Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Phantom Limb: Perception of painful and nonpainful phantom sensations that occur following the complete or partial loss of a limb. The majority of individuals with an amputated extremity will experience the impression that the limb is still present, and in many cases, painful. (From Neurol Clin 1998 Nov;16(4):919-36; Brain 1998 Sep;121(Pt 9):1603-30)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Subtraction Technique: Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).Models, Structural: A representation, generally small in scale, to show the structure, construction, or appearance of something. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Radiation ProtectionThermoluminescent Dosimetry: The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Gamma Cameras: Electronic instruments that produce photographs or cathode-ray tube images of the gamma-ray emissions from organs containing radionuclide tracers.Tomography, Optical: Projection of near-IR light (INFRARED RAYS), in the 700-1000 nm region, across an object in parallel beams to an array of sensitive photodetectors. This is repeated at various angles and a mathematical reconstruction provides three dimensional MEDICAL IMAGING of tissues. Based on the relative transparency of tissues to this spectra, it has been used to monitor local oxygenation, brain and joints.Amputation Stumps: The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.Signal-To-Noise Ratio: The comparison of the quantity of meaningful data to the irrelevant or incorrect data.Elasticity Imaging Techniques: Non-invasive imaging methods based on the mechanical response of an object to a vibrational or impulsive force. It is used for determining the viscoelastic properties of tissue, and thereby differentiating soft from hard inclusions in tissue such as microcalcifications, and some cancer lesions. Most techniques use ultrasound to create the images - eliciting the response with an ultrasonic radiation force and/or recording displacements of the tissue by Doppler ultrasonography.Tomography: Imaging methods that result in sharp images of objects located on a chosen plane and blurred images located above or below the plane.Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Contrast Media: Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Whole Body Imaging: The creation of a visual display of the inside of the entire body of a human or animal for the purposes of diagnostic evaluation. This is most commonly achieved by using MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; or POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY.Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Data Compression: Information application based on a variety of coding methods to minimize the amount of data to be stored, retrieved, or transmitted. Data compression can be applied to various forms of data, such as images and signals. It is used to reduce costs and increase efficiency in the maintenance of large volumes of data.Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging with the added dimension of time, to follow motion during imaging.Photons: Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Fiducial Markers: Materials used as reference points for imaging studies.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Ultrasonics: A subfield of acoustics dealing in the radio frequency range higher than acoustic SOUND waves (approximately above 20 kilohertz). Ultrasonic radiation is used therapeutically (DIATHERMY and ULTRASONIC THERAPY) to generate HEAT and to selectively destroy tissues. It is also used in diagnostics, for example, ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ECHOENCEPHALOGRAPHY; and ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY, to visually display echoes received from irradiated tissues.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Radio Waves: Electromagnetic waves with frequencies between about 3 kilohertz (very low frequency - VLF) and 300,000 megahertz (extremely high frequency - EHF). They are used in television and radio broadcasting, land and satellite communications systems, radionavigation, radiolocation, and DIATHERMY. The highest frequency radio waves are MICROWAVES.Technetium: The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.Whole-Body Counting: Measurement of radioactivity in the entire human body.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Relative Biological Effectiveness: The ratio of radiation dosages required to produce identical change based on a formula comparing other types of radiation with that of gamma or roentgen rays.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Film Dosimetry: Use of a device (film badge) for measuring exposure of individuals to radiation. It is usually made of metal, plastic, or paper and loaded with one or more pieces of x-ray film.Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed: X-ray image-detecting devices that make a focused image of body structures lying in a predetermined plane from which more complex images are computed.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.X-Ray Intensifying Screens: Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Germanium: A rare metal element with a blue-gray appearance and atomic symbol Ge, atomic number 32, and atomic weight 72.63.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Tomography, Emission-Computed: Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Mammography: Radiographic examination of the breast.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Gelatin: A product formed from skin, white connective tissue, or bone COLLAGEN. It is used as a protein food adjuvant, plasma substitute, hemostatic, suspending agent in pharmaceutical preparations, and in the manufacturing of capsules and suppositories.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Particle Accelerators: Devices which accelerate electrically charged atomic or subatomic particles, such as electrons, protons or ions, to high velocities so they have high kinetic energy.Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the breathing cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts. The images are used diagnostically and also interventionally to coordinate radiation treatment beam on/off cycles to protect healthy tissues when they move into the beam field during different times in the breathing cycle.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Tellurium: Tellurium. An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has the atomic symbol Te, atomic number 52, and atomic weight 127.60. It has been used as a coloring agent and in the manufacture of electrical equipment. Exposure may cause nausea, vomiting, and CNS depression.