Bleeding in the anterior chamber of the eye.
Agents that dilate the pupil. They may be either sympathomimetics or parasympatholytics.
An antifibrinolytic agent that acts by inhibiting plasminogen activators which have fibrinolytic properties.
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.
A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a rapid onset of action and a longer duration of action than procaine hydrochloride. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1017)
Benign disorder of infants and children caused by proliferation of HISTIOCYTES, macrophages found in tissues. These histiocytes, usually lipid-laden non-Langerhans cells, form multiple yellow-red nodules most often in the skin, the eye, and sometimes in the viscera. Patients appear to have normal lipid metabolism and are classified as a normolipemic non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis.
Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.
Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.
A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.
Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.
Devices, usually incorporating unidirectional valves, which are surgically inserted in the sclera to maintain normal intraocular pressure.
Any surgical procedure for treatment of glaucoma by means of puncture or reshaping of the trabecular meshwork. It includes goniotomy, trabeculectomy, and laser perforation.
Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.
Confinement of an individual to bed for therapeutic or experimental reasons.
Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.
A pharmaceutical preparation containing a mixture of water-soluble, conjugated estrogens derived wholly or in part from URINE of pregnant mares or synthetically from ESTRONE and EQUILIN. It contains a sodium-salt mixture of estrone sulfate (52-62%) and equilin sulfate (22-30%) with a total of the two between 80-88%. Other concomitant conjugates include 17-alpha-dihydroequilin, 17-alpha-estradiol, and 17-beta-dihydroequilin. The potency of the preparation is expressed in terms of an equivalent quantity of sodium estrone sulfate.
Diseases of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.
Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.
Hemorrhage within the orbital cavity, posterior to the eyeball.
A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Recession of the eyeball into the orbit.

Factors associated with the poor final visual outcome after traumatic hyphema. (1/62)

In order to determine the factors related to the worse final visual outcome following nonperforating traumatic hyphema, the clinical characteristics of 18 patients with visual outcome of 0.1 or worse were compared with those of 166 patients with visual outcome of 0.15 or better. The presence of posterior segment injuries such as macula edema, retinal hemorrhage, epiretinal membrane, and choroidal rupture were significant factors of a poor final visual outcome (P < 0.01). The presence of anterior segment injuries such as corneal blood staining, traumatic mydriasis, iridodialysis, cataract, and lens subluxation had significant predictive factors on a poor final visual outcome and the concurrent posterior segment injuries were more frequent in these patients. Initial visual acuity of 0.1 or worse, glaucoma, vitreous hemorrhage, and eyelid laceration were also significant associations of a poor final visual outcome (P < 0.05). Patients with initially larger hyphema (grade I or more vs microscopic) and older age group (16 years or more vs 15 years or less) tended to have poor final visual acuities. Rebleeding was not associated with significant deterioration in visual prognosis. We conclude that the posterior segment injuries seem to be directly related to a poor visual outcome rather than the occurrence of secondary hemorrhage.  (+info)

Air bags and ocular injuries. (2/62)

PURPOSE: This investigation retrospectively examined ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment to gain a better appreciation of potential risk factors in motor vehicle accidents. National statistics regarding the efficacy of air bags were reviewed. METHODS: Review of the literature from 1991 to 1998 identified 44 articles describing 97 patients with air-bag-induced ocular injuries. Variables extracted from each case were age, sex, height, position in the car, eye wear, vehicle impact speed, visual acuity, and specific ocular injuries. RESULTS: Corneal abrasions occurred in 49% of occupants, hyphemas in 43%, vitreous or retinal hemorrhages in 25%, and retinal tears or detachments in 15%. The globe was ruptured in 10 patients. Patients involved in higher-speed accidents (over 30 mph) sustained a greater percentage of vitreous or retinal hemorrhages and traumatic cataracts, while those at slower speeds were more prone to retinal tears or detachments. In a subset of 14 patients with serious ocular injuries, the impact speed of 11 patients was recorded at 30 mph or less. Slower speed may be a risk factor for some ocular injuries. Occupant height was not a significant factor. National statistics confirm that air bags reduce fatalities in motor vehicle accidents. However, children sitting in the front seat without a seat belt and infants in passenger-side rear-facing car seats are at risk for fatal injury. CONCLUSION: Air bags combined with seat belts are an effective means of reducing injury and death in adults during motor vehicle accidents. However, this study has documented a wide variety of ocular injuries associated with air bag deployment. It is hoped that researchers can develop modifications that continue to save lives while minimizing additional harm.  (+info)

Acute panuveitis with haemorrhagic hypopyon as a presenting feature of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). (3/62)

Anterior uveitis is a known clinical entity in herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with AIDS. However, reports of acute haemorrhagic hypopyon uveitis in such cases are lacking. Herein we describe a young male patient presenting with acute panuveitis with haemorrhagic hypopyon, who was found HIV positive on investigation.  (+info)

Immune recovery vitritis presenting as panuveitis following therapy with protease inhibitors. (4/62)

Immune reconstitution in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients on highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis manifested as posterior segment intraocular inflammation has been reported. We report an adult HIV-positive Indian male with clinically inactive CMV retinitis who developed panuveitis with hypopyon. This was related to immune recovery mediated by combination anti-retroviral treatment, including protease inhibitors.  (+info)

The National Survey of Trabeculectomy. III. Early and late complications. (5/62)

PURPOSE: There is a considerable body of literature relating to trabeculectomy, however there are no data representative of the national experience of trabeculectomy in the United Kingdom (UK). The Department of Health funded a national survey of trabeculectomy to establish current practice patterns and the outcome of trabeculectomy in the National Health Service (NHS). In this paper we present the reported complications of first-time trabeculectomy from a nationally representative cohort of patients with chronic open angle glaucoma. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of consultant ophthalmologists performing trabeculectomy in the NHS. Participants recruited their four most recent consecutive first-time trabeculectomy cases with chronic open angle glaucoma according to study eligibility criteria and data were collected by self-administered questionnaire. FOLLOW-UP: one year post-trabeculectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: occurrence of early and late complications. RESULTS: Clinical outcome data were available for 1240 (85.3%) of cases. Early complications were reported in 578 (46.6%) cases and late complications in 512 (42.3%) cases. Some cases had more than one complication. The most frequent early complications were hyphaema (n = 304, 24.6%), shallow anterior chamber (n = 296, 23.9%), hypotony (n = 296, 24.3%), wound leak (n = 216, 17.8%) and choroidal detachment (n = 175, 14.1%). The most frequent late complications were cataract (n = 251, 20.2%), visual loss (n = 230, 18.8%) and encapsulated bleb (n = 42, 3.4%). The occurrence of most complications was not associated with a consultant's specialist interest, level of activity, type of hospital or region. Encapsulated bleb was reported more frequently in a university hospital setting. CONCLUSIONS: The complication rates reported in this paper represent the national experience of first-time trabeculectomy for open angle glaucoma in the UK. These are similar to previous published studies and highlight in particular, the impact of trabeculectomy on visual acuity in the first year following surgery. This survey provides valid and clinically relevant data on the complications of trabeculectomy for the production of guidelines and standards for audit at regional, local and individual level.  (+info)

