An extensive order of highly specialized insects including bees, wasps, and ants.
Any of numerous winged hymenopterous insects of social as well as solitary habits and having formidable stings.
Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.
Venoms from animals of the phylum Arthropoda. Those most investigated are from scorpions and spiders of the class Arachnidae and from ant, bee, and wasp families of the Insecta order Hymenoptera. The venoms contain protein toxins, enzymes, and other bioactive substances and may be lethal to man.
Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)
Bites and stings inflicted by insects.
Venoms obtained from Apis mellifera (honey bee) and related species. They contain various enzymes, polypeptide toxins, and other substances, some of which are allergenic or immunogenic or both. These venoms were formerly used in rheumatism to stimulate the pituitary-adrenal system.
Venoms produced by the wasp (Vespid) family of stinging insects, including hornets; the venoms contain enzymes, biogenic amines, histamine releasing factors, kinins, toxic polypeptides, etc., and are similar to bee venoms.
Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.
Organisms, biological agents, or biologically-derived agents used strategically for their positive or adverse effect on the physiology and/or reproductive health of other organisms.
An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.
The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
The management and maintenance of colonies of honeybees.
A plant genus of the family MORACEAE. It is the source of the familiar fig fruit and the latex from this tree contains FICAIN.
An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).
An acute hypersensitivity reaction due to exposure to a previously encountered ANTIGEN. The reaction may include rapidly progressing URTICARIA, respiratory distress, vascular collapse, systemic SHOCK, and death.
Immunosuppression by the administration of increasing doses of antigen. Though the exact mechanism is not clear, the therapy results in an increase in serum levels of allergen-specific IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, suppression of specific IgE, and an increase in suppressor T-cell activity.
The number of males per 100 females.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.
Paired sense organs connected to the anterior segments of ARTHROPODS that help them navigate through the environment.
A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.
An in vitro test used in the diagnosis of allergies including drug hypersensitivity. The allergen is added to the patient's white blood cells and the subsequent histamine release is measured.
The mechanisms by which the SEX of an individual's GONADS are fixed.
A large order of insects comprising the butterflies and moths.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.
The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).
A large family of fruit flies in the order DIPTERA, comprising over 4,500 species in about 100 genera. They have patterned wings and brightly colored bodies and are found predominantly in the tropical latitudes.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)
A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)
A unisexual reproduction without the fusion of a male and a female gamete (FERTILIZATION). In parthenogenesis, an individual is formed from an unfertilized OVUM that did not complete MEIOSIS. Parthenogenesis occurs in nature and can be artificially induced.
Constituent of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 28S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.
Venoms from the superfamily Formicoidea, Ants. They may contain protein factors and toxins, histamine, enzymes, and alkaloids and are often allergenic or immunogenic.
Glands of external secretion that release its secretions to the body's cavities, organs, or surface, through a duct.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Sugar-rich liquid produced in plant glands called nectaries. It is either produced in flowers or other plant structures, providing a source of attraction for pollinating insects and animals, as well as being a nutrient source to animal mutualists which provide protection of plants against herbivores.
Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.
Viruses infecting insects, the largest family being BACULOVIRIDAE.
A family of MITES in the subclass ACARI. It includes the single genus Varroa.
Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.
A family of invertebrate RNA viruses in the order Picornavirales.
Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.
A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.
An epithelial outgrowth of the cloaca in birds similar to the thymus in mammals. It atrophies within 6 months after birth and remains as a fibrous remnant in adult birds. It is composed of lymphoid tissue and prior to involution, is the site of B-lymphocyte maturation.
A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.
Restriction of freedom of movement of individuals who have been exposed to infectious or communicable disease in order to prevent its spread; a period of detention of vessels, vehicles, or travelers coming from infected or suspected places; and detention or isolation on account of suspected contagion. It includes government regulations on the detention of animals at frontiers or ports of entrance for the prevention of infectious disease, through a period of isolation before being allowed to enter a country. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
Order of mammals whose members are adapted for flight. It includes bats, flying foxes, and fruit bats.
The properties of a pathogen that makes it capable of infecting one or more specific hosts. The pathogen can include PARASITES as well as VIRUSES; BACTERIA; FUNGI; or PLANTS.

Evolutionary dynamics of a mitochondrial rearrangement "hot spot" in the Hymenoptera. (1/339)

The arrangement of tRNA genes at the junction of the cytochrome oxidase II and ATPase 8 genes was examined across a broad range of Hymenoptera. Seven distinct arrangements of tRNA genes were identified among a group of wasps that have diverged over the last 180 Myr (suborder Apocrita); many of the rearrangements represent evolutionarily independent events. Approximately equal proportions of local rearrangements, inversions, and translocations were observed, in contrast to vertebrate mitochondria, in which local rearrangements predominate. Surprisingly, homoplasy was evident among certain types of rearrangement; a reversal of the plesiomorphic gene order has arisen on three separate occasions in the Insecta, while the tRNA(H) gene has been translocated to this locus on two separate occasions. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene translocation is real and is not an artifactual translocation resulting from the duplication of a resident tRNA gene followed by mutation of the anticodon. The nature of the intergenic sequences surrounding this region does not indicate that it should be especially prone to rearrangement; it does not generally have the tandem or inverted repeats that might facilitate this plasticity. Intriguingly, these findings are consistent with the view that during the evolution of the Hymenoptera, rearrangements increased at the same time that the rate of point mutations and compositional bias also increased. This association may direct investigations into mitochondrial genome plasticity in other invertebrate lineages.  (+info)

Presence of polydnavirus transcripts in an egg-larval parasitoid and its lepidopterous host. (2/339)

The parasitoid Chelonus inanitus (Braconidae, Hymenoptera) oviposits into eggs of Spodoptera littoralis (Noctuidae, Lepidoptera) and, along with the egg, also injects polydnaviruses and venom, which are prerequisites for successful parasitoid development. The parasitoid larva develops within the embryonic and larval stages of the host, which enters metamorphosis precociously and arrests development in the prepupal stage. Polydnaviruses are responsible for the developmental arrest and interfere with the host's endocrine system in the last larval instar. Polydnaviruses have a segmented genome and are transmitted as a provirus integrated in the wasp's genome. Virions are only formed in female wasps and no virus replication is seen in the parasitized host. Here it is shown that very small amounts of viral transcripts were found in parasitized eggs and early larval instars of S. littoralis. Later on, transcript quantities increased and were highest in the late last larval instar for two of the three viral segments tested and in the penultimate to early last larval instar for the third segment. These are the first data on the occurrence of viral transcripts in the host of an egg-larval parasitoid and they are different from data reported for hosts of larval parasitoids, where transcript levels are already high shortly after parasitization. The analysis of three open reading frames by RT-PCR revealed viral transcripts in parasitized S. littoralis and in female pupae of C. inanitus, indicating the absence of host specificity. For one open reading frame, transcripts were also seen in male pupae, suggesting transcription from integrated viral DNA.  (+info)

Related RNAs in lepidopteran cells after in vitro infection with Hyposoter didymator virus define a new polydnavirus gene family. (3/339)

In the present study, we describe the isolation and the characterization of three different Hyposoter didymator virus (HdV) lepidopteran host-expressed genes, the products of which might interfere with the host physiology during parasitism. In this report, we study the expression of HdV genes in Sf9 cells infected with HdV since results indicate that the Sf9 model mimics to some extent the in vivo model and may be utilized to study expression of HdV genes in lepidopteran host cells. This system allowed us to isolate three HdV-specific cDNAs, termed M24, M27, and M40. cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated significant regions of homology. The three cDNAs displayed repeated sequences arranged in tandem array that might have evolved through domain duplication. Similar to other previously described polydnavirus host-expressed genes, two intron positions have been found in the M24 leader region. The cDNAs corresponded to RNAs of 1.5, 1.6, and 2.3 kb that are also detected in parasitized Spodoptera littoralis larvae. They are encoded by different genes likely located on different HdV DNA molecules. Corresponding RNAs are detected early postinfection and remain detectable for at least 10 days postinfection. They encode secreted glycine- and proline-rich proteins. An antiserum raised against a baculovirus recombinant M24-encoded protein detected similar proteins in the culture medium of infected lepidopteran cells and in parasitized host hemolymph. We propose that the three cloned genes belong to an HdV gene family specifically expressed in parasitized lepidopteran hosts.  (+info)

General kin selection models for genetic evolution of sib altruism in diploid and haplodiploid species. (4/339)

A population genetic approach is presented for general analysis and comparison of kin selection models of sib and half-sib altruism. Nine models are described, each assuming a particular mode of inheritance, number of female inseminations, and Mendelian dominance of the altruist gene. In each model, the selective effects of altruism are described in terms of two general fitness functions, A(beta) and S(beta), giving respectively the expected fitness of an altruist and a nonaltruist as a function of the fraction of altruists beta in a given sibship. For each model, exact conditions are reported for stability at altruist and nonaltruist fixation. Under the Table 3 axions, the stability conditions may then be partially ordered on the basis of implications holding between pairs of conditions. The partial orderings are compared with predictions of the kin selection theory of Hamilton.  (+info)

Linkage analysis of sex determination in Bracon sp. near hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). (5/339)

To test whether sex determination in the parasitic wasp Bracon sp. near hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is based upon a single locus or multiple loci, a linkage map was constructed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. The map includes 71 RAPD markers and one phenotypic marker, blonde. Sex was scored in a manner consistent with segregation of a single "sex locus" under complementary sex determination (CSD), which is common in haplodiploid Hymenoptera. Under haplodiploidy, males arise from unfertilized haploid eggs and females develop from fertilized diploid eggs. With CSD, females are heterozygous at the sex locus; diploids that are homozygous at the sex locus become diploid males, which are usually inviable or sterile. Ten linkage groups were formed at a minimum LOD of 3.0, with one small linkage group that included the sex locus. To locate other putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) for sex determination, sex was also treated as a binary threshold character. Several QTL were found after conducting permutation tests on the data, including one on linkage group I that corresponds to the major sex locus. One other QTL of smaller effect had a segregation pattern opposite to that expected under CSD, while another putative QTL showed a female-specific pattern consistent with either a sex-differentiating gene or a sex-specific deleterious mutation. Comparisons are made between this study and the in-depth studies on sex determination and sex differentiation in the closely related B. hebetor.  (+info)

Single-locus complementary sex determination in Diadegma chrysostictos (Gmelin) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). (6/339)

Following the establishment of isofemale lines and subsequent inbreeding, the ichneumonid parasitoid wasp Diadegma chrysostictos (Gmelin) was shown by segregation of polymorphic alloenzyme loci to have single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD). This and the biparental nature of diploid males was confirmed using two independent Mendelian recessive phenotypic markers. The existence of diploid males, sl-CSD, and the abrogation of diploid males following outbreeding was further confirmed by flow cytometry, a potentially general method that is independent of the maternal sex allocation or the need for genetic markers. Estimates of the number of sex alleles in several British populations demonstrated 17-19 alleles in Britain, with a decline toward the northerly limit of the parasitoid's range, varying from 16 in the south of England to 4-5 in central Scotland, in broad agreement with the rate of attainment of a male-biased sex ratio when used to establish en masse laboratory cultures. These data represent the second confirmation of the existence of sl-CSD in the Ichneumonidae (and the first in the Campopleginae subfamily), lending further support to the notion that sl-CSD was the ancestral condition in the Aculeata/Ichneumonoidea clade (Cook 1993a; Periquet et al. 1993).  (+info)

Behavioural mimicry of honeybees (Apis mellifera) by droneflies (Diptera: Syrphidae: Eristalis spp.). (7/339)

Droneflies (Syrphidae: Eristalis spp. resemble honeybees (Apis mellifera) in appearance and have often been considered to be Batesian mimics. This study used a focal watch technique in order to compare the foraging behaviour of droneflies Eristalis tenax, Eristalis pertinax, Eristalis arbustorum and Eristalis nemorum) whilst they were feeding on patches of flowers with the behaviour of honeybees and other hymenopterans and dipterans. It was found that, on a range of plant species, the time droneflies spent on individual flowers and the time spent flying between them was more similar to that of honeybees than to the times of other hymenopterans and dipterans. These results suggest that dronefly behaviour has evolved to become more similar to that of honeybees and they support the hypothesis that droneflies are Batesian mimics.  (+info)

A linkage map of the turnip sawfly Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) based on random amplified polymorphic DNAs. (8/339)