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Health Physics: The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.Amputation, Traumatic: Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Thermography: Imaging the temperatures in a material, or in the body or an organ. Imaging is based on self-emanating infrared radiation (HEAT WAVES), or on changes in properties of the material or tissue that vary with temperature, such as ELASTICITY; MAGNETIC FIELD; or LUMINESCENCE.Echo-Planar Imaging: A type of MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING that uses only one nuclear spin excitation per image and therefore can obtain images in a fraction of a second rather than the minutes required in traditional MRI techniques. It is used in a variety of medical and scientific applications.Radiotherapy, Image-Guided: The use of pre-treatment imaging modalities to position the patient, delineate the target, and align the beam of radiation to achieve optimal accuracy and reduce radiation damage to surrounding non-target tissues.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.Photoacoustic Techniques: Investigative and diagnostic methods and procedures based on the photoacoustic effect, which is the generation of SOUND WAVES from the absorption of ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional: Minimally invasive procedures guided with the aid of magnetic resonance imaging to visualize tissue structures.Scintillation Counting: Detection and counting of scintillations produced in a fluorescent material by ionizing radiation.Gadolinium DTPA: A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA see PENTETIC ACID), that is given to enhance the image in cranial and spinal MRIs. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p706)Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Normal Distribution: Continuous frequency distribution of infinite range. Its properties are as follows: 1, continuous, symmetrical distribution with both tails extending to infinity; 2, arithmetic mean, mode, and median identical; and 3, shape completely determined by the mean and standard deviation.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Radiographic Magnification: Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.X-Rays: Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques: Timing the acquisition of imaging data to specific points in the cardiac cycle to minimize image blurring and other motion artifacts.Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection: A method of producing a high-quality scan by digitizing and subtracting the images produced by high- and low-energy x-rays.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)Fluorine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. F atoms with atomic weights 17, 18, and 20-22 are radioactive fluorine isotopes.Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Organotechnetium Compounds: Organic compounds that contain technetium as an integral part of the molecule. These compounds are often used as radionuclide imaging agents.Tomography, Spiral Computed: Computed tomography where there is continuous X-ray exposure to the patient while being transported in a spiral or helical pattern through the beam of irradiation. This provides improved three-dimensional contrast and spatial resolution compared to conventional computed tomography, where data is obtained and computed from individual sequential exposures.Electromagnetic Phenomena: Characteristics of ELECTRICITY and magnetism such as charged particles and the properties and behavior of charged particles, and other phenomena related to or associated with electromagnetism.Microwaves: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from the UHF (ultrahigh frequency) radio waves and extending into the INFRARED RAYS frequencies.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Optical Processes: Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Molecular Imaging: The use of molecularly targeted imaging probes to localize and/or monitor biochemical and cellular processes via various imaging modalities that include RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; FLUORESCENCE IMAGING; and MICROSCOPY.Biomimetics: An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.Refractometry: Measurement of the index of refraction (the ratio of the velocity of light or other radiation in the first of two media to its velocity in the second as it passes from one into the other).
... (SAU) Imaging is an advanced form of imaging technology used to form high-resolution images in ... Experiments have been done in both phantom and in-vivo experiments; the image quality of the SAU-BiPBF method was considerably ... Much research showed that 3D imaging which generates volumetric images, will result in better medical interpretations and more ... To improve the imaging resolution, separable beamforming for SAU 3D imaging was used to decompose the 2D beamforming as a ...
... solid phantoms placed in a pad under the patient during CT image acquisition are used for calibration. These phantoms contain ... Using 3D imaging substantially reduced image acquisition time, improved reproducibility and enabled QCT bone density analysis ... At the same time, CT imaging technology progressed rapidly and Genant and Boyd worked with one of EMI's first whole body CT ... Using pre-existing images, including CT colonography exams, QCT allows for bone density screening without submitting the ...
A unique advantage of MRI is that it provides not only the phase image but also the magnitude image. In principle, the contrast ... MEDI has also been validated extensively in phantom, in vitro and ex vivo experiments. In in vivo human brain, MEDI calculated ... Quantitative susceptibility maps obtained from in vivo human brain imaging also showed high degree of agreement with previous ... QSM utilizes phase images, solves the magnetic field to susceptibility source inverse problem, and generates a three- ...
Xu and his students pioneered a method to use cadaver images to construct voxel human phantoms that are anatomically realistic ... of RPI-adult male and female computational phantoms to obese patients and a Monte Carlo study of the effect on CT imaging dose ... voxel phantoms with a voxel size of 0.33mm x 0.33mm x 1 mm. The phantom sets a world record in the total number of voxels in ... a method in adopting a set of high-fidelity color image dataset from the Visible Human Project to develop the VIP-Man phantom ...
