Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.
A disease of elderly men characterized by large osteophytes that bridge vertebrae and ossification of ligaments and tendon insertions.
Syndrome consisting of SYNOVITIS; ACNE CONGLOBATA; PALMOPLANTAR PUSTULOSIS; HYPEROSTOSIS; and OSTEITIS. The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. The association of sterile inflammatory bone lesions and neutrophilic skin eruptions is indicative of this syndrome.
Thickening of the inner table of the frontal bone, which may be associated with hypertrichosis and obesity. It most commonly affects women near menopause.
A rare, benign rheumatologic disorder or syndrome characterized by hyperostosis and soft tissue ossification between the clavicles and the anterior part of the upper ribs. It is often associated with the dermatologic disorder palmoplantar pustulosis, particularly in Japan. Careful diagnosis is required to distinguish it from psoriatic arthritis, OSTEITIS DEFORMANS, and other diseases. Spondylitis of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris is one of the possible causes; also, evidence suggests one origin may be bone infection. Bone imaging is especially useful for diagnosis. It was originally described by Sonozaki in 1974.
Benign hypertrophy that projects outward from the surface of bone, often containing a cartilaginous component.
A form of osteosclerosis extending in a linear track mainly through one of the long bones of the upper and lower limbs.
Fixation and immobility of a joint.
The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.
A mucosal tumor of the urinary bladder or nasal cavity in which proliferating epithelium is invaginated beneath the surface and is more smoothly rounded than in other papillomas. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Inflammation of the bone.
A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.
Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.
A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)
Developmental bone diseases are a category of skeletal disorders that arise from disturbances in the normal growth and development of bones, including abnormalities in size, shape, structure, or composition, which can lead to various musculoskeletal impairments and deformities.
The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.
'Spinal diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that affect the structural integrity, function, or health of the spinal column, including degenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory processes, traumatic injuries, neoplasms, and congenital abnormalities.
Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.
Two extensive fibrous bands running the length of the vertebral column. The anterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale anterius; lacertus medius) interconnects the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies; the posterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale posterius) interconnects the posterior surfaces. The commonest clinical consideration is OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.
Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).
Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.

A case report of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis syndrome presenting with spondylodiscitis. (1/60)

SAPHO syndrome stands for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis. The common site of skeletal lesions in this syndrome is the sternocostoclavicular area. Spondylodiscitis is rarely described in published studies. In general, skin lesions develop before the onset of skeletal lesions. We report a case of SAPHO syndrome in which spondylodiscitis developed more than 1 year before the onset of pustulosis.  (+info)

Proximal femoral bone loss and increased rate of fracture with a proximally hydroxyapatite-coated femoral component. (2/60)

We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical and radiological outcomes of total hip replacement using an uncemented femoral component proximally coated with hydroxyapatite. Of 136 patients, 118 who had undergone 124 primary total hip replacements were available for study. Their mean age was 66.5 years (19 to 90) and the mean follow-up was 5.6 years (4.25 to 7.25). At the final follow-up the mean Harris hip score was 92 (47.7 to 100). Periprosthetic femoral fractures, which occurred in seven patients (5.6%), were treated by osteosynthesis in six and conservatively in one. We had to revise five femoral components, one because of aseptic loosening, one because of septic loosening and three because of periprosthetic fracture. At the final follow-up there were definite signs of aseptic loosening in two patients. Radiologically, proximal femoral bone loss in Gruen zones I and VI was evident in 96.8% of hips, while bone hypertrophy in zones III and V was seen in 64.7%. In 24 hips (20.2%) the mean subsidence of the stem was 3.7 mm which occurred within the first 12 postoperative weeks. This indicated poor initial stability, which might have been aggravated by early weight-bearing. The high rate of failure in our study suggests that proximal femoral bone loss affects the long-term survival of the replacement.  (+info)

Hypertrophic osteodystrophy in a Great Dane puppy. (3/60)

An intact male, Great Dane puppy was evaluated for weakness, lethargy, reluctance to move, and inability to stand. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy was diagnosed based on clinical and radiographic findings. Clinical signs, radiographic lesions, gross pathology, histopathology, etiology, and treatment of the disease are discussed.  (+info)

Stenosis of the cervical canal in craniodiaphyseal dysplasia. (4/60)

Craniodiaphyseal dysplasia (CDD) is a rare sclerosing bone disorder, the severity of which depends on its phenotypic expression. Hyperostosis can cause progressive foraminal stenosis leading to palsy of cranial nerves, epilepsy and mental retardation. We report the only case of CDD in an adult, with stenosis of the cervical canal leading to quadriparesis as a late complication of hyperostosis, and describe the problems associated with its treatment. Although the syndrome is rare, its pathophysiological and therapeutic considerations may be applicable to the management of stenosis of the spinal canal in other hyperostotic bone disorders.  (+info)

Frequency variations of discrete cranial traits in major human populations. III. Hyperostotic variations. (5/60)

Seven discrete cranial traits usually categorised as hyperostotic characters, the medial palatine canal, hypoglossal canal bridging, precondylar tubercle, condylus tertius, jugular foramen bridging, auditory exostosis, and mylohyoid bridging were investigated in 81 major human population samples from around the world. Significant asymmetric occurrences of the bilateral traits were detected in the medial palatine canal and jugular foramen bridging in several samples. Significant intertrait associations were found between some pairs of the traits, but not consistently across the large geographical samples. The auditory exostosis showed a predominant occurrence in males. With the exception of the auditory exostosis and mylohyoid bridging in a few samples, significant sex differences were slight. The frequency distributions of the traits (except for the auditory exostosis) showed some interregional clinality and intraregional discontinuity, suggesting that genetic drift could have contributed to the observed pattern of variation.  (+info)

Simultaneous reduction in cancer pain, bone destruction, and tumor growth by selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2. (6/60)

More than half of all chronic cancer pain arises from metastases to bone, and bone cancer pain is one of the most difficult of all persistent pain states to fully control. Several tumor types including sarcomas and breast, prostate, and lung carcinomas grow in or preferentially metastasize to the skeleton where they proliferate, and induce significant bone remodeling, bone destruction, and cancer pain. Many of these tumors express the isoenzyme cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. To begin to define the role COX-2 plays in driving bone cancer pain, we used an in vivo model where murine osteolytic 2472 sarcoma cells were injected and confined to the intramedullary space of the femur in male C3HHeJ mice. After tumor implantation, mice develop ongoing and movement-evoked bone cancer pain-related behaviors, extensive tumor-induced bone resorption, infiltration of the marrow space by tumor cells, and stereotypic neurochemical alterations in the spinal cord reflective of a persistent pain state. Thus, after injection of tumor cells, bone destruction is first evident at day 6, and pain-related behaviors are maximal at day 14. A selective COX-2 inhibitor was administered either acutely [NS398; 100 mg/kg, i.p.] on day 14 or chronically in chow [MF. tricyclic; 0.015%, p.o.] from day 6 to day 14 after tumor implantation. Acute administration of a selective COX-2 inhibitor attenuated both ongoing and movement-evoked bone cancer pain, whereas chronic inhibition of COX-2 significantly reduced ongoing and movement-evoked pain behaviors, and reduced tumor burden, osteoclastogenesis, and bone destruction by >50%. The present results suggest that chronic administration of a COX-2 inhibitor blocks prostaglandin synthesis at multiple sites, and may have significant clinical utility in the management of bone cancer and bone cancer pain.  (+info)

