Gout: Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.Hyperuricemia: Excessive URIC ACID or urate in blood as defined by its solubility in plasma at 37 degrees C; greater than 0.42mmol per liter (7.0mg/dL) in men or 0.36mmol per liter (6.0mg/dL) in women. This condition is caused by overproduction of uric acid or impaired renal clearance. Hyperuricemia can be acquired, drug-induced or genetically determined (LESCH-NYHAN SYNDROME). It is associated with HYPERTENSION and GOUT.Uric Acid: An oxidation product, via XANTHINE OXIDASE, of oxypurines such as XANTHINE and HYPOXANTHINE. It is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism in humans and primates, whereas in most other mammals URATE OXIDASE further oxidizes it to ALLANTOIN.Gout Suppressants: Agents that increase uric acid excretion by the kidney (URICOSURIC AGENTS), decrease uric acid production (antihyperuricemics), or alleviate the pain and inflammation of acute attacks of gout.Allopurinol: A XANTHINE OXIDASE inhibitor that decreases URIC ACID production. It also acts as an antimetabolite on some simpler organisms.Arthritis, Gouty: Arthritis, especially of the great toe, as a result of gout. Acute gouty arthritis often is precipitated by trauma, infection, surgery, etc. The initial attacks are usually monoarticular but later attacks are often polyarticular.Uricosuric Agents: Gout suppressants that act directly on the renal tubule to increase the excretion of uric acid, thus reducing its concentrations in plasma.Urate Oxidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of urate and unidentified products. It is a copper protein. The initial products decompose to form allantoin. EC 1.7.3.3.Apazone: An anti-inflammatory agent used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. It also has uricosuric properties and has been used to treat gout.Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative: A family of monosaccharide transport proteins characterized by 12 membrane spanning helices. They facilitate passive diffusion of GLUCOSE across the CELL MEMBRANE.Xanthine Oxidase: An iron-molybdenum flavoprotein containing FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE that oxidizes hypoxanthine, some other purines and pterins, and aldehydes. Deficiency of the enzyme, an autosomal recessive trait, causes xanthinuria.Tumor Lysis Syndrome: A syndrome resulting from cytotoxic therapy, occurring generally in aggressive, rapidly proliferating lymphoproliferative disorders. It is characterized by combinations of hyperuricemia, lactic acidosis, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia.Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Glomerular Filtration Rate: The volume of water filtered out of plasma through glomerular capillary walls into Bowman's capsules per unit of time. It is considered to be equivalent to INULIN clearance.Benzbromarone: Uricosuric that acts by increasing uric acid clearance. It is used in the treatment of gout.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Uromodulin: A glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) - anchored membrane protein found on the thick ascending limb of the LOOP OF HENLE. The cleaved form of the protein is found abundantly in URINE.Oxonic Acid: Antagonist of urate oxidase.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: An inherited disorder transmitted as a sex-linked trait and caused by a deficiency of an enzyme of purine metabolism; HYPOXANTHINE PHOSPHORIBOSYLTRANSFERASE. Affected individuals are normal in the first year of life and then develop psychomotor retardation, extrapyramidal movement disorders, progressive spasticity, and seizures. Self-destructive behaviors such as biting of fingers and lips are seen frequently. Intellectual impairment may also occur but is typically not severe. Elevation of uric acid in the serum leads to the development of renal calculi and gouty arthritis. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp127)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.TaiwanToe Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.Purine-Pyrimidine Metabolism, Inborn ErrorsSodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit SODIUM CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS. They act as DIURETICS. Excess use is associated with HYPOKALEMIA.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Probenecid: The prototypical uricosuric agent. It inhibits the renal excretion of organic anions and reduces tubular reabsorption of urate. Probenecid has also been used to treat patients with renal impairment, and, because it reduces the renal tubular excretion of other drugs, has been used as an adjunct to antibacterial therapy.Rheumatology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.United StatesModels, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
"Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout Guidance and guidelines". www.nice.org.uk. 17 December 2008 ... Febuxostat is used to treat chronic gout and hyperuricemia. Febuxostat is typically only recommended in those who cannot ... Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout (TA164) Chapter 4. Consideration of the evidence Archived ... is a medication used in the treatment of chronic gout and hyperuricemia. There are concerns about more heart related deaths ...