Davis' laboratory has developed innovative brain-imaging approaches, culminating in the first functional MRI images of brain ... Davis KD, Kiss ZH, Luo L, Tasker RR, Lozano AM, Dostrovsky JO (January 1998). "Phantom sensations generated by thalamic ... Davis has also worked on phantom pain. She has demonstrated that findings support the hypothesis that the thalamic ... A variety of experimental techniques are used, including functional brain imaging (fMRI, PET) psychophysical and cognitive ...
However, each CinemaDNG image is encoded using that DNG image format. The image stream can then be stored in one of two formats ... IRIDAS press release: IRIDAS Supports CinemaDNG RAW Standard Silicon Imaging press release: Silicon Imaging Oscar Filmmaking ... "Phantom software already has support for save/convert a cine to DNG format. This is a good start to get a cinemaDNG." ... Silicon Imaging (April 2009): (Silicon Imaging Oscar Filmmaking Digital Cinema Cameras go 3D): "The files can also be exported ...
2: Phantom object, two kitty-corner squares. Fig. 3: Sinogram of the phantom object (Fig.2) resulting from tomography. 50 ... That is, we wish to find the image μ ( x , y ) {\displaystyle \mu (x,y)} . The simplest and easiest way to visualise the method ... The mathematical basis for tomographic imaging was laid down by Johann Radon. A notable example of applications is the ... TomoPy is an open-source Python toolbox to perform tomographic data processing and image reconstruction tasks at the Advanced ...
... as a treatment for phantom limb paralysis. Ramachandran found that in some cases restoring movement to a paralyzed phantom limb ... Ramachandran theorized that there was a relationship between the cortical reorganization evident in the MEG image and the ... In 2011 McGeoch, Brang and Ramachandran reported a functional imaging experiment involving four subjects who desired lower limb ... These include Phantoms in the Brain (1998), "A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness" (2004) and The Tell-Tale Brain (2010). ...
For planar or projection imaging, the recorded values may be exposure, skin dose or some other value that may not be patient's ... For computed tomography, "CTDI" is a dose estimate to a standard plastic phantom. Plastic is not human tissue. Therefore, the ... Such an estimate is derived from the fluoroscopic technique factors and the total exposure time, including any image recording ... Newer scanners are able to create DICOM radiation dose structured reports (RDSRs) alongside the images themselves. REM ...
... and x-ray imaging. MRI also has better image quality than other imaging modalities and is better able to distinguish between ... MRI robots are typically tested using an imaging phantom, a typical test "subject" used in imaging. These tests can be used to ... SNR is a very important measurement in imaging. If the noise is too high compared to the signal, the image quality will suffer ... Some robots will be used under continuous imaging while others may only be imaged in intervals. Some of the tests performed ...
Pirola L and Rosi G 2004 In-phantom imaging of all dose components in boron neutron capture therapy by means of gel dosimeters ... Perera G M and Mooij R B 2002 Image distortion in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery ... De Deene et al undertook an investigation into the overall accuracy of an anthropomorphic polymer gel dosimetry phantom for the ... dose profile studies based on MR imaging with polymer BANG gels in stereotactic radiation techniques Magn Reson Imaging 18 343- ...
Aggregated images can create contour maps to track where water flows, determine variable-rate seeding, and create yield maps of ... Precision agriculture has also been enabled by unmanned aerial vehicles like the DJI Phantom which are relatively inexpensive ... Mahlein, Anne-Katrin (2015-09-01). "Plant Disease Detection by Imaging Sensors - Parallels and Specific Demands for Precision ... The base images must have the right level of resolution and geometric quality to ensure that geolocation is sufficiently ...
... they are also phantom images of our co-citizens; this woman into whose photographic eyes I now look is perhaps today weeding ... which digital imaging, installation and montage works effectively convey. The thirty-five artists include Christian Boltanski, ... Each grouping of images builds upon the next, creating an intricate story of human life. The design of the exhibition built on ... All 503 images from the exhibition were reproduced with an introduction by Carl Sandburg, whose prologue reads, in part: "The ...
PET imaging is best performed using a dedicated PET scanner. However, it is possible to acquire PET images using a conventional ... The overall performance of PET systems can be evaluated by quality control tools such as the Jaszczak phantom. Diffuse optical ... Imaging infections with molecular imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment follow-up. PET has been widely used ... The sinograms are sorted by the angle of each view and tilt (for 3D images). The sinogram images are analogous to the ...
"Diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors". Topics in magnetic resonance imaging : TMRI. 5 (1): 25-31 ... On the other hand, set of data obtained from images acquired with a multiple b values can be fitted with Eq.[1] using either ... "Magnetic resonance diffusion/perfusion phantom experiments". Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 19 (2): 254-260. doi:10.1002/mrm. ... One has to keep in mind that IVIM imaging has a differential sensitivity to vessel types, according to the range of motion ...