A linkage map was constructed for the sawfly, Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera), based on the segregation of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and a visible mutation, yellow fat body (yfb). Forty haploid male progeny (20 yfb and 20+) from a single diploid female parent (yfb/+) were examined. Sixty-one of the 180 arbitrary primers tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) produced one or more RAPD bands. A total of 79 RAPD markers were detected. Of these, seven showed significant deviation from the expected 1:1 ratio, and were therefore excluded from further analysis. The remaining 72 RAPD markers and the marker mutation, yfb, were subjected to linkage analysis. Sixty RAPD markers and the yfb marker were organized into 16 linkage groups, spanning a distance of 517.2 cM. Twelve RAPD markers showed no linkage relationship to any group. Thirteen gel-purified RAPD bands were cloned and sequenced to generate the sequence-tagged sites (STSs). A single locus was represented by two markers, with one of them having a short internal deletion.  (+info)

Define Tenthredinidae. Tenthredinidae synonyms, Tenthredinidae pronunciation, Tenthredinidae translation, English dictionary definition of Tenthredinidae. Noun 1. Tenthredinidae - sawflies family Tenthredinidae arthropod family - any of the arthropods Hymenoptera, order Hymenoptera - an order of insects...
The eusocial Hymenoptera have radiated across a wide range of thermal environments, exposing them to significant physiological stressors. We reconstructed the evolutionary history of three families of Heat Shock Proteins (Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp40), the primary molecular chaperones protecting against thermal damage, across 12 Hymenopteran species and four other insect orders. We also predicted and tested for thermal inducibility of eight Hsps from the presence of cis-regulatory heat shock elements (HSEs). We tested whether Hsp induction patterns in ants were associated with different thermal environments. We found evidence for duplications, losses, and cis-regulatory changes in two of the three gene families. One member of the Hsp90 gene family, hsp83, duplicated basally in the Hymenoptera, with shifts in HSE motifs in the novel copy. Both copies were retained in bees, but ants retained only the novel HSE copy. For Hsp70, Hymenoptera lack the primary heat-inducible orthologue from Drosophila melanogaster and
The first identification of a sex pheromone of a pine sawfly (Hymenoptera, Diprionidae) dates back almost thirty years. Since then, female-produced pheromones of over twenty diprionid species have been investigated by solvent extraction followed by separation and identification. However, no study has shown what the females actually release. Collection of airborne compounds using absorbtion on charcoal filter as well as solid phase microextraction (SPME) followed by analysis employing gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), revealed an unusual system in Diprion pini, in which the pheromone precursor alcohol, 3,7-dimethyl-2-tridecanol, is released together with acetic, propionic, butyric and isobutyric acids. The corresponding acetate, propionate and butyrate esters of 3,7-dimethyl-2-tridecanol were also found in the samples. All esters were electrophysiologically active, and the propionate and isobutyrate were attractive in trapping experiments. Based on these and earlier ...
Carpenter, J. M., and W. C. Wheeler. 1999. Towards simultaneous analysis of morphological and molecular data in Hymenoptera. Zoologica Scripta 28(1-2):251-260.. Crozier, R. H. 1975. Hymenoptera. Borntraeger, Berlin; Stuttgart.. Danforth, B. D. 1989. The evolution of hymenopteran wings: The importance of size. Journal Of Zoology 218(2):247-276.. Gauld, I. and Bolton, B. 1988. The Hymenoptera. British Museum (Natural History); Oxford University Press, London; Oxford; New York.. Gibson, G.A.P. 1985. Some pro- and mesothoracic structures important for phylogenetic analysis of Hymenoptera, with a review of terms used for the structures. Can. Ent. 117:1395-1443.. Goulet, H. and J. T. Huber. 1993. Hymenoptera of the world: an identification guide to families. Agriculture Canada Research Branch Monograph no. 1894E.. Johnson, N. F. 1988. Midcoxal articulations and the phylogeny of the order Hymenoptera. Annals Of The Entomological Society Of America 81(6): 870-881.. Krombein, K. V. 1979. Catalog of ...
Alvarez JM. 2000. Use of molecular tools for discriminating between two populations of the citrus leafminer parasitoid Ageniaspis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Florida, Gainesville. Alvarez JM, Hoy MA. 2002. Evaluation of the ribosomal ITS2 DNA sequences in separating closely related populations of the parasitoid Ageniaspis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America 95: 250-256. Argov Y, Rossler Y. 1996. Introduction, release and recovery of several exotic natural enemies for biological control of the citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella, in Israel. Phytoparasitica 24: 33-38. Beattie GAC, Smith D. 1993. Citrus Leafminer. Agfact H2.AE.4, second ed. New South Wales, Australia. Bullock RC, Killer EE, Pelosi RR. 1996. The release and distribution of Ageniaspis citricola in St. Lucie County, Florida. In Hoy MA (ed.) Managing the citrus leafminer, Proceedings of the International Conference, Orlando, Fl. April 2-25, 1996. University of ...
Jérôme Rousselet, C. Geri, G.M. Hewitt, F. Lemeunier. The chromosomes of Diprion pini and D. similis (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae): Implications for karyotype evolution. Heredity, Nature Publishing Group, 1998, 81, pp.573-578. ⟨hal-02688941⟩ ...
Most sawflies (Symphyta) are plant feeders and many species are pest insects in agriculture or forestry. Every year the larvae of diprionids (conifer or pine sawflies) defoliate large areas of conifer forests in Europe, Asia and North America. The most important effect of pine sawfly defoliation is reduced growth of the trees. In some areas chemical insecticides are used to reduce populations and damage. The general biology and distribution of these species are usually well known, whereas the chemical ecology of sawflies is less known, with exception of the family Diprionidae.. Within this project we attempt to characterize pheromones of different sawfly species, and so far emphasis has been on diprionid species. We also investigate the possibility to use pheromones for monitoring and control of sawflies. Until now the following diprionid species have been studied within the project: Diprion jingyuanensis, D. pini, D. similis, Gilpinia frutetorum, G. pallida, G. socia, Macrodiprion nemoralis, ...
Throughout the northern hemisphere, there are many sawflies of the family Diprionidae which defoliate conifers and sometimes cause significant damage during their outbreaks. For example, in North...
The taxonomy of the ichneumonids is still poorly known. The family is highly diverse, containing 24,000 described species. Approximately 60,000 species are estimated to exist worldwide, though some estimates place this number at over 100,000. They are severely undersampled, and studies of their diversity typically produce very high numbers of species which are represented by only a single individual.[19][20] Due to the high diversity, the existence of numerous small and hard to identify species, and the majority of species being undiscovered, it has proven difficult to resolve the phylogeny of the ichneumonids. Even the relationships between subfamilies are unclear. The sheer diversity also means DNA sequence data is only available for a tiny fraction of the species, and detailed cladistic studies require major computing capacity. Extensive catalogues of the ichneumonids include those by Aubert,[9][10][11] Gauld,[21] Perkins,[12][13] and Townes.[14][22][23][24][25] Due to the taxonomic ...
Two sawfly species that feed on white fir were studied in Modoc County, California: Neodiprion near deleoni Ross and N. abietis complex. Neodiprion near deleoni comprised 91 percent of the field Neodiprion populations and spun opaque brown cocoons in the litter or soil. Neodiprion abietis accounted for 9 percent of the field population and spun translucent cocoons that appear green and are attached to foliage. Full-grown larvae, pupae, and adults of the two strains were morophologically distinct, though eggs and young larvae were not. Differences in morphology, phenology, physiology, and behavior are described for the two species. Mortality factors are identified, primarily for N. near deleoni. Parasitoids emerged from eggs and cocoons; many parasitoids that emerge from cocoons attack larvae. Larval predation was observed only rarely, except for predation by theridiid spiders. Sampled cocoons showed: 16 to 21 percent parasitized
Sawflies make up the suborder Symphyta, a group of largely herbivorous insects in the order Hymenoptera. This group is an artificial assemblage of superfamilies that are essentially the most primitive taxa within the Hymenoptera (some going back 200 million years). Sawflies are distinguishable from most other Hymenoptera by the broad connection between the abdomen and the thorax (see image), and the caterpillar-like larvae (below). The common name comes from the appearance of the ovipositor, which looks much like the blade of a saw. This ovipositor, which is modified into a stinger in some members of the Apocrita, is not used as a weapon. Females use the ovipositor to cut into plants where they lay their eggs. A few species have long thin ovipositors used to drill holes deep into wood. Large populations can cause economic damage in cultivated areas and forests. The larvae look like caterpillars (the larvae of moths and butterflies), with two notable exceptions; (1) they have five or more ...
The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, a moth originating from tropical and subtropical America, has recently become a serious pest of cereals in sub-Saharan Africa. Biological control offers an economically and environmentally safer alternative to synthetic insecticides that are being used for the management of this pest. Consequently, various biological control options are being considered, including the introduction of Telenomus remus, the main egg parasitoid of S. frugiperda in the Americas, where it is already used in augmentative biological control programmes. During surveys in South, West, and East Africa, parasitized egg masses of S. frugiperda were collected, and the emerged parasitoids were identified through morphological observations and molecular analyses as T. remus. The presence of T. remus in Africa in at least five countries provides a great opportunity to develop augmentative biological control methods and register the parasitoid against S. frugiperda. Surveys should be carried out
article{7fbbd565-b530-4a67-9457-94160ef86600, abstract = {Males of the European pine sawfly, Neodiprion sertifer Geoffr., were marked and released downwind from pheromone traps, baited with 100 mug of the sex pheromone (2S,3S,7S)-3,7-dimethyl-2-pentadecyl acetate. Males were released 5 m downwind from one trap, or downwind from five traps, 50 m or 200 m away. The average capture rates after 24 hr were 21.5%, 17.7% and 3.8%, respectively. The capture rate was highest at moderate wind speeds (1-2 m/sec) in the 50 m experiments, whereas it decreased above wind speeds of 1.5 m/sec in the 200 m experiments. With no precipitation and > 13.5 degreesC during overcast, wind speed is presumably the most important climatic factor for N. sertifer males flying upwind to a pheromone source. Travel time, the elapsed time form take-off to landing on the trap, varied considerably, and the shortest recorded travel times were 1, 6 and 45 min for the 5, 50, and 200 m experiments, respectively. The trap ...
Karyotypes of eleven parasitoid species of the family Eulophidae were examined, namely, Chrysocharis laomedon (Walker, 1839) (2n = 10), Chrysocharis sp. aff. laomedon (n = 5, 2n = 10), Chrysocharis sp. aff. albipes (Ashmead, 1904) (2n = 12), Mischotetrastichus petiolatus (Erdös, 1961) (n = 6, 2n = 12), Minotetrastichus frontalis (Nees, 1834) (n = 5, 2n = 10), Cirrospilus pictus (Nees, 1834) (2n = 12), Hyssopus geniculatus (Hartig, 1838) (2n = 16), Sympiesis gordius (Walker, 1839) (2n = 12), S. sericeicornis (Nees, 1834) (2n = 12), Pnigalio agraules (Walker, 1839) (2n = 12 + 0-2B) and Pnigalio gyamiensis Myartseva & Kurashev, 1990 (2n = 12 + 0-6B) reared from Phyllonorycter acerifoliella (Zeller, 1839), Ph. apparella (Herrich-Schäffer, 1855), Ph. issikii (Kumata, 1963) (Gracillariidae) and Chrysoesthia sexguttella (Thunberg, 1794) (Gelechiidae). Chromosome sets of all species except P. agraules and P. gyamiensis were studied for the first time. B chromosomes were detected in the two latter species; in
The life cycle of Euplectrus Puttleri Gordh, 1980 (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) on Alabama argillacea Hubner, 1818 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae
Hymenoptera stings can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis, and the most severe reactions can be refractory to single or multiple doses of. Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is highly effective and well-tolerated by most patients.VIT for patients with all
Finding the nearest relatives of Nasonia (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Roger Burks University of California, Riverside Department of Entomology. What is Nasonia ?. Gregarious puparial parasitoids of calyptrate flies in bird nests and refuse Slideshow 2994323 by deacon
Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea) comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the
Citation: Schauff, M.E., Gates, M.W., Lasalle, J. 2006. FAMILY EULOPHIDAE. Neotropical Hymenoptera. 755-760. Interpretive Summary: Controlling insect pests by using natural enemies is both cost effective and environmentally safe. Parasitic wasps attack many crop pests and have been very useful as biological controls. Wasps in the family Eulophidae have been used against many pest leafminers, caterpillars, thrips, and other insects. In this book chapter, we summarize what is known about Eulophidae diversity, hosts, relationships, and identification characters for South America. This information will be useful to insect identifiers, biological control researchers, and quarantine officials. Technical Abstract: The family Eulophidae is summarized for South America. Data on numbers of species, genera, subfamilies, and a key are given. Current ideas on phylogeny and recent taxonomic changes are presented. ...