... but are contraindicated in persons with conditions including hyperuricemia and gout. Uricosuria Hamada T, Ichida K, Hosoyamada ... "Effect on serum uric acid levels of drugs prescribed for indications other than treating hyperuricaemia". Curr. Pharm. Des. 11 ... In some persons with loss-of-function mutations of URAT1, the uricosurics benzbromarone and losartan had no effect, suggesting ... Thus, use of these drugs is contraindicated in persons already with a high urine concentration of uric acid (hyperuricosuria). ...
Hyperuricemia is a classic feature of gout, but nearly half of the time gout occurs without hyperuricemia and most people with ... "Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout Guidance and guidelines". www.nice.org.uk. 17 December 2008 ... of people with hyperuricemia develop gout at some point in their lifetimes. The risk, however, varies depending on the degree ... Some 5.8 million people were affected in 2013. Rates of gout approximately doubled between 1990 and 2010. This rise is believed ...
This results in both hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria, associated with severe gout and kidney problems. Neurological signs ... Hyperuricaemia associated with classic primary gout, which is caused by low uric acid renal clearance rather than uric acid ... Persons affected are cognitively impaired and have behavioral disturbances that emerge between two and three years of age. The ... and some may develop symptoms of hyperuricemia, and suffer from gout in their later years. Testing in this context has no ...
"Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with pirai (TA164) Chapter 4. Consideration of the evidence". ... "Hyperuricemia and gout: new insights into pathogenesis and treatment". Bulletin of the NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases. 65 (3 ... Eggebeen AT (2007). "Gout: an update". Am Fam Physician. 76 (6): 801-8. PMID 17910294.. Parameter ,month=. yang tidak diketahui ... "FDA approves new drug for gout". FDA.. *^ Sundy, JS (2011 Aug 17). "Efficacy and tolerability of pegloticase for the treatment ...
"Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout (TA164) Chapter 4. Consideration of the evidence". Guidance ... 2008). "Chapter 87: Gout and Hyperuricemia". Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology (8 izd.). Elsevier. ISBN 978-1-4160-4842-8.. ... Merriman, TR; Dalbeth, N (2011). "The genetic basis of hyperuricaemia and gout.". Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme 78 ( ... Choi HK (marec 2010). "A prescription for lifestyle change in patients with hyperuricemia and gout". Curr Opin Rheumatol 22 (2 ...
"Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout (TA164) Chapter 4. Consideration of the evidence". Guidance ... 2008). "Chapter 87: Gout and Hyperuricemia". KELLEY'S Textbook of Rheumatology (ed. 8th). Elsevier. ISBN 978-1-4160-4842-8.. ... Merriman, TR; Dalbeth, N (2011 Jan). "The genetic basis of hyperuricaemia and gout.". Joint, bone, spine: revue du rhumatisme ... Reginato AM, Mount DB, Yang I, Choi HK (2012). "The genetics of hyperuricaemia and gout". Nat Rev Rheumatol. PMID 22945592. doi ...
The Symptoms of gout could cause soft tissue and shared damage, even if will not be any gouty Arthritis Symptoms. Most people ... Usually hyperuricemia are easily cleared up through simple adjustments to eating habits, through losing fat, and via the item ... The swelling and pain would like gone away, nevertheless our prime uric acid concentrations (hyperuricaemia) towards system ... Frequently a gout person, once the discomfort is long gone, wont realize that the root issue which brought on tremendously ...