A common side effect of phantom limbs is phantom limb pain. The neurophysiological mechanisms by which phantom limbs occur is ... Body image may involve a person's conscious perception of his or her own physical appearance. It is how individuals see ... Recent fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) studies confirm earlier results. For example, the schema for feet and hands ... Phantom limbs are a phenomenon which occurs following amputation of a limb from an individual. In 90-98% of cases, amputees ...
... and synchronized with imaging. High-power LEDs are available allowing well-lit images even with very short light pulses. This ... they can create a phantom array, where ghost images of the LED appear if the eyes quickly scan across the array. White LED ... The tunability of emission wavelengths and narrow bandwidth is also beneficial as excitation sources for fluorescence imaging. ... "Nanoscale fluorescence imaging with quantum dot near-field electroluminescence". Applied Physics Letters. 101 (4): 043118. ...
PET imaging is best performed using a dedicated PET scanner. However, it is possible to acquire PET images using a conventional ... The overall performance of PET systems can be evaluated by quality control tools such as the Jaszczak phantom.[80] ... Small animal imaging[edit]. PET technology for small animal imaging: A miniature PE tomograph has been constructed that is ... Musculo-skeletal imaging[edit]. Musculoskeletal imaging: PET has been shown to be a feasible technique for studying skeletal ...
Computed Tomography Imaging Spectrometer[2]. Visible light spectral imaging CTIS Computed tomography of chemiluminescence[3][4] ... A typical 3D data set is a group of 2D slice images acquired, for example, by a CT, MRI, or MicroCT scanner. These are usually ... Instantaneous 3D measurements and Phantom studies of a turbulent opposed jet flame". Combustion and Flame. 158 (2): 376-391. ... Infrared microtomographic imaging[8]. Mid-infrared 2013 Laser Ablation Tomography Laser Ablation & Fluorescent Microscopy LAT ...
... they can create a phantom array, where ghost images of the LED appear if the eyes quickly scan across the array. White LED ... Composite image of an 11 × 44 LED matrix lapel name tag display using 1608/0603-type SMD LEDs. Top: A little over half of the ...
3D tactile image (C) is composed from 2D pressure maps (B) recorded in the process of tissue phantom examination (A). ... This imaging modality utilizes a wide beam of x rays for image acquisition and is the first imaging technique available in ... Images of the same subject produced with two different imaging systems may be correlated (called image registration) by placing ... Used primarily in ultrasound imaging, capturing the image produced by a medical imaging device is required for archiving and ...
SPECT imaging is performed by using a gamma camera to acquire multiple 2-D images (also called projections), from multiple ... The overall performance of SPECT systems can be performed by quality control tools such as the Jaszczak phantom.[15] ... Main article: Myocardial perfusion imaging. Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a form of functional cardiac imaging, used ... such as tumor imaging, infection (leukocyte) imaging, thyroid imaging or bone scintigraphy. ...
Image registration. *Imaging instruments. *Imaging phantom. *INFINITT Healthcare. *Insightec. *Instruments used in radiology ... Pages in category "Medical imaging". The following 172 pages are in this category, out of 172 total. This list may not reflect ... Medical imaging (ICD-9-CM V3 87-88, ICD-10-PCS B, CPT 70010-79999) ... Media in category "Medical imaging". This category contains only the following file. ...
Thus in an image processing context the original image ƒ can be recovered from the 'sinogram' data Rƒ by applying a ramp filter ... IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 5 (4): 170-176, doi:10.1109/TMI.1986.4307775, PMID 18244009. . ... In two dimensions, the operator Hsd/ds appears in image processing as a ramp filter.[9] One can prove directly from the Fourier ... The process of reconstruction produces the image (or function f. {\displaystyle f}. in the previous section) from its ...
The crew compartment of the uncrewed Artemis 1 Orion spacecraft will include two female mannequins imaging phantoms which will ... ArgoMoon, designed by Argotec and coordinated by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), is designed to image the Interim Cryogenic ... One phantom will be shielded with the AstroRad vest and the other will be left unprotected. The phantoms provide the ... two mannequins will be strapped and used as radiation imaging phantoms.[14] ...
PET imaging is best performed using a dedicated PET scanner. It is also possible to acquire PET images using a conventional ... The overall performance of PET systems can be evaluated by quality control tools such as the Jaszczak phantom.[73] ... Small animal imagingEdit. PET technology for small animal imaging: A miniature PE tomograph has been constructed that is small ... Musculo-skeletal imagingEdit. Musculoskeletal imaging: PET has been shown to be a feasible technique for studying skeletal ...