Characteristics and functional outcome of traumatic hyphema without routine administration of epsilon-aminocaproic acid. (6/62)

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of traumatic hyphema as well as the distribution of its severity varies among different patient populations. Treatment recommendations in the literature differ significantly among various published reports. This lack of a uniformly accepted treatment probably reflects the different characteristics of this pathology among the populations investigated and cells for a population-adjusted treatment recommendation. OBJECTIVES: To report the characteristics and functional outcome of patients with traumatic hyphema and to discuss possible recommendations regarding the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid. METHODS: A prospective, non-randomized study was conducted in 154 consecutive patients with traumatic hyphema, including data collection of ophthalmic status at various time points, the presence or absence of secondary hemorrhage, and final visual acuity. RESULTS: Of the 154 eyes studied over 3 years, nearly 90% had hyphema of grade 1 or less, 5 (3.25%) experienced rebleeding, and 2 (1.3%)--neither of which rebled--needed surgical intervention. None of the four patients who experienced final visual acuity of 6/40 or less suffered rebleeding. CONCLUSION: The use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid in the studied population was unjustified and routine use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid in our patient population is probably not indicated. A treatment policy regarding epsilon-aminocaproic acid use should be adjusted to the population being treated.  (+info)

A case of air-bag associated severe ocular injury. (7/62)

Air-bags have received widespread support as an effective means of enhancing automotive safety, and they are becoming more common as standard automobile equipment on many cars. Although air-bag induced ocular injuries are rare, they present a serious concern because of the possibility of permanent damage or visual impairment. To date, most reports have investigated ocular injury from high velocity motor vehicle accidents and reports of ocular injury from low speed motor vehicle accidents have been rare. We describe a patient who sustained severe ocular injury, including periorbital fracture, hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, and choroidal rupture of the macular area, due to an inflated air-bag in a low speed motor vehicle accident.  (+info)

Ocular injury in hurling. (8/62)

OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics of ocular injuries sustained in hurling in the south of Ireland and to investigate reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear. METHODS: Retrospective review of the case notes of 310 patients who attended Cork University Hospital or Waterford Regional Hospital between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 2002 with ocular injuries sustained during a hurling match. A confidential questionnaire on reasons for non-use of protective headgear and eye wear was completed by 130 players. RESULTS: Hurling related eye injuries occurred most commonly in young men. Fifty two patients (17%) required hospital admission, with hyphaema accounting for 71% of admissions. Ten injuries required intraocular surgical INTERVENTION: retinal detachment repair (5); macular hole surgery (1); repair of partial thickness corneal laceration (1); repair of globe perforation (1); enucleation (1); trabeculectomy for post-traumatic glaucoma (1). Fourteen eyes (4.5%) had a final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of <6/12 and six (2%) had BCVA <3/60. In the survey, 63 players (48.5%) reported wearing no protective facemask while playing hurling. Impairment of vision was the most common reason cited for non-use. CONCLUSIONS: Hurling related injury is a significant, and preventable, cause of ocular morbidity in young men in Ireland. The routine use of appropriate protective headgear and faceguards would result in a dramatic reduction in the incidence and severity of these injuries, and should be mandatory.  (+info)

Hyphema is defined as the presence of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, which is the space between the cornea and the iris. This condition usually results from trauma or injury to the eye, but it can also occur due to various medical conditions such as severe eye inflammation, retinal surgery, or blood disorders that affect clotting.

The blood in the anterior chamber can vary in amount, ranging from a few drops to a complete fill, which is called an "eight-ball hyphema." Hyphema can be painful and cause sensitivity to light (photophobia), blurred vision, or even loss of vision if not treated promptly.

Immediate medical attention is necessary for hyphema to prevent complications such as increased intraocular pressure, corneal blood staining, glaucoma, or cataracts. Treatment options may include bed rest, eye drops to reduce inflammation and control intraocular pressure, and sometimes surgery to remove the blood from the anterior chamber.

Mydriatics are medications that cause mydriasis, which is the dilation of the pupil. These drugs work by blocking the action of the muscarinic receptors in the iris, leading to relaxation of the circular muscle and constriction of the radial muscle, resulting in pupil dilation. Mydriatics are often used in eye examinations to facilitate examination of the interior structures of the eye. Commonly used mydriatic agents include tropicamide, phenylephrine, and cyclopentolate. It is important to note that mydriatics can have side effects such as blurred vision, photophobia, and accommodation difficulties, so patients should be advised accordingly.

Aminocaproic acid is an antifibrinolytic medication, which means it helps to prevent the breakdown of blood clots. It works by blocking plasmin, an enzyme in your body that dissolves blood clots.

This drug is used for the treatment of bleeding conditions due to various causes, such as:

1. Excessive menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia)
2. Bleeding after tooth extraction or surgery
3. Hematuria (blood in urine) due to certain medical procedures or conditions like kidney stones
4. Intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding inside the skull)
5. Hereditary angioedema, a genetic disorder that causes swelling of various parts of the body

Aminocaproic acid is available in oral and injectable forms. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Serious side effects are rare but may include allergic reactions, seizures, or vision changes. It's essential to use this medication under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper usage might lead to blood clots, stroke, or other severe complications.

An eye hemorrhage, also known as subconjunctival hemorrhage, is a condition where there is bleeding in the eye, specifically under the conjunctiva which is the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye (sclera). This membrane has tiny blood vessels that can rupture and cause blood to accumulate, leading to a visible red patch on the surface of the eye.

Eye hemorrhages are usually painless and harmless, and they often resolve on their own within 1-2 weeks without any treatment. However, if they occur frequently or are accompanied by other symptoms such as vision changes, pain, or sensitivity to light, it is important to seek medical attention as they could indicate a more serious underlying condition. Common causes of eye hemorrhages include trauma, high blood pressure, blood thinners, and aging.

Eye injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the eye or its surrounding structures. These injuries can vary in severity and may include:

1. Corneal abrasions: A scratch or scrape on the clear surface of the eye (cornea).
2. Chemical burns: Occurs when chemicals come into contact with the eye, causing damage to the cornea and other structures.
3. Eyelid lacerations: Cuts or tears to the eyelid.
4. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: Bleeding under the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye.
5. Hyphema: Accumulation of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, which is the space between the cornea and iris.
6. Orbital fractures: Breaks in the bones surrounding the eye.
7. Retinal detachment: Separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
8. Traumatic uveitis: Inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye, caused by trauma.
9. Optic nerve damage: Damage to the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain.

Eye injuries can result from a variety of causes, including accidents, sports-related injuries, violence, and chemical exposure. It is important to seek medical attention promptly for any suspected eye injury to prevent further damage and potential vision loss.

Propoxycaine is a local anesthetic that was previously used in medical and dental procedures for its numbing effect. It works by blocking the nerve impulses in the area where it is administered, thus reducing the sensation of pain. However, its use has become less common due to the development of safer and more effective alternatives.

The chemical name for Propoxycaine is 2-diethylamino-N-(1-methoxyprop-2-yl)butanamide. It is a derivative of procaine, another local anesthetic, with an added methoxy group to the propanolamine side chain. This modification was intended to increase its potency and duration of action compared to procaine.

