Immunoglobulin D: An immunoglobulin which accounts for less than 1% of plasma immunoglobulin. It is found on the membrane of many circulating B LYMPHOCYTES.Immunoglobulin delta-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN D. They have a molecular weight of approximately 64 kDa and they contain about 500 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region.Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency: Autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the mevalonate kinase gene. Because of the mutations cholesterol biosynthesis is disrupted and MEVALONIC ACID accumulates. It is characterized by a range of symptoms, including dysmorphic FACIES, psychomotor retardation, CATARACT, hepatosplenomegaly, CEREBELLAR ATAXIA, elevated IMMUNOGLOBULIN D, and recurrent febrile crises with FEVER; LYMPHADENOPATHY; ARTHRALGIA; EDEMA; and rash.Immunoglobulin Constant Regions: The domains of the immunoglobulin molecules that are invariable in their amino acid sequence within any class or subclass of immunoglobulin. They confer biological as well as structural functions to immunoglobulins. One each on both the light chains and the heavy chains comprises the C-terminus half of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FAB FRAGMENT and two or three of them make up the rest of the heavy chains (all of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FC FRAGMENT)Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains: The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.Immunoglobulins: Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Immunoglobulins, Intravenous: Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.Genes, Immunoglobulin: Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).Immunoglobulin Light Chains: Polypeptide chains, consisting of 211 to 217 amino acid residues and having a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa. There are two major types of light chains, kappa and lambda. Two Ig light chains and two Ig heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) make one immunoglobulin molecule.Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains: One of the types of light chains of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Receptors, IgG: Specific molecular sites on the surface of various cells, including B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that combine with IMMUNOGLOBULIN Gs. Three subclasses exist: Fc gamma RI (the CD64 antigen, a low affinity receptor), Fc gamma RII (the CD32 antigen, a high affinity receptor), and Fc gamma RIII (the CD16 antigen, a low affinity receptor).Actinobacillus suis: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS. It is mainly a pathogen of PIGS, but also can infect HORSES.Mice, Hairless: Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.Pemphigoid, Benign Mucous Membrane: A chronic blistering disease with predilection for mucous membranes and less frequently the skin, and with a tendency to scarring. It is sometimes called ocular pemphigoid because of conjunctival mucous membrane involvement.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Desensitization, Immunologic: Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Encephalomalacia: Softening or loss of brain tissue following CEREBRAL INFARCTION; cerebral ischemia (see BRAIN ISCHEMIA), infection, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or other injury. The term is often used during gross pathologic inspection to describe blurred cortical margins and decreased consistency of brain tissue following infarction. Multicystic encephalomalacia refers to the formation of multiple cystic cavities of various sizes in the cerebral cortex of neonates and infants following injury, most notably perinatal hypoxia-ischemic events. (From Davis et al., Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p665; J Neuropathol Exp Neurol, 1995 Mar;54(2):268-75)IgA Deficiency: A dysgammaglobulinemia characterized by a deficiency of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.Dysgammaglobulinemia: An immunologic deficiency state characterized by selective deficiencies of one or more, but not all, classes of immunoglobulins.Agammaglobulinemia: An immunologic deficiency state characterized by an extremely low level of generally all classes of gamma-globulin in the blood.IgG Deficiency: A dysgammaglobulinemia characterized by a deficiency of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G.Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes: Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral.Rho(D) Immune Globulin: Immunizing agent containing IMMUNOGLOBULIN G anti-Rho(D) used for preventing Rh immunization in Rh-negative individuals exposed to Rh-positive red blood cells.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Rh Isoimmunization: The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.Erythroblastosis, Fetal: A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.Rh-Hr Blood-Group System: Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.Fetomaternal Transfusion: Transplacental passage of fetal blood into the circulation of the maternal organism. (Dorland, 27th ed)Abortion, Threatened: UTERINE BLEEDING from a GESTATION of less than 20 weeks without any CERVICAL DILATATION. It is characterized by vaginal bleeding, lower back discomfort, or midline pelvic cramping and a risk factor for MISCARRIAGE.Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Heterogeneous group of immunodeficiency syndromes characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia of most isotypes, variable B-cell defects, and the presence of recurrent bacterial infections.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin: Specialized Fc receptors (RECEPTORS, FC) for polymeric immunoglobulins, which mediate transcytosis of polymeric IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN M into external secretions. They are found on the surfaces of epithelial cells and hepatocytes. After binding to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, the receptor-ligand complex undergoes endocytosis, transport by vesicle, and secretion into the lumen by exocytosis. Before release, the part of the receptor (SECRETORY COMPONENT) that is bound to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A is proteolytically cleaved from its transmembrane tail. (From Rosen et al., The Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)Secretory Component: The extracellular moiety of the POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR found alone or complexed with IGA or IGM, in a variety of external secretions (tears, bile, colostrum.) Secretory component is derived by proteolytic cleavage of the receptor during transcytosis. When immunoglobulins IgA and IgM are bound to the receptor, during their transcytosis secretory component becomes covalently attached to them generating SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or secretory IMMUNOGLOBULIN M.Immunoglobulin A, Secretory: The principle immunoglobulin in exocrine secretions such as milk, respiratory and intestinal mucin, saliva and tears. The complete molecule (around 400 kD) is composed of two four-chain units of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, one SECRETORY COMPONENT and one J chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN J-CHAINS).Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)

