal. By measuring these diffraction patterns, researchers can determine the crystal structures of various materials, including biological macromolecules such as proteins and viruses.

In the medical field, XRD is often used to study the structure of drugs and drug candidates, as well as to analyze the composition and structure of tissues and other biological samples. For example, XRD can be used to investigate the crystal structures of calcium phosphate minerals in bone tissue, which can provide insights into the mechanisms of bone formation and disease. Additionally, XRD is sometimes used in the development of new medical imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast X-ray imaging, which has the potential to improve the resolution and contrast of traditional X-ray images.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

IgE receptors, also known as Fc epsilon RI receptors, are membrane-bound proteins found on the surface of mast cells and basophils. They play a crucial role in the immune response to parasitic infections and allergies. IgE receptors bind to the Fc region of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, which are produced by B cells in response to certain antigens. When an allergen cross-links two adjacent IgE molecules bound to the same IgE receptor, it triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins. These mediators cause the symptoms associated with allergic reactions, including inflammation, itching, and vasodilation. IgE receptors are also involved in the activation of the adaptive immune response by promoting the presentation of antigens to T cells.

"Chickens" is a common term used to refer to the domesticated bird, Gallus gallus domesticus, which is widely raised for its eggs and meat. However, in medical terms, "chickens" is not a standard term with a specific definition. If you have any specific medical concern or question related to chickens, such as food safety or allergies, please provide more details so I can give a more accurate answer.

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are a type of protein found on the surface of cells that mediate the attachment or adhesion of cells to either other cells or to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells.

CAMs play crucial roles in various biological processes, including tissue development, differentiation, repair, and maintenance of tissue architecture and function. They are also involved in cell signaling, migration, and regulation of the immune response.

There are several types of CAMs, classified based on their structure and function, such as immunoglobulin-like CAMs (IgCAMs), cadherins, integrins, and selectins. Dysregulation of CAMs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Trypsin is a proteolytic enzyme, specifically a serine protease, that is secreted by the pancreas as an inactive precursor, trypsinogen. Trypsinogen is converted into its active form, trypsin, in the small intestine by enterokinase, which is produced by the intestinal mucosa.

Trypsin plays a crucial role in digestion by cleaving proteins into smaller peptides at specific arginine and lysine residues. This enzyme helps to break down dietary proteins into amino acids, allowing for their absorption and utilization by the body. Additionally, trypsin can activate other zymogenic pancreatic enzymes, such as chymotrypsinogen and procarboxypeptidases, thereby contributing to overall protein digestion.

Lymphocyte activation is the process by which B-cells and T-cells (types of lymphocytes) become activated to perform effector functions in an immune response. This process involves the recognition of specific antigens presented on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells or macrophages.

The activation of B-cells leads to their differentiation into plasma cells that produce antibodies, while the activation of T-cells results in the production of cytotoxic T-cells (CD8+ T-cells) that can directly kill infected cells or helper T-cells (CD4+ T-cells) that assist other immune cells.

Lymphocyte activation involves a series of intracellular signaling events, including the binding of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of cytokines, which ultimately result in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and effector functions. The activation process is tightly regulated to prevent excessive or inappropriate immune responses that can lead to autoimmunity or chronic inflammation.

Erythrocytes, also known as red blood cells (RBCs), are the most common type of blood cell in circulating blood in mammals. They are responsible for transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs.

Erythrocytes are formed in the bone marrow and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to fold and bend easily as they pass through narrow blood vessels. They do not have a nucleus or mitochondria, which makes them more flexible but also limits their ability to reproduce or repair themselves.

In humans, erythrocytes are typically disc-shaped and measure about 7 micrometers in diameter. They contain the protein hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and gives blood its red color. The lifespan of an erythrocyte is approximately 120 days, after which it is broken down in the liver and spleen.

Abnormalities in erythrocyte count or function can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, polycythemia, and sickle cell disease.

Immunologic receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of immune cells that recognize and bind to specific molecules, known as antigens, on the surface of pathogens or infected cells. This binding triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that activate the immune cell and initiate an immune response.