Vascular malformations of the lower limb with osseous involvement. (7/60)

Vascular malformations are rare congenital lesions which often have associated skeletal changes. Over a period of ten years, 90 patients at our clinic had a vascular anomaly of the lower limb, examined by either CT or MRI. Of these, 18 (20%) had bony involvement. A questionnaire was sent to these patients (8 men, 10 women) to evaluate their age of presentation, initial symptoms and current complaints. Radiological imaging revealed 15 low- and three high-flow lesions. The mean age at presentation to a physician was six years of age. Pain was the most common complaint. Disparity in leg length of 2 cm or more was observed in ten patients. Of the 16 patients with muscle infiltration, 13 had four or more muscles involved. Treatment by resection alone would require radical surgery.  (+info)

Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulates sclerostin in Van Buchem disease. (8/60)

Mutations in distant regulatory elements can have a negative impact on human development and health, yet because of the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences, we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem (VB) disease, a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis, we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (SOST) from normal (SOST(wt)) or Van Buchem (SOST(vbDelta) alleles. Only the SOST(wt) allele faithfully expressed high levels of human SOST in the adult bone and had an impact on bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a SOST-specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays, we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human SOST expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.  (+info)

Hyperostosis is a medical term that refers to an excessive growth or abnormal thickening of bone tissue. It can occur as a result of various conditions, such as inflammation, injury, or genetic disorders. The extra bone growth can cause pain, stiffness, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, hyperostosis can also lead to deformities and other complications.

There are several types of hyperostosis, including:

1. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): This is a condition that affects the spine, causing calcification and stiffening of the ligaments and bone spurs to form along the edges of the vertebrae. It is often asymptomatic but can cause pain and stiffness in some cases.
2. Flat bone hyperostosis: This type of hyperostosis affects the flat bones of the body, such as the skull, ribs, and pelvis. It can be caused by various conditions, including Paget's disease, fibrous dysplasia, and certain types of cancer.
3. Focal hyperostosis: This refers to localized areas of bone overgrowth that can occur in response to injury, infection, or inflammation. Examples include heterotopic ossification (the formation of bone in soft tissues) and Freiberg's infarction (a condition that affects the joint surface of the metatarsal bones in the foot).
4. Hyperostosis frontalis interna: This is a benign condition that causes thickening of the inner table of the frontal bone in the skull. It is more common in women and often asymptomatic but can cause headaches and other symptoms in some cases.

Treatment for hyperostosis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary. However, if the condition causes pain or limits mobility, various treatments may be recommended, such as medication, physical therapy, or surgery.

Diffuse Idiopathic Hyperostosis (DIH), also known as Forestier's Disease, is a non-inflammatory skeletal disorder characterized by the abnormal thickening and hardening (hyperostosis) of the bony portions of the spine and/or other parts of the skeleton. In DIH, there is an excessive formation of new bone along the edges of these bones, particularly at the sites where ligaments attach to the bones.

The term "idiopathic" indicates that the cause of this condition is currently unknown, while "diffuse" refers to its widespread involvement of multiple skeletal areas. The exact pathogenesis of DIH remains unclear; however, it has been suggested that there might be a connection with abnormal bone metabolism and/or localized inflammation.

DIH primarily affects middle-aged and older adults, with men being more commonly affected than women. Common symptoms include stiffness, pain, and limited mobility in the spine and joints. In some cases, DIH may also lead to complications such as spinal stenosis or nerve compression due to the excessive bone growth.

It is important to note that while hyperostosis can be a feature of various medical conditions, the term "Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis" specifically refers to this distinct clinical entity characterized by the widespread involvement of the skeleton and the absence of inflammation or other underlying causes.

Acquired hyperostosis syndrome is not a widely recognized medical term, and it may refer to several different conditions that involve abnormal bone growth or hardening. One possible condition that might be referred to as acquired hyperostosis syndrome is diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is a non-inflammatory condition that affects the spine and other parts of the body. It is characterized by the calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses, which are the sites where tendons or ligaments attach to bones. This process can lead to the formation of bony spurs or growths, called osteophytes, along the spine and other affected areas.

The exact cause of DISH is not known, but it is more common in older adults, males, and people with certain medical conditions such as diabetes and obesity. The symptoms of DISH can vary widely depending on the severity and location of the bone growths. Some people may experience stiffness, pain, or limited mobility in the affected areas, while others may have no symptoms at all.

It is important to note that there are many other conditions that can cause abnormal bone growth or hardening, so a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the underlying cause of any symptoms. If you have concerns about acquired hyperostosis syndrome or any other medical condition, you should speak with your healthcare provider for further guidance.

Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna (HFI) is a medical condition characterized by an abnormal thickening or overgrowth of the inner table of the frontal bone, which is the bone that forms the forehead. This condition most commonly affects middle-aged to older women. The exact cause of HFI is not known, but it may be associated with hormonal factors, as it is more common in women who have gone through menopause.

In HFI, the overgrowth of bone can cause a raised, bumpy, or irregular appearance on the forehead, and can sometimes lead to headaches or other symptoms. However, many people with HFI do not experience any symptoms at all. The diagnosis of HFI is typically made based on imaging studies such as X-rays or CT scans, which show the characteristic thickening of the frontal bone.

While HFI is not a life-threatening condition, it can cause cosmetic concerns and may require treatment in some cases. Treatment options for HFI include medication to manage symptoms such as headaches, as well as surgical removal of the excess bone in severe cases.

Hyperostosis, sternocostoclavicular, is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal thickening and hardening of the bone tissue in the sternocostoclavicular joint and surrounding areas. The sternocostoclavicular joint is where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the sternum (breastbone) and manubrium, and costae (ribs). This condition can result in pain, stiffness, and limited range of motion in the affected area. The exact cause of hyperostosis, sternocostoclavicular, is not fully understood, but it may be associated with trauma, inflammation, or genetic factors. In some cases, this condition may be asymptomatic and only discovered during imaging studies performed for other reasons. Treatment options typically include pain management, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery to remove the excess bone growth.

Exostoses are benign (noncancerous) bone growths that develop on the surface of a bone, usually in response to repeated stress or friction. They are often small and smooth, but can become larger and more irregular over time. In some cases, they may cause pain or discomfort, especially if they continue to grow and put pressure on nearby nerves, muscles, or other bones.