Propoxycaine can be administered through various routes, including topical application, injection, or as a suppository. Its effects typically begin within a few minutes after administration and last for up to an hour. Common side effects may include localized pain, redness, or swelling at the site of injection, as well as more systemic effects such as dizziness, headache, or heart palpitations.

It is important to note that Propoxycaine is no longer widely used in clinical practice due to its association with rare but serious side effects, including allergic reactions, seizures, and cardiac arrhythmias. Therefore, its use is generally restricted to specific indications and under the close supervision of a healthcare professional.

Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare, benign type of histiocytic tumor that typically presents in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized by the proliferation of lipid-laden macrophages called xanthoma cells, along with Touton giant cells and other inflammatory cells. JXG usually appears as a single or multiple, firm, yellowish to reddish-brown papules or nodules on the skin. While most cases of JXG are self-limited and resolve without treatment, some may involve extracutaneous sites such as the eyes, mouth, bones, and internal organs, which can lead to complications. The exact cause of JXG remains unknown, but it is not considered a hereditary condition.

Patient positioning in a medical context refers to the arrangement and placement of a patient's body in a specific posture or alignment on a hospital bed, examination table, or other medical device during medical procedures, surgeries, or diagnostic imaging examinations. The purpose of patient positioning is to optimize the patient's comfort, ensure their safety, facilitate access to the surgical site or area being examined, enhance the effectiveness of medical interventions, and improve the quality of medical images in diagnostic tests.

Proper patient positioning can help prevent complications such as pressure ulcers, nerve injuries, and respiratory difficulties. It may involve adjusting the height and angle of the bed, using pillows, blankets, or straps to support various parts of the body, and communicating with the patient to ensure they are comfortable and aware of what to expect during the procedure.

In surgical settings, patient positioning is carefully planned and executed by a team of healthcare professionals, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, and surgical technicians, to optimize surgical outcomes and minimize risks. In diagnostic imaging examinations, such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs, patient positioning is critical for obtaining high-quality images that can aid in accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Antifibrinolytic agents are a class of medications that inhibit the breakdown of blood clots. They work by blocking the action of enzymes called plasminogen activators, which convert plasminogen to plasmin, the main enzyme responsible for breaking down fibrin, a protein that forms the framework of a blood clot.

By preventing the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, antifibrinolytic agents help to stabilize existing blood clots and prevent their premature dissolution. These medications are often used in clinical settings where excessive bleeding is a concern, such as during or after surgery, childbirth, or trauma.

Examples of antifibrinolytic agents include tranexamic acid, aminocaproic acid, and epsilon-aminocaproic acid. While these medications can be effective in reducing bleeding, they also carry the risk of thromboembolic events, such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, due to their pro-coagulant effects. Therefore, they should be used with caution and only under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Acoustic microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses sound waves to visualize and analyze the structure and properties of various materials, including biological samples. In the context of medical diagnostics and research, acoustic microscopy can be used to examine tissues, cells, and cellular components with high resolution, providing valuable information about their mechanical and physical properties.

In acoustic microscopy, high-frequency sound waves are focused onto a sample using a transducer. The interaction between the sound waves and the sample generates echoes, which contain information about the sample's internal structure and properties. These echoes are then recorded and processed to create an image of the sample.

Acoustic microscopy offers several advantages over other imaging techniques, such as optical microscopy or electron microscopy. For example, it does not require staining or labeling of samples, which can be time-consuming and potentially damaging. Additionally, acoustic microscopy can provide high-resolution images of samples in their native state, allowing researchers to study the effects of various treatments or interventions on living cells and tissues.

In summary, acoustic microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses sound waves to visualize and analyze the structure and properties of biological samples with high resolution, providing valuable information for medical diagnostics and research.

Penetrating eye injuries are a type of ocular trauma where a foreign object or substance pierces the outer layers of the eye and damages the internal structures. This can result in serious harm to various parts of the eye, such as the cornea, iris, lens, or retina, and may potentially cause vision loss or blindness if not promptly treated.

The severity of a penetrating eye injury depends on several factors, including the type and size of the object that caused the injury, the location of the wound, and the extent of damage to the internal structures. Common causes of penetrating eye injuries include sharp objects, such as metal shards or glass fragments, projectiles, such as pellets or bullets, and explosive materials.

Symptoms of a penetrating eye injury may include pain, redness, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, floaters, or the presence of a foreign body in the eye. If you suspect that you have sustained a penetrating eye injury, it is essential to seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist or other healthcare professional with experience in treating eye trauma.

Treatment for penetrating eye injuries may include removing any foreign objects or substances from the eye, repairing damaged tissues, and administering medications to prevent infection and reduce inflammation. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the injury and restore vision. Preventing eye injuries is crucial, and appropriate protective eyewear should be worn when engaging in activities that pose a risk of eye trauma.

A glaucoma drainage implant is a medical device used in the surgical management of glaucoma, a group of eye conditions that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss. The implant provides an alternative drainage pathway for the aqueous humor, the clear fluid inside the eye, to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) when other treatment methods have been unsuccessful.

The glaucoma drainage implant typically consists of a small silicone or polypropylene plate with a tube attached. During surgery, the tube is carefully inserted into the anterior chamber of the eye, allowing the aqueous humor to flow through the tube and collect on the plate. The plate is placed underneath the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye, where the fluid gets absorbed by the body.

There are various types of glaucoma drainage implants available, such as the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve, Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant, and Molteno Glaucoma Implant. Each type has its unique design features and may be more suitable for specific cases depending on the severity of glaucoma, previous surgical history, and individual patient factors.

Glaucoma drainage implant surgery is usually considered when other treatment options, such as medication or laser therapy, have failed to control IOP effectively. The procedure aims to prevent further optic nerve damage and preserve the patient's remaining vision. Potential complications of glaucoma drainage implant surgery include infection, bleeding, hypotony (abnormally low IOP), exposure of the tube, and failure of the device. Regular postoperative follow-up with an eye care professional is essential to monitor the implant's performance and manage any potential complications.

A trabeculectomy is a surgical procedure performed on the eye to treat glaucoma, an eye condition characterized by increased pressure within the eye that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss. The main goal of this operation is to create a new channel for the aqueous humor (the clear fluid inside the eye) to drain out, thus reducing the intraocular pressure (IOP).

During the trabeculectomy procedure, a small flap is made in the sclera (the white part of the eye), and a piece of the trabecular meshwork (a structure inside the eye that helps regulate the flow of aqueous humor) is removed. This opening allows the aqueous humor to bypass the obstructed drainage system and form a bleb, a small blister-like sac on the surface of the eye, which absorbs the fluid and reduces IOP.

The success of trabeculectomy depends on various factors, including the patient's age, type and severity of glaucoma, previous treatments, and overall health. Potential complications may include infection, bleeding, cataract formation, hypotony (abnormally low IOP), or failure to control IOP. Regular follow-up appointments with an ophthalmologist are necessary to monitor the eye's response to the surgery and manage any potential issues that may arise.

Nonpenetrating wounds are a type of trauma or injury to the body that do not involve a break in the skin or underlying tissues. These wounds can result from blunt force trauma, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. They can also result from crushing injuries, where significant force is applied to a body part, causing damage to internal structures without breaking the skin.