There are several types of immunologic receptors, including:

1. T-cell receptors (TCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of T cells and recognize antigens presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.
2. B-cell receptors (BCRs): These receptors are found on the surface of B cells and recognize free antigens in solution.
3. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs): These receptors are found inside immune cells and recognize conserved molecular patterns associated with pathogens, such as lipopolysaccharides and flagellin.
4. Fc receptors: These receptors are found on the surface of various immune cells and bind to the constant region of antibodies, mediating effector functions such as phagocytosis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

Immunologic receptors play a critical role in the recognition and elimination of pathogens and infected cells, and dysregulation of these receptors can lead to immune disorders and diseases.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

Complementarity Determining Regions (CDRs) are the portions of an antibody that recognize and bind to a specific antigen. These regions are located in the variable domains of both the heavy and light chains of the antibody molecule. The CDRs are formed by the hypervariable loops within these domains, which have unique sequences that allow them to bind specifically to a particular epitope on an antigen. There are three CDRs in each variable domain, for a total of six CDRs per antibody. The CDRs are primarily responsible for the antigen-binding specificity and affinity of an antibody.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "goats" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a common noun referring to the domesticated animal species Capra aegagrus hircus. If you have any questions about a specific medical condition or term, please provide that and I would be happy to help.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Bispecific antibodies are a type of artificial protein that have been engineered to recognize and bind to two different antigens simultaneously. They are created by combining two separate antibody molecules, each with a unique binding site, into a single entity. This allows the bispecific antibody to link two cells or proteins together, bringing them into close proximity and facilitating various biological processes.

In the context of medicine and immunotherapy, bispecific antibodies are being investigated as a potential treatment for cancer and other diseases. For example, a bispecific antibody can be designed to recognize a specific tumor-associated antigen on the surface of cancer cells, while also binding to a component of the immune system, such as a T cell. This brings the T cell into close contact with the cancer cell, activating the immune system and triggering an immune response against the tumor.

Bispecific antibodies have several potential advantages over traditional monoclonal antibodies, which only recognize a single antigen. By targeting two different epitopes or antigens, bispecific antibodies can increase the specificity and affinity of the interaction, reducing off-target effects and improving therapeutic efficacy. Additionally, bispecific antibodies can bring together multiple components of the immune system, amplifying the immune response and enhancing the destruction of cancer cells.

Overall, bispecific antibodies represent a promising new class of therapeutics that have the potential to revolutionize the treatment of cancer and other diseases. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and optimize their clinical use.

"Gene rearrangement" is a process that involves the alteration of the order, orientation, or copy number of genes or gene segments within an organism's genome. This natural mechanism plays a crucial role in generating diversity and specificity in the immune system, particularly in vertebrates.

In the context of the immune system, gene rearrangement occurs during the development of B-cells and T-cells, which are responsible for adaptive immunity. The process involves breaking and rejoining DNA segments that encode antigen recognition sites, resulting in a unique combination of gene segments and creating a vast array of possible antigen receptors.

There are two main types of gene rearrangement:

1. V(D)J recombination: This process occurs in both B-cells and T-cells. It involves the recombination of variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments to form a functional antigen receptor gene. In humans, there are multiple copies of V, D, and J segments for each antigen receptor gene, allowing for a vast number of possible combinations.
2. Class switch recombination: This process occurs only in mature B-cells after antigen exposure. It involves the replacement of the constant (C) region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene with another C region, resulting in the production of different isotypes of antibodies (IgG, IgA, or IgE) that have distinct effector functions while maintaining the same antigen specificity.

These processes contribute to the generation of a diverse repertoire of antigen receptors, allowing the immune system to recognize and respond effectively to a wide range of pathogens.