Exostoses can occur in various parts of the body, but they are most commonly found in the long bones of the arms and legs, as well as in the small bones of the feet. They may also develop in response to chronic irritation or injury, such as from jogging or playing sports that involve a lot of running or jumping.

In some cases, exostoses may be surgically removed if they cause persistent pain or other symptoms. However, in many cases, they do not require treatment and can be left alone. If you are concerned about any bone growths or other unusual symptoms, it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Melorheostosis is a very rare, progressive bone disorder characterized by the thickening and hardening of the bones' outer covering (periosteum). The name "melorheostosis" means "melting bones," which describes the appearance of the long bones on X-rays. It resembles dripping candle wax flowing down the shafts of the bones.

The condition typically affects one side of the body, often involving the legs and arms, but can also affect the skull, spine, and ribs. The symptoms can vary widely, depending on the location and extent of bone involvement. They may include bone pain, deformities, limited mobility, joint stiffness, and skin changes over the affected bones.

The exact cause of melorheostosis is unknown, but it is not a hereditary condition. It is thought to be related to abnormal blood vessel formation during fetal development, leading to improper bone growth and development. There is no known cure for melorheostosis, but various treatments can help manage symptoms and improve quality of life. These may include pain management, physical therapy, surgery, and other supportive measures.

Ankylosis is a medical term that refers to the abnormal joining or fusion of bones, typically in a joint. This can occur as a result of various conditions such as injury, infection, or inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. The fusion of bones can restrict movement and cause stiffness in the affected joint. In some cases, ankylosis can lead to deformity and disability if not treated promptly and effectively.

There are different types of ankylosis depending on the location and extent of bone fusion. For instance, when it affects the spine, it is called "ankylosing spondylitis," which is a chronic inflammatory disease that can cause stiffness and pain in the joints between the vertebrae.

Treatment for ankylosis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, physical therapy or surgery may be necessary to restore mobility and function to the affected joint.

Paleopathology is the study of ancient diseases and injuries as recorded in bones, mummies, and other archaeological remains. It is an interdisciplinary field that combines knowledge from pathology, epidemiology, anthropology, and archaeology to understand the health and disease patterns of past populations. The findings of paleopathology can provide valuable insights into the evolution of diseases, the effectiveness of ancient medical practices, and the impact of environmental and social factors on human health over time. Examples of conditions that may be studied in paleopathology include infectious diseases (such as tuberculosis or leprosy), nutritional deficiencies, trauma, cancer, and genetic disorders.

Inverted papilloma is a specific type of benign (non-cancerous) growth that occurs in the mucosal lining of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. It is also known as schneiderian papilloma or cylindrical cell papilloma.

This condition is characterized by the growth of finger-like projections (papillae) that invert or grow inward into the underlying tissue, hence the name "inverted." The lesions are usually composed of an outer layer of stratified squamous epithelium and an inner core of connective tissue.

Inverted papillomas can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, sinus pressure, and difficulty breathing through the nose. In some cases, they may also lead to more serious complications, including recurrence after removal and a small risk of malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma.

It is important to note that while inverted papillomas are benign, they can still cause significant problems due to their location and tendency to recur. Therefore, they typically require surgical removal and close follow-up with an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist).

Osteitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of bone tissue. It can occur as a result of various conditions, such as infection (osteomyelitis), trauma, or autoimmune disorders. The symptoms of osteitis may include pain, swelling, warmth, and redness in the affected area, as well as fever and general malaise. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the inflammation, which may involve antibiotics for infection or anti-inflammatory medications for other causes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove infected or damaged bone tissue.

Congenital cortical hyperostosis is a rare, inherited bone disorder that is characterized by abnormal thickening of the outer layer of bones (cortical hyperostosis). This condition primarily affects the skull and long bones of the arms and legs. The exact cause of congenital cortical hyperostosis is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to mutations in certain genes that regulate bone growth and development.

The symptoms of congenital cortical hyperostosis can vary widely from person to person, depending on the severity and location of the bone abnormalities. Some common features of this condition include:

* A thickened skull, which may cause a prominent forehead or a misshapen head
* Abnormally thick and dense long bones in the arms and legs, which can make them heavy and difficult to move
* Delayed growth and development
* Increased risk of fractures
* Pain and stiffness in the affected bones

Congenital cortical hyperostosis is typically diagnosed based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies (such as X-rays or CT scans), and genetic testing. There is no cure for this condition, but treatment may involve pain management, physical therapy, and surgery to correct any bone deformities. In some cases, the symptoms of congenital cortical hyperostosis may improve over time, but in others, they may persist throughout life.

Spinal osteophytosis, also known as spinal osteophyte formation or bone spurs on the spine, refers to the abnormal growth of bony projections along the vertebral column's margins. These bony outgrowths develop due to degenerative changes, inflammation, or injury in the joints between the vertebrae (facet joints) and can cause stiffness, pain, and reduced mobility. In some cases, spinal osteophytosis may lead to complications such as spinal stenosis or nerve compression.

Paranasal sinuses are air-filled cavities in the skull that surround the nasal cavity. There are four pairs of paranasal sinuses, including the maxillary, frontal, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. These sinuses help to warm, humidify, and filter the air we breathe. They also contribute to our voice resonance and provide a slight cushioning effect for the skull. The openings of the paranasal sinuses lead directly into the nasal cavity, allowing mucus produced in the sinuses to drain into the nose. Infections or inflammation of the paranasal sinuses can result in conditions such as sinusitis.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

The cervical vertebrae are the seven vertebrae that make up the upper part of the spine, also known as the neck region. They are labeled C1 to C7, with C1 being closest to the skull and C7 connecting to the thoracic vertebrae in the chest region. The cervical vertebrae have unique structures to allow for a wide range of motion in the neck while also protecting the spinal cord and providing attachment points for muscles and ligaments.

A meningioma is a type of slow-growing tumor that forms on the membranes (meninges) surrounding the brain and spinal cord. It's usually benign, meaning it doesn't spread to other parts of the body, but it can still cause serious problems if it grows and presses on nearby tissues.

Meningiomas most commonly occur in adults, and are more common in women than men. They can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size, including headaches, seizures, vision or hearing problems, memory loss, and changes in personality or behavior. In some cases, they may not cause any symptoms at all and are discovered only during imaging tests for other conditions.

Treatment options for meningiomas include monitoring with regular imaging scans, surgery to remove the tumor, and radiation therapy to shrink or kill the tumor cells. The best treatment approach depends on factors such as the size and location of the tumor, the patient's age and overall health, and their personal preferences.

Developmental bone diseases are a group of medical conditions that affect the growth and development of bones. These diseases are present at birth or develop during childhood and adolescence, when bones are growing rapidly. They can result from genetic mutations, hormonal imbalances, or environmental factors such as poor nutrition.