Biased JH usage in plasma cell immunoglobulin gene sequences from colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis but not in Crohn's disease. (1/605)

BACKGROUND: Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease of the colonic and rectal mucosa. Autoantibodies have been observed in ulcerative colitis which may have a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Evidence also suggests that there is an hereditary predisposition towards the disease, although no individual genes have been identified. AIMS: This is a pilot study of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes (IgH) in ulcerative colitis to determine whether they have any particular genetic characteristics which may lead to a better understanding of the disease aetiology. SUBJECTS: Colonic or rectal tissue was obtained from five children with ulcerative colitis. Tissue was also obtained from five children with Crohn's disease and five children who did not have inflammatory bowel disease as controls. METHODS: B cells and IgD+ B cells were identified by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections. Areas of lamina propria containing plasma cells, and areas of IgD+ B cells were microdissected. The immunoglobulin genes were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Sequences were analysed for content of somatic mutations and composition of heavy chain. RESULTS: An increase in the use of JH6 and DXP'1, and a decrease in the use of JH4, gene segments in immunoglobulin genes from lamina propria plasma cells, and from virgin IgD+ B cells, was found in patients with ulcerative colitis. These biases were not present in the control groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is a fundamental difference in the immunoglobulin genes from patients with ulcerative colitis. Whether this is caused by a difference in content of immunoglobulin gene segments in the germline or a difference in the recombination mechanism is not known.  (+info)

Antigen-stimulated dissociation of BCR mIg from Ig-alpha/Ig-beta: implications for receptor desensitization. (2/605)

B cell antigen receptor (BCR) ligation leads to receptor desensitization wherein BCR remain competent to bind antigen and yet fail to transduce signals. Desensitized BCR exhibit a defect at the most proximal level of signal transduction, consistent with failed transmission of signals through the receptor complex. We report that antigen stimulation leads to dissociation or destabilization of the BCR reflected by inability to coimmunoprecipitate Ig-alpha/Ig-beta with mIg. This destabilization is temporally correlated with desensitization and occurs in BCR containing mIgM and mIgD. Induction of BCR destabilization requires tyrosine kinase activation but is not induced by phosphatase inhibitors. BCR destabilization occurs at the cell surface and "dissociated" Ig-alpha/Ig-beta complexes remain responsive to anti-Ig-beta stimulation, suggesting that mIg-transducer uncoupling may mediate receptor desensitization.  (+info)

IL-5 induces IgG1 isotype switch recombination in mouse CD38-activated sIgD-positive B lymphocytes. (3/605)

Mouse B cells express CD38, whose ligation by anti-CD38 Ab induces their proliferation and protection from apoptosis. We previously showed that stimulation of mouse splenic B cells with IL-5 together with CS/2, an anti-mouse CD38 mAb, induces production of IgG1 and IgM. Here we examined the role of IL-5 and CS/2 in the expression of germline gamma1 transcripts and the generation of reciprocal products forming DNA circles as byproducts of mu-gamma1 switch recombination. By itself, CS/2 induced significant expression of germline gamma1 transcripts in splenic naive B cells, whereas IL-5 neither induced nor enhanced germline gamma1 expression. Increased cellular content of reciprocal product, which is characteristic of mu-gamma1 recombination, was not observed after culturing B cells with CS/2, but increased reciprocal product, along with high levels of lgG1 secretion, was found when B cells were cultured with CS/2 plus IL-5. Although IL-4 did not, by itself, induce mu-gamma1 recombination in B cells stimulated with CS/2, in conjunction with CS/2 plus IL-5, IL-4 dramatically enhanced sterile gamma1 transcription and IgG1 production. These results demonstrate that CD38 ligation induces only germline gamma1 transcription and that IL-5 promotes both mu-gamma1 switch recombination and lgG1 secretion in an IL-4-independent manner.  (+info)