Nonpenetrating wounds can cause a range of injuries, including bruising, swelling, and damage to internal organs, muscles, bones, and other tissues. The severity of the injury depends on the force of the trauma, the location of the impact, and the individual's overall health and age.

While nonpenetrating wounds may not involve a break in the skin, they can still be serious and require medical attention. If you have experienced blunt force trauma or suspect a nonpenetrating wound, it is important to seek medical care to assess the extent of the injury and receive appropriate treatment.

Bed rest is a medical recommendation for a person to limit their activities and remain in bed for a period of time. It is often ordered by healthcare providers to help the body recover from certain medical conditions or treatments, such as:

* Infections
* Pregnancy complications
* Recent surgery
* Heart problems
* Blood pressure fluctuations
* Bleeding
* Bone fractures
* Certain neurological conditions

The duration of bed rest can vary depending on the individual's medical condition and response to treatment. While on bed rest, patients are typically advised to change positions frequently to prevent complications such as bedsores, blood clots, and muscle weakness. They may also receive physical therapy, occupational therapy, or other treatments to help maintain their strength and mobility during this period.

A bandage is a medical dressing or covering applied to a wound, injury, or sore with the intention of promoting healing or preventing infection. Bandages can be made of a variety of materials such as gauze, cotton, elastic, or adhesive tape and come in different sizes and shapes to accommodate various body parts. They can also have additional features like fasteners, non-slip surfaces, or transparent windows for monitoring the condition of the wound.

Bandages serve several purposes, including:

1. Absorbing drainage or exudate from the wound
2. Protecting the wound from external contaminants and bacteria
3. Securing other medical devices such as catheters or splints in place
4. Reducing swelling or promoting immobilization of the affected area
5. Providing compression to control bleeding or prevent fluid accumulation
6. Relieving pain by reducing pressure on sensitive nerves or structures.

Proper application and care of bandages are essential for effective wound healing and prevention of complications such as infection or delayed recovery.

Orbital diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the orbit, which is the bony cavity in the skull that contains the eye, muscles, nerves, fat, and blood vessels. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as eyelid swelling, protrusion or displacement of the eyeball, double vision, pain, and limited extraocular muscle movement.

Orbital diseases can be broadly classified into inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic (benign or malignant), vascular, traumatic, and congenital categories. Some examples of orbital diseases include:

* Orbital cellulitis: a bacterial or fungal infection that causes swelling and inflammation in the orbit
* Graves' disease: an autoimmune disorder that affects the thyroid gland and can cause protrusion of the eyeballs (exophthalmos)
* Orbital tumors: benign or malignant growths that develop in the orbit, such as optic nerve gliomas, lacrimal gland tumors, and lymphomas
* Carotid-cavernous fistulas: abnormal connections between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus, leading to pulsatile proptosis and other symptoms
* Orbital fractures: breaks in the bones surrounding the orbit, often caused by trauma
* Congenital anomalies: structural abnormalities present at birth, such as craniofacial syndromes or dermoid cysts.

Proper diagnosis and management of orbital diseases require a multidisciplinary approach involving ophthalmologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other specialists.

Compartment syndromes refer to a group of conditions characterized by increased pressure within a confined anatomical space (compartment), leading to impaired circulation and nerve function. These compartments are composed of bones, muscles, tendons, blood vessels, and nerves, surrounded by a tough fibrous fascial covering that does not expand easily.

There are two main types of compartment syndromes: acute and chronic.

1. Acute Compartment Syndrome (ACS): This is a medical emergency that typically occurs after trauma, fractures, or prolonged compression of the affected limb. The increased pressure within the compartment reduces blood flow to the muscles and nerves, causing ischemia, pain, and potential muscle and nerve damage if not promptly treated with fasciotomy (surgical release of the fascial covering). Symptoms include severe pain disproportionate to the injury, pallor, paresthesia (abnormal sensation), pulselessness, and paralysis.
2. Chronic Compartment Syndrome (CCS) or Exertional Compartment Syndrome: This condition is caused by repetitive physical activities that lead to increased compartment pressure over time. The symptoms are usually reversible with rest and may include aching, cramping, tightness, or swelling in the affected limb during exercise. CCS rarely leads to permanent muscle or nerve damage if managed appropriately with activity modification, physical therapy, and occasionally surgical intervention (fasciotomy or fasciectomy).

Early recognition and appropriate management of compartment syndromes are crucial for preventing long-term complications such as muscle necrosis, contractures, and nerve damage.

A retrobulbar hemorrhage is a rare but serious condition that involves the accumulation of blood in the retrobulbar space, which is the area between the back surface of the eyeball (the globe) and the front part of the bony socket (orbit) that contains it. This space is normally filled with fatty tissue and various supportive structures like muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

Retrobulbar hemorrhage typically occurs as a result of trauma or surgery to the eye or orbit, causing damage to the blood vessels in this area. The bleeding can lead to increased pressure within the orbit, which may compress the optic nerve and restrict the flow of blood and oxygen to the eye. This can result in rapid vision loss, proptosis (forward displacement of the eyeball), pain, and other ocular dysfunctions.

Immediate medical attention is required for retrobulbar hemorrhage, as it can lead to permanent visual impairment or blindness if not treated promptly. Treatment options may include observation, medication, or surgical intervention to relieve the pressure and restore blood flow to the eye.

Surgical decompression is a medical procedure that involves relieving pressure on a nerve or tissue by creating additional space. This is typically accomplished through the removal of a portion of bone or other tissue that is causing the compression. The goal of surgical decompression is to alleviate symptoms such as pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness caused by the compression.

In the context of spinal disorders, surgical decompression is often used to treat conditions such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, or bone spurs that are compressing nerves in the spine. The specific procedure used may vary depending on the location and severity of the compression, but common techniques include laminectomy, discectomy, and foraminotomy.

It's important to note that surgical decompression is a significant medical intervention that carries risks such as infection, bleeding, and injury to surrounding tissues. As with any surgery, it should be considered as a last resort after other conservative treatments have been tried and found to be ineffective. A thorough evaluation by a qualified medical professional is necessary to determine whether surgical decompression is appropriate in a given case.

In medical terms, the orbit refers to the bony cavity or socket in the skull that contains and protects the eye (eyeball) and its associated structures, including muscles, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and the lacrimal gland. The orbit is made up of several bones: the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, maxilla bone, and palatine bone. These bones form a pyramid-like shape that provides protection for the eye while also allowing for a range of movements.

Enophthalmos is a medical term that refers to the abnormal positioning of the eyeball within its socket, resulting in a posterior or backward displacement of the eye. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, surgical procedures, or diseases that affect the orbital tissues, including cancer, inflammation, or infection. Enophthalmos may lead to cosmetic concerns and visual disturbances, depending on its severity. A thorough examination by an ophthalmologist or an oculoplastic surgeon is necessary for accurate diagnosis and management of this condition.