OBJECTIVES:Ultrasound lesions of gout have been described in people with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. However, the anatomical ... and discrimination of OMERACT-defined elementary ultrasound lesions of gout in people with asymptomatic hyperuricaemia: A ... at various sites in people with asymptomatic hyperuricemia and to determine which sites and lesions discriminate from people ... CONCLUSION:In people with asymptomatic hyperuricemia, scanning of the 1MTP and femoral condyle for double contour, plus the ...
9 several additional phases or checkpoints are required for development of gout in people with hyperuricaemia. The first of ... Asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Risks and consequences in the Normative Aging Study. Am J Med 1987;82:421-6. ... The current widely used clinical staging system for hyperuricaemia and gout describes the symptomatology of gout, but does not ... Diagnosis of gout in patients with asymptomatic hyperuricaemia: a pilot ultrasound study. Ann Rheum Dis 2012;71:157-8. ...
Febuxostat for the treatment of hyperuricaemia in people with gout: a single technology appraisal. Health Technol Assess 2009; ... Japanese Society of Gout and Nucleic Acid Metabolism. Japanese guideline for the management of hyperuricemia and gout: second ... Prevalence of Hyperuricemia and Gout in Mainland China from 2000 to 2014: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Biomed Res Int ... Patients with hyperuricaemia or gout are at risk of developing a variety of comorbidities, such as hypertension,4 5 chronic ...
... important when determining the factors that contribute to the development of hyperuricaemia and gout in a particular person. No ... 1990) Hyperuricemia-hyperlipemia association in the absence of obesity and alcohol abuse. Clin Rheum 9:28-31, . ... The finding of hyperlipidaemia in patients with hyperuricaemia and gout is common. The usual abnormality is ... "primary gout". Similarly, it is no longer expected that each patient with gout would have inherited a "gouty diathesis", unless ...
Febuxostat: A Novel Non-Purine Selective Inhibitor of Xanthine Oxidase for the Treatment of Hyperuricemia in Gout. Yu, Kuang- ... non-purine selective inhibitor of xanthine oxidase being developed for the management of hyperuricaemia in patients with gout. ... Management guidelines for behavioural and psychotic symptoms in persons with dementia--A review article. Jeyapaul, Premkumar; ... and role of febuxostat for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. A... ...
Hyperuricemia is a classic feature of gout, but nearly half of the time gout occurs without hyperuricemia and most people with ... "Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout Guidance and guidelines". www.nice.org.uk. 17 December 2008 ... of people with hyperuricemia develop gout at some point in their lifetimes. The risk, however, varies depending on the degree ... Some 5.8 million people were affected in 2013. Rates of gout approximately doubled between 1990 and 2010. This rise is believed ...
Background Reduced renal clearance of uric acid is a major contributor to hyperuricemia. The aim of this study was to examine ... Renal under-excretion of uric acid is the dominant cause of hyperuricaemia in 80-90% of people with gout [1, 2]. A number of ... Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007- ... Hyperuricaemia and gout prevalence is higher in men compared to women [22], and it is unusual for pre-menopausal women to ...
20 21 This urate raising effect was found to be exaggerated in people with hyperuricaemia18 or a history of gout.17 It is ... Shadick NA, Kim R, Weiss S, Liang MH, Sparrow D, Hu H. Effect of low level lead exposure on hyperuricemia and gout among middle ... of recommending a reduction in fructose intake in patients with hyperuricaemia and gout in order to reduce the risk of gout as ... Fructose intake and incident gout. Increasing fructose intake was associated with increasing risk of gout (table 3⇓). Compared ...
The role of hyperuricemia and gout in kidney and cardiovascular disease. Cleve Clin J Med. 2008 Jul. 75 Suppl 5:S13-6. [Medline ... In addition, persons with gout and those who form stones, in particular, have a reduced postprandial alkaline tide (alkaline ... Avram Z, Krishnan E. Hyperuricaemia--where nephrology meets rheumatology. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2008 Jul. 47(7):960-4. [ ... Chronic hyperuricemia and gout are the only causes of chronic urate nephropathy, if it exists as a clinical entity. Uric acid ...