Imaging phantom, or simply phantom, is a specially designed object that is scanned or imaged in the field of medical imaging to ... and other imaging methods or modalities. A phantom used to evaluate an imaging device should respond in a similar manner to how ... Phantoms were originally employed for use in 2D x-ray based imaging techniques such as radiography or fluoroscopy, though more ... Shepp-Logan Phantom Computational human phantom Iturralde, Mario P. (1990), CRC dictionary and handbook of nuclear medicine and ...
... gives possibility to obtain qualitatively very good images, most quantitative results obtained by means of MRI ...
APPLIED IMAGE, INC.. 1653 E MAIN ST, ROCHESTER, NY, 14609 DUNS: N/A ...
In particular, systems and method are provided for a phantom including a pattern plate having a plurality of passages and a ... A phantom for a nuclear imaging system is provided. ... the nuclear imaging system can acquire an image of the phantom ... Microscopy imaging phantoms. US20110293074 *. 27 May 2011. 1 Dec 2011. Coolens Catherine. Dynamic flow imaging phantom and ... Due to the deficiencies in current nuclear imaging phantom designs, it would be desirable to have a nuclear imaging phantom ...
... such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). On the other hand, fMRI averages brain activity over seconds, making it ... Homethe digestPhantom images stored in flexible network throughout brain. Phantom images stored in flexible network throughout ... The neuroscientists discovered that when images were shown to the eye opposite the lesion (output of the left eye goes to the ... The patients with stroke damage to the prefrontal cortex had, as suspected, problems when images were presented to the eye on ...
... and rising demand for accurate calibration techniques for effective diagnostic imaging procedures are the key factors expected ... The global medical imaging phantoms market size was valued at USD 141.1 million in 2019 and is anticipated to register a CAGR ... Phantoms developed using 3D technology represent realistic images of tissues and organs produced by various imaging modalities ... Medical Imaging Phantoms Market Size, Industry Report, 2027 Medical Imaging Phantoms Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis ...
Only if other resources available (images, video, datasets) Title and Abstract. All text ... Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging on large phantoms: Depth studies Anuradha Godavarty, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca, Chaoyang Zhang ... A. Godavarty, E. M. Sevick-Muraca, C. Zhang, and M. J. Eppstein, "Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging on large phantoms: ...
Image Anal. 16(5), 1063-1072 (2012). [Crossref] [PubMed] S. R. Shott, "Sleep cine magnetic resonance imaging-A dynamic ... Volume estimation of tonsil phantoms using an oral camera with 3D imaging Anshuman J. Das, Tulio A. Valdez, Jose Arbouin Vargas ... Biomimetic 3D-printed neurovascular phantoms for near-infrared fluorescence imaging Yi Liu, Pejhman Ghassemi, Andrew Depkon, ... b) Respective image after thresholding and segmention. The corresponding phase image (c) and reconstruced 3D map (d). ...
This paper presents a phantom study to asses the feasibility of the medical image registration algorithms in the operating room ... Medical image registration, image-guided devices and interventions, multimodal imaging, computer aided surgery ... Retrospective Study on Phantom for the Application of Medical Image Registration in the Operating Room Scenario Bogdan M. Maris ... This paper presents a phantom study to asses the feasibility of the medical image registration algorithms in the operating room ...
We believe the phantom images could allow for the validation and further aid in the development of novel medical image ... PVA-C is material widely used in medical imaging phantoms because of its mechanical similarities to soft tissues. The phantom ... and magnetic resonance imaging. Multiple sets of multimodal data were acquired from this phantom. The methods for building the ... The phantom contained deep sulci, a complete insular region, and an anatomically accurate left ventricle. It was found to ...
We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index ... Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance. ... Dual-energy CT is dose-neutral in imaging the head and abdomen in children. It is not dose-neutral in chest imaging of very ... and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no ...
The phantom calibration body (12) includes a homogeneous aque ... A phantom calibration body (12) for calibrating diffusion MRI ... such as diffusion imaging or diffusion tensor imaging methods. In diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), each image voxel (i.e., ... Phantom for diffusion MRI imaging Abstract. A phantom calibration body (12) for calibrating diffusion MRI device (16) that ... c. Diffusion-Weighted Image As used herein, the term "diffusion-weighted image" refers to any diffusion MRI image in which the ...
In the second case, computed variables of interest (e.g. brain volume or voxel values from segmented gray matter images) were ... In the second case, computed variables of interest (e.g. brain volume or voxel values from segmented gray matter images) were ... We draw upon thousands of MRI scans captured via the COllaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics Suite (COINS). We then ... We draw upon thousands of MRI scans captured via the COllaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics Suite (COINS). We then ...