Some examples of developmental bone diseases include:

1. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI): Also known as brittle bone disease, OI is a genetic disorder that affects the body's production of collagen, a protein necessary for healthy bones. People with OI have fragile bones that break easily and may also experience other symptoms such as blue sclerae (whites of the eyes), hearing loss, and joint laxity.
2. Achondroplasia: This is the most common form of dwarfism, caused by a genetic mutation that affects bone growth. People with achondroplasia have short limbs and a large head relative to their body size.
3. Rickets: A condition caused by vitamin D deficiency or an inability to absorb or use vitamin D properly. This leads to weak, soft bones that can bow or bend easily, particularly in children.
4. Fibrous dysplasia: A rare bone disorder where normal bone is replaced with fibrous tissue, leading to weakened bones and deformities.
5. Scoliosis: An abnormal curvature of the spine that can develop during childhood or adolescence. While not strictly a developmental bone disease, scoliosis can be caused by various underlying conditions such as cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, or spina bifida.

Treatment for developmental bone diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment may include medication, physical therapy, bracing, or surgery to correct deformities and improve function. Regular follow-up with a healthcare provider is essential to monitor growth, manage symptoms, and prevent complications.

The fibula is a slender bone located in the lower leg of humans and other vertebrates. It runs parallel to the larger and more robust tibia, and together they are known as the bones of the leg or the anterior tibial segment. The fibula is the lateral bone in the leg, positioned on the outside of the tibia.

In humans, the fibula extends from the knee joint proximally to the ankle joint distally. Its proximal end, called the head of the fibula, articulates with the lateral condyle of the tibia and forms part of the inferior aspect of the knee joint. The narrowed portion below the head is known as the neck of the fibula.

The shaft of the fibula, also called the body of the fibula, is a long, thin structure that descends from the neck and serves primarily for muscle attachment rather than weight-bearing functions. The distal end of the fibula widens to form the lateral malleolus, which is an important bony landmark in the ankle region. The lateral malleolus articulates with the talus bone of the foot and forms part of the ankle joint.

The primary functions of the fibula include providing attachment sites for muscles that act on the lower leg, ankle, and foot, as well as contributing to the stability of the ankle joint through its articulation with the talus bone. Fractures of the fibula can occur due to various injuries, such as twisting or rotational forces applied to the ankle or direct trauma to the lateral aspect of the lower leg.

Spinal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the spinal column, which is made up of vertebrae (bones), intervertebral discs, facet joints, nerves, ligaments, and muscles. These diseases can cause pain, discomfort, stiffness, numbness, weakness, or even paralysis, depending on the severity and location of the condition. Here are some examples of spinal diseases:

1. Degenerative disc disease: This is a condition where the intervertebral discs lose their elasticity and height, leading to stiffness, pain, and decreased mobility.
2. Herniated disc: This occurs when the inner material of the intervertebral disc bulges or herniates out through a tear in the outer layer, causing pressure on the spinal nerves and resulting in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected area.
3. Spinal stenosis: This is a narrowing of the spinal canal or the neural foramen (the openings where the spinal nerves exit the spinal column), which can cause pressure on the spinal cord or nerves and result in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness.
4. Scoliosis: This is a curvature of the spine that can occur in children or adults, leading to an abnormal posture, back pain, and decreased lung function.
5. Osteoarthritis: This is a degenerative joint disease that affects the facet joints in the spine, causing pain, stiffness, and decreased mobility.
6. Ankylosing spondylitis: This is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the spine and sacroiliac joints, leading to pain, stiffness, and fusion of the vertebrae.
7. Spinal tumors: These are abnormal growths that can occur in the spinal column, which can be benign or malignant, causing pain, neurological symptoms, or even paralysis.
8. Infections: Bacterial or viral infections can affect the spine, leading to pain, fever, and other systemic symptoms.
9. Trauma: Fractures, dislocations, or sprains of the spine can occur due to accidents, falls, or sports injuries, causing pain, neurological deficits, or even paralysis.

Paranasal sinus neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the paranasal sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located inside the skull near the nasal cavity. These tumors can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from various types of tissue within the sinuses, such as the lining of the sinuses (mucosa), bone, or other soft tissues.

Paranasal sinus neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms, including nasal congestion, nosebleeds, facial pain or numbness, and visual disturbances. The diagnosis of these tumors typically involves a combination of imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans) and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches, depending on the specific type and stage of the neoplasm.

The sternum, also known as the breastbone, is a long, flat bone located in the central part of the chest. It serves as the attachment point for several muscles and tendons, including those involved in breathing. The sternum has three main parts: the manubrium at the top, the body in the middle, and the xiphoid process at the bottom. The upper seven pairs of ribs connect to the sternum via costal cartilages.

Longitudinal ligaments, in the context of anatomy, refer to the fibrous bands that run lengthwise along the spine. They are named as such because they extend in the same direction as the long axis of the body. The main function of these ligaments is to provide stability and limit excessive movement in the spinal column.

There are three layers of longitudinal ligaments in the spine:

1. Anterior Longitudinal Ligament (ALL): This ligament runs down the front of the vertebral bodies, attached to their anterior aspects. It helps to prevent hyperextension of the spine.
2. Posterior Longitudinal Ligament (PLL): The PLL is located on the posterior side of the vertebral bodies and extends from the axis (C2) to the sacrum. Its primary function is to limit hyperflexion of the spine.
3. Ligamentum Flavum: Although not strictly a 'longitudinal' ligament, it is often grouped with them due to its longitudinal orientation. The ligamentum flavum is a pair of elastic bands that connect adjacent laminae (posterior bony parts) of the vertebral arch in the spine. Its main function is to maintain tension and stability while allowing slight movement between the vertebrae.

These longitudinal ligaments play an essential role in maintaining spinal alignment, protecting the spinal cord, and facilitating controlled movements within the spine.

Meningeal neoplasms, also known as malignant meningitis or leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, refer to cancerous tumors that originate in the meninges, which are the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can arise primarily from the meningeal cells themselves, although they more commonly result from the spread (metastasis) of cancer cells from other parts of the body, such as breast, lung, or melanoma.

Meningeal neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms, including headaches, nausea and vomiting, mental status changes, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (such as MRI) and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained through a spinal tap. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or surgery, depending on the type and extent of the tumor. The prognosis for patients with meningeal neoplasms is generally poor, with a median survival time of several months to a year.

Skull base neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors located in the skull base, which is the region where the skull meets the spine and where the brain connects with the blood vessels and nerves that supply the head and neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from various types of cells in this area, including bone, nerve, glandular, and vascular tissue.

Skull base neoplasms can cause a range of symptoms depending on their size, location, and growth rate. Some common symptoms include headaches, vision changes, hearing loss, facial numbness or weakness, difficulty swallowing, and balance problems. Treatment options for skull base neoplasms may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. The specific treatment plan will depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history.

Nose neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and have the potential to metastasize.

Nose neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, difficulty breathing through the nose, loss of smell, facial pain or numbness, and visual changes if they affect the eye. The diagnosis of nose neoplasms usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans), and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

"Bone" is the hard, dense connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrate animals. It provides support and protection for the body's internal organs, and serves as a attachment site for muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Bone is composed of cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone formation and resorption, respectively, and an extracellular matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral crystals.