A layered hyphema when fresh blood is seen lower in the anterior chamber is moderately severe. A full hyphema (total hyphema), ... A traumatic hyphema is caused by a blow to the eye. A hyphema can also occur spontaneously. A decrease in vision or a loss of ... Rebleeding occurs in 4-35% of hyphema cases and is a risk factor for glaucoma. Young children with traumatic hyphema are at an ... Sedation is not usually necessary for patients with hyphema. Aminocaproic or tranexamic acids are often prescribed for hyphema ...
Uvietis, Glaucoma, and Hyphema are the classic sins of UGH syndrome, but the term is often used when one, two, or all three ... A hyphema results from damage to vascular tissue of the iris, ciliary body, or angle by mispositioned IOL. Elevated intraocular ... "Uveitis-Glaucoma-Hyphema Syndrome - EyeWiki". eyewiki.aao.org. Austin R, Fox; Jason P, Kam; Wallase L.M, Alward. "Uveitis ... Du, Yu; Zhu, Xiangjia; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Yinglei; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yi (10 January 2020). "Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome with ...
Hyphema is diagnosed with a slit lamp examination. If the hyphema is large enough, it will also be visible on a penlight exam. ... All patients with hyphema require ophthalmology consultation. Any patient with a hyphema larger than grade II, elevated ... In hyphema, blood pools in the anterior chamber, where the iris (the colored part of the eye) and the pupil are located. ... Hyphema is a result of blunt or penetrating trauma to the orbit that increases intraocular pressure, causing tears in the ...
This includes penetrating globe injuries; corneal abrasions or corneal foreign bodies; hyphema (must be referred); eyelid ... Multiple complications are known to occur following eye injury: corneal scarring, hyphema, iridodialysis, post-traumatic ...
"Topical aminocaproic acid in the treatment of traumatic hyphema". Archives of Ophthalmology. 115 (9): 1106-1112. doi:10.1001/ ... carries an orphan drug designation from the FDA for the prevention of recurrent hemorrhage in patients with traumatic hyphema. ...
A large hyphema may require careful anterior chamber washout. Rebleeds may require additional intervention and therapy. Later, ... Iridodialyses often accompany angle recession and may cause glaucoma or hyphema. Hypotony may also occur. Those with traumatic ... Iridodialysis causing an associated hyphema has to be carefully managed, and recurrent bleeds should be prevented by strict ...
"Systemic metastasis following hyphema drainage in an unsuspected retinoblastoma". J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 44 (2): 120- ...
Its complications include cataracts, hyphema, glaucoma and unresolved vitreous haemorrhage. Pahl DA, Green NS, Bhatia M, Chen ...
Pain, hyphema and iridocyclitis are possible complications of TS-CPC. Fibrin exudates, hyphema, cystoid macular edema and loss ...
Blood in the anterior chamber of the eye is known as hyphema. Severe hyphema covering pupillary area can cause sudden decrease ...
Al-Fadhil, Nawal; Pathare, Anil; Ganesh, Anuradha (2001-10-01). "Traumatic Hyphema and Factor XI Deficiency (Hemophilia C)". ...
Hyphema, anterior uveitis and glaucoma are three main pathologies in this area. In hyphema, blood fills the anterior chamber as ... Glaucoma Hyphema Hypopyon Intraocular pressure Ocular hypertension Anterior chamber angle cross-section imaged by an SD-OCT. ...
List of systemic diseases with ocular manifestations Intermediate uveitis Uveitis-Glaucoma-Hyphema syndrome "Uveitis". National ...
Occular Hypotony and hyphema following the removal of cheesewire sutures are also common occurrences. Surgeons can take several ...
The presence of JXG in the eye can cause spontaneous hyphema, secondary glaucoma or even blindness. It is most often seen in ... spontaneous hyphema or heterochromia iridis. Diagnosing and treating the patient as early as possible contributes to the most ...
It can also cause temporary blurred vision or darkness of vision, temporary shortsightedness, hyphema and retinal detachment. ...
Ocular signs of arterial hypertension include mydriasis, hyphema, or blindness due to retinal detachment and/or intraocular ...
Hyphema - Hemorrhage in the front chamber of the eye Uveitis - Inflammation of the uvea of the eye Huang, John H.; Gaudio, Paul ...
Bleeding within the eye, a condition called a hyphema, is more serious: it can permanently reduce vision and can damage the ...
Zhu Yunyi has recovered from hyphema, and Zhou Yanchen has recovered from fainting from hypoglycemia for the practices for the ... at midnight of the live performance when his belt hit his right contact lens and temporarily blinded him due to hyphema. He had ...
Zhu Yunyi has recovered from hyphema, and Zhou Yanchen has recovered from fainting from hypoglycemia for the practices for the ... at midnight of the live performance when his belt hit his right contact lens and temporarily blinded him due to hyphema. He had ...
Recent research has shown the most common complications to include hyphema, peripheral anterior synechiae, corneal injury and ...
Hemosiderosis - long standing hyphema (blood in the anterior chamber) following blunt trauma to the eye may lead to iron ...
One indication can be the Amsler sign, which is the presence of blood (hyphema) in the aspirated vitreous fluid, in ... also known as hyphema. This condition is usually unilateral, and its symptoms vary from none to mild blurring and discomfort. ...
Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome is a complication caused by the mechanical irritation of a mis-positioned IOL over the iris, ...
Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome is a complication caused by the mechanical irritation of a mis-positioned IOL over the iris, ...
There is less incidence of uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome in a fibrin glue-assisted IOL implantation, as compared with a ...
... glaucoma due to phacotoxic meshwork blockage Subluxation of lens Glaucoma secondary to intraocular hemorrhage Hyphema Hemolytic ...
... hyphema) in the aspirated aqueous fluid, in paracentesis of the anterior chamber, and is caused due to iris atrophy usually ...
... hyphema MeSH C23.550.414.756.775 - retinal hemorrhage MeSH C23.550.414.756.887 - vitreous hemorrhage MeSH C23.550.414.788 - ...
A layered hyphema when fresh blood is seen lower in the anterior chamber is moderately severe. A full hyphema (total hyphema), ... A traumatic hyphema is caused by a blow to the eye. A hyphema can also occur spontaneously. A decrease in vision or a loss of ... Rebleeding occurs in 4-35% of hyphema cases and is a risk factor for glaucoma. Young children with traumatic hyphema are at an ... Sedation is not usually necessary for patients with hyphema. Aminocaproic or tranexamic acids are often prescribed for hyphema ...
Hyphema is the collection of red blood cells in the anterior chamber. A microhyphema occurs when the red blood cells are only ... In a macroscopic hyphema (hyphema), a visible layer of red blood cells in the anterior chamber may be detected even without the ... Prognosis depends on the size of the hyphema. Patients with a small-sized hyphema have a good prognosis with simple management ... Trauma is the most common cause of hyphema; consequently, hyphema is often seen in younger patients. A blunt, compressive force ...
Hyphema is blood in the front area (anterior chamber) of the eye. The blood collects behind the cornea and in front of the iris ... Hyphema is blood in the front area (anterior chamber) of the eye. The blood collects behind the cornea and in front of the iris ... You may not be able to see a small hyphema when looking at your eye in the mirror. With a total hyphema, the collection of ... Hyphema is most often caused by trauma to the eye. Other causes of bleeding in the front chamber of the eye include:. *Blood ...
that case is known as glaucoma post-hyphema.. Who is at risk for glaucoma post-hyphema?. People with SCT are at increased risk ... What treatments are available for glaucoma post-hyphema in a person with SCT? Treatment of hyphema in individuals with SCT ... What is glaucoma post-hyphema?. Hyphema, the presence of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, may follow eye injury. It ... Sometimes hyphema can lead to glaucoma and damage to the optic nerve. So once hyphema has occurred, persistent vision ...