To effectively evaluate an ultrasound systems imaging capabilities, a phantom is essential. There are several tests that need ... How to Use a Phantom - Verify Image Quality. by jrickner on 12.1.2016 ... In summary, image quality is a difficult problem to define and troubleshoot. By using these tests periodically we are able to ... By scanning a phantom using known targets, the accuracy of caliper measurements can be determined. Because vertical distance ...
... training models and phantoms for ultrasound and radiology from Japan since 1895. ... Can reproduce image variations of the heart by injecting RI solutions in the liver, kidney and lungs ... Examination of myocardial density through SPECT imaging. *Verification of myocardial imaging with use of various RI solution ... PET/SPECT Thorax Phantom is an optimal tool for study in nuclear medicine ...
Phantom Sensor. The phantom sensor material mimics optical properties of brain tissue, and it is used to test the system to ... MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging +. Electrodes & Accessories. Airflow and Gas Analysis Accessories. Amplifier Modules. Cable ... MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging +. Electrodes & Accessories. Airflow and Gas Analysis Accessories. Amplifier Modules. Cable ... FNIR-PHANTOM , mimics optical properties of brain tissue to test sensor performance ,≥ Imager 1100 ...
http://irdb.nii.ac.jp/analysis/file/image/logo/33.gif 操作を選択. Refer/BibIX形式. BibTex形式. TSV形式. 実行 ... The use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in radiation therapy: a phantom study for setting internal ... a phantom study for setting internal target volume of biological target volume. ... target volume of biological target volumeThe use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in radiation ...
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging. in Acta Radiologica. volume. 31. issue. 2. pages. 213 - 216. publisher. John ... In a phantom study using a 0.3 tesla MR system the signal alterations, artifacts and image distortion induced by a bowel ... Signal alterations, artifacts and image distortion induced by a superparamagnetic contrast medium. A phantom study in a 0.3 ... artifacts and image distortion induced by a superparamagnetic contrast medium. A phantom study in a 0.3 tesla MR system}, ...
Free Download Three Dimensional Analytical Magnetic Resonance Imaging Phantom in the Fourier Domain by Cheng Guan Koay - This ... In the Web domain, sometimes it is necessary to dynamically create images containg just text. This recipe uses PIL to do just ... Related: Imaging, phantom, resonance, magnetic, Analytical, Fourier, Domain, obtained, Article. O/S:BSD, Linux, Solaris, Mac OS ... Three Dimensional Analytical Magnetic Resonance Imaging Phantom in the Fourier Domain. Magn Reson Med. 58: 430-436 (2007). The ...
Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize ... Comparative Imaging Study in Ultrasound, MRI, CT and DSA using a Multi-Modality Renal Artery Phantom. ... Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers and ... D.M. King, A.J. Fagan, C.M. Moran, J.E. Browne, Comparative Imaging Study in Ultrasound, MRI, CT and DSA using a Multi-Modality ...
The images clearly reveal the locations of small inhomogeneous regions embedded within the phantom. These results were obtained ... Multiple-slice imaging of a tissue-equivalent phantom by use of time-resolved optical tomography. APPL OPTICS , 39 (19) 3380 - ... Multiple-slice imaging of a tissue-equivalent phantom by use of time-resolved optical tomography ... Multiple-slice imaging of a tissue-equivalent phantom by use of time-resolved optical tomography. ...
PURPOSE: Several image-based retrospective sorting methods of 4D magnetic resonance imaging (4D MRI) have been proposed for ... Image-based retrospective 4D MRI in external beam radiotherapy: A comparative study with a digital phantom.. ... Comparisons were performed by means of an MRI digital phantom, derived from the XCAT CT phantom generated with different ... The three image-based methods were compared against a conventional retrospective sorting method based on an external surrogate ...
A phantom having similar light scattering characteristics to living tissues of interest is obtained by suspending in a selected ... Microscopy imaging phantoms WO2009056560A3 (en) * 2007-11-02. 2009-09-11. Ge Healthcare Uk Limited. Microscopy imaging phantoms ... the evaluation of image resolution. ... phantom. particles. θ. light. Prior art date. 1988-11-08. Legal ... Microscopy imaging phantoms US8116842B2 (en) 2004-06-10. 2012-02-14. Nse Products, Inc.. Bio-photonic feedback control software ...
... vertical motion joint and it is adapted to be powered off when the magnetic resonance imager is being used to collect images. ... Phantom for esr imaging and phantom fixing tool JP2852902B2 (en) 1996-08-20. 1999-02-03. 大西 登. Human body phantom for ... The phantom as claimed in claim 35. wherein the phantom organ is a phantom prostate, the phantom treatable portion is a phantom ... Multi-imaging modality tissue mimicking materials for imaging phantoms US20030055436A1 (en) * 2001-09-14. 2003-03-20. Wolfgang ...