About 10% of people with hyperuricaemia develop gout, but 80-90% of patients with gout are hyperuricaemic.4,5 The chance of ... Comorbidities of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: NHANES 2007-2008. Am J Med 2012;125:679-687.e1. ... The burden of gout is growing worldwide, due to the increasing number of people with conditions that predispose them to ... Systematic review of the prevalence of gout and hyperuricaemia in Australia. Intern Med J 2012;42:997-1007. ...
Genetic data may inform assessment of disease prognosis in individuals with hyperuricaemia or established gout, personalised ... there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of hyperuricaemia and gout as well as of the ... the identification of genes associated with development of gout in the context of hyperuricaemia, recognition that ABCG2 ... In combination with evidence that ABCG2 associates with gout using people with asymptomatic hyperuricemia as controls even ...
Febuxostat for the management of hyperuricaemia in people with gout. NICE technology appraisal guidance [TA164]. December 17, ... Comorbidities of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: NHANES 2007-2008. Am J Med. 2012;125:679-687.e1.. 6. ... baseline gout flare frequency, and acute gout flare medications. For the secondary outcome of gout flares, an additional ... Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007- ...
There has been no broad epidemiological survey of hyperuricemia in China, especially in Tibetan area. This study was therefore ... Background Hyperuricemia is a common and serious public health problem. ... did not cause major purine nucleotide degradation and may be beneficial for people with gout or hyperuricemia [38]. Another ... Recent insights into the pathogenesis of hyperuricaemia and gout. Hum Mol Genet. 2009;18(R2):R177-84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
... www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103339/lesinurad-for-the-treatment-of-hyperuricaemia-in-people-with-gout ... gout, interleukin-1 inhibitors, acute gout, gout treatment, urate lowering therapies, hyperuricemia, colchicine, ... The management of gout implies both the treatment of flares and the treatment of hyperuricaemia itself. Recent improvement in ... DATA SELECTION: A MEDLINE search (2000 to April 2017) was conducted using the terms hyperuricemia, gout, URAT-1, URAT-1 ...
Gout may be inherited in nature. Gout affected persons have a family history of gouty arthritis. Other causes of gout include ... Metabolic diseases: Gout. Clin Dermatol 2006;24:498-508.. r-11. Gaffo AL, Saag KG. Management of hyperuricemia and gout in CKD ... Another important risk factor for the development of gout is hyperuricaemia. Acute gout can be diagnosed on the basis of ... Gout is an acute inflammatory disease that 1 in 100 people in Pakistan. Gout is caused by increased level of uric acid in blood ...
... general Enzymology Physiological aspects Gout Care and treatment Drug therapy Gout suppressants Iron compounds Molybdenum ... a new treatment for hyperuricaemia in gout --a review article. by National Journal of Physiology, Pharmacy and Pharmacology; ... Gout and hyperuricemia. Curr Opin Rheumatol 2002; 14:281-286. [2.] Loeb JN. The influence of temperature on the solubility of ... Slow vital capacity parameters as indicators of pulmonary efficiency in obese people--a case control study.. ...
Comorbidities, especially CKD, and drugs prescribed for their treatment, also impact gout management. Numerous epidemiological ... stroke and peripheral arterial disease have been repeatedly shown to be increased in gout. Therefore, the screening and care of ... large randomised placebo-controlled trials are still needed to assess the benefits of treating asymptomatic hyperuricaemia. ... Gout, the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis worldwide, is associated with cardiovascular and renal diseases, and is an ...
Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops when an excess of uric acid in the blood leads to deposits of uric acid ... of Australians have gout. Gout is more common in males than females-almost 8 in 10 (79%) people with gout are males (ABS 2019). ... The underlying cause of gout is excess uric acid in the blood-a metabolic disorder called hyperuricaemia. This disorder is an ... Gout, Hyperuricemia, and Crystal-Associated Disease Network Consensus Statement Regarding Labels and Definitions for Disease ...