Hyphema - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the Merck Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... People with hyphema often have blurred vision and pain when exposed to bright light. If the hyphema is large enough, a layer of ... Because a hyphema increases the life-long risk of developing glaucoma, people who have had a hyphema should have their eyes ... A hyphema is bleeding into the front chamber (the fluid-filled space between the clear cornea and the colored iris) of the eye ...
Primary hyphema was always unilateral. In four of these cases, the cause of hyphema was trauma and remaining case was caused by ... Perhaps traumatic hyphema is less complicated than other types of hyphema in everyday practice and simply does not reach the ... Dog #20, unilateral hyphema, left eye (OS), systemic nature. In this case, hyphema is characterized by dark blood filling part ... Dog #20, unilateral hyphema, left eye (OS), systemic nature. In this case, hyphema is characterized by dark blood filling part ...
Hyphema in dogs is a condition where blood cells mix with the aqueous humor of the dogs eye. It can be systemic or localized. ... Localized causes of hyphema in dogs. There are several eye disorders that can trigger hyphema in dogs:. *Trauma to the eyes: it ... Systemic causes of hyphema in dogs. The two main systemic causes that can cause hyphema in dogs are:. *Hypertension: increased ... Symptoms of hyphema in dogs Although most of us will be alerted to the presence of hyphema in dogs due to the appearance of ...
Hyphema is the collection of red blood cells in the anterior chamber. A microhyphema occurs when the red blood cells are only ... In a macroscopic hyphema (hyphema), a visible layer of red blood cells in the anterior chamber may be detected even without the ... Trauma is the most common cause of hyphema; consequently, hyphema is often seen in younger patients. A blunt, compressive force ... encoded search term (Hyphema Glaucoma) and Hyphema Glaucoma What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Hyphema is a pooling of blood in the interior part of the eye, in the space between the iris and cornea. Trauma inside the eye ... Follow-ups for Hyphema. Following the development and treatment of hyphema, it is advisable to schedule regular eye checkups. ... Preventing Hyphema. An accidental injury to the eye is the most common cause of blood pooling in the eye, and the easiest to ... How is Hyphema Diagnosed?. The doctor will carry out a physical eye exam and enquire into the visual medical history of the ...
Hyphema - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... People with hyphema often have blurred vision and pain when exposed to bright light. If the hyphema is large enough, a layer of ... Because a hyphema increases the life-long risk of developing glaucoma, people who have had a hyphema should have their eyes ... A hyphema is bleeding into the front chamber (the fluid-filled space between the clear cornea and the colored iris) of the eye ...
Partial lens subluxation and traumatic hyphema. Posted on March 6, 2020. by Edward Gillis ...
What does a hyphema indicate?. A hyphema usually happens when an injury causes a tear of the iris or pupil of the eye. ... How long does it take for a hyphema to clear?. If your hyphema is mild, it can heal on its own in about one week. You can treat ... Hyphema is the collection of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye. The most common cause of hyphema is blunt trauma, though ... Does hyphema need surgery?. In some situations, however, the hyphema can be so severe that it nearly completely fills the ...
Hyphema caused by trauma is more common in males. Other things that may raise the risk of this problem from trauma are:. *A ... Hyphema is when blood collects between the clear dome of the eye (cornea) and the colored part of the eye (iris). This can lead ... Treating any underlying health problems that may be causing the hyphema *Medicines to ease discomfort and swelling, such as ... Hyphema-emergency management. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://www.dynamed.com/management/hyphema-emergency- ...
TREATMENT AND PROGNOSIS IN THE TRAUMATIC HYPHEMA. Ali Y lmaz1, Cahit zg n1, Ayd n Y ld r m1, Ercan ng r1, Faruk Ero lu1. ... Keywords: TRAUMATIC HYPHEMA, PARACENTESIS, VISUAL PROGNOSIS. TRAVMAT K H FEMADA TEDAV VE PROGNOZ. Ali Y lmaz1, Cahit zg n1, Ayd ... In our study, we evaluated treatment of traumatic hyphema and prognostic factors in visual outcomes. Between the years of 1992- ... All of those eight patients initially had total hyphema. Causes of reduced final vision were cataract, retinal detachment, ...
Do not ignore the first signs of hyphema. All you need to know about hyphema and hyphema definition is in the article. ... What Is Hyphema? Do you wonder what hyphema is? For example blood in the anterior chamber of the eye is the sign of the hyphema ... How long does hyphema last?. When you have hyphema you might be in panic but you dont need to. The first few days the hyphema ... A blow in the eye may cause a traumatic hyphema. What Are the Symptoms of Traumatic Hyphema?. One of the most common questions ...
Erosion of the tumor into blood vessels in adjacent tissues, or areas of necrosis within the tumor, can lead to hyphema or ... Floaters can be reported when areas of necrosis within the tumor or adjacent structures produce vitreous hemorrhage or hyphema. ... They can cause such secondary effects as cataract; lens subluxation; hyphema; orbital involvement via extrascleral extension; ...
Hyphema won the Dec 9, 2011 Friday Book Cover Vote on the Shades of Love website & was recommended in the book Summer Reading: ... Her other works include the EMS Novels Bundle Pack (contains both Final Sin and Hyphema); Until the Ambulance Arrives (a ... Popular trade magazine EMSWorld posted about Final Sin & Hyphema.. Bartletts Rule was named one of Carolyn Howard Johnsons ...
Deutsch, T. A., Weinreb, R. N., & Goldberg, M. F. (1984). Indications for Surgical Management of Hyphema in Patients with ... Deutsch, Thomas A. ; Weinreb, Robert N. ; Goldberg, Morton F. / Indications for Surgical Management of Hyphema in Patients with ... Indications for Surgical Management of Hyphema in Patients with Sickle Cell Trait. / Deutsch, Thomas A.; Weinreb, Robert N.; ... Indications for Surgical Management of Hyphema in Patients with Sickle Cell Trait. Archives of ophthalmology. 1984 Apr;102(4): ...
Hyphema: A hyphema is blood inside your eye, usually due to an eye injury or following surgery. ...
Hyphema. *Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension. *Iridocyclitis. *Iris Ciliary Degeneration. *Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. * ...
Hyphema. Gragg J, Blair K, Baker MB. Gragg J, et al. Among authors: baker mb. 2022 Dec 26. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure ...
Erosion of the tumor into blood vessels in adjacent tissues, or areas of necrosis within the tumor, can lead to hyphema or ... Floaters can be reported when areas of necrosis within the tumor or adjacent structures produce vitreous hemorrhage or hyphema. ... They can cause such secondary effects as cataract; lens subluxation; hyphema; orbital involvement via extrascleral extension; ...
H21.01 Hyphema, OD; S01.111A Laceration without foreign body of right eyelid and periocular area, initial encounter; and S05.11 ...
... a total hyphema, no light perception vision and an intraocular pressure of 60 mmHg (right eye). He had a history of diabetes ... We report the case of a patient with total hyphema, neovascular glaucoma, long-standing retinal detachment and no light ... total hyphema and no posterior view given the hyphema (Figure 1). He had an unremarkable examination of his left eye, with ... Olawoye, O., Teng, C.C., Shabto, U. et al. Visual recovery in a patient with total hyphema, neovascular glaucoma, long-standing ...
Signs of globe rupture include hyphema; a peaked, teardrop-shaped, or otherwise irregularly shaped pupil; exposed uveal tissue ...
Is Hyphema In Cats An Emergency?. Hyphema, or bleeding in the eye, can point to other issues that may cause an emergency. ... Hyphema means "bleeding inside the eye", and it can happen for a number of reasons including trauma (e.g. an accident where ... The concern when a cat develops hyphema is that if there is a serious underlying cause that remains untreated, there could be ... For this reason, if a cat develops hyphema, they should be taken to the emergency vet without delay. ...