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... is made from the Fab fragments of an immunoglobulin that targets the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor on the platelet ...
1996). "Crystallization of a complex between the Fab fragment of a human immunoglobulin M (IgM) rheumatoid factor (RF-AN) and ... Immunoglobulin lambda-like polypeptide 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the IGLL1 gene. IGLL1 has also recently been ... 1989). "Immunoglobulin lambda light-chain-related genes 14.1 and 16.1 are expressed in pre-B cells and may encode the human ... 1991). "The immunoglobulin lambda-like gene cluster (14.1, 16.1 and F lambda 1) contains gene(s) selectively expressed in pre-B ...
... immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.538.500 - immunoglobulin fc fragments MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.538. ... immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.124.790.651.538.500 - immunoglobulin fc fragments MeSH D12.776.124.790.651.538. ... immunoglobulin fragments MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.680.650 - immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.680.650.500 ... immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.797.590 - immunoglobulin joining region MeSH D12.776.124.486.485.900 - ...
The primary treatment of digoxin toxicity is digoxin immune fab, which is an antibody made up of anti-digoxin immunoglobulin ... "Treatment of 150 cases of life-threatening digitalis intoxication with digoxin-specific Fab antibody fragments. Final report of ... Fab dose can be determined by two different methods. First method is based on the amount of digoxin ingested whereas the second ... Treatment of severe toxicity is with digoxin-specific antibody fragments. Its use is recommended in those who have a serious ...
Streptococcal IgA1 protease, digestion, Fab and Fc fragments, and the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 heavy chain ... Streptococcal IgA1 protease, digestion, Fab and Fc fragments, and the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 heavy chain ... Immunoglobulin heavy constant alpha 1 is a immunoglobulin gene with symbol IGHA1. It encodes a constant (C) segment of ... Immunoglobulin A is an antibody that plays a critical role in immune function in the mucous membranes. IgA shows the same ...
... fragments, such as Fab and nanobodies are not considered as antibody mimetics. Common advantages over antibodies are ... Each immunoglobulin domain has a similar structure, characteristic of all the members of the immunoglobulin superfamily: it is ... Streptococcal IgA1 protease, digestion, Fab and Fc fragments, and the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 heavy chain ... Somatic recombination of immunoglobulins, also known as V(D)J recombination, involves the generation of a unique immunoglobulin ...
This type of antigen-binding fragment is called Fcab. Fcab fragments can be inserted into a full immunoglobulin by swapping the ... Antibody Fab region Protein tag Janeway, CA, Jr.; et al. (2001). Immunobiology (5th ed.). Garland Publishing. ISBN 978-0-8153- ... "Introducing antigen-binding sites in structural loops of immunoglobulin constant domains: Fc fragments with engineered HER2/neu ... The fragment crystallizable region (Fc region) is the tail region of an antibody that interacts with cell surface receptors ...
1992). "Crystal structure of a chimeric Fab' fragment of an antibody binding tumour cells". J. Mol. Biol. 227 (1): 253-64. doi: ... Immunoglobulin kappa constant, also known as IGKC, is a human gene that encodes the constant domain of kappa-type light chains ... 2001). "Structure of CD40 ligand in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing humanized antibody". Structure. 9 (4): 321- ... The primary structure of a monoclonal immunoglobulin L-chain of kappa-type, subgroup 3 (Bence-Jones protein Ti). IV. The ...
... two Fab fragments and one Fc fragment. An antibody can also be digested by pepsin to produce two fragments: a F(ab')2 fragment ... Whole antibody products consist of the entire antibody molecule, often immunoglobulin G (IgG), whereas antibody fragments are ... The fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) is a region on an antibody that binds to antigens, such as venoms. The molecular ... or Fab, is the selective antigen binding region. An antibody, such as IgG, can be digested by papain to produce three fragments ...