Discover Lifes page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Hymenoptera - Ants, Bees, Wasps, Sawflies, Horntails, Ichneumons, Mud daubers, Cow killers, Cicada killers -- Discover Life
The spatial distribution of two pine sawflies and methods of sampling for the study of population dynamics. 1964. Lyons, L.A. The Canadian Entomologist 96(11):1373-1407.. Year: 1964. Issued by: Great Lakes Forestry Centre Catalog ID: 37727. Language: English. Availability: PDF (request by e-mail). Mark record. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Diagnosis of hymenoptera venom sensitivity. AU - Hamilton, Robert G.. PY - 2002/8. Y1 - 2002/8. N2 - Purpose of review: The objective of this review is to highlight recent advances in the preparation, documentation and performance of reagents and methods used in the diagnosis of Hymenoptera-venom-induced immediate-type hypersensitivity. Recent findings: The following potent allergens have been reported: (1) a low-molecular-weight honey-bee allergen (Api m 6) has been described; (2) venom allergens in the North American species of bumble-bee (Bombus pennsylvanicus) have been more fully characterized, with the focus on phospholipase A2; (3) the vespid venom Ves v 5 allergen has been structurally mapped to identify immunoglobulin-E-binding epitopes; (4) the possible role of carbohydrate antigen epitopes as a cause of cross-reactivity among honey-bee and vespid venom proteins has been reported; and (5) the venom of Pachycondyla chinensis, an ant found commonly in the Far East, has ...
This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Sharkey, Michael (2010): Aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) from Thailand. Zootaxa 2498: 47-52, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.195775 ...
Alien parasitic wasps, including accidental introductions and purposefully released biological control agents, have been implicated in the decline of native Hawaiian Lepidoptera. Understanding the potential impacts of alien wasps requires knowledge of ecological parameters that influence parasitism rates for species in their new environment. Sophora seed-feeding Cydia spp. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) were surveyed for larval parasitoids to determine how native and alien wasps are partitioned over an elevation gradient (2200-2800 m) on Hawaii Island, Hawaii. Parasitism rate of native Euderus metallicus (Eulophidae) increased with increased elevation, while parasitism rate by immigrant Calliephialtes grapholithae (Ichneumonidae) decreased. Parasitism by Pristomerus hawaiiensis (Ichneumonidae), origins uncertain, also decreased with increased elevation. Two other species, Diadegma blackburni (Ichneumonidae), origins uncertain, and Brasema cushmani (Eupelmidae), a purposefully introduced biological control
Issuu is a digital publishing platform that makes it simple to publish magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online. Easily share your publications and get them in front of Issuus millions of monthly readers. Title: The Hymenoptera of Suffolk: Final Part, Author: Suffolk Naturalists Society, Name: The Hymenoptera of Suffolk: Final Part, Length: 26 pages, Page: 1, Published: 2016-12-21
Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine how Apanteles scutellaris and Agathis gibbosa (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) coexist as solitary endophagous parasitoids of potato tuberworm (PTW) larvae, Phthorimaea opercullela (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), in southern California. The competitive characteristics of Orgilus jennieae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), an exotic parasitoid of PTW larvae, were compared with those of the native species to determine its potential for establishment. Emergence of the egg-larval parasitoid Chelonus phthorimaeae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from field-collected PTW larvae was compared with those of the other parasitoids, but its competitive interactions were not considered. Seasonal density changes, mine characteristics, and within-plant distributions of PTW larvae were studied to determine their possible impacts on parasitoid interactions. Apanteles scutellaris and A. gibbosa oviposited in similar
Florida Entomologist contains contributions on all aspects of basic and applied entomological science from all geographic regions.
Hefei City, Anhui Province, China, July 9, 2020.- PHOTOGRAPH BY Costfoto / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing. Adults are actually wasps. While butterfly and moth caterpillars have 2 to 5 pairs of fleshy prolegs on the abdomen; sawflies have more than 5 pairs. These larvae feed and cause damage on many kinds of ornamentals and fruit trees, including cherry, cotoneaster, mountain-ash, pear, purple leaf plum and serviceberry. Low impact pesticides. Cimbex connatus. In the tradition of the worlds great dynasties, centuries of breeding and pampering have established roses (Rosa spp.) The larvae hatch quite quickly and move in a group to the freshly emerged leaves. About a week after, both were infested with what appears to have been the pamphillidae-ancantholyda sp. Sawfly Larvae Look Like Caterpillars . Similar Images . The adults are brown, flylike insects that are ½ inch (12 mm) long. Figure 1. Sawfly larvae go mad on the Solomons Seal - Duration: 2:06. intoGardens 1,358 views. Its larvae ...
We lightened up your lateral view and we conclude this is not a Caterpillar. There are ten legs visible, three true legs and seven prolegs, and because insects have bilateral symmetry, we can deduce that there are seven pairs of prolegs. Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs, though caterpillars from the Inchworm family Geometridae have but two pairs of prolegs. This is the larva of a Sawfly, and though it really resembles members of the genus Cimbex, including the Elm Sawfly, we have never seen such coloration that we can recall. Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this Sawfly.. ...
Chewing large holes, or entire leaf blades is another, less-common sawfly. The larvae of Megaxyela major (Cresson) is yellow in color with prominent black spots and a black head capsule. Larvae grow to 3/4 inch long before dropping to the ground and pupating. This sawfly has the curious habit of curling around a leafs rachis or midrib during daylight hours (photo at right). As night falls, the larvae continue to feed on entire leaves often leaving just the midrib. We have never had a serious outbreak of this sawfly species ...
Ash sawfly definition is - any of various sawflies (especially Tomostethus multicinctus and Tethida cordigera) having larvae that feed on and defoliate ash trees.
Use Trichogramma spp., a moth egg parasite that prevents caterpillars from emerging by laying their eggs in the moth eggs, killing them. Timing the release is important - if you release too early there arent enough pest eggs for the wasps to parasitize - too late means that the pest eggs have hatched and you have a new problem - caterpillar pests. Biology & Life Cycle: Trichogramma wasps lay their eggs inside the pest eggs, stopping development. The larvae feed on the egg and then emerge as adults. The larvae take 10 days to develop within the pest moth egg, which turns brown or black as the larvae pupate. The adult wasps live anywhere from 7 to 14 days, depending on temperature and moisture and the female Trichogramma will parasitize up to 300 pest moth eggs. Eggs on cards usually hatch within 2-5 days. Preferred food: Trichogramma parasitize the eggs of more than 200 pests, including borers, webworms, loopers, leafworms, fruitworms, cutworms, bollworms, and armyworms (except beet armyworms).
This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Song, Li-Wen, Cao, Liang-Ming, Li, Xing-Peng, Yang, Zhong-Qi, Chen, Yue-Qu (2017): A new species of Macrocentrus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitizing larva of Dioryctria pryeri (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Zootaxa 4303 (1): 122-130, DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4303.1.7 ...
VIT is globally accepted as the treatment of choice in venom allergy.15. Although 44 patients in the current study declared a negative effect of VIT on work, caused by changing working time and economic loss due to VIT, most of our participants declared an indifferent effect of VIT on work. Individuals at high risk of sting reported a positive VIT impact on work. This will support the accepted medical approach that occupation may influence the decision to initiate VIT, also for non-life-threatening reactions.5. Another predictor of a perceived positive effect from VIT was completion of treatment. Participants who have already completed VIT are probably more aware of the long-term beneficial effects of treatment. They are less likely to report any drawbacks of VIT, such as the time spent in therapy, which can affect work and social life. A relevant number of participants reported a negative impact of VIT on work and even if we could not find any peculiar characteristic of this group, this finding ...
Sexy Mouth Odour Male Oral Gland Pheromone in the Grain Beetle Parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus Förster Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Wasps - Hymenoptera Identification & Descriptions Wasp, common name applied to most species of hymenopteran insects (see Hymenoptera), except bees and ants. Insects known as wasps include the sawflies, the parasitic wasps, and the [...] ...
The HYMENOPTERA class of insects are the only stinging insects. However only a few of the hymenoptera (honeybees, wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and fire ants) cause serious allergic reactions. Overall, the yellow jacket is the most common offender followed by honey bees, wasp and then hornets. Bumblebees rarely sting humans. The base of the stinger of hymenoptera insects is attached to a small venom filled sac. Most stinging insects except the honeybees can reuse their stingers, inflicting multiple venom injections. In contrast, the honeybees stinger is barbed so when it tries to remove its stinger from the skin, both the stinger and venom sacs are torn off and left in the victim. Most hymenoptera actually use their stingers in self defense, for defense of the hive or for killing other insects ...
Honda, J. Y. and S. V. Trapitzin. 1995. A Species Description and Biological Comparison Between a New Species of Telenomus Haliday (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) and Trichogramma platneri Nagarkatti (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae): Two Egg Parasitoids of Sabulodes aegrotata (Guenee) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae). The Pan-Pacific Entomologist. 71(4): 227-236 ...
Figure 3. In general, larvae complete feeding by the time needles emerge from the candelabra. Therefore, those needles are not damaged. There really is only a minor threat of branch or tree death resulting from sawfly larval feeding. However, the loss of second- and third-year needles may be noticeable in landscape trees and ruin their appearance. In late spring, the larvae drop to the ground and pupate in brown, leathery cocoons at the base of trees. Wasp-like adults emerge in fall and lay eggs in the needles before winter. There is one generation per year in Kansas.. Although sawfly larvae look-like caterpillars; they are not caterpillars (Order: Lepidoptera) as they are related to ants, bees, and wasps (Order: Hymenoptera). The best way to tell a sawfly larva from a caterpillar is by the following: 1) sawfly larva have prolegs on every abdominal segment whereas caterpillars are missing prolegs on the abdomen and 2) caterpillar larva have hairs or crochets on their feet whereas sawfly larva do ...
17 گونه از 3 جنس Bruchophagus Ashmead, 1888، Eurytoma Illiger, 1807 و Systole Walker, 1832 (Hym.: Eurytomidae) از بذور 25 گونه گیاه در مراتع استان قم طی سال-های 1389 تا 1396 پرورش داده شدند. این گیاهان متعلق به تیره-هایAsteraceae ، Apiaceae،Fabaceae وLamiaceae بودند. شش گونه B. desertus Zerova, 1994،B. hippocrepidis Zerova, 1969 ،B. parvulus Zerova, 1994 ،B. platypterus (Walker, 1834)،E. dentata Mayr, 1878 و--S. prangicola Zerova, 1972 برای اولین بار برای فون ایران گزارش می-شوند .این نمونه-ها از بذور 25 گونه گیاهی پرورش داده شدند که 6 گیاه، میزبان جدیدی برای این زنبور-ها می باشند. نتایج این تحقیق می‌تواند برای تهیه بذور سالم برای احیا گیاهان در مراتع ایران بکار رود.
Behavior and Survival of the Filth Fly Parasitoids Spalangia endius and Urolepis rufipes (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Response to Three Granular House Fly Baits and Components ...
El Archivo Digital UPM alberga en formato digital la documentacion academica y cientifica (tesis, pfc, articulos, etc..) generada en la Universidad Politecnica de Madrid.Los documentos del Archivo Digital UPM son recuperables desde buscadores: Google, Google Academics, Yahoo, Scirus, etc y desde recolectores OAI: E-ciencia, DRRD, Recolecta (REBIUN-FECYT), Driver, Oaister, etc.
Juvenile sawfly larvae can appear in several different forms, depending on the variety. Often, they will look like small slug or worm. They feed on the soft tissue of leaves and on evergreens, consumeing the new needles. In a few cases, the sawfly larvae act as leafminers, living and eating within the leaf, never emerging outside of the leaf. The leafminer version is more difficult to control than the exposed juveniles, because being inside the leaf protects them.. ...
Juvenile sawfly larvae can appear in several different forms, depending on the variety. Often, they will look like small slug or worm. They feed on the soft tissue of leaves and on evergreens, consumeing the new needles. In a few cases, the sawfly larvae act as leafminers, living and eating within the leaf, never emerging outside of the leaf. The leafminer version is more difficult to control than the exposed juveniles, because being inside the leaf protects them.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Using parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia for the selection of optimal lines of the egg parasitoid Trichogramma pretiosum for use in biocontrol. AU - Ebrahimi, Valeh. AU - Ashouri, Ahmad. AU - Rugman-Jones, Paul F.. AU - Lindsey, Amelia R.I.. AU - Javan-Nikkhah, Mohammad. AU - Stouthamer, Richard. N1 - Funding Information: This work was supported in part by a grant from the United States Department of Agriculture NIFA 194617 to R.S. and V.E. was supported in part by the Department of Entomology of the University of Tehran. Publisher Copyright: © 2019 The Netherlands Entomological Society. PY - 2019/3. Y1 - 2019/3. N2 - Trichogramma wasps (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) are egg parasitoids commonly employed in augmentative biological control releases against a variety of mainly lepidopteran pests. By exploiting the mechanism by which the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia induces parthenogenesis in this genus, we created a set of completely homozygous Wolbachia-infected ...