Bones can be classified into two main types: compact bone and spongy bone. Compact bone is dense and hard, and makes up the outer layer of all bones and the shafts of long bones. Spongy bone is less dense and contains large spaces, and makes up the ends of long bones and the interior of flat and irregular bones.

The human body has 206 bones in total. They can be further classified into five categories based on their shape: long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, and sesamoid bones.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Hyperostosis frontalis interna Infantile cortical hyperostosis Porotic hyperostosis ... Hyperostosis is an excessive growth of bone. It may lead to exostosis. It occurs in many musculoskeletal disorders. ... Suri D, Dayal D, Singh M (July 2005). "Infantile cortical hyperostosis". Archives of Disease in Childhood. 90 (7): 711. doi: ... MOORE S, CARR AD (January 1952). "Hyperostosis frontalis interna; two contrasting cases". Journal of the American Medical ...
... , is a pathological condition that affects bones of the cranial vault, and is characterized by localized ... Porotic hyperostosis and the Gelligaer skull. Journal of Clinical Pathology, Volume 21, Issue 6, Pages 753-758. Retrieved on ... From this perspective, porotic hyperostosis could be viewed as a biological attempt to adapt to the environment, rather than an ... Porotic Hyperostosis, Anemias, Malarias, and Marshes in the Prehistoric Eastern Mediterranean. Science Volume 153, Number 3737 ...
... is a common, benign thickening of the inner side of the frontal bone of the skull. It is found ... She R, Szakacs J (2004). "Hyperostosis frontalis interna: case report and review of literature". Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 34 (2): ...
... (ICH) is a self-limited inflammatory disorder of infants that causes bone changes, soft tissue ... The average age at onset for the sporadic form is 9-11 weeks.[citation needed] Cortical hyperostosis is a potential side effect ... In the early stages of infantile cortical hyperostosis, biopsy shows inflammation of the periosteum and adjacent soft tissues. ... July 2008). "Prenatal cortical hyperostosis with COL1A1 gene mutation". Am. J. Med. Genet. A. 146A (14): 1820-4. doi:10.1002/ ...
"Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) [ankylosing hyperostosis of forestier and Rotes-Querol]". Seminars in Arthritis ... Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a condition characterized by abnormal calcification/bone formation ( ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (Use dmy dates from July 2013, Articles with ... 2014). "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A review". Surg Neurol Int. 5 (Suppl 3): S122-S125. doi:10.4103/2152- ...
... is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by ossification of ... "Ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis with tylosis - About the Disease - Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center". ... "Orphanet: Ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis with tylosis". www.orpha.net. Retrieved 2022-09-29. " ... "Entry - 106400 - ANKYLOSING VERTEBRAL HYPEROSTOSIS WITH TYLOSIS - OMIM". www.omim.org. Retrieved 2022-09-29. (Articles with ...
... and calvarial hyperostosis; 612714; COX4I2 Exostoses, multiple, type 1; 133700; EXT1 Exostoses, multiple, type 2; 133701; EXT2 ... SLC25A15 Hyperostosis, endosteal; 144750; LRP5 Hyperoxaluria, primary, type 1; 259900; AGXT Hyperoxaluria, primary, type II; ...
MS Sherman and DT Hellyer (1950). "Infantile cortical hyperostosis; review of the literature and report of five cases". The ... " "Infantile cortical hyperostosis; review of the literature and report of five cases" "The non-specificity of synovial ...
Marlet JJ (2015). "Development of cranial hyperostosis. A radiological approach to a process". Radiologia Clinica et Biologica ...
Resnick, D (1978). "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis". American Journal of Roentgenology. 130 (3): 588-589. doi:10.2214 ... Other degeneration of the vertebral column includes diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) which is the calcification ...
Cohen and Tibbles said Merrick showed the following signs of Proteus syndrome: "macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the large skull; ...
Chamot AM, Benhamou CL, Kahn MF, Beraneck L, Kaplan G, Prost A (1987). "Acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis syndrome. Results ... The term SAPHO (an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) was coined in 1987 to represent this ... Anterior chest wall (most common site, 65-90% of patients):[citation needed] Hyperostosis, sclerosis and bone hypertrophy ... including sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, pustulotic arthro-osteitis, and acne-associated spondyloarthropathy. ...
Pastor K, Boulay J, Schelling S, Carpenter J (2000). "Idiopathic hyperostosis of the calvaria in five young bullmastiffs". J Am ... McConnell J, Hayes A, Platt S, Smith K (2006). "Calvarial hyperostosis syndrome in two bullmastiffs". Vet Radiol Ultrasound. 47 ... It is also similar to human infantile cortical hyperostosis. It is characterized by irregular, progressive bony proliferation ...
Stewart, R. M. (1928). "Localised cranial hyperostosis in the insane". Journal of Neurology and Psychopathology. 8 (32): 321- ...
OPLL may also be associated with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Myeolography, including post-myelographic CT is ... Belanger, T. A.; Rowe, D. E. (2001-07-01). "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: musculoskeletal manifestations". The ... Meyer, Paul (1999). "diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in the cervical spine". Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research ...
J. J. Verlaan (August 2007). "Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in ancient clergymen". Eur Spine J. 16 (8): 1129-35. doi ...
It was first described in 1955 as "hyperostosis corticalis generalisata familiaris", but was given the current name in 1968. ... Fosmoe RJ, Holm RS, Hildreth RC (April 1968). "Van Buchem's disease (hyperostosis corticalis generalisata familiaris). A case ...
The disease was named hyperostosis corticalis generalisata but became more widely known as Van Buchem disease or sometimes in ... In 1955, van Buchem wrote a paper titled "An uncommon familial systemic disease of the skeleton: Hyperostosis corticalis ... Bettini, R; Sessa, V; Mingardi, R; Molinari, A; Anzani, P; Vezzetti, V (January 1991). "[Endosteal hyperostosis with recessive ... Van Buchem, FS (1970). "The pathogenesis of hyperostosis corticalis generalisata and calcitonin". Proceedings of the ...
Like the crevalle jack, the horse-eye jack is known to develop hyperostosis in parts of its skeletal structure. Adult horse-eye ... Smith-Vaniz, W.; L. S. Kaufman; J. Glowacki (1995). "Species-specific patterns of hyperostosis in marine teleost fishes". ...
She R, Szakacs J (2004). "Hyperostosis frontalis interna: case report and review of literature". Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 34 (2): ... The diagnosis of Morgagni-Stewart-Morel is based upon a radiological finding of hyperostosis frontalis interna. Diagnosis ... Seizures and headaches associated with hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) are treated with standard medications. INSERM US14 ... a usually benign condition known as hyperostosis frontalis interna. The syndrome was first described in 1765. It is named after ...
Much of this is due to reactive orbital hyperostosis. With invasion of the tumor into the orbit, diplopia is common. Patients ...
Thus, hookworm parasitism may be a causal factor in observed cribra orbitalia and porotic hyperostosis, though dietary factors ... doi:10.1016/0047-2484(74)90203-6. Holland TD, O'Brien MJ (1997). "Parasites, porotic hyperostosis, and the implications of ... and anemia is one factor associated with the skeletal changes of cribra orbitalia and porotic hyperostosis. ...
Brickley, Megan B. (2018). "Cribra orbitalia and porotic hyperostosis: A biological approach to diagnosis". American Journal of ... Angel, J. Lawrence (1966-08-12). "Porotic Hyperostosis, Anemias, Malarias, and Marshes in the Prehistoric Eastern Mediterranean ... "New evidence suggesting a dissociated etiology for cribra orbitalia and porotic hyperostosis: RIVERA and LAHR". American ...
Forestier is also known for his work with polymyalgia rheumatica and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. With his ... "Forestier's disease": also known as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). It is a type of degenerative spinal ...