The most common events were intraocular pressure elevation, hyphema, and stent blockage. ...
  • A traumatic hyphema is caused by a blow to the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traumatic hyphema may lead to increased intraocular pressure (IOP), peripheral anterior synechiae, atrophy of the optic nerve, staining of the cornea with blood, re-bleeding, and impaired accommodation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Young children with traumatic hyphema are at an increased risk of developing amblyopia, an irreversible condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of people with a traumatic hyphema are children and young adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rahmani B, Jahadi HR. Comparison of tranexamic acid and prednisolone in the treatment of traumatic hyphema. (medscape.com)
  • A surgical approach that involves paracentesis and gentle anterior chamber washout and minimal surgical trauma is presented for dealing with traumatic hyphema. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • A blow in the eye may cause a traumatic hyphema. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • What Are the Symptoms of Traumatic Hyphema? (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • In our study, we evaluated treatment of traumatic hyphema and prognostic factors in visual outcomes. (tjtes.org)
  • Between the years of 1992-1995, 100 traumatic hyphema patients which have been treated in outpatient or inpatient, have been included in this study. (tjtes.org)
  • In conclusion, while complications of traumatic hyphema can be prevented with medical and surgical treatment, anterior and posterior segment problems determine visual prognosis. (tjtes.org)
  • Nerf Guns can cause serious eye injuries in kids - including traumatic hyphema, which can cause permanent blindness due to blood pooling between the surface of the cornea and iris, a new case report suggests. (fatherly.com)
  • All three patients were diagnosed with traumatic hyphema and significant eye trauma. (fatherly.com)
  • Secondary hemorrhage, or rebleeding of the hyphema, is thought to worsen outcomes in terms of visual function and lead to complications such as glaucoma, corneal staining, optic atrophy, or vision loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyphema (hemorrhage within the anterior chamber of the eye) can be caused by several mechanisms and can easily be detected in routine ophthalmic or necroscopic examination as discolored red eye(s). (scielo.br)
  • Hyphema presented as a unilateral (14 cases out of 20) or bilateral (6/20) disorder in dogs and cats and extension of hemorrhage varied from minimal to diffuse. (scielo.br)
  • Erosion of the tumor into blood vessels in adjacent tissues, or areas of necrosis within the tumor, can lead to hyphema or vitreous hemorrhage. (medscape.com)
  • ocular lesions such as hyphema, mydriasis, anisocoria, retinal hemorrhage or detachment may be noted. (dvm360.com)
  • Rebleeding occurs in 4-35% of hyphema cases and is a risk factor for glaucoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain types of anterior chamber intraocular lenses used after cataract extraction lend themselves to hyphema, especially rigid lenses, which is called uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema (UGH) syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Chronic glaucoma following hyphema is partly caused by fibrotic changes in the trabecular meshwork induced by inflammation. (medscape.com)
  • The relative risk of developing glaucoma after ocular trauma associated with hyphema has been found to be 6.9. (medscape.com)
  • Sickle Cell Trait and Glaucoma Post-Hyphema: Tips to protect your patient's vision. (cdc.gov)
  • more likely to develop glaucoma post-hyphema. (cdc.gov)
  • What is glaucoma post-hyphema? (cdc.gov)
  • Glaucoma, or increased intraocular pressure, may occur after hyphema, and in that case is known as glaucoma post-hyphema. (cdc.gov)
  • Who is at risk for glaucoma post-hyphema? (cdc.gov)
  • People with SCT are at increased risk of glaucoma post-hyphema. (cdc.gov)
  • What are the signs and symptoms of glaucoma post-hyphema? (cdc.gov)
  • Sometimes hyphema can lead to glaucoma and damage to the optic nerve. (cdc.gov)
  • So once hyphema has occurred, persistent vision impairment suggests rebleeding or glaucoma. (cdc.gov)
  • What treatments are available for glaucoma post-hyphema in a person with SCT? (cdc.gov)
  • Since there is a significant risk for glaucoma post-hyphema, the ophthalmologist must also be familiar with prevention and management of glaucoma. (cdc.gov)
  • Because a hyphema increases the life-long risk of developing glaucoma, people who have had a hyphema should have their eyes examined every year. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Hyphema, anterior uveitis and glaucoma are three main pathologies in this area. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • We report the case of a patient with total hyphema, neovascular glaucoma, long-standing retinal detachment and no light perception vision, who regained counting fingers vision with complete regression of neovascularization following anterior chamber washout, intravitreal bevacizumab, pars plana vitrectomy, and silicone oil placement. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Given his need for blood thinners, as well as his stage of glaucoma and his active lifestyle, I chose to perform a Hydrus implant as opposed to a goniotomy or a trabeculotomy given the risk of a high - recurrent hyphema. (reachmd.com)
  • I would look for anterior segment inflammation and uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome. (crstoday.com)
  • This group is more likely to have complications of hyphema, including central retinal artery occlusion. (medscape.com)
  • Hyphema was secondary to systemic disease (15/20) or occurred as a primary ocular lesion (5/20) in four dogs and one cat. (scielo.br)
  • The most common causes of hyphema are intraocular surgery, blunt trauma, and lacerating trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • In four of these cases, the cause of hyphema was trauma and remaining case was caused by phacoclastic uveitis in a dog with bilateral hypermature cataract. (scielo.br)
  • Cataract-associated lesions were observed in 10 animals and included hyphema (one case), posterior synechiae (five cases), pupil seclusion (three cases), keratitis or corneal edema (three cases). (vin.com)
  • Treatment of hyphema in individuals with SCT should be provided by an ophthalmologist. (cdc.gov)
  • Sedation is not usually necessary for patients with hyphema. (wikipedia.org)
  • consequently, hyphema is often seen in younger patients. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with a small-sized hyphema have a good prognosis with simple management and treatment. (medscape.com)
  • Patients whose eyes undergo rebleeding have a poor prognosis because they have a larger sized hyphema and are also more likely to have higher IOP. (medscape.com)
  • All of those eight patients initially had total hyphema. (tjtes.org)
  • Hyphema is the medical condition of bleeding in the front (anterior) chamber of the eye between the iris and the cornea. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hyphema is bleeding into the front chamber (the fluid-filled space between the clear cornea and the colored iris) of the eye. (merckmanuals.com)
  • If the hyphema is large enough, a layer of blood is visible behind the lower part of the cornea when the person is upright. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Hyphema is a pooling of blood in the interior part of the eye, the space between the iris and cornea. (facty.com)
  • Hyphema is when blood collects between the clear dome of the eye (cornea) and the colored part of the eye (iris). (epnet.com)
  • The child had more complications than the two adults - in addition to hyphema, he also experienced swelling of the cornea and neuroretina, a battery of secondary eye injuries that have been linked with worse visual outcomes in children . (fatherly.com)
  • Hyphema (sounds like 'high-fee-ma') is a pooling or collection of blood in the front part of the eye, in the space between the cornea and the iris. (fraserhealth.ca)