Spalangia cameroni Perkins (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a pupal parasitoid of the Medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedmann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the principal pests of Spanish agriculture. Spalangia cameroni is a potential biocontrol agent for this pest if methods can be developed to mass-rear it effectively on C. capitata. Here, we report on the use of freeze-killed pupae of C. capitata to maintain a laboratory colony of S. cameroni, with a view to setting up a mass-rearing protocol. Realised fecundity, adult progeny, sex ratio, and superparasitism level were the principal parameters analysed. No significant differences were found in respect of these parameters between living or freeze-killedMedfly pupae used as hosts, although sex ratios showed a bias towards females in the case of freeze-killed pupae. Freeze-killed pupae were concluded to present the best option for the laboratory-rearing of S. cameroni, on account of ease of rearing, and avoidance of the emergence of Medfly adults ...
The evolution of eusociality occurred repeatedly in different orders of animals, particularly the hymenoptera (the wasps, bees, and ants). This true sociality in animals, in which sterile individuals work to further the reproductive success of others, is found in termites, ambrosia beetles, gall-dwelling aphids, thrips, marine sponge-dwelling shrimp (Synalpheus regalis), naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber), and the insect order Hymenoptera (which includes bees, wasps, and ants). The fact that this behavior has evolved so many times in the hymenoptera (between 8 and 11 times ), but remains rare throughout the rest of the animal kingdom, has made the evolution of eusociality a topic of debate among evolutionary biologists. Eusocial organisms at first appear to behave in stark contrast with simple interpretations of Darwinian evolution: passing on ones genes to the next generation, or fitness, is a central idea in evolutionary biology. Current theories propose that the evolution of ...
Systematic Studies on Meteorinae of China (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), This monograph deals with the systematic studies on the subfamily Meteorinae Cresson of the family Braconidae from China. It comprises two parts, namely general account and systematic account. In t,All books from China,especially scientific and academic books,export Chinese and English version books to libraries and book stores over the world,China Scientific Book Services:The Best Professional China Books,hceis.com
With yellow jackets it is sometimes difficult to determine whether you should like them or not. On one hand, they can result in severe discomfort when you accidentally disturb a nest, and the workers swarm and in the process of defending their hives they attack you. On the other hand, yellow jackets are voracious predators of plant-feeding herbivores such as caterpillars, beetles and other pests. Yellow jackets contribute toward the reduction of pest populations.. Yellow jackets are wasps in the family Vespidae. There are many species of yellow jackets in North America. One of the more common in our area is the Eastern yellow jacket. Colonies can be underground, in dense shrubs or vegetation, or in human-made structures. Nests are made of paper and the outer shell encloses a comb that supports the developing yellow jacket brood. Unlike honey bees, nests contain no honey or pollen.. Although adults feed primarily on items rich in sugars and carbohydrates (fruits, flower nectar, tree sap, apple ...
This is the time of year that Extension agents receive numerous calls about yellow jackets, hornets and how to control them. Many folks dont know the difference between the various types of hornets and yellow jackets we have in Georgia. The confusion is understandable, considering yellow jackets, wasps and hornets are all in the Vespidae family, and they all make their home in the state. Even within the same species individual wasps, hornets and yellow jackets have varying color patterns, depending on whether they are a male, a worker or a queen. To add to the confusion, many people use the terms hornet and yellow jacket interchangeably. For example, the bald-faced hornet is actually a type of yellow jacket.. In general, the term hornet is used for species that nest above ground, and the term yellow jacket is used for those that make nests in the ground. Colonies start each spring when a single queen, who mated the previous fall and then overwintered in the soil or leaf litter - starts a nest. ...
The citrus leafminer (CLM) probably originated in Asia and its host range includes citrus species and a few closely-related Rutaceae (Heppner 1993, Knapp et al. 1995). The citrus leafminer has a relatively simple life history: adult males and females emerge in the early morning hours and mate at dusk and females begin to deposit eggs about 24 hours later on tender new leaves 10-20 mm in length (also called flush) during the night. A single female can deposit approximately 50 eggs during her life. The eggs mature within a day in summer and the young larvae immediately chew their way into the tiny leaf, where each produces a mine. There are three larval stages found within the mine and, after five to six days in summer, the larvae become prepupae, a nonfeeding stage. The prepupa produces silk to form a closed pupal chamber, usually made by folding the edge of the leaf. Molting to the pupal stage occurs within this protected chamber and, after about six days, adults emerge from the end of the ...
The primary, solitary parasitoids Asobara tabida Nees (Braconidae: Alysiinae) and Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson) (= Pseudeucoila bochei Weld): Eucoilidae) are sympatric, show seasonal overlap and share the same hosts, viz. larvae of Drosophila species. Discrimination between unparasitized hosts and hosts parasitized by the other species was studied. No differences were found in their behaviour towards the two kinds of hosts: these were accepted equally well for parasitization.
Parasitoids were initially recognized from the order Hymenoptera, but later research showed that a number of families in the Diptera order and one in the Coleoptera order also contain true parasitoids. In describing parasitic insects, the term parasitoid was first used in Reuter 1913. His definition referred to an organism that goes through complete metamorphosis and whose larvae are parasitic but whose adults are free living (see Defining Parasitoids). Since that time, the term has been greatly refined to accommodate the plethora of life-history strategies that are found in parasitoids. Some of the most important pioneering research on host-parasitoid interactions was performed by George Salt (Salt 1941) and Stanley Flanders (Flanders 1942 and Flanders 1950), whose early works on development and reproduction are still considered to be of profound importance today. Their studies also influenced later generations of entomologists working on parasitoids. Doutt 1959 wrote the first comprehensive ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - N,N-dimethyluracil and actinidine, two pheromones of the ponerine ant Megaponera foetens (Fab.) (Hymenoptera. T2 - Formicidae). AU - Janssen, Edelgard. AU - Bestmann, Hans J.. AU - Hölldobler, Bert. AU - Kern, Friedrich. PY - 1995/12. Y1 - 1995/12. N2 - By means of gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric, and micro-preparative methods N,N-dimethyluracil and actinidine were identified as two ethologically active compounds in the ponerine ant Megaponera foetens. The synthesized poison gland compound N,N-dimethyluracil released trail-following behavior, whereas actinidine, found in the pygidial gland, stimulated ants to leave the nest, possibly in an alarm reaction. Biological activity of the synthetic samples were confirmed by behavioral experiments and electroantennogram responses with worker antennae.. AB - By means of gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric, and micro-preparative methods N,N-dimethyluracil and actinidine were identified as two ethologically active compounds in ...
Cryptic Lineages in the Cardiocondyla sl. kagutsuchi Terayama (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Discovered by Phylogenetic and Morphological Approaches
Animal mitochondrial genomes have provided large and diverse datasets for evolutionary studies. Here, the first two representative mitochondrial genomes from the family Pompilidae (Hymenoptera: Vespoidea) were determined using next-generation sequencing. The sequenced region of these two mitochondrial genomes from the species Auplopus sp. and Agenioideus sp. was 16,746 bp long with an A + T content of 83.12% and 16,596 bp long with an A + T content of 78.64%, respectively. In both species, all of the 37 typical mitochondrial genes were determined. The secondary structure of tRNA genes and rRNA genes were predicted and compared with those of other insects. Atypical trnS1 using abnormal anticodons TCT and lacking D-stem pairings was identified. There were 49 helices belonging to six domains in rrnL and 30 helices belonging to three domains in rrns present. Compared with the ancestral organization, four and two tRNA genes were rearranged in mitochondrial genomes of Auplopus and Agenioideus, respectively.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Species Phylogeny of the Bee Genus Exoneurella Michener (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Allodapini): Evidence from Molecular and Morphological Data Sets. AU - Reyes, Stephen G.. AU - Cooper, Steven J.B.. AU - Schwarz, Michael P.. PY - 1999/1. Y1 - 1999/1. N2 - An hypothesis of genealogical relationships among taxa provides an historical map along which character evolution (e.g., social traits) can be traced to reveal patterns of common origin or repeated but independent evolution. To investigate the evolution of social traits in the allodapine bee genus Exoneurella, we have derived a species phylogeny based on 32 morphological features of adult and immature stages and sequences from 2 mitochondrial DNA genes, cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and cytochrome b (Cyt b). The morphological and COI data support the close relationship of Brevineura and Exoneurella in accord with previous hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships among allodapine bees. In contrast, the Cyt b data supported the ...
CHAMBERS, V.H. 1971. Large populations of Belytinae (Hymenoptera, Diapriidae). Entomologists Monthly Magazine, 106: 149-154.. COON, B.R. 2000. Biology of Trichopria columbiana (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae), an endoparasitoid of Hydrellia pakistanae (Diptera: Ephydridae) a biological control agent of the aquatic weed Hydrilla verticillata (Hydrocharitaceae). Masters thesis. Entomology and Nematology Department, University of Florida, Gainesville.. EARLY, J.W., L. MASNER, A.D. AUSTIN AND I.I.D. NAUMANN. 2001. Maamingidae, a new family of proctotrupoid wasp (Insecta: Hymenoptera) from New Zealand. Invertebrate Taxonomy, 15: 341-352.. HOFFMEISTER, T. 1989. Biologie und Wirtskreis parasitischer Hautfl gler der familie Diapriidae. Natur und Museum, 119: 327-334.. ISIDORO, N., F. BIN, R. ROMANI, J. PUJADE-VILLAR AND P. ROS-FARRE. 1999. Diversity and function of male antennal glands in Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera). Zoologica Scripta, 28: 165-174.. JOHNSON, N. 1992. Catalog of world Proctotrupoidea excluding ...
Host choice behavior in insect parasitoids and herbivores has been predicted to vary dynamically in response to external and internal factors acting on a foraging female; physiological state and egg load in particular have been shown to play a major role. In my dissertation, I addressed the role of physiological state in parasitoid host choice behavior at the host species level under field conditions. The parasitoid of choice was the classical biological control agent Binodoxys communis Matsumura that has been released in 2007 throughout the Midwestern USA as part of a classical biological control project against the invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Gahan). First, I designed a series of laboratory experiments to assess egg load and the risk of egg limitation in female B. communis in response to temperature, sugar feeding, and host availability. These experiments showed that B. communis maintains a constant egg load by varying its egg maturation rate in response to oviposition events. I ...
Hent samlet pdf. Kimmie Møenbo Jensen:. The Danish Piesmatidae - Distribution and identification (Hemiptera, Heteroptera) .................... 1. Otto Buhl, Per Falck, Ole Karsholt, Knud Larsen & Flemming Vilhelmsen:. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2017 (Lepidoptera)....................................................... 13. Simone N. Gasque, George O. Poinar, & Brian L. Fredensborg:. Ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) parasitism by Neoneurinae wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in Denmark ....................................................................................... 27. Walther Gritsch:. Fund af Coniopteryx (Metaconiopteryx) tjederi Kimmins, 1934 (Neuroptera, Coniopterygidae)- en ny voksnetvinge for den danske fauna ................................................................................ 31. Peter Neerup Buhl:. A new species of Platygaster Latreille, 1809 (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae) from Denmark .... 35. Henning Bang Madsen, Kent Runge Poulsen, Claus Rasmussen, Isabel ...
At emergence females of Trichogramma had a lot of mature eggs in their ovaries, but some delayed parasitization or refused to parasitize a laboratory host. The effect of constant and alternating temperatures on the percentage of Trichogramma b...