In an antibody, the Fab (fragment, antigen-binding) region is formed from the amino-terminal end of both the light and heavy ... "Immunoglobulins- antigen-antibody reactions and selected tests". Microbiology and Immunology. University of South Carolina ... chains of the immunoglobulin polypeptide. This region, called the variable (V) domain, is composed of amino acid sequences that ...
In parallel with this work, Huber solved the structures of several immunoglobulin fragments. He was the first to determine the ... which was also the first variable and the first constant domains in Fab-fragments. Huber's structure of citrate synthase ... Colman, P. M.; Deisenhofer, J; Huber, R (1976). "Structure of the human antibody molecule Kol (immunoglobulin G1): An electron ... "Crystallographic structure studies of an IgG molecule and an Fc fragment". Nature. 264 (5585): 415-20. Bibcode:1976Natur.264.. ...
... which is missing in the Fab fragment. In case the IgG immunoglobulin was more suitable for the treatment or some other ... Fab fragment antibodies can be used for detection of not bound drugs or free drugs in the serum. Fab antibodies have also been ... Both scFv and Fab fragment recombinant antibodies are routinely produced using the antibody phage display. From all the ... Structurally Fab fragments consist of two sets of variable and constant components, which create two polypetide chains. ...
1992). "Crystal structure of a chimeric Fab' fragment of an antibody binding tumour cells". J. Mol. Biol. 227 (1): 253-64. doi: ... "Entrez Gene: IGHG1 immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 (G1m marker)". Ponstingl H, Hilschmann N (1977). "[The rule of ... 2001). "Structure of CD40 ligand in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing humanized antibody". Structure. 9 (4): 321- ... Deisenhofer J (1981). "Crystallographic refinement and atomic models of a human Fc fragment and its complex with fragment B of ...
"F(ab')₂ Fragment Secondary Antibodies - Jackson ImmunoResearch". www.jacksonimmuno.com. Retrieved 2021-01-29. "Fab Fragment ... yielding two monovalent Fab moieties. They can be used to block endogenous immunoglobulins on cells, tissues or other surfaces ... Papain digestion generates Fab fragments, which removes the entire Fc fragment including the hinge region, ... F(ab')2 fragments are generated by pepsin digestion to remove most of the Fc fragment, this avoids recognition by Fc receptors ...
In one approach to overcome these limitations, recombinant binding fragments (Fab, Fv or scFv) or domains (VH, VHH) of ... Skrlec, K; Strukelj, B; Berlec, A (July 2015). "Non-immunoglobulin scaffolds: a focus on their targets". Trends Biotechnol. 33 ... Crivianu-Gaita, V; Thompson, M (November 2016). "Aptamers, antibody scFv, and antibody Fab' fragments: An overview and ... This strategy is also valid for antibody fragments. However, in the absence of specific structural data, other strategies must ...
... immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.538.500 - immunoglobulin fc fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.538. ... immunoglobulin fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.680.650 - immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.680.650.500 ... immunoglobulin fab fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.797.590 - immunoglobulin joining region MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.900 - ... immunoglobulin fc fragments MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.680.660.249 - cd4 immunoadhesins MeSH D12.776.377.715.548.680.660.500 - ...
... the Fab (fragment-antigen binding) part can be separated from the Fc (fragment crystallizable region) part of the molecule. The ... Omalizumab inhibits human immunoglobulin E (IgE) and is useful in moderate-to-severe allergic asthma.[citation needed] ... Fab fragments contain the variable domains, which consist of three antibody hypervariable amino acid domains responsible for ... Jefferis R, Lefranc MP (July-August 2009). "Human immunoglobulin allotypes: possible implications for immunogenicity". mAbs. 1 ...
Single chain variable fragments (scFv) and Fab fragments also bind to Protein L. Despite this wide binding range, Protein L is ... immobilize or detect immunoglobulins. Each of these immunoglobulin-binding proteins has a different antibody binding profile in ... Binding of mouse immunoglobulins is restricted to those having VκI light chains. Given these specific requirements for ... Unlike Protein A and Protein G, which bind to the Fc region of immunoglobulins (antibodies), Protein L binds antibodies through ...