The presence of hyperostosis varies among R. russelii of different ages and sizes; it is present in most large adult fish, and ... The hyperostosis provides additional support to the pterygiophores during movement. It has also been hypothesized that this ... The skeleton contains distinct areas of hyperostosis, or hyper-ossified bones, that are most prominent on the dorsal ...
Porotic hyperostosis is a pathological condition affecting the cranial vault. It is characterized by porosities in the outer ... She used porotic hyperostosis and periosteal reactions to examine health and disease in urban medieval England. Grauer ... Since the 1950s, the most widely accepted probable cause of porotic hyperostosis and cribra orbitalia is chronic iron- ... Anne L. Grauer, Professor of Anthropology at Loyola University Chicago, assessed the presence of porotic hyperostosis and ...
hyperostosis A condition resulting in enlargement of areas of bone. hyaline Translucent or transparent. hypural joint The joint ...
The Bonnanaro population suffered from osteoporosis, hyperostosis, anemia, caries and tumors. Cranial trepannation was ...
Manifestations include enlarged viscera, hepatomegaly, diabetes, short stature and cranial hyperostosis.[citation needed] Bruno ... cranial hyperostosis, and typical facial features. It is probably a variant of the autosomal recessive type of ...
Angel, J. Lawrence (1966-08-12). "Porotic Hyperostosis, Anemias, Malarias, and Marshes in the Prehistoric Eastern Mediterranean ...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Hyperostosis frontalis interna Infantile cortical hyperostosis Porotic hyperostosis ... Hyperostosis is an excessive growth of bone. It may lead to exostosis. It occurs in many musculoskeletal disorders. ... Suri D, Dayal D, Singh M (July 2005). "Infantile cortical hyperostosis". Archives of Disease in Childhood. 90 (7): 711. doi: ... MOORE S, CARR AD (January 1952). "Hyperostosis frontalis interna; two contrasting cases". Journal of the American Medical ...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) describes a phenomenon characterized by a tendency toward ossification of ... encoded search term (Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH)) and Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) What ... Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH). Updated: Aug 03, 2022 * Author: Bruce M Rothschild, MD; Chief Editor: Jeffrey ... Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A review. Surg Neurol Int. 2014. 5 (Suppl 3):S122-5. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. [Full Text] ...
elizabeth peacockhank skinnerharold comerhyperostosisjohn mannoccupational therapistpalmar injurytwila busbywrit of habeas ...
Hyperostosis. A high prevalence of skeletal hyperostosis was noted in clinical trials for disorders of keratinization with a ... Additionally, skeletal hyperostosis was noted in six of eight patients in a prospective study of disorders of keratinization.6 ... Hyperostosis may require a longer time frame to appear. The clinical course and significance remain unknown. ... skeletal hyperostosis, calcification of tendons and ligaments, premature epiphyseal closure, decreases in bone mineral density ...
Dysplastic cortical hyperostosis, Al-Gazali type. Related Disorders. Dysplastic cortical hyperostosis. Disorder Group. ... Dysplastic cortical hyperostosis, Al-Gazali type?. Our RARE Concierge Services Guides are available to assist you by providing ... Dysplastic cortical hyperostosis, Al-Gazali type. Get in touch with RARE Concierge.. Contact RARE Concierge ...
Craniotubular Hyperostoses - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical ... Endosteal hyperostosis (van Buchem syndrome) This disorder is usually autosomal recessive Autosomal Recessive Genetic disorders ... Craniotubular hyperostoses are osteopetroses Overview of Osteopetroses Osteopetroses are familial disorders characterized by ... Hyperostoses affect the long bones and skull. Cranial nerve compression and elevated intracranial pressure occur occasionally. ...
Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is the hardening of the spinal ligament where they attach to bone. Gentle care for ... Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is hardening, calcification of the spinal ligaments where they attach to bone, ... About Murfreesboro Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis and Murfreesboro Chiropractic Care. Introduction. "Man, I get up in ...
Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is the hardening of the spinal ligament where they attach to bone. Gentle care for ... Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is hardening, calcification of the spinal ligaments where they attach to bone, ... About Fort Wayne Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis and Fort Wayne Chiropractic Care. Introduction ...
Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is the hardening of the spinal ligament where they attach to bone. Gentle care for ... Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is hardening, calcification of the spinal ligaments where they attach to bone, ...
Endosteal Hyperostosis, Autosomal Recessive. Hyperostosis Corticalis Generalisata. Hyperphosphatasemia Tarda. Late Onset ...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common, non-inflammatory systemic disease of the spine and peripheral ...
Wheeler, Sandra Michelle, "Porotic hyperostosis among the ancient Maya : a regional perspective" (2002). Retrospective Theses ...
Eleven of the 13 patients with hyperostosis gave a history of musculoskeletal symptoms compared with three of the 10 patients ... skeletal hyperostosis. Skeletal scintigraphy, plain radiographs, haematological and biochemical analyses were performed. Using ... skeletal scintigraphy was positive in only nine of the 13 patients who showed hyperostosis. ... without hyperostosis. There was no clear association with total dose or duration of treatment. Serum chemistry and ...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in Late Jomon Hokkaido, Japan. Marc F. Oxenham*, H. Matsumura, T. Nishimoto. * ... Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in Late Jomon Hokkaido, Japan. / Oxenham, Marc F.; Matsumura, H.; Nishimoto, T. In: ... Oxenham, Marc F. ; Matsumura, H. ; Nishimoto, T. / Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in Late Jomon Hokkaido, Japan. In: ... Oxenham, M. F., Matsumura, H., & Nishimoto, T. (2006). Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in Late Jomon Hokkaido, Japan. ...
Melorheostosis is a rare bone disease. Explore symptoms, inheritance, genetics of this condition.
Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo in adults: A consequence of brain atrophy from diverse causes. / Wolf, D. A.; Falsetti, A. B. In: ... Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo in adults: A consequence of brain atrophy from diverse causes. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 2001 ... Wolf, D. A. ; Falsetti, A. B. / Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo in adults : A consequence of brain atrophy from diverse causes. In ... Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo is diffuse thickening of the bones of the cranium occurring after successful ventricular shunting ...
Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) * Ankylosing Spondylitis and Undifferentiated Spondyloarthropathy * Spinal ...
Ankylosing Vertebral Hyperostosis. *Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tear. *Arthritis. *Autoimmune Diseases. *Back Pain ...
Ankylosing Vertebral Hyperostosis. *Arthritis of the Elbow. *Back Pain. *Bone Cancer. *Broken Neck ...
Volver a los detalles del artículo Un estudio de diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (dish) o enfermedad hiperostósica en ... el cementerio del hospital medieval de Chichester, West Sussex, Inglaterra / A Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) ...
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is often incorporated into osteoarthritis. Although DISH[1] often coexists with OA, ...
Resnick D. Enostosis, hyperostosis, and periostitis. Bone and Joint Imaging. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 1996. 1211- ...
Ankylosing Vertebral Hyperostosis ...
Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO).. *Deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA). ...
Defects in COL1A1 are the cause of Caffey disease (CAFFD) [MIM:114000]; also known as infantile cortical hyperostosis. Caffey ...