Description: There is extraordinary diversity in sexual dimorphism (SD) among animals, but little is known about its epigenetic basis. To study the epigenetic architecture of SD in a haplodiploid system, we performed RNA-seq and whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of adult females and males from two closely related parasitoid wasps, Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti. More than 75% of expressed genes displayed significantly sex-biased expression. As a consequence, expression profiles are more similar between species within each sex than between sexes within each species. Furthermore, extremely male- and female-biased genes are enriched for totally different functional categories: male-biased genes for key enzymes in sexpheromone synthesis and female-biased genes for genes involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Remarkably, just 70 highly expressed, extremely male-biased genes account for 10% of all transcripts in adult males. Unlike expression profiles, DNA methylomes are ...
Schiopu, I.; Andriescu, I.D. 2002, The parasitoid and inquiline complex of oak gall wasp Andricus vindobonensis Mueller (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in southeast Romania. Parasitic wasps: evolution, systematics, biodiversity and biological control. International symposium: Parasitic Hymenoptera: Taxonomy and Biological Control (14-17 May 2001, Köszeg, Hungary). pp.370 (Eds: Melika, G.; Thuróczy, C.) Agroinform Kiadó & Nyomda, Budapest, Hungary ...
Due to the relatively recent invasion of exotic Tephritidae pest species the interests in Tephritidae fruit fly management increased and so also the number of studies on both the exotic and the native fruit flies and their parasitoids. The exotic Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) causes serious damage to fruit trees thereby threatening the horticulture industry. Until now, native parasitoids of B. dorsalis have never been reared most likely owing to encapsulation of their eggs inside the host and as a result for B. dorsalis to become a sink for native parasitoids. Because of the above and the fact that Fopius arisanus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was at the time the most successful natural enemy in classical biological control programs of fruit flies in other parts of the world, it was shipped from a laboratory colony at icipe, Nairobi, Kenya in 2008 to IITA-Benin where it was mass-reared in an insectary for experimental releases. Studies on interspecific competition between the exotic ...
Bees, wasps, yellow jackets, and hornets belong to a class of insects called Hymenoptera. Most insect stings cause only minor discomfort. Stings can occur anywhere on the body and can be painful and frightening for a child. Yellow jackets cause the most allergic reactions in the US. Stings from these insects cause three to four times more deaths than poisonous snake bites, due to severe allergic reaction. Fire ants, usually found in southern states, can sting multiple times, and the sites are more likely to become infected.. The two greatest risks from most insect stings are allergic reaction (which can sometimes be fatal if the allergic reaction is severe enough) and infection (more common and less serious).. ...
Bees, wasps, yellow jackets, and hornets belong to a class of insects called Hymenoptera. Most insect stings cause only minor discomfort. Stings can occur anywhere on the body and can be painful and frightening for a child. Yellow jackets cause the most allergic reactions in the US. Stings from these insects cause three to four times more deaths than poisonous snake bites, due to severe allergic reaction. Fire ants, usually found in southern states, can sting multiple times, and the sites are more likely to become infected.. The two greatest risks from most insect stings are allergic reaction (which can sometimes be fatal if the allergic reaction is severe enough) and infection (more common and less serious).. ...
Interested students and scholars should get in touch with us. Publications:. 25) Oettler J, Platschek T, Schmidt C, Rajakumar R, Favé M-J, Khila A, Heinze J, Abouheif E (2018) The gene network underlying the male wing polyphenism evolved independently from the pre-existing female wing polyphenism in Cardiocondyla ants. J Exp Zool B accepted. 24) Schultner E, Oettler J, Helanterä H (accepted) The role of brood in eusocial Hymenoptera. Quart Rev Biol. 23) Schrader L, Helanterä H, Oettler J (2016) Accelerated evolution of developmentally biased genes in a tetraphenic ant. Mol Biol Evol doi:10.1093/molbev/msw240. 22) Oettler J, Schrempf A (in press) Fitness and aging in Cardiocondyla obscurior ant queens. Curr Opin Insect Sci 21) Klein A, Schultner E, Lowak H, Schrader L, Heinze J, Holman L, Oettler J (2016) Evolution of social insect polyphenism facilitated by the sex differentiation cascade. PLOS Genetics doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1005952. 20) Seifert B, Buschinger A, Aldawood A, Antonova V, ...
The Personal Health Division of LaSalle County Health Department has on staff, Registered Nurses, a Personal Health Educator, and Program Assistants who provide health care services in a variety of settings. Within this division, there are three categories of health care-Family Health, Communicable Disease, and Health Promotion. To learn more about the health care programs available at LaSalle County Health Department, click below on your area of need or interest. Additional information on educational presentations and pamphlets can be found by visiting the Health Education site. Immunization Clinics. ...
Meet the talented staff at Bright Horizons Bright Horizons at Chicago Central Loop (33 N. LaSalle) in Chicago IL. Our trained teachers at Bright Horizons at Chicago Central Loop (33 N. LaSalle) will help your child during their day in back-up or emergency child care. Learn how.
Copyright © 2018 Lasalle County. All rights reserved. By using this site you acknowledge that you have read the disclaimer and you accept and will be bound by the terms thereof ...
In North Florida, insect encounters are a commonplace occurrence; insect allergy is a frequent concern seen in the office of an allergy & immunology physician. The most common insects that cause allergic reactions include those of the order Hymenoptera: yellow jacket, hornet, wasp, honey bee, bumble bee and fire ant.
PUBLICATIONS Peer reviewed articles 1. Fernández-Triana, J.L., Whitfield, J.B., Smith, M.A., Janzen, D., Hallwachs, W., Rodríguez, J., Ward, D., Huber, J.T., Mason, P.G., Zaldivar- Riveron, A., Guclu, C., Hebert, P.D.N. DNA barcoding and the taxonomy of Microgastrinae wasps (Hymenoptera, Braconidae): impacts after eight years and more than 20,000 sequences. Molecular Ecology Resources. En revisión. 2. Ceccarelli, F. S., Robinson, D. E., Clebsch, H., Zaldívar-Riverón, A. Parasitoid wasps from different sized forest patches in Jamaica, with a focus on the subfamily Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Caribean Journal of Science. En revisión. 3. Quicke, D. L. J., Smith, A. M., Janzen, D., Hallwachs, W., Fernandez-Triana, J., Laurenne, N., Zaldívar-Riverón, A., Shaw, M., Broad, G., Klopfstein, S., Shaw, S., Hrcek, J., Rodriguez, J., Whitfield, J., Sharkey, M. J., Sharanowski, B., Jussila, R., Chesters, D., Vogler, A. Utility of the DNA barcoding gene fragment for parasitic wasp phylogeny ...
uuid: 9805554d-99c6-4862-a729-34d3a837a768, type: records, etag: 518fbede8db8ec44c388ee515cf0a04199cb0519, data: { dwc:specificEpithet: novogranadensis, dwc:kingdom: animalia, dwc:recordedBy: 2º tropical rainforest; ex sifted leaf litter, dwc:fieldNumber: dry-mount, dwc:order: hymenoptera, dwc:habitat: 2010-06-15, dwc:georeferenceRemarks: 20, dwc:occurrenceID: CAS:ANTWEB:casent0618019, dwc:dateIdentified: 2011-04-15, id: CAS:ANTWEB:casent0618019, dwc:stateProvince: Atlántida, dwc:country: Honduras, dwc:collectionCode: ANTWEB, dwc:higherClassification: animalia;arthropoda;insecta;hymenoptera;hymenoptera;formicidae;formicinae, dwc:decimalLatitude: 15.763573, dwc:basisOfRecord: PreservedSpecimen, dwc:genus: Camponotus, dwc:preparations: adult worker, dwc:sex: MiniWinkler, dwc:identifiedBy: Wa-C-08-1-36, dwc:ownerInstitutionCode: JTLC, dwc:phylum: arthropoda, dwc:locality: J. Longino, ...
Many studies have investigated relationships between the volume of whole brains and/or particular brain centres and the behavioural repertoire, cognitive capacities, social life-style or food preference in a wide range of vertebrate and invertebrate species [1-9]. When relating volumes of brain centres to cognitive capacities, it becomes particularly interesting to quantify brain centres involved in learning and memory, such as the insect mushroom bodies (MBs) [10-15]. In Hymenoptera (a large insect order comprising sawflies, wasps, bees and ants), the MBs can be voluminous in relation to other brain regions [16-22] and contain large numbers of intrinsic neurons (Kenyon cells, KCs) [23-25]. Furthermore, in Hymenoptera, the MBs receive multimodal sensory input (in particular mostly olfaction and vision) segregated into different subdivisions of the MBs [26,27]. Olfactory and visual projection neurons form distinct synaptic complexes (microglomeruli, MG) with KC dendrites in the olfactory lip or ...
INTRODUCTION. Lepidoptera pests can cause significant damage to eucalyptus plantations in Brazil (Zanuncio et al. 1993,1998, 2001, Bernardino et al. 2007). Euselasia eucerus (Hewitson, 1872) (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae), also reported as Euselasia apisaon (Dalman, 1823) (Zanuncio et al. 1990, Murta et el. 2008), is a Brazilian native insect and its caterpillars are commonly found in Eucalyptus spp. plantations in São Paulo, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and Minas Gerais States, Brazil in outbreaks conditions (Zanuncio et al. 1994). The entire developmental cycle of E. eucerus takes place on Eucalyptus trees, this insect lays its egg clusters on their leaves and its caterpillars are gregarious and pupate on leaves of Eucalyptus spp. (Zanuncio et al. 1990). Euselasia eucerus eggs are parasitized by Trichogramma maxacalii Voegelé and Pointel, 1980, Trichogramma demoraesi Nagaraja, 1983 and Trichogramma acacioi Brun, Moraes and Soares, 1984 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae); its caterpillars and ...
In order to deposit her eggs inside the tissue of a living plant the female needs relatively much force. Often the terminal segments are adapted to the job, mostly by being heavily chitinised and hardened, like for example in the Agromyzidae, Cecidomyiidae, and Tephritidae. In the sawflies, Tenthredinidae, the ovipositor has taken the shape of a little saw. ...
Venoms from Animals of the phylum Arthropoda. Those most investigated are from Scorpions and Spiders of the class Arachnidae and from ant, bee, and Wasp Families of the Insecta order Hymenoptera. The Venoms contain protein toxins, Enzymes, and other bioactive substances and may be lethal to man ...
While walking through your yard or gardening, you may notice flying insects go into the ground. Its also possible youve seen mounds of soil around holes in the earth. Several kinds of flying insects make their homes in soil. These include many species in the order Hymenoptera, which includes bees, wasps and ...
This site shares information about the Iranian species of Braconidae parasitoid waps (Ichneumonoidea: Braconidae). These wasps parasitize caterpillars of moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera), and thus are one of the most important groups in the biological control of agriculture and forestry pests.. Photos, host records, and distribution data for as many species/genera as possible are included. We are keeping an updated checklist of Iranian species, and also provide information on regional/local lists of species, as part of ongoing research projects. And we will keep a blog to post on other topics related to this fascinating group of wasps. Check How to use this site (http://cyberbraconid.myspecies.info/node/3) for suggestions on how to navigate the resources and data available. And if you want to reference this website, check How to cite us (http://cyberbraconid.myspecies.info/node/3).. We invite anyone interested in parasitoids of caterpillars to join this site, browse its contents, ...
Today were taking the wraps off of two simple, but handy tools that we have developed to encourage wider adoption of the HAO. The first, our analyzer is simply a tool that takes a block of text and compares it to labels found in the HAO. This tool is aimed at addressing a commonly seen element of taxonomic revisions: the statements in a Materials and Methods section that indicate where anatomic concepts were first defined or in what context they are being used (e.g. wing venation is described following the conventions of Smith, 1945). The analyzer allows users to explicitly reference anatomical concepts by providing resolvable URIs for them. It further highlights where potential conflicts may arise, for example, youre using paramere, did you know that paramere many different ways? (try paramere for fun ...
Accessory nuclei bud off from the membrane of the nucleus, the cellular structure that contains the chromosomes. By the time the egg is fully developed, it contains several hundred accessory nuclei that look much like the nucleus except that they dont contain chromosomes. Late in the development of the egg cell, the accessory nuclei disintegrate and centrosomes appear in the same locations in the cell. Right before the egg is laid, the membranes of the accessory nuclei break down, and at the same time the centrosomes begin to form, Ferree said. One of the most striking aspects of this mechanism is the large number of accessory nuclei and centrosomes that form in the developing eggs of these Hymenopteran insects. You only need two centrosomes, and they make hundreds of them. So they go through a lot of work to make a male, Sullivan said. A lot of energy goes into making these centrosomes, and if the egg gets fertilized they dont use them--the centrosome from the sperm is used ...
Knowledge of the cost of parasitism and the competitive ability of parasitized larvae is important for understanding the evolution of resistance. We used larvae of two Drosophila species as hosts for two parasitoid species which differ in their counter-resistance mechanism. Parasitism by Leptopilina heterotoma leads to a reduction in survival, in contrast to parasitism by Asobara tabida. This can be explained by L. heterotoma having a counter-defence mechanism that actively interferes with the hosts immune system. Parasitized D. melanogaster larvae, which can encapsulate the parasitoids egg to some degree, tend to suffer from a slight reduction in competitive ability, as opposed to parasitized D. subobscura larvae, which are unable to mount an immune response to parasitoids. Combined with earlier work, our results suggest that, in this system, the costs of actual defence are lower than the costs of maintaining an efficient immune system.