Induction of Ig somatic hypermutation and class switching in a human monoclonal IgM+ IgD+ B cell line in vitro: definition of the requirements and modalities of hypermutation. (4/605)

Partly because of the lack of a suitable in vitro model, the trigger(s) and the mechanism(s) of somatic hypermutation in Ig genes are largely unknown. We have analyzed the hypermutation potential of human CL-01 lymphocytes, our monoclonal model of germinal center B cell differentiation. These cells are surface IgM+ IgD+ and, in the absence of T cells, switch to IgG, IgA, and IgE in response to CD40:CD40 ligand engagement and exposure to appropriate cytokines. We show here that CL-01 cells can be induced to effectively mutate the expressed VHDJH-C mu, VHDJH-C delta, VHDJH-C gamma, VHDJH-C alpha, VHDJH-C epsilon, and V lambda J lambda-C lambda transcripts before and after Ig class switching in a stepwise fashion. In these cells, induction of somatic mutations required cross-linking of the surface receptor for Ag and T cell contact through CD40:CD40 ligand and CD80: CD28 coengagement. The induced mutations showed intrinsic features of Ig V(D)J hypermutation in that they comprised 110 base substitutions (97 in the heavy chain and 13 in the lambda-chain) and only 2 deletions and targeted V(D)J, virtually sparing CH and C lambda. These mutations were more abundant in secondary VHDJH-C gamma than primary VHDJH-C mu transcripts and in V(D)J-C than V lambda J lambda-C lambda transcripts. These mutations were also associated with coding DNA strand polarity and showed an overall rate of 2.42 x 10(-4) base changes/cell division in VHDJH-CH transcripts. Transitions were favored over transversions, and G nucleotides were preferentially targeted, mainly in the context of AG dinucleotides. Thus, in CL-01 cells, Ig somatic hypermutation is readily inducible by stimuli different from those required for class switching and displays discrete base substitution modalities.  (+info)

The evolutionarily conserved sequence upstream of the human Ig heavy chain S gamma 3 region is an inducible promoter: synergistic activation by CD40 ligand and IL-4 via cooperative NF-kappa B and STAT-6 binding sites. (5/605)

Germline C gamma gene transcription is a crucial event in the process that leads to switch DNA recombination to IgG, but its regulation in the human is poorly understood. We took advantage of our monoclonal model of germinal center B cell differentiation, IgM+ IgD+ CL-01 cells, to define the role of the I gamma 3 evolutionarily conserved sequence (ECS) in the germline transcriptional activation of the human C gamma 3 gene. The I gamma 3 ECS lies upstream of the major I gamma 3 transcription initiation site and displays more than 90% identity with the corresponding human I gamma 1, I gamma 2, and I gamma 4 regions. Reporter luciferase gene vectors containing the human gamma 3 ECS were used to transfect CL-01 cells, which have been shown to undergo Smu-->S gamma 3 DNA recombination, upon engagement of CD40 by CD40 ligand (CD40L) and exposure to IL-4. In these transfected CL-01 cells, CD40:CD40L engagement and exposure to IL-4 synergistically induced gamma 3 ECS-dependent luciferase reporter gene activation. Targeted mutational analysis demonstrated that a tandem NF-kappa B/Rel binding motif is critical for the gamma 3 ECS responsiveness to both CD40L and IL-4, while a STAT-6-binding site is additionally required for IL-4 inducibility. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that p50/p65/c-Rel and STAT-6 are effectively induced by CD40L and IL-4, respectively, and bind to specific DNA motifs within the ECS. These partially overlapping CD40L and IL-4 responsive elements are functionally cooperative as the disruption of one of them prevents synergistic promoter activation. Thus, the gamma 3 ECS is an inducible promoter containing cis elements that critically mediate CD40L and IL-4-triggered transcriptional activation of the human C gamma 3 gene.  (+info)

Differential regulation of transcription termination occurring at two different sites on the micro-delta gene complex. (6/605)