... and it may be used to ensure quality control when comparing images within and between medical research studies. ... This phantom mimics the response of human breast tissue to test the performance of MRI systems, ... NIST engineer Katy Keenan holds a new phantom that will help standardize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast. ... NIST engineer Katy Keenan holds a new phantom that will help standardize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast. This ...
  • Purpose: A range of anatomically-realistic multi-modality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). (tcd.ie)
  • Such multi-modality phantoms may prove useful in evaluating current and emerging US, MRI, CT and DSA technology. (tcd.ie)
  • Increasing disease burden of lifestyle-associated disorders such as cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, And Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and rising demand for accurate calibration techniques for effective diagnostic imaging procedures are the key factors expected to drive the market growth. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Increasing number of diagnostic imaging facilities and growing need for in-house calibration techniques are the factors driving the demand for innovative imaging phantoms. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • A phantom calibration body (12) for calibrating diffusion MRI device (16) that mimics a material such as a mammalian tissue is disclosed. (patents.com)
  • The phantom calibration body (12) includes a homogeneous aqueous solution (30) that contains a mixture of low molecular-weight and high molecular-weight polymers housed in a container (14) that is placed in the diffusion MRI device (16) for obtaining one or more diffusion MRI images of the phantom calibration body (12). (patents.com)
  • Methods of using the phantom calibration body (12) to calibrate diffusion MRI device (16) are also disclosed. (patents.com)
  • and, a diffusion MRI device configured for scanning the phantom calibration body in order to generate diffusion imaging data of the phantom calibration body, wherein the MRI device comprises one or more processors and wherein the diffusion imaging data are provided and stored on at least one of the one or more processors. (patents.com)
  • This study presents a proactive comparison of three published image-based sorting methods, to define a groundwork for benchmarking in 4D MRI. (edu.au)
  • METHODS: Three published 4D MRI methods were selected for image retrospective sorting: body area, mutual information, and navigator slice. (edu.au)
  • The three image-based methods were compared against a conventional retrospective sorting method based on an external surrogate. (edu.au)
  • CONCLUSIONS: A comparison between three different image-based retrospective sorting methods for 4D MRI is proposed, providing guidelines for benchmark definition in MRI-guided radiotherapy. (edu.au)
  • Methods: We used polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based materials and a 3D printing technique to construct a breast phantom. (elsevier.com)
  • For instance, phantoms made for 2D radiography may hold various quantities of x-ray contrast agents with similar x-ray absorbing properties to normal tissue to tune the contrast of the imaging device or modulate the patients' exposure to radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. (springer.com)
  • Signal alterations, artifacts and image distortion induced by a superparamagnetic contrast medium. (lu.se)
  • In a phantom study using a 0.3 tesla MR system the signal alterations, artifacts and image distortion induced by a bowel contrast medium containing superparamagnetic magnetite particles were evaluated. (lu.se)
  • Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast to allow for quantitative measurements of the degree of stenosis in each phantom. (tcd.ie)
  • The high dynamic range shows significant detail, especially in high-contrast environments, while the low noise is particularly beneficial when analyzing the dark regions of an image. (dpreview.com)
  • In designing this new, cutting-edge sensor, we focused on capturing the best image in addition to meeting the speed and sensitivity requirements of the market. (dpreview.com)
  • This phantom mimics the response of human breast tissue to test the performance of MRI systems, and it may be used to ensure quality control when comparing images within and between medical research studies. (nist.gov)
  • 6. The spine phantom of claim 5 , further comprising a sheet layer affixed to the block, the sheet layer attenuating x-rays differently than the block, the sheet layer and block together having x-ray attenuation characteristics simulating human soft tissue. (google.com)
  • Results: The 3D-printed breast phantom had an average background value of 36.2 HU, which is close to that of glandular breast tissue (40 HU). (elsevier.com)
  • The present invention relates to a phantom having optical characteristics, in particular light-scattering characteristics, that are similar to those of living tissues. (google.com)
  • Furthermore, increasing number of clinical trials by universities and institutes for improving the accuracy of phantoms for various disorders such as solid tumors is expected to positively affect the market growth. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. (springer.com)
  • From a clinical standpoint, this area is the best location to obtain diagnostic images. (conquestimaging.com)
  • A cardiac phantom, containing two different size cold lesions, was utilized to evaluate the platelet de-noising method performance and compare it with the performance of the Butterworth filtering method, applied on raw data in pre-processing fashion, as well as on reconstructed data, representing the clinical routine. (elsevier.com)
  • A. Godavarty, E. M. Sevick-Muraca, C. Zhang, and M. J. Eppstein, "Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging on large phantoms: Depth studies," in Frontiers in Optics , OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2003), paper WE3. (osapublishing.org)