doi: 10.1590/S1984-46702011000300012 The Brazilian Cerrado (a savanna like vegetation) once occupied some 2 million square kilometers, representing about 21% of the Brazilian territory (Bridgewater et al. 2004). The Cerrado was recently recognized as one of the world hotspots for biodiversity conservation (Myers et al. 2000) because of its high endemism and rates of biodiversity loss due to recent human occupation and agricultural expansion; however, only 2.2% of its area is under legal protection (Klink & Machado 2005). The relatively high level of landscape conversion to agriculture is a major threat to the conservation of Cerrados biodiversity. It is estimated that around 55% of the biome has been already deforested (Klink & Machado 2005, Silva et al. 2006). Habitat edges are a ubiquitous feature of modern fragmented landscapes and have profound influences on the spatial distribution of many species (Ewers & Didham 2008). Edge effects induce different micro-environmental conditions from ...
Domain: Eukaryota • Regnum: Animalia • Phylum: Arthropoda • Subphylum: Hexapoda • Classis: Insecta • Subclassis: Pterygota • Infraclassis: Neoptera • Superordo: Endopterygota • Ordo: Hymenoptera • Subordo: Apocrita • Infraordo: Aculeata • Superfamilia: Vespoidea • Familia: Formicidae • Subfamilia: Dolichoderinae • Tribus: Leptomyrmecini • Genus: Froggattella Forel, 1902 ...
Terán, A.L.; Collado de Manes, M.L.; Glencross, S.; Alvarez, R.; Lazaro, H. 1985, Primary and secondary parasitoid Hymenoptera of scale insects, except Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.) (Homoptera: Coccoidea), in citrus trees of Tucumán Argentina. Revista de Investigación, Centro de Investigaciones para la Regulación de Poblaciones de Organismos Nocivos, Argentina 3(3/4):25-33 ...
929 kB]. Edwin, E.-S., P.. Vasantha-Srinivasan, A. Ponsankar, A. Thanigaivel, S. Selin Rani, R. W. Mankin, S. Senthil Nathan, K. Kalaivani, M. Murali-Baskaran, V. Duraipandiyan, and N. A. Al Dhabi. 2016. Effects of temperature and nonionizing ultraviolet radiation treatments of eggs of five hosts insects on production of Trichogramma chilonis Ishii (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) for biological control applications. J. Asia-Pacific Entomology 19: 1139-1144. ...
Psyche is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes original research articles as well as review articles in all areas of basic entomology. Psyche is the official publication of the Cambridge Entomological Club, which founded the journal in 1874.
It is a member of the family Formicidae, belonging to the order Hymenoptera, an order of insects containing ants, bees, and ... Tribe Ectatommini (Hymenoptera)" (PDF). Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 118 (5): 175-362. doi:10.5281/zenodo. ... Emery, C. (1911). "Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Ponerinae" (PDF). Genera Insectorum. 118: 1-125. Wheeler, W.M. (1911 ... Thomas, M.L. (2002). "Nest site selection and longevity in the ponerine ant Rhytidoponera metallica (Hymenoptera, Formicidae ...
Hymenoptera. In: Paszlavsky, J.: Fauna Regni Hungariae. Regia Societas Scientiarum Naturalium Hungarica, Budapest: 7-113 (1918 ... In: Taeger, A. & Blank, S. M. 1998 (Hrsg.) Pflanzenwespen Deutschlands (Hymenoptera, Symphyta). Kommentierte Bestandsaufnahme. ... was a Hungarian entomologist who specialised in Hymenoptera. He was the Curator of the Hungarian Natural History Museum where ...
Hymenoptera". American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico (2nd ed.). Boca Raton: CRC Press. p. 557. ... Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) induces behavioral modification in its spider host". Entomological Science. 21 (1): 59-65. doi: ...
Hymenoptera). Boll. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat. Venezia 39: 71-172. v t e. ...
Emery, C (1925). "Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Formicinae". Genera Insectorum. 183: 1-302. Ichinose, K. (1986). " ... Trager, J. C (1984). "A revision of the genus Paratrechina (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of the continental United States". ... LaPolla, J. S.; Dlussky, G. M. (2010a). "Review of fossil Prenolepis genus-group species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)". ... Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of the World: An introduction to the systematics and biology of the genus." (PDF), Zootaxa, 3110: 1-9 ...
1993). Hymenoptera of the world: an identification guide to families. Agriculture Canada. p. 202. ISBN 978-0660149332. OCLC ... Quicke, Donald L. J. (2009). "Hymenoptera". In Resh, Vincent H.; Cardé, Ring T. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Insects (2nd ed.). ...
Hymenoptera). Boll. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat. Venezia 39: 71-172. Garcete-Barrett, B. R. 2001. Notes on Neotropical Eumeninae I ( ... James Michael Carpenter (1986). "A Synonymic Generic Checklist of the Eumeninae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)". Psyche. 93: 61-90. ... Hymenoptera: Vespidae). Bol. Mus. Nac. Hist. Nat. Parag., 13 : 38 - 40. v t e. ...
It is a member of the family Formicidae, belonging to the order Hymenoptera, It was once the sole member of its own genus and ... Tribe Ectatommini (Hymenoptera)". Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 118: 175-362. doi:10.5281/zenodo.26958. Lattke ... Emery, C. (1911). "Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Ponerinae" (PDF). Genera Insectorum. 118: 1-125. Emery, C. (1901). " ... Amber Collection Stuttgart: Hymenoptera, Formicidae. V: Ponerinae, partim.)" (PDF). Stuttgarter Beiträge zur Naturkunde. 197: 1 ...
Biolib Richards, Owain Westmacott; Davies, R G (1977). "Hymenoptera". Imms' General Textbook of Entomology. 1: Structure, ...
Hymenoptera., Lipsiae. 358-408. Horstmann, K. (1992) Revisionen einiger von Linnaeus, Gmelin, Fabricius, Gravenhorst und ... Thunberg, C.P. (1822) Ichneumonidea, Insecta Hymenoptera illustrata., Memoires de l'Academie Imperiale des Sciences de Saint ... Vollenhoven, S.C. Snellen van (1873) Nieuwe naamlist van Nederlandsche vliesvleugelige Insecten (Hymenoptera). Tweede Stuk., ... Forster beschriebener Arten der Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae)., Mitteilungen Munchener Entomologischen ...
Hymenoptera. Vol. III. (Formicidae.) (PDF). London: Porter. p. 59. OCLC 84261387. Emery, C. (1915). "Definizione del genere ... Emery, C. (1921). "Hymenoptera, Fam. Formicidae, subfam. Myrmicinae" (PDF). Genera Insectorum. 174: 1-65. doi:10.5281/ZENODO. ... Johnson, N.F. (December 19, 2007). "Novomessor ensifer Forel". Hymenoptera Name Server version 1.5. Columbus, Ohio, USA: Ohio ... 556: 1-6. Wheeler, G.C.; Wheeler, J. (1960). "Supplementary studies on the larvae of the Myrmicinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae ...
Oudhia, P. "Traditional medicinal knowledge about red ant Oecophylla smaragdina (Fab.)[Hymenoptera; Formicidae] in Chhattisgarh ...
Keall, J.B. (1981). "A note on the occurrence of Myrmecia brevinoda (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in New Zealand". Records of the ... doi:10.1111/j.1440-6055.1991.tb00438.x. Wheeler, W.M. (1915). "Hymenoptera". Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society ... Ride, W.D.L.; Taylor, R.W. (1973). "Formica maxima Moore, 1842 (Insecta, Hymenoptera): proposed suppression under the plenary ... Wheeler, G. C.; Wheeler, J. (1971). "Ant larvae of the subfamily Myrmeciinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)" (PDF). Pan-Pacific ...
Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Myrmicinae. [part]. Genera Insectorum 174B: 95-206 (page 148, Combination in C. ( ... Pheromone alarms are common among the social Hymenoptera. Some of these have been chemically identified, but the number is ...
Hymenoptera). Boll. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat. Venezia 39: 71-172. Cooper, M. 1999b. New species of Gamma Zavattari (Hym., Vespidae, ...
Hymenoptera). Boll. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat. Venezia 39: 71-172. v t e. ... James Michael Carpenter (1986). "A Synonymic Generic Checklist of the Eumeninae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)". Psyche. 93: 61-90. ... Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae)". Systematic Entomology. 40: 365-384. doi:10.1111/syen.12105. Giordani Soika, A. 1990. ...
9. Hymenoptera; Eumeninae". Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences. 24 (9): 313-336. Slevin, Joseph R. (1931). "Log ...
It is a member of the family Formicidae in the order Hymenoptera. The type species for the genus is M. gulosa, discovered by ... Hymenoptera Aculeata (PDF). London: British Museum. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 July 2015. Retrieved 24 July ... Keall, J.B. (1981). "A note on the occurrence of Myrmecia brevinoda (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in New Zealand". Records of the ... Emery, Carlo (1911). "Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Ponerinae" (PDF). Genera Insectorum. 118: 1-125. Wheeler, William ...
He worked mainly on Hymenoptera and Orthoptera. His first paper, in 1852, was on solitary wasps. In 1854 he traveled to the ... Genève 17: 171-244 (1863). Hymenoptera. In, Reise der österreichischen Fregatte Novara um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858, ... ensuring that its collections of Hymenoptera and Orthoptera became one of the best in the world. In 1872 he was made an ... was a Swiss mineralogist and entomologist specialising in studies of Hymenoptera and Orthoptera. He also was a prolific ...
Hymenoptera... Vol. 1. Taylor & Francis, 1897.[page needed] Ospina, Mónica. "Abejas carpinteras (Hymenoptera: Apidae: ... Anzenberger, Gustl (2010). "Ethological Study of African Carpenter Bees of the Genus Xylocopa (Hymenoptera, Anthophoridae)1". ...
Hymenoptera. Vol 2. Media related to Myrmicaria brunnea at Wikimedia Commons v t e. ...
Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Formicinae. Genera Insectorum 183: 1-302 (page 61, fig. 14 worker described) v t e. ...
Emery, C. (1922). "Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Myrmicinae. [part]." Genera Insectorum 174B: 95-206. Forel, A. (1912 ... Moffett, M. W. (December 1986). "Behavior of the group-predatory ant Proatta butteli (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): an Old World ...
Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Formicinae. Genera Insectorum 183: 1-302 (page 60, fig. 13 male described) v t e. ...
Hymenoptera. Pp. 203-209 in: Spencer, B. (ed.) Report on the work of the Horn Scientific Expedition to central Australia. Part ... Hymenoptera: Formicidae), of Australia's Northern Arid Zone". Australian Journal of Entomology. 33 (4): 309-316. doi:10.1111/j. ...
In addition to his work with African species, he conducted research of Hymenoptera native to Burma. During the last years of ... In 1883 he undertook a zoological expedition to eastern Sudan and Eritrea, in which he collected a number of Hymenoptera ... Magretti was the author of 28 publications on Hymenoptera. Besides his endeavours in entomology, Magretti was also a cyclist, ... Risultati di raccolte imenotterologiche nell'Africa Orientale, 1884 - Results in regards to Hymenoptera collected in East ...
Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Formicinae. Genera Insectorum 183: 1-302 (page 52, fig. 5 worker, queen, male described) ...
Hymenoptera). Boll. Mus. Civ. Stor. Nat. Venezia 39: 71-172. v t e. ... Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae)". Systematic Entomology. 40: 365-384. doi:10.1111/syen.12105. Giordani Soika, A. 1990. ...
Hymenoptera., Lipsiae. 358-408. Gmelin, J.F. (1790) Caroli a Linne Systema Naturae (Ed. XIII). Tom I., G.E. Beer. Lipsiae. 2225 ...
Hymenoptera Vespidae., Volume: 11 Pages: 73-89 Antonio Giordani Soika (1956) Boll.Mus.Civ.Stor.nat.Venezia Studi di Ecologia e ... A Catalogue of the Eumeninae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) of the Ethiopian Region excluding Malagasy Subregion. Part II: Genera ... Hymenoptera. Vespides solitarires, Volume: 36 Pages: 362-367 Antonio Giordani Soika (1935) Mems Estud.Mus.zool.Univ.Coimbra ... Hymenoptera - Vespidae), Volume: 19 Pages: 161-199 Antonio Giordani Soika (1951) Rivista di Biologia Coloniale Missione ...
Hymenoptera Forum German and International. *Hymenoptera of North America - large format reference photographs, descriptions, ... 1993). Hymenoptera of the world: An identification guide to families (PDF). Ottawa: Agriculture Canada. ISBN 978-0-660-14933-2 ... checklist of Australian Hymenoptera. Books. *"Bees and Wasps and Ants, Oh My!": Digitized book of the week: Nouvelle méthode de ... Grissell, Eric (2010). Bees, Wasps, and Ants: The Indispensable Role of Hymenoptera in Gardens. Timber Press.. ...
SOME SPECIAL FEATURES OF HYMENOPTERA:  Wings membranous, hind wings , smaller than the fore wings ,which interlock by means of ... hymenoptera * 1. SOME SPECIAL FEATURES OF HYMENOPTERA:  Wings membranous, hind wings , smaller than the fore wings ,which ... 8. SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION KINGDOM: Animalia PHYLUM: Arthropoda CLASS: Insecta ORDER: Hymenoptera FAMILY: Ichneumonidae ... 4. SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION KINGDOM: Animalia PHYLUM: Arthropoda CLASS: Insecta ORDER: Hymenoptera FAMILY: Tenthredinidae ...
CSIRO Hymenoptera Ecowatch * Hymenoptera Families (INBIO, Costa Rica) * Introduction to the Hymenoptera at UCMP Berkeley * ... Hymenoptera Wasps, ants, bees, and sawflies. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window ... Hymenoptera Name Server (Ohio State University) * The Social Insects Web (American Museum of Natural History) * Cal Academy ... Phylogeny of the Hymenoptera: a reanalysis of the Ronquist etal. (1999) reanalysis, emphasizing wing venation and apocritan ...
Sniffer bees or sniffer wasps are insects in the order Hymenoptera that can be trained to perform a variety of tasks to detect ... First evidence of fine colour discrimination ability in ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) Bees help in the battle against ...
... ,. Psyche: A Journal of Entomology,. vol. 59. ,. Article ID 049184. ,. 1. page ...
The order Hymenoptera includes Apis species, ie, bees (European, African), vespids (wasps, yellow jackets, hornets), and ants. ... Hymenoptera stings account for more deaths in the United States than any other envenomation. ... encoded search term (Hymenoptera Stings) and Hymenoptera Stings What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases ... Hymenoptera stings account for more deaths in the United States than any other envenomation. The order Hymenoptera includes ...