The progression of polymerases across the micro-delta Ig heavy chain gene complex is characterized by two termination events occurring at different sites on the transcription unit and at different times during B cell differentiation. We have utilized two mouse strains to analyze the regulatory determinants for these events in primary B cells. In the transgenic pmicro.microdeltaRatt strain a 1160 bp intervening DNA segment (the att site) has been inverted. This mutation results in the abrogation of transcription termination that occurs in early B cells. Using a novel method that takes advantage of an internal ribosome entry site we have further restricted the size of the segment that is needed for inducing transcription termination in transfectants. This 200 bp termination-inducing sequence operates in tumor equivalents of early but not mature B cells and the activity is correlated with differential binding of nuclear proteins. To explore the regulatory basis for the change in site of transcription termination upon B cell activation we have examined the microS-/- deletion mutant strain in which the microS poly(A) site has been eliminated. The results suggest that polyadenylation at the microS site plays a dominant but not exclusive role in regulating transcription termination in activated B cells.  (+info)

Serum hyaluronan in patients with multiple myeloma: correlation with survival and Ig concentration. (7/605)

Serum from 386 myeloma patients were analyzed for serum hyaluronan (HYA) at diagnosis. Median age was 68 years (range, 32 to 87 years). The distribution of Ig classes was typical (58% IgG, 21% IgA, 1% IgD, and 20% light chain disease). The patients comprised 58% in stage III, 33% in stage II, and 9% in stage I. The majority (82%) had HYA values within an intermediate range (10 to 120 micrograms/L), 13% had high values (>120 micrograms/L), and 5% had abnormally low values (0 to 9 micrograms/L). For the first time, a patient group with abnormally low HYA serum values is reported. An inverse correlation between survival and HYA serum level was found (P =.015). When tested separately, patients with abnormally low or high HYA values had significantly shorter median survival (21.1 and 19.7 months, respectively) than those with an intermediate HYA concentration (32. 6 months; P =.005). Patients with abnormally low or high HYA levels had more advanced disease as judged by staging and biochemical markers. Interestingly, there was an inverse correlation between the HYA value and the M-component concentration in serum. Fifty percent of patients with abnormally low HYA values had IgA myelomas. In conclusion, the serum concentration of HYA may be of prognostic value in selected cases of multiple myeloma. Further studies will be performed to elucidate possible explanations for our findings, especially those related to the HYA cell surface binding proteins.  (+info)

Composite low grade B-cell lymphomas with two immunophenotypically distinct cell populations are true biclonal lymphomas. A molecular analysis using laser capture microdissection. (8/605)

Low grade B-cell lymphomas comprise several well defined, clinically and immunophenotypically distinct disease entities. Composite lymphomas showing phenotypic characteristics of more than one of these tumor subtypes in the same site are rare, and both common and separate clonal origins of the two tumor parts have been reported for cases studied by molecular methods. We describe the detailed immunohistochemical and molecular findings in three cases with features of composite low grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). All three neoplasms contained morphologically distinct but interwoven compartments of different cell types, which exhibited discordant expression of several markers, including CD5, CD10, CD43, and cyclin D1. According to their morphology and phenotypes, they were classified as mantle cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma (Case 1), follicular lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma (Case 2), and mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (Case 3). PCR analysis of DNA obtained from whole tissue sections failed to reveal evidence for biclonality in any of the cases. We therefore isolated cell populations with different antigen expression patterns by laser capture microdissection and analyzed them by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements and oncogene rearrangements. Sequence analysis revealed unrelated clonal rearrangements in each of the two tumor parts in all three cases, suggesting distinct clonal origins. In addition, Case 1 showed a bcl-2 rearrangement present only in the follicular lymphoma part. Our findings suggest that low grade B-NHL with two distinct morphological and immunophenotypic patterns in the same anatomical site are frequently biclonal. This is in keeping with current classification schemes, which recognize subtypes of low grade B-NHL as separate disease entities. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates the power of laser capture microdissection in revealing molecular microheterogeneity in complex neoplasms.  (+info)