  • We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. (springer.com)
  • There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by visual assessment. (springer.com)
  • Schulz B, Kuehling K, Kromen W et al (2012) Automatic bone removal technique in whole-body dual-energy CT angiography: performance and image quality. (springer.com)
  • We demonstrate these approaches using multiple examples from over 10,000 data sets including (1) quality control measures calculated from phantom data over time, (2) quality control data from human functional MRI data across various studies, scanners, sites, (3) volumetric and density measures from human structural MRI data across various studies, scanners and sites. (frontiersin.org)
  • This is particularly true for the neuroimaging community, where researchers commonly rely on the visual inspection of individual images as their primary means of quality control (QC). (frontiersin.org)
  • When technologists report a poor image quality problem, they often use subjective terminology such as mushy, grainy and splotchy. (conquestimaging.com)
  • There are several tests that need to be performed when verifying the image quality during a service call. (conquestimaging.com)
  • In summary, image quality is a difficult problem to define and troubleshoot. (conquestimaging.com)
  • The image quality is improved by the employment of an approximate correction method that uses scaling factors derived from the ratios of finite-element forward simulations in two and three spatial dimensions. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • It features a new proprietary 4-Megapixel (Mpx) CMOS image sensor (2048 x 1952) that delivers unprecedented image quality at up to 26 Gpx/sec, while reaching 6,600 frames per second (fps) at full 2048 x 1952 resolution, and 11,750 fps at 1920 x 1080. (dpreview.com)
  • We're excited to bring this extremely high image quality to the high-speed camera market," says Jay Stepleton, Vice President and General Manager of Vision Research. (dpreview.com)
  • Users will also benefit from the camera's Phantom HQ shooting mode, a high-performance setting which yields the ultimate in image quality. (abelcine.com)
  • When set to Phantom HQ Mode, the Flex trades speed for enhanced image quality, however, the camera still offers impressive maximum recording speeds of 727* fps at 2560x1600, 1,278* fps at 1920x1080, and 2,800* fps at 1280x720. (abelcine.com)
  • Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. (springer.com)
  • To evaluate performance of these techniques, we used a swine phantom with small airways to have three different sizes of wall thickness. (ieice.org)
  • The main issues of the registration algorithms in an OR application are, on one hand, the lack of the initial guess of the registration transformation - the images to be registered may be completely independent- and, on the other hand, the multimodality of the data. (actapress.com)
  • This work analyzes how, under these requirements, the current state of the art algorithms in medical image registration may be used and shows which direction should be taken when designing a OR navigation system that includes registration as a component. (actapress.com)
  • For situations that demand the ultimate in resolution, the Phantom Flex boasts a specially engineered four mega-pixel color CMOS sensor which offers a maximum resolution of 2560x1600. (abelcine.com)
  • The 32-channel system was employed to generate maps of the internal scattering and the absorption properties at 14 different transverse planes across the phantom. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically-realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. (tcd.ie)
  • Conclusions: We developed a multi-purpose breast phantom using a 3D printing technique and determined its value for multi-modal breast imaging studies. (elsevier.com)
  • In particular, systems and method are provided for a phantom including a pattern plate having a plurality of passages and a plurality of channels sequentially interconnecting each of the plurality of cylindrical cavities. (google.ca)
  • Vision Research, a leading manufacturer of digital high-speed imaging systems, has introduced the Phantom® v2640, the fastest 4-Megapixel (MPx) camera available. (dpreview.com)
  • WAYNE, N.J., April 7, 2010 -- Setting new standards for innovation, Vision Research, a leading manufacturer of digital high-speed imaging systems, today proudly unveiled the Phantom Flex , the company's next generation, high-speed camera for the digital cinema market. (abelcine.com)
  • The comparison results demonstrate that the PET predictions obtained in PMMA phantom tests for single proton beam therapy verification are reliable and that the research can be extended to verification in human body treatment with further investigation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Disclosed herein is a spine phantom for calibrating a dual energy x-ray attenuation measurement device for measuring vertebral bone density. (google.com)
  • Simplified construction of the phantom is made possible by equating the density variations in the three dimensionally complex and inhomogeneous spine as a set of. (google.com)
  • As 19 F-MRS is able to detect TAS-102 in phantom and murine models, the use of 19 F-MRS remains a potential tool to noninvasively detect and possibly monitor the metabolism when higher dosages of TAS-102 are administered, for example in organoid and animal studies. (springer.com)
  • A phantom is more readily available and provides more consistent results than the use of a living subject or cadaver, and likewise avoids subjecting a living subject to direct risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to delivering impressive results for high-speed imaging, the Phantom Flex can also be used to record at more traditional speeds with frame rates starting as low as 5 fps, further adding to the versatility of the camera system. (abelcine.com)