"Introducing antigen-binding sites in structural loops of immunoglobulin constant domains: Fc fragments with engineered HER2/neu ... This type of antibodies are therefore able to recognise two different antigens, one at their Fab region and a second one at the ... This antibody fragment is part of the modular antibody technology of F-star Biotechnology Ltd.[citation needed] Antibody ... Fcabs are antibodies fragments engineered from the constant region of an antibody (Fc). In naturally occurring antibodies (such ...
... and Fab (the Ig fragment responsible for antigen recognition). The native state of the B domain, deviates a lot since its inter ... Protein A contains five highly homologous immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding domains in tandem (designated domains E, D, A, B and C), ... "Crystal structure of a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain complexed with the Fab fragment of a human IgM antibody: ... It does this though SpAB binding to the Fc fragment of IgG. The B domain of SpA (SpAB) consists of three a-helices which are ...
... and even smaller than Fab fragments (~50 kDa, one light chain and half a heavy chain) and single-chain variable fragments (~25 ... these are called VHH fragments. Cartilaginous fishes also have heavy-chain antibodies (IgNAR, 'immunoglobulin new antigen ... A single-domain antibody (sdAb), also known as a Nanobody, is an antibody fragment consisting of a single monomeric variable ... An alternative approach is to split the dimeric variable domains from common immunoglobulin G (IgG) from humans or mice into ...
Fab construction is a complex technique as Fab fragments contain both variable domains and constant regions. The same heavy and ... "Dextran as a Generally Applicable Multivalent Scaffold for Improving Immunoglobulin-Binding Affinities of Peptide and ... "Therapeutic anti-IgE monoclonal antibody single chain variable fragment (scFv) safety and immunomodulatory effects after one ... light variable chains used for scFv construction can be used in the construction of Fab. Construction of pre-made phage display ...
When IgG molecules, specific for a certain antigen or surface component, bind to the pathogen with their Fab region (fragment ... Two types of FcεR are known: the high-affinity receptor FcεRI is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (it has two Ig-like ... Its name is derived from its binding specificity for a part of an antibody known as the Fc (fragment crystallizable) region. Fc ... It is composed of two extracellular Ig-like domains, and is a member of both the immunoglobulin superfamily and the multi-chain ...
The ability to manipulate the antibody genes make it possible to generate new antibodies and antibody fragments, such as Fab ... Affimer binders have been produced to a large number of targets including ubiquitin chains, immunoglobulins and C-reactive ... Synthetic antibodies include recombinant antibodies, nucleic acid aptamers and non-immunoglobulin protein scaffolds. As a ... or from non-immunoglobulin protein scaffolds / peptide aptamers, into which hypervariable loops are inserted to form the ...
It binds the heavy chain within the Fc region of most immunoglobulins and also within the Fab region in the case of the human ... Deisenhofer J (April 1981). "Crystallographic refinement and atomic models of a human Fc fragment and its complex with fragment ... "Crystal structure of a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain complexed with the Fab fragment of a human IgM antibody: ... Protein A can bind with strong affinity to the Fc portion of immunoglobulin of certain species as shown in the below table. In ...
"Entrez Gene: FCAR Fc fragment of IgA, receptor for". Bakema JE, van Egmond M (November 2011). "The human immunoglobulin A Fc ... as shown by targeting FcαRI in transgenic mice models with anti-FcαRI Fab antibodies, which mimic the binding of monomeric IgA ... Fc fragment of IgA receptor (FCAR) is a human gene that codes for the transmembrane receptor FcαRI, also known as CD89 (Cluster ... Aleyd E, Heineke MH, van Egmond M (November 2015). "The era of the immunoglobulin A Fc receptor FcαRI; its function and ...
TNX-224, an anti-Factor D Fab, the antigen-binding fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting Factor D of the human ... an anti-immunoglobulin E chimeric monoclonal antibody, in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis". Clin Pharmacol Ther. 62 (6 ... an Fab fragment of a humanized antibody against Factor D of the human immune complement system to be tested for treating ... that pertained to the use of humanized antibodies for targeting immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgE-expressing B lymphocytes for the ...