  • Because of the less-than-robust response to therapy and impact on choice of optimal chemotherapy and prognosis, chronic kidney disease has drawn attention in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a malignant hematologic disorder that can produce significant amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs). (jci.org)
  • To the extent that the experiments reflect the human condition, these studies offer insights into the pathogenesis of progressive kidney failure in the setting of lymphoproliferative disorders, such as multiple myeloma, that feature increased circulating levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin fragments that require metabolism by the kidney. (jci.org)
  • A monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody used in the treatment of severe asthma and chronic idiopathic urticaria. (drugbank.ca)
  • Human immunoglobulin therapy first occurred in the 1930s and a formulation for injection into a vein was approved for medical use in the United States in 1981. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunoglobulin therapy is also used for a number of other conditions, including in many autoimmune disorders such as dermatomyositis in an attempt to decrease the severity of symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunoglobulin therapy is also used in some treatment protocols for secondary immunodeficiencies such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), some autoimmune disorders (such as immune thrombocytopenia and Kawasaki disease ), some neurological diseases ( multifocal motor neuropathy , stiff person syndrome , multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis ) some acute infections and some complications of organ transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunoglobulin therapy is especially useful in some acute infection cases such as pediatric HIV infection and is also considered the standard of treatment for some autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome . (wikipedia.org)
  • Different national bodies and medical associations have established varying standards for the use of immunoglobulin therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products of Canada (NAC) and Canadian Blood Services have also developed their own separate set of guidelines for the appropriate use of immunoglobulin therapy, which strongly support the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and some complications of HIV, while remaining silent on the issues of sepsis, multiple sclerosis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 2011, the IDF Medical Advisory Committee wrote a resolution regarding formulary changes that limit a physician's ability to determine the most appropriate immunoglobulin replacement therapy. (primaryimmune.org)
  • Don't recommend replacement immunoglobulin therapy for recurrent infections unless impaired antibody responses to vaccines are demonstrated. (choosingwisely.org)
  • Measurement of IgG subclasses is not routinely useful in determining the need for immunoglobulin therapy. (choosingwisely.org)
  • Evaluation of Immunoglobulin A-capture Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay for Serodiagnosis of Dengue Virus Infection. (who.int)
  • In September 2008, CDC, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state health departments began a nationwide investigation into an increase in false-positive test results obtained with a commercially available West Nile virus (WNV) immunoglobulin M (IgM) capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). (cdc.gov)
  • We have designed a set of oligonucleotide primers to amplify the cDNA of mouse immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable domains by the polymerase chain reaction. (pnas.org)
  • The V domains of normal immunoglobulin are highly heterogeneous, reflecting their role in protecting against the great variety of infectious microbes, and this heterogeneity impeded detailed structural analysis of IgM. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normal immunoglobulin E, or IgE, levels in children are 10 international units per milliliter for 1-year-olds. (reference.com)
  • Restricting access of subscribers to only one or two product/formulations of replacement immunoglobulin regardless of the particular product the patient may currently be receiving poses an unjustified safety risk for patients. (primaryimmune.org)
  • We found that a regulatory system in the prominent human commensal Bacteroides fragilis modulates its surface architecture to invite binding of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in mice. (sciencemag.org)
  • Overall, 2% of patients who had received IV immunoglobulin for various indications were affected, compared with 4.1% of controls who had not received the treatment ( P =0.002), Howard Fillit, MD, of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, and colleagues reported in the July 21 issue of Neurology . (medpagetoday.com)
  • Binding of the immunoglobulins to a microbe can have immediate effects such as blocking invasion and it can mobilize other components of the immune system to destroy or otherwise inactivate the microbes, thereby providing protection against infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allergic (extrinsic) asthma is associated with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-an antibody generated by the immune system, in this case, in response to a normally harmless substance. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The present study demonstrated that during the process of metabolism of immunoglobulin FLCs, ROS activated the STAT1 pathway in proximal tubule epithelium. (jci.org)
  • These conditions include primary immunodeficiency , immune thrombocytopenic purpura , chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy , Kawasaki disease , certain cases of HIV/AIDS and measles , Guillain-Barré syndrome , and certain other infections when a more specific immunoglobulin is not available. (wikipedia.org)
  • You may be given an immunoglobulin if you are exposed to certain infectious diseases, such as hepatitis A , rubella , or measles. (wellspan.org)
  • The Chinese company added that the bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) kits helps to prevent and treat blue ear disease, respiratory pneumonia, pseudorabies, swine fever and foot and mouth disease, which are common diseases affecting pig in the farming industry. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • IV immunoglobulin has been used safely for more than 20 years to treat other diseases but is thought to have an indirect effect on Alzheimer's disease by targeting beta-amyloid," Dr. Fillit said. (medpagetoday.com)
  • And if I remember correctly these diseases occur with low immunoglobulin counts so the immunoglobulin being administered via IV may be to increase the levels as opposed to replenish the levels. (wisegeek.com)