Gout is a painful condition that develops in some people who have chronically high blood levels of uric acid (hyperuricemia). ... Gout and Hyperuricaemia. *Hair loss. *Health Advice for Hajj and Umrah in Saudi Arabia ... Generally up to two-thirds of individuals with hyperuricemia never develop symptoms. The symptoms of gout result from the ... Ouch!!!!! That joint bloody hurts……is it GOUT?. Posted by Dr Benjamin on Mar 1, 2016 in Chronic Disease, GP Services , 0 ...
... of people with gout and hyperuricemia will have renal impairment. 25-40% of people with untreated hypertension (HTN) have [ ... For the pathophysiology of chronic urate nephropathy, a series of reactions initiated by hyperuricaemia or uricosuria was ... Etiology Gout Deposition of urate crystals into joints Hyperuricemia predisposes to gout Associations : Diabetes mellitus ... There are five recognized stages of gout: asymptomatic hyperuricemia acute gouty arthritis intercritical gout (between acute ...
Mechanism of secondary gout? *- Associated with a number of conditions which lead to hyperuricaemia.*- Increased uric acid ... What are the four clinical stages of gout? *1. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia*2. Acute gouty arthritis*Pain that usually involves 1 ... Can a diet high in purine-rich foods lead to gout in a healthy person? ... Mechanism of primary gout? *- 85% of the time results from an as-yet unexplained impairment of renal uric acid excretion. In ...
Possible causes include Hyperuricemia. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow ... Since thiazides reduce the clearance of uric acid, patients with gout or hyperuricemia may have exacerbations of their disease ... causes a steeper increase in the blood uric acid level than do equivalent quantities in persons with normouricemia. 24,25 We ... and is reflected by a reduction in uric acid clearance and development of hyperuricaemia. [academic.oup.com] ...
  • Gout affects 3.9% of the US adult population, 1 and its prevalence is rising as a result of the increasing rates of comorbidities that promote hyperuricemia and extensive use of thiazide and loop diuretics for the treatment of cardiovascular (CV) diseases (CVD). (ahdbonline.com)
  • Similarly, it is no longer expected that each patient with gout would have inherited a "gouty diathesis", unless you regard this concept as meaning a relatively poor renal clearance of urate in the presence of otherwise normal renal function. (bmj.com)
  • In disorders such as sickle cell disease, hypertension, and eclampsia, hyperuricemia out of proportion with decreases in glomerular filtration result from decreased renal blood flow. (medscape.com)
  • Reduced renal clearance of uric acid is a major contributor to hyperuricemia. (springer.com)
  • The central pathogenetic cause of gout is monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition. (bmj.com)
  • The crystallization of uric acid, often related to relatively high levels in the blood, is the underlying cause of gout. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the last decade, there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of hyperuricaemia and gout as well as of the pharmacogenetics of urate-lowering therapy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Genetic data may inform assessment of disease prognosis in individuals with hyperuricaemia or established gout, personalised lifestyle advice, selection and dosing of urate-lowering therapy, and prevention of serious medication adverse effects. (biomedcentral.com)
  • New discoveries regarding the genetic basis of hyperuricaemia and gout, gene-environment interactions, and the pharmacogenetics of urate-lowering therapy (ULT) have increased the possibilities for personalised medicine approaches to be used in clinical practice. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Likewise, alcohol consumption is well established as a factor that can contribute to both hyperuricaemia and raised triglyceride concentrations. (bmj.com)
  • Hyperuricemia was a risk factor for high triglyceride ((OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.156-3.9266) and high total cholesterol (OR: 2.313, 95% CI: 1.364-3.923) in men and for high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.696, 95% CI: 1.386-5.245) in women. (springer.com)
  • The release of the cytokines rapidly ignites a broader inflammatory response and the infamous redness, pain, and swelling of an acute gout flare. (ispub.com)
  • Conventional dietary recommendations for gout have focused on restriction of purine and alcohol intake but with no restriction of sugar sweetened soft drinks. (bmj.com)