Ordo: Hymenoptera Subordines (2): Apocrita - Symphyta (paraphyletic) Overview of familiae (92 + fossil familiae)[edit]. ... Goulet, H.; Huber, J.T. (eds.) 1993: Hymenoptera of the world: an identification guide to families. Agriculture Canada ... Huber, J.T. 2009: Biodiversity of Hymenoptera. Pp. 303-323 in: Foottit, R.G.; Adler, P.H. (eds.) 2009: Insect biodiversity: ... Sharkey, M.J. 2007: Phylogeny and classification of Hymenoptera. Pp. 521-548 In: Zhang, Z.-Q. & Shear, W.A. (eds) Linnaeus ...
Hymenoptera of Canada. Pp 311-360 In Langor, D.W. & Sheffield, C.S. (eds.). The Biota of Canada - A Biodiversity Assessment. ... Ordo: Hymenoptera Subordines (2): Apocrita - Symphyta (paraphyletic) Overview of familiae (92 + fossil familiae)[ивын]. ... Goulet, H.; Huber, J.T. (eds.) 1993: Hymenoptera of the world: an identification guide to families. Agriculture Canada ... Huber, J.T. 2009: Biodiversity of Hymenoptera. Pp. 303-323 in: Foottit, R.G.; Adler, P.H. (eds.) 2009: Insect biodiversity: ...
... George C. Wheeler and Jeanette Wheeler ...
Hymenoptera) are extremely diverse with more than 23,000 species described and over 500,000 species estimated to exist. This is ...
The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO) was developed to surmount this challenge and to aid future communication related to ... Hymenoptera is an extraordinarily diverse lineage, both in terms of species numbers and morphotypes, that includes sawflies, ... A Gross Anatomy Ontology for Hymenoptera. Figure 1. Usage of the term "paramere" as defined in different publications.. The ...
I-Hsin Sung, Sheng-Shan Lu, Jung-Tai Chao, Wen-Chi Yeh, and Wei-Jie Lee "Establishment of Vespa bicolor in Taiwan (Hymenoptera ... Establishment of Vespa bicolor in Taiwan (Hymenoptera: Vespidae). I-Hsin Sung, Sheng-Shan Lu, Jung-Tai Chao, Wen-Chi Yeh, Wei- ... I-Hsin Sung, Sheng-Shan Lu, Jung-Tai Chao, Wen-Chi Yeh, Wei-Jie Lee "Establishment of Vespa bicolor in Taiwan (Hymenoptera: ... The social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) of Taiwan. Bull. Natl Museum Natl Sci. 3: 93-138. Google Scholar ...
Ingemar Fries and Suresh Raina "American Foulbrood and African Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae)," Journal of Economic ... Ingemar Fries, Suresh Raina "American Foulbrood and African Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae)," Journal of Economic Entomology, ...
Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) typically form mixed-species (61.7%) aggregations composed of up ... Sexual behavior among parasitic Megarhyssa wasps (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). *Owen S. Crankshaw. 1. nAff2 & ... Heatwole H, Davis DM, Wenner AM (1964) Detection of mates and hosts by parasitic insects of the genus Megarhyssa (Hymenoptera: ... Crankshaw, O.S., Matthews, R.W. Sexual behavior among parasitic Megarhyssa wasps (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). Behav Ecol ...
"I highly recommend Hymenoptera and Conservationto anybody who works with Hymenoptera (including invasive species, biological ... Hymenoptera, the bees, wasps and ant, are one of the largest insect orders, and have massive ecological importance as ... "In Hymenoptera and Conservation New captures the reader, offering a concise chronology of past interventions and, in doing so, ... This global overview, the first such account for the whole of the Hymenoptera, discusses a broad range of themes to introduce ...
Hymenoptera stings can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis, and the most severe reactions can be refractory to single or ... Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy: Technical issues, protocols, adverse effects, and monitoring. Author. David F Graft, MD. David ... Regimens of Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy. Ann Intern Med 1980; 92:620.. *Golden DBK, Kagey-Sobotka A, Hamilton RG. Human ... Hymenoptera stings can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis, and the most severe reactions can be refractory to single or ...
Alarm pheromone perception in honey bees is decreased by smoke (Hymenoptera: Apidae). ...
Our objective was to examine the serum levels of AGEs, AOPPs, and NPs in patients with allergic reactions to hymenoptera venom ... Keywords: Oxidative stress; advanced glycation end products; advanced oxidation protein products; hymenoptera venom allergy; ... These findings suggest that, although hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) is characterized by isolated episodes of reactions to ...
Bee Viruses: Routes of Infection in Hymenoptera. Orlando Yañez1,2*, Niels Piot3, Anne Dalmon4, Joachim R. de Miranda5, Panuwan ... Hymenoptera. Many species of the Vespidae family prey on bees and/or share nectar resources with Apoidea, this exposes them to ... Krunicì, M. D., and Stanisavljevicì, L. Z. (2006). The Biology of European Orchard Bee Osmia Cornuta (Latr.) (Hymenoptera: ... Hunter, W. B. (2010). Medium for development of bee cell cultures (Apis mellifera: Hymenoptera: Apidae). In Vitro Cell. Dev. ...
... Dataset homepage. Citation. Sharkey M (2009). Aphid ... Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) from Thailand. Zootaxa 2498: 47-52, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.195775 Taxonomic Coverages. ... parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) from Thailand. Plazi.org taxonomic treatments database. Checklist Dataset ...
... Dataset homepage. Citation. Hara H, Ibuki S, plazi (2020). Caliroa ... Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae). Zootaxa 4768 (3): 301-333, DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4768.3.1 Taxonomic Coverages. ... slug sawflies of Japan (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae). Plazi.org taxonomic treatments database. Checklist dataset https://doi. ...
... A prospective observational multicenter study of the European ...
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. The Royal Societys flagship biological research journal, dedicated to the fast publication and worldwide dissemination of high-quality research. Find out more. ...
Brito RM, Caixeiro APA, Pompolo SG and Azevedo GG (2003) Cytogenetic data of Partamona peckolti (Hymenoptera, Apidae, ... Stingless bees of the genus Partamona (Hymenoptera, Apidae) are widely distributed geographically. Their range extends from the ... Costa MA, Pompolo SG and Campos LAO (1992) Supernumerary chromosomes in Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponinae). ... Four colonies of the stingless bee Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera: Apidae) were cytogenetically analyzed using conventional ...
The Siricidae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) of Florida. Insecta Mundi 309: 1-16.. Lombardero, MJ, Ayres MP, Krivak-Tetley FE, Fitza ... Sirex Woodwasp Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae)1. Demian Gomez, Andrea Lucky, and Jiri Hulcr2 ... Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) is a major forestry pest in Pinus plantations in the Southern Hemisphere and ... All woodwasps, also known as horntails, belong to the family Siricidae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta). The Symphyta can be easily ...
1975) in The Higher Hymenoptera of the Mesozoic, ed Rasnitsyn A P(Acad. Sci. USSR, Moscow) (in Russian). pp 114-122. ... A formicine in New Jersey Cretaceous amber (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and early evolution of the ants. David Grimaldi and Donat ... Ants from the Miocene Totolapa amber (Chiapas, Mexico), with the first record of the genus Forelius (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) ... A formicine in New Jersey Cretaceous amber (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and early evolution of the ants ...
Within-field spatial distribution of Cephus cinctus (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) larvae in Montana wheat fields. Download ... Home / Publications / Within-field spatial distribution of Cephus cinctus (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) larvae in Montana wheat ... Within-field spatial distribution of Cephus cinctus (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) larvae in Montana wheat fields. Canadian ...
The genera of Bethylinae (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae). Journal of Hymenoptera Research 3: 9-105. [ Links ]. ... The Insects of Japan: Bethylidae (Hyme-noptera). Touka Shobo, Fukuoka, 319p. [ Links ]. WAICHERT, C. & C.O. AZEVEDO. 2009. ... A synopsis of the American Bethylidae (Hymenoptera, Aculeata). Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology 132: 1-222. [ ... A catalog of the world Bethylidae (Hymenoptera). Memoirs of the American Entomological Institute 46: 1-364. [ Links ]. ...
Hymenoptera) é uma família monofilética, de ampla distribuição, representada por seis subfamílias existentes (Carpenter 1993): ... Vespidae (Hymenoptera) é uma família monofilética, de ampla distribuição, representada por seis subfamílias existentes ( ... Vespidae (Hymenoptera) is a widely distributed, monophyletic family, with six subfamilies (Carpenter 1993): Euparagiinae + ( ... Análise filogenética de alguns gêneros de vespas sociais Neotropicais (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Epiponini). ...
  • First evidence of fine colour discrimination ability in ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) Bees help in the battle against tuberculosis, 3 News. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thelytokous parthenogenesis in the fungus-gardening ant Mycocepurus smithii (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). (nih.gov)
  • Catalog of Hymenoptera in America north of Mexico An updated checklist of the ants of India with their specific distributions in Indian states (Hymenoptera, Guénard B, Bharti M, Economo EP (2016) An updated checklist of the ants of India with their specific distributions in Indian states (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). (opportunitygreen.com)
  • A new workerless social parasite in the ant genus Pseudomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with a discussion of the origin of social parasitism in ants. (archive.org)
  • Identification of the mitochondrial DNA haplotype of an invasive Linepithema humile (Mayr, 1868) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) population of a new location in Japan for its effective eradication. (cabi.org)
  • Bolton, B. (1995) A taxonomic and zoogeographical census of the extant ant taxa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). (mapress.com)
  • Schmidt, C.A. & Shattuck, S.O. (2014) The higher classification of the ant subfamily Ponerinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with a review of ponerine ecology and behavior. (mapress.com)
  • Willey, R.B. & Brown, Jr. W.L. (1983) New species of the ant genus Myopias (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae). (mapress.com)
  • Xu, Z. (1998) Two new record genera and three new species of Formicidae (Hymenoptera) from China. (mapress.com)
  • Hymenoptera is a large order of insects , comprising the sawflies , wasps , bees , and ants . (wikipedia.org)
  • Sniffer bees or sniffer wasps are insects in the order Hymenoptera that can be trained to perform a variety of tasks to detect substances such as explosive materials or illegal drugs, as well as some human and plant diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Male wasps of three sympatric species of Nearctic Megarhyssa (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) typically form mixed-species (61.7%) aggregations composed of up to 28 males over sites of female emergence. (springer.com)
  • Hymenoptera, the bees, wasps and ant, are one of the largest insect orders, and have massive ecological importance as pollinators and as predators or parasitoids of other insects. (wiley.com)
  • Wasps belong to the order Hymenoptera , which includes more parasitoids than any other order of insects, with thousands of parasitic species in over 40 families. (umd.edu)
  • essay on order hymenoptera Hymenoptera Bees, ants, and wasps. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • The book provides a considerable amount of information in the study of the venoms of the Hymenoptera Harpactus is a genus of hunting wasps in the tribe Gorytini References. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • However, much work still needs to be done in particular on the parasitic wasps which it is thought may turn out to be even more speciose than the beetles The Hymenoptera order of insects will undergo complete metamorphosis, which means that they have a worm-like larval stage which will change into a pupa and from there they will hatch and mature into adults. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • Aculeata (Hymenoptera) is largely known for its bees, ants, and social wasps, from which most people would immediately recognize honey bees and paper wasps. (amnh.org)
  • In a collaborative effort, UIUC faculty and graduate students have completed an online database of Hymenoptera (ants, bees, sawflies, and wasps) within the Illinois Natural History Survey (INHS). (illinois.edu)
  • The order Hymenoptera (bees, ants, wasps, sawflies) contains about eight percent of all described species, but no analytical studies have addressed the origins of this richness at family-level or above. (nih.gov)
  • Subfamily Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is one of the largest subfamilies of parasitoid wasps, both in terms of number of described species as well as estimated total number of species. (illinois.edu)
  • An annotated distributional checklist of solitary wasps of the subfamily Eumeninae (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) of Vietnam. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Biogeography of the masarine wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Masarinae), with particular emphasis on the southern African taxa and on correlations between masarine and forage plant distributions. (scielo.org.za)
  • Hymenoptera (sawflies, wasps, ants, and bees) are one of four mega-diverse insect orders, comprising more than 153,000 described and possibly up to one million undescribed extant species [1, 2]. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Gene arrangement and sequence of mitochondrial genomes yield insights into the phylogeny and evolution of bees and sphecid wasps (Hymenoptera: Apoidea). (semanticscholar.org)