  • In many people, the vision will improve, however some people may have other injuries related to trauma to the eye or complications related to the hyphema. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyphema is known as a temporary result of pressure or injuries in the eye however it affects the ability of sight. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • The most common cause of the hyphema is a hit on the eye, so sportive activities and injuries may result in blood in the eye problem. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Slit lamp examination revealed right eye nasal and temporal band keratopathy, mild corneal edema, total hyphema and no posterior view given the hyphema (Figure 1 ). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Complications are more frequently related to hyphema than microhyphema. (medscape.com)
  • Source of bleeding in hyphema with blunt trauma to eye is circulus iridis major artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Layered hyphema from blunt trauma. (medscape.com)
  • Most hyphema cases are due to blunt trauma. (medscape.com)
  • A layered hyphema when fresh blood is seen lower in the anterior chamber is moderately severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • A full hyphema (total hyphema), when blood fills up the chamber completely, is the most severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most severe complication of hyphema is an increase in pressure in the eye. (facty.com)
  • In some situations, however, the hyphema can be so severe that it nearly completely fills the anterior chamber and creates a large clot that does not clear without surgical intervention. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • If the hyphema is not severe, basic hyphema treatment can be applied at home remedy. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Even if it is so rare in the severe level of hyphema a surgery might be needed. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Prognosis depends on the size of the hyphema. (medscape.com)
  • When hyphema in dogs occurs, the eye will look glassy red due to the blood cells mixed with the normally transparent aqueous humor . (animalwised.com)
  • The most common events were intraocular pressure elevation, hyphema, and stent blockage. (medscape.com)
  • A 63-year-old Caucasian man with a 55-year history of long-standing retinal detachment after trauma presented to our facility with pain and redness, a total hyphema, no light perception vision and an intraocular pressure of 60 mmHg (right eye). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Primary hyphema was always unilateral. (scielo.br)
  • Generally, localized hyphema are usually unilateral. (animalwised.com)
  • Hyphema may also result from systemic diseases, including widespread inflammation ( Powell 2002 Powell C.C. 2002. (scielo.br)
  • Neovascularization of the iris or ciliary body may result in hyphema. (medscape.com)
  • With a total hyphema, the collection of blood will block the view of the iris and pupil. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Eventually, blood may cover the entire iris, resulting in hyphema. (facty.com)
  • As a result, the iris appears swollen, a stage known as "complete" or 'eight ball hyphema. (facty.com)
  • He did not have a postoperative hyphema. (reachmd.com)
  • Given her prior goniotomy, she did have a little micro-hyphema on postoperative week 1, but it resolved pretty quickly, and on post-op day 1, her pressure was a 7, her anterior chamber was formed and deep, and her vision was actually unchanged. (reachmd.com)
  • Conditions or medications that cause thinning of the blood, such as aspirin, warfarin, or drinking alcohol may also cause hyphema. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyphema is the collection of red blood cells in the anterior chamber. (medscape.com)
  • In a macroscopic hyphema (hyphema), a visible layer of red blood cells in the anterior chamber may be detected even without the aid of slit-lamp magnification. (medscape.com)
  • Hyphema is blood in the front area (anterior chamber) of the eye. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hyphema, the presence of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, may follow eye injury. (cdc.gov)
  • However, when blood appears to be in the eye of the dog, it suggests a condition known as hyphema . (animalwised.com)
  • Although most of us will be alerted to the presence of hyphema in dogs due to the appearance of blood in the dog's eye, there are other signs which we might notice. (animalwised.com)
  • The degree of hyphema is typically described in terms relating to the amount of the anterior chamber that is filled with blood. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • If your eye does not bleed again, the hyphema will usually heal in one or two weeks, depending on how much blood is present. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • The blood from a hyphema can clog the drainage canals of the eye causing a rise in intraocular pressure. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • Sometimes people mistake a broken blood vessel in the front of the eye for a hyphema. (ventolaphotography.com)
  • Hyphema (Blood in the Eye), All You Need to Know About! (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • For example blood in the anterior chamber of the eye is the sign of the hyphema. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Although hyphema seems scary looking with blood in the eye it does not lead to serious problems. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Dark red blood pools inside the front of your eyeball are known as hyphema . (hamptonsvision.com)
  • Hyphema is most often caused by trauma to the eye. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hyphema caused by trauma is more common in males. (epnet.com)
  • A decrease in vision or a loss of vision is often the first sign of a hyphema. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person with a full hyphema may not be able to see at all (complete loss of vision). (wikipedia.org)
  • In some studies, final vision was found better than 20/50 in almost 75% of all hyphema cases. (medscape.com)
  • Trauma to the eye followed by eye pain, sensitivity to light, and vision changes, such as decreased vision or vision loss, may suggest that a hyphema has occurred. (cdc.gov)
  • A hyphema will usually resolve with medical treatment, but requires monitoring as it can result in permanent, partial, or complete loss of vision. (merckmanuals.com)
  • People with hyphema often have blurred vision and pain when exposed to bright light. (merckmanuals.com)
  • If not treated in time, hyphema can block the vision partially or completely. (facty.com)
  • How long does it take for vision to return after hyphema? (ventolaphotography.com)
  • If you do not even apply the basic rating or avoid pressure or protect the eye from irritation the hyphema continues and may result in vision loss in the long run. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Initial treatment for hyphema includes eye protection to limit further trauma, and might also require bedrest and sedation for those who are found to have an increased risk for rebleeding. (cdc.gov)
  • A person with a hyphema should be examined by an ophthalmologist (a medical doctor who specializes in the evaluation and treatment-surgical and nonsurgical-of eye disorders) as soon as possible. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Following the development and treatment of hyphema, it is advisable to schedule regular eye checkups. (facty.com)
  • If you have hyphema in your eyes and are looking for a treatment you should visit an eye doctor. (ophthalmologybreakingnews.com)
  • Bloodstaining is an ominous sign and often heralds the need for surgical evacuation of the hyphema. (medscape.com)
  • Available at: http://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-hyphema. (epnet.com)
  • Hyphema is most common among athletes involved in activities such as basketball. (facty.com)
  • Total hyphema is difficult to treat, and the visual outcome is usually poor. (medscape.com)
  • In North America, the incidence of hyphema is 17-20 cases per 100,000 people per year. (medscape.com)
  • Vasculitis due to feline infectious peritonitis accounted for half of the cases (n=3) of systemic hyphema in cats. (scielo.br)