... also known as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and occasionally as hiperostotic spondylosis and ankylosing hyperostosis ... Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): Forestier s disease with extraespinal manifestations. Radiology 1975; 115: 513 ... Eviatar E, Harell M. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with dysphagia (A review). J Laryngol Otol 1987; 101: 627-32. ... Forestier J, Rotes-Querol J. Senile ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine. Ann Rheum Dis 1950; 9: 321-30. ...
Beretta-Piccoli BC et al (2000) Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome in childhood: a report of ... Dihlmann W (1993) Acquired hyperostosis syndrome (so-called pustular arthro-osteitis). Review of the literature including 73 ... Dihlmann W et al (1988) The acquired hyperostosis syndrome. Synthesis of 13 personal observations of sternocostoclavicular ... Freyschmidt J et al (1998) The bullhead sign: scintigraphic pattern of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis and pustulotic ...
Spinal fracture and paraplegia after minimal trauma in a patient with ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed ...
In addition, they may show calcification and hyperostosis; growth within the jugular foramen and/or below the skull base is ...
Infantile cortical hyperostosis. (1 August, 1976) L Frána, M Sekanina. *. HCG stimulation test in children with abnormal sexual ...
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Hyperostosis frontalis interna Infantile cortical hyperostosis Porotic hyperostosis SAPHO syndrome Stuart-Macadam P (April 1985). (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier disease, describes a phenomenon characterized by a tendency toward ossification of ligaments. (medscape.com)
  • Radiograph of the thoracic spine (anteroposterior view) showing osteophytes on the right side only, a feature typical of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) was first described in 1948 by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in a report on nine patients, ranging in age from 50 to 73 years, who suffered from spinal rigidity and had exuberant osteophytes on radiologic studies. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is characterized by a tendency toward ossification of ligament, tendon, and joint capsule (enthesial) insertions. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is simply a tendency toward calcification of entheses. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is present in approximately 19% of men and 4% of women older than 50 years. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is hardening, calcification of the spinal ligaments where they attach to bone , particularly at the front of the skeletal column. (mostchiropractic.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common, non-inflammatory systemic disease of the spine and peripheral skeleton that occurs in many breeds of dogs. (unibe.ch)
  • In an ongoing study of patients on long‐term etretinate (Tigason) therapy, 13 patients with a congenital or inherited disorder of keratinization and 10 patients with psoriasis were examined to investigate the incidence of, and the factors associated with, skeletal hyperostosis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The purpose of this study is to describe and analyse the evidence for diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in samples of human skeletal material recovered from Late Jomon (ca. 1500-300 BCE) and Okhotsk (CE 500-900) cultural period sites, northwestern Hokkaido, Japan. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is often incorporated into osteoarthritis. (ima.org.il)
  • Forestier, skeletal hyperostosis, dysphagia. (medigraphic.com)
  • Forestier s disease, also known as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and occasionally as hiperostotic spondylosis and ankylosing hyperostosis was first described by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in 1950. (medigraphic.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): Forestier s disease with extraespinal manifestations. (medigraphic.com)
  • Cervical myelopathy in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (medigraphic.com)
  • Eviatar E, Harell M. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis with dysphagia (A review). (medigraphic.com)
  • Outcomes following conservative treatment of extension fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: is external orthosis alone a reasonable option? (thejns.org)
  • Extension fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) represent highly unstable injuries. (thejns.org)
  • A forensic anthropologist examining skeletal remains may describe the condition of DISH, (Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis). (oxfordreference.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is characterized by ossification of the enthesis. (koreamed.org)
  • Here, we present a patient with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) who developed a T10/T11 s ynovial cyst contributing to myelopathy that resolved following surgical cyst excision. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • 2 , 8 ] Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) results in spontaneous bony bridging of the anterolateral spinal ligaments and tendons. (surgicalneurologyint.com)
  • 2009). The coexistence of ankylosing spondylitis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis - A postmortem diagnosis . (up.pt)
  • These authors termed the condition senile vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis. (medscape.com)
  • Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo is diffuse thickening of the bones of the cranium occurring after successful ventricular shunting in hydrocephalic children, presumably as a compensatory phenomenon. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Spinal fracture and paraplegia after minimal trauma in a patient with ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis. (bmj.com)
  • Beretta-Piccoli BC et al (2000) Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome in childhood: a report of ten cases and review of the literature. (springer.com)
  • 4. Patients with SAPHO (Synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis) syndrome. (who.int)
  • In endosteal hyperostosis, genetic lesions seem to affect the normal function of osteoblasts. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dihlmann W (1993) Acquired hyperostosis syndrome (so-called pustular arthro-osteitis). (springer.com)
  • Dihlmann W et al (1988) The acquired hyperostosis syndrome. (springer.com)
  • Forestier J, Rotes-Querol J. Senile ankylosing hyperostosis of the spine. (medigraphic.com)
  • Wolf, DA & Falsetti, AB 2001, ' Hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo in adults: A consequence of brain atrophy from diverse causes ', Journal of Forensic Sciences , vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 370-373. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Eleven of the 13 patients with hyperostosis gave a history of musculoskeletal symptoms compared with three of the 10 patients without hyperostosis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Hyperostosis is excessive bone growth that is a physiological indicator of stress and also of many musculoskeletal disorders. (syfy.com)
  • Diagnosis of diaphyseal dysplasia is suspected by the combination of muscular deficits and hyperostoses of the long bones and skull. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Ossification of the ligamentum teres as a possible mechanism of lateral subluxation in coxopathy associated with ankylosing spinal hyperostosis. (bmj.com)
  • Our observations suggest that hyperostosis cranii ex vacuo is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized, and point to a relationship between dynamic changes in brain size and skull thickness. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Synthesis of 13 personal observations of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis and 300 cases from the literature. (springer.com)
  • Using all criteria, 7 of 13 patients with a congenital or inherited disorder of keratinization showed evidence of hyperostosis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • in particular, skeletal scintigraphy was positive in only nine of the 13 patients who showed hyperostosis. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Hyperostosis frontalis interna Infantile cortical hyperostosis Porotic hyperostosis SAPHO syndrome Stuart-Macadam P (April 1985). (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: A review. (medscape.com)