Its Fab fragment was crystallized in complex with the ED3 domain of DENV2. Its epitope straddles β-strands A and G of ED3. The ... ED3 is a continuous polypeptide segment; its fold is compact and immunoglobulin-like. Dengue virus is transmitted by species of ... Its Fab fragment was crystallized in complex with the sE protein of DENV4. Its epitope is included in domain 1 (ED1) of the E ... Its Fab and scFv fragments were crystallized in complex with the ED3 domain of DENV1. Its epitope is located around β-strands C ...
"Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments" by people in UAMS Profiles by year, and whether "Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments" was a major or ... "Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments" by people in Profiles over the past ten ... Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments*Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments. *Fab Fragments, Immunoglobulin. *Immunoglobulins, Fab Fragment ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments / therapeutic use * Peptides / therapeutic use * Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors / therapeutic use ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments / pharmacology* * Immunoglobulins / pharmacology * Immunohistochemistry * Immunoprecipitation * ... Interestingly, the variable Fab fragment of an anti-SOD1 antibody was sufficient to confer some protection in G93A-SOD1 mice. ... Intracerebroventricular infusion of monoclonal antibody or its derived Fab fragment against misfolded forms of SOD1 mutant ...
DigiFab is a sterile, lyophilized preparation of digoxin-immune ovine Fab (monovalent) immunoglobulin fragments. It is prepared ... papain is used to cleave the antibody into Fab and Fc fragments) should not use ovine digoxin immune fab. Because it is ... digesting it with papain and isolating the digoxin-specific Fab fragments by affinity chromatography. These antibody fragments ... Digoxin immune fab or digoxin-specific antibody is an antidote for overdose of digoxin. It is made from immunoglobulin ...
The use of immunoglobulin fragments eliminates non-specific binding between the Fc portions of antibodies and the Fc receptor ... Using fragment secondary antibodies. F(ab) fragments. Monovalent antibody fragments (F(ab) fragments) are powerful tools to ... F(ab) fragments are used to block endogenous immunoglobulins on cells, tissues and exposed immunoglobulins in multiple labeling ... F(ab)2 fragments. Divalent antibody fragments (F(ab)2 fragments) are smaller than whole IgG molecules and enable a better ...
They are formed from parts of the variable regions of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. MeSH, 1973 chemical ligand ... It is a small region (of 5 to 10 amino acids[citation needed]) of the antibodys Fv region, part of the fragment antigen- ... antisense oligonucleotides: Short fragments of DNA or RNA that are used to alter the function of target RNAs or DNAs to which ... binding (Fab region), and contains parts of the antibodys heavy and light chains.[1] Each arm of the Y shape of an antibody ...
DutaFabs are engineered therapeutic Fab fragments that can bind two targets simultaneously. Beckmann, R., Jensen, K., Fenn, S. ... FragMAX: the fragment-screening platform at the MAX IV Laboratory. Lima, G. M. A., Talibov, V. O., Jagudin, E., Sele, C., ...
Immunoglobulin G1 Fab fragment [218-lysine], anti-(human metalloproteinase STEAP1) (human-Mus musculus … Matched Description ... IMMUNOGLOBULIN SCFV-SCFV, ANTI-(HOMO SAPIENS EGFR (EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR, RECEPTOR TYROSINE-PROTEIN … ... cell costimulator ligand variant immunoglobulin domain designed to inhibit simultaneously the CD28 and … Matched Categories: … ...
We tested a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment (c7E3) directed against the platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa integrin, the receptor ...
The Relation of Some Antigenic Determinants of Immunoglobulin G to the Non-L Chain Portion of the Fab Fragment Subject Area: ... The Relation of Some Antigenic Determinants of Immunoglobulin G to the Non-L Chain Portion of the Fab Fragment ...