  • Luo TD, Varacallo M. Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH). (medscape.com)
  • Rotés-Querol J. Clinical manifestations of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis as reflected in the paleontologic record: dinosaurs and early mammals. (medscape.com)
  • Spinal entheseal new bone formation: the early changes of spinal diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (medscape.com)
  • Dan Lantsman C, Herman A, Verlaan JJ, Stern M, Mader R, Eshed I. Abdominal fat distribution in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and ankylosing spondylitis patients compared to controls. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): misconceptions and reality. (medscape.com)
  • Mori K, Kasahara T, Mimura T, Nishizawa K, Nakamura A, Imai S. Prevalence of thoracic diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) in Japanese: Results of chest CT-based cross-sectional study. (medscape.com)
  • The prevalence of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in an outpatient population in the Netherlands. (medscape.com)
  • No cure for diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) exists. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a condition where adjacent vertebrae become fused through formation of osteophytes. (nih.gov)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier disease, describes a phenomenon characterized by a tendency toward ossification of ligaments. (medscape.com)
  • Radiograph of the thoracic spine (anteroposterior view) showing osteophytes on the right side only, a feature typical of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) was first described in 1948 by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in a report on nine patients, ranging in age from 50 to 73 years, who suffered from spinal rigidity and had exuberant osteophytes on radiologic studies. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is characterized by a tendency toward ossification of ligament, tendon, and joint capsule (enthesial) insertions. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is simply a tendency toward calcification of entheses. (medscape.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is present in approximately 19% of men and 4% of women older than 50 years. (medscape.com)
  • We aimed to review the literature linking metabolic factors to Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH), in order to assess associations between growth factors and DISH. (openrheumatologyjournal.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a common skeletal disorder characterised by the presence of new bone formation. (openrheumatologyjournal.com)
  • Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis is hardening, calcification of the spinal ligaments where they attach to bone , particularly at the front of the skeletal column. (pflugervillechiro.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a condition that commonly affects the spine. (yuanspine.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is more common among individuals older than 50 years of age with a male predominance. (yuanspine.com)
  • If you have diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, you tend to have a higher body mass index, elevated uric acid levels and a higher tendency to develop diabetes mellitus. (yuanspine.com)
  • Objective: Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) causes spinal ankylosis, which can result in patients suffering specific spinal fractures that lead to a reduction in the activities of daily life in older patients. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a systemic skeletal disease of unknown etiology characterized by ligamentous ossification of the anterolateral spine and the extraspinal ligaments. (ftrdergisi.com)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and ankylosing spondylitis are types of arthritis. (webmd.com)
  • Outcomes following conservative treatment of extension fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: is external orthosis alone a reasonable option? (thejns.org)
  • Extension fractures in the setting of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) represent highly unstable injuries. (thejns.org)
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH): relation to vertebral fractures and bone density. (escholarship.org)
  • Radiographs and spinal bone mineral density (BMD) were evaluated from 342 elderly men regarding possible effects of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) on vertebral fractures and densitometry measurements. (escholarship.org)
  • Kamoun-Goldrat A, le Merrer M. Infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease): a review. (medscape.com)
  • Infantile cortical hyperostosis of the mandible. (medscape.com)
  • T mutation in COL1A1 is recurrent in Korean patients with infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease). (medscape.com)
  • A novel COL1A1 mutation in infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease) expands the spectrum of collagen-related disorders. (medscape.com)
  • Infantile cortical hyperostosis and COL1A1 mutation in four generations. (medscape.com)
  • Fetuin-A deficiency is associated with infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease). (medscape.com)
  • Swelling over the face: infantile cortical hyperostosis. (nih.gov)
  • Infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease): a possible misdiagnosis as physical abuse. (nih.gov)
  • Caffey disease or infantile cortical hyperostosis: a case report. (nih.gov)
  • 1. Autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance of Caffey disease (infantile cortical hyperostosis). (nih.gov)
  • 4. Familial infantile cortical hyperostosis: an update. (nih.gov)
  • 5. Recurrent severe infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease) in siblings. (nih.gov)
  • 8. Familial infantile cortical hyperostosis in a large Canadian family. (nih.gov)
  • 9. [Familial occurrence of infantile cortical hyperostosis. (nih.gov)
  • 10. Perinatal death in two sibs with infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease). (nih.gov)
  • Imaging findings in patients with a combination of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) are often misinterpreted as discitis/osteomyelitis or metastases, resulting in multiple biopsies and delayed diagnosis. (ajnr.org)
  • SAPHO was proposed to refer to a combination of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis as a heading for these syndromes. (ajnr.org)
  • Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna (HFI) is an unusual condition characterized by the thickening of the frontal bone of the skull. (pcom.edu)
  • Hyperostosis corticalis generalisata, also known as van Buchem disease, is a rare craniotubular hyperostosis characterized by hyperostosis of the skull, mandible, clavicles, ribs and diaphyses of the long bones, as well as the tubular bones of the hands and feet. (nih.gov)
  • Diagnosis of diaphyseal dysplasia is suspected by the combination of muscular deficits and hyperostoses of the long bones and skull. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In endosteal hyperostosis, genetic lesions seem to affect the normal function of osteoblasts. (msdmanuals.com)
  • When Do Symptoms of Hyperostosis corticalis generalisata Begin? (nih.gov)
  • Hyperostosis corticalis infantum. (nih.gov)
  • of the second and third fingers distinguishes sclerosteosis from other forms of craniotubular hyperostoses. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Giantin-knockout zebrafish display hyperostosis and ectopic calcium mineral debris, recapitulating phenotypes of hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis, an illness due to mutations in GALNT3. (bioskinrevive.com)
  • 14. [Familial childhood cortical hyperostosis]. (nih.gov)
  • These range from hyperostosis linking two vertebral bodies, without intervening disc disease and extend to different numbers of vertebrae linked by confluent anterior longitudinal ligament related new bone. (openrheumatologyjournal.com)
  • Hyperostosis may be a systemic condition, and thickening of the bones of the skull may also be present. (nih.gov)
  • 2004). In such cases, complete loss of GALNT3 function results in a failure to O-glycosylate FGF23, leading to its inactivation and the subsequent development of hyperostosis and ectopic calcium deposits in pores and skin and subcutaneous cells. (bioskinrevive.com)
  • Hyperostosis should be diagnosed whenever present and assigned a severity grade. (nih.gov)
  • Figure 1 Nose, Turbinate - Hyperostosis in a male B6C3F1/N mouse from a chronic study. (nih.gov)