Ultrastructural autoradiographic detection of intracellular immunoglobulins with iodinated Fab fragments of antibody. The ... Amyloid fibrils from the N-terminal prion protein fragment are infectious. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of ... Identification of novel proteinase K-resistant C-terminal fragments of PrP in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The Journal of ... accumulation of covalently-linked multimers of internal prion protein fragments. Acta Neuropathologica Communications. 7: 1. ...
... intact immunoglobulin G (IgG) and ≥90% Fab and F(ab)2 immunoglobulin fragments. These fragments are created by the enzymatic ... cleavage and removal of Fc immunoglobulin components in a process sometimes referred to as despeciation. HBAT is supplied on an ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments. Citation. APA Chicago ICMJE MLA NLM Looger, L. L., & Hellinga, H. W. (2001). Generalized dead-end ...
Peptide Fragments [D12.644.541]. *Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.644.541.500]. *Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [D12.644.541.500. ... A polyethylene-glycolated Fab fragment of TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR antibody that binds specifically to TNF-ALPHA and neutralises ... Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.776.124.486.485.680]. *Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [D12.776.124.486.485.680.650] ... Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.776.124.790.651.680]. *Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [D12.776.124.790.651.680.650] ...
... of a region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab Kol based on the analogous region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab ... of a region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab Kol based on the analogous region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab ... of a region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab Kol based on the analogous region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab ... of a region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab Kol based on the analogous region of the human immunoglobulin fragment Fab ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments Medicine & Life Sciences 12% * Immunosorbents Medicine & Life Sciences 12% ... F(ab′)2 and Fabfragments were as effective inhibitors of IgE binding as the intact anti‐anti‐Id antibodies. Some of the anti‐ ... F(ab′)2 and Fabfragments were as effective inhibitors of IgE binding as the intact anti‐anti‐Id antibodies. Some of the anti‐ ... F(ab′)2 and Fabfragments were as effective inhibitors of IgE binding as the intact anti‐anti‐Id antibodies. Some of the anti‐ ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments Medicine & Life Sciences 15% 查看完整的指紋 ... After panning against human IgG, Fab fragments from 71/96 phage clones bound to Fc-coated wells. Sequence analysis of 20 ... After panning against human IgG, Fab fragments from 71/96 phage clones bound to Fc-coated wells. Sequence analysis of 20 ... After panning against human IgG, Fab fragments from 71/96 phage clones bound to Fc-coated wells. Sequence analysis of 20 ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments Medicine & Life Sciences 7% * Collodion Medicine & Life Sciences 7% ... This binding was blocked by Fab fragments of anti-C-CAM antibodies. Furthermore, preincubation of hepatocytes with anti-C-CAM ... This aggregation was blocked by Fab fragments of anti-C-CAM antibodies and by alkaline pH. After neutralization a rapid ... This binding was blocked by Fab fragments of anti-C-CAM antibodies. Furthermore, preincubation of hepatocytes with anti-C-CAM ...
One prediction of this model, that the intact canyon-spanning immunoglobulin G molecule would block attachment of the virus to ... Structure of human rhinovirus complexed with Fab fragments from a neutralizing antibody. / Smith, Thomas J.; Olson, Norman H.; ... By adjusting the elbow angles of the bound Fab fragments from 162○ to 198○, an intact antibody molecule can be easily modeled. ... Structure of human rhinovirus complexed with Fab fragments from a neutralizing antibody. Journal of virology. 1993 Mar;67(3): ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Melanoma Medicine & Life Sciences 64% ... Localization of 131I-labeled p97-specific Fab fragments in human melanoma as a basis for radiotherapy. In: Journal of Clinical ... For improved radiation safety, we developed automated methods to label Fab fragments with up to 200 mCi of 131I. So far, a ... Localization of 131I-labeled p97-specific Fab fragments in human melanoma as a basis for radiotherapy. Journal of Clinical ...
These mAbs were found to bind epitopes harbored in the M77 Fab fragment. Binding to the epitopes was shown to require the ... Antigen association to its corresponding binding site in the immunoglobulin molecule can elicit conformational rearrangements, ... These mAbs were found to bind epitopes harbored in the M77 Fab fragment. Binding to the epitopes was shown to require the ... These mAbs were found to bind epitopes harbored in the M77 Fab fragment. Binding to the epitopes was shown to require the ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments Medicine & Life Sciences 96% * Pseudomonas Medicine & Life Sciences 82% ... T1 - B3(Fab)-PE38M. T2 - A Recombinant Immunotoxin in Which a Mutant Form of Pseudomonas Exotoxin Is Fused to the Fab Fragment ... B3(Fab)-PE38M: A Recombinant Immunotoxin in Which a Mutant Form of Pseudomonas Exotoxin Is Fused to the Fab Fragment of ... B3(Fab)-PE38M: A Recombinant Immunotoxin in Which a Mutant Form of Pseudomonas Exotoxin Is Fused to the Fab Fragment of ...
Peptide Fragments [D12.644.541] * Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.644.541.500] * Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [D12.644.541.500. ... Immunoglobulins [D12.776.124.486.485] * Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.776.124.486.485.680] * Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [ ... Immunoglobulins [D12.776.124.790.651] * Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.776.124.790.651.680] * Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [ ... Immunoglobulins [D12.776.377.715.548] * Immunoglobulin Fragments [D12.776.377.715.548.680] * Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments [ ...
Fab: Fragment antigen-binding region of immunoglobulin; Fc: Fragment crystallizable region of immunoglobulin; FR: Framework ... In the FR domains of the Fab regions, the homology in the amino acid sequence was decreased to 80% and 85% for the heavy and ... 32 Freed KA, Brennecke SP, Moses EK (2005) Gene expression of the constant region of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin G (IgG ... Belmont, CA). Briefly, the amino acid sequence in the Fab regions of both the heavy and light chains for mGHR106 were converted ...
The standard TOYOPEARL AF-rProtein A-650F resin binds human and mouse immunoglobulin G, IgM, and Fab fragments. It provides a ... It is composed of five immunoglobulin-binding domains, each of which are able to bind proteins from many mammalian species, ... most notably Immunoglobulin G (IgG) through the heavy chain within the Fc region. While the native form of Protein A was used ...
866.5520 Immunoglobulin G (Fab fragment specific) immunological test system.. 21:8.0.1.1.20.6.1.40. SECTION 866.5530. 866.5530 ... 866.5540 Immunoglobulin G (Fd fragment specific) immunological test system.. 21:8.0.1.1.20.6.1.42. SECTION 866.5550. 866.5550 ... 866.5510 Immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, and E immunological test system.. 21:8.0.1.1.20.6.1.39. SECTION 866.5520. ... Immunoglobulin G (Fc fragment specific) immunological test system.. 21:8.0.1.1.20.6.1.41. SECTION 866.5540. ...
IMMUNOGLOBULIN, IMMUNE SYSTEM 1q9o:C (ASP1) to (THR74) S45-18 FAB UNLIGANDED , ANTIGEN-BINDING FRAGMENT, FAB, ANTI-CARBOHYDRATE ... CHIMERIC MATURE FAB 7G12-APO , ANTIBODY, IMMUNOGLOBULIN, ANTIGEN BINDING FRAGMENT (FAB), IMMUNE SYSTEM 3rug:E (GLN3) to (SER93 ... ANTI HIV1 PROTEASE FAB , FAB FRAGMENT, CROSS-REACTIVITY, HIV1 PROTEASE, ENZYME INHIBITION, IMMUNOGLOBULIN, IMMUNE SYSTEM 4xmm:L ... ANTI HIV1 PROTEASE FAB COMPLEX , FAB FRAGMENT, CROSS-REACTIVITY, HIV1 PROTEASE, ENZYME INHIBITION, IMMUNOGLOBULIN 4ozf:H (GLY3 ...
... these regions form one of two Fab fragments (antigen binding fragment). The third component of the molecule is called the Fc- ... Immunoglobulins (antibodies) are the glycoproteins involved in the immune response. Immunoglobulins recognize and bind antigens ... the section between the Fab and Fc fragments) [5]. The model presented provides a view of the common IgG1 protein. Light chains ... fragment (crystallizable fragment) and is comprised of the invariable CH2 and CH3 domains of the heavy chains. This latter ...
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments * Remote Sensing Technology * Weightlessness * Gestures Explore _. Co-Authors (9) ...

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