  • Hymenoptera is a diverse order of insects that contains wasps, bees, and sawflies. (alexanderwild.com)
  • Localized reactions can also be caused by a variety of insects, e.g., spiders, however, there is rarely immediate pain associated with the bite compared to that associated with Hymenoptera insects (bees, wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and fire ants). (renalandurologynews.com)
  • This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Sharkey, Michael (2010): Aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) from Thailand. (gbif.org)
  • Five new species of the genus Microplitis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) from China. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Five new species of the genus Microplitis Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae) are described and illustrated: Microplitis basipallescentis, sp. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Se describen e ilustran cinco especies nuevas del g6nero Microplitis Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Microgastrinae): Microplitis basipallescentis, sp. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 1999. Systematics of the world genera of Cardiochilinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). (lsuagcenter.com)
  • 1988. Cardiochiles (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of lepidopterous larvae, in the Sahel of Africa, with a review of the biology and host relationships of the genus. (lsuagcenter.com)
  • Biology of Mesostoa kerri Austin and Wharton (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Mesostoinae), an endemic Australian wasp that causes stem galls on Banksia marginata Cav. (ento.csiro.au)
  • Two new species of Bracon F. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitic on Phylacteophaga spp. (ento.csiro.au)
  • Ingemar Fries and Suresh Raina "American Foulbrood and African Honey Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae)," Journal of Economic Entomology 96(6), 1641-1646, (1 December 2003). (bioone.org)
  • Stingless bees of the genus Partamona (Hymenoptera, Apidae) are widely distributed geographically. (scielo.br)
  • Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea, Apiformes) are taxonomically and ecologically diverse, with a wide range of social complexity, nesting preferences, floral associations, and biogeographic restrictions. (cambridge.org)
  • Stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) are a diverse group of eusocial bees providing pollination services in tropical landscapes, exhibiting a large range in body size across species. (ku.edu)
  • Four colonies of the stingless bee Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera: Apidae) were cytogenetically analyzed using conventional staining and the fluorochromes CMA 3 e DAPI. (scielo.br)
  • Seqüenciamento e análise do genoma mitocondrial de Melipona bicolor (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini). (usp.br)
  • Sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genome of Melipona bicolor (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini). (usp.br)
  • Here we document the highly aberrant occurrence of a solitary bee species, Anthophora squammulosa Dours, 1870 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Anthophorini), nesting within meters of an active volcanic crater in Nicaragua, Central America. (open.ac.uk)
  • See 'Hymenoptera venom immunotherapy: Efficacy, indications, and mechanism of action' and 'Stings of imported fire ants: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment', section on 'Treatment' . (uptodate.com)
  • Mycocepurus smithii is unique among ants and among eusocial Hymenoptera, in that males seem to be completely absent and only queens (and not workers) produce diploid offspring via thelytoky. (nih.gov)
  • This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Hara, Hideho, Ibuki, Shinichi (2020): Caliroa slug sawflies of Japan (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae). (gbif.org)
  • The tremendous diversity of Hymenoptera is commonly attributed to the evolution of parasitoidism in the last common ancestor of parasitoid sawflies (Orussidae) and wasp-waisted Hymenoptera (Apocrita). (zfmk.de)
  • Additions to the checklist of Scoliidae, Sphecidae, Pompilidae and Vespidae of Peru, with notes on the endemic status of some species (Hymenoptera, Aculeata). (wikimedia.org)
  • Análise filogenética de alguns gêneros de vespas sociais Neotropicais (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Epiponini). (usp.br)
  • The genus Euparagia Cresson (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Euparagiinae). (amnh.org)
  • Our objective was to examine the serum levels of AGEs, AOPPs, and NPs in patients with allergic reactions to hymenoptera venom before and after ultrarush venom immunotherapy (VIT). (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Objectives Little is known about the Hymenoptera venom allergy impact on work ability and the effect of venom immunotherapy (VIT) on work. (bmj.com)
  • Predictors of side effects during the buildup phase of venom immunotherapy for Hymenoptera venom allergy: The importance of baseline serum tryptase. (aaem.pl)
  • In the hymenoptera venom allergy, BAT is an effective tool in identifying primary sensitizing antigen and in the follow up of patient in venom immunotherapy. (minervamedica.it)
  • Heatwole H, Davis DM, Wenner AM (1964) Detection of mates and hosts by parasitic insects of the genus Megarhyssa (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). (springer.com)
  • Heatwole H, Davis DM (1965) Ecology of three sympatric species of parasitic insects of the genus Megarhyssa (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). (springer.com)
  • Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy The first EAACI position paper on immunotherapy with Hymenoptera venoms was published in 1987 (1). (opportunitygreen.com)
  • Hymenoptera stings account for more deaths in the United States than any other envenomation. (medscape.com)
  • Anaphylaxis is a common and life-threatening consequence of Hymenoptera stings and is typically a result of sudden systemic release of mast cells and basophil mediators. (medscape.com)
  • Hymenoptera stings can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis, and the most severe reactions can be refractory to single or multiple doses of epinephrine [ 1,2 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Hymenoptera stings may cause both local and systemic allergic reactions and sometimes even life threatening anaphylaxis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Mast cells (MC) are effector cells during severe systemic reactions (SR) to Hymenoptera stings. (aaem.pl)
  • In children with IgE-mediated SR to Hymenoptera stings, elevation of baseline values of PGD 2 metabolites in blood is accompanied by decreased excretion of its urinary metabolites. (aaem.pl)
  • There is an association between urinary PGD 2 metabolites and severity of the SR to Hymenoptera stings. (aaem.pl)
  • Clonal mast cell disorders in patients with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings and increased serum tryptase levels. (aaem.pl)
  • Sensitization to Hymenoptera venom in patients without a history of systemic allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings is frequently found and can be due to the presence of specific IgE to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCD). (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Specific IgE to Hymenoptera venom was detected in 45.7% of the pollen allergic subjects and in 26.7% of the non-atopic controls, both without a history of systemic allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • 1992. Phylogenetic implications of the structure and distribution of ovipositor valvilli in the Hymenoptera (Insecta). (tolweb.org)
  • 1992. Sperm structure and ultrastructure in the Hymenoptera (Insecta). (tolweb.org)
  • Phylogeny of the Hymenoptera (Insecta): The state of the art. (tolweb.org)
  • Morphology and evolution of the tarsal plantulae in Hymenoptera (Insecta), focussing on the basal lineages. (tolweb.org)
  • Review of morphological evidence on the phylogeny of basal Hymenoptera (Insecta), with a discussion of the ordering of characters. (tolweb.org)
  • Simultaneous analysis of basal Hymenoptera (Insecta): introducing robust-choice sensitivity analysis. (tolweb.org)
  • 2002. Simultaneous analysis of the basal lineages of Hymenoptera (Insecta) using sensitivity analysis. (tolweb.org)
  • The phylogeny of lower Hymenoptera (Insecta), with a summary of the early evolutionary history of the order. (tolweb.org)
  • The ovipositor apparatus of basal Hymenoptera (Insecta): phylogenetic implications and functional morphology. (tolweb.org)
  • Phylogeny and classification of the extant basal lineages of the Hymenoptera (Insecta). (tolweb.org)
  • Gibson, G.A.P. 2010: The spatial complexity in describing leg surfaces of Hymenoptera (Insecta), the problem and a proposed solution. (wikimedia.org)
  • Penati, F. & Mariotti, A. 2015: Catalog of Hymenoptera described by Giovanni Gribodo (1846-1924) (Insecta). (wikimedia.org)
  • The name Hymenoptera refers to the wings of the insects, but the original derivation is ambiguous. (wikipedia.org)
  • This global overview, the first such account for the whole of the Hymenoptera, discusses a broad range of themes to introduce the insects and their conservation roles and needs, and how their wellbeing may be approached. (wiley.com)
  • The insect order Hymenoptera is one of the largest orders of insects and includes some of the most familiar types of insects known. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • Though we edit our accounts for accuracy, we cannot guarantee all information in those accounts hymenoptera insects is concerned 14 species abundant, 28 species occasional and 8 species werere ra in the study site. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • Exposure to insects of the order Hymenoptera is the most useful historical parameter. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • These findings suggest that, although hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) is characterized by isolated episodes of reactions to stinging insect venom and is not included among chronic inflammatory diseases, an oxidative stress status occurs in patients suffering from this kind of allergy. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Dissecting cross-reactivity in hymenoptera venom allergy by circumvention of alpha-1,3-core fucosylation. (uniprot.org)
  • Hymenoptera venom allergy is known to cause life-threatening and sometimes fatal IgE-mediated anaphylactic reactions in allergic individuals. (uniprot.org)
  • Work disability was defined as having to have changed jobs/tasks and/or suffered economic loss because of Hymenoptera venom allergy. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Hymenoptera venom allergy could determine work disability. (bmj.com)
  • Patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy having a high-risk job for exposure to Hymenoptera seem to have higher risk of work disability and refer more frequently a positive effect of VIT on work. (bmj.com)
  • In the current study, for the first time, work disability and occupational effects of Hymenoptera venom allergy were studied in a group of patients in working age. (bmj.com)
  • The results suggest that Hymenoptera venom allergy has an impact on work, causing work disability. (bmj.com)
  • Self-employed workers and workers at high risk of sting seem to be at higher risk of work disability related to Hymenoptera venom allergy. (bmj.com)
  • Hymenoptera venom allergy affects approximately 5% of the general population and can provoke severe systemic or life-threatening reactions. (bmj.com)
  • Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid, or ant sting. (uzh.ch)
  • Patients with an IgE-mediated Hymenoptera allergy will typically present with systemic symptoms (described below) that begin within minutes of the sting. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • What are the typical symptoms of Hymenoptera allergy? (renalandurologynews.com)
  • For patients presenting with a recent history of an insect sting and concern for Hymenoptera allergy, there are a few laboratory tests that are helpful to confirm the diagnosis of Hymenoptera allergy. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy. (aaem.pl)
  • Clinical Features and the Diagnostic Value of Component Allergen-Specific IgE in Hymenoptera Venom Allergy. (aaem.pl)
  • Predictors of severe systemic anaphylactic reactions to patients with hymenoptera venom allergy: importance of baseline serum tryptase - a study of the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology Interest Group on Insect Venom Hypersensitivity. (aaem.pl)
  • Courtship sequence and evidence of volatile pheromones in Phasgonophora sulcate (Hymenoptera: Chalcidiae), a North American parasitoid of the invasive Agrilus planippenis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). (gc.ca)
  • Phasgonophora sulcat Westwood (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) is a North American parasitoid now using Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) as a novel host, and may prove useful in biocontrol. (gc.ca)
  • Sawfly genomes reveal evolutionary acquisitions that fostered the mega-radiation of parasitoid and eusocial Hymenoptera. (zfmk.de)
  • Forschung › Publikationen › ZFMK-Publikationsverzeichnis › Sawfly genomes reveal evolutionary acquisitions that fostered the mega-radiation of parasitoid and eusocial Hymenoptera. (zfmk.de)
  • A phylogenetic analysis of the megadiverse Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera). (gc.ca)
  • Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) is extremely diverse with an estimated 500 000 species. (gc.ca)
  • Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - aculeates (Apoidea, Chrysidoidea and Vespoidea). (wikimedia.org)
  • Midcoxal articulations and the phylogeny of the order Hymenoptera. (tolweb.org)
  • 1999. Phylogeny of the Hymenoptera: A cladistic reanalysis of Rasnitsyn's data (1988) data. (tolweb.org)
  • Phylogeny and Classification of Hymenoptera. (tolweb.org)
  • 2002. Phylogeny of the Hymenoptera: a reanalysis of the Ronquist etal. (tolweb.org)
  • Sharkey, M.J. 2007: Phylogeny and classification of Hymenoptera. (wikimedia.org)
  • To investigate which major subtaxa experienced significant shifts in diversification, we assembled a family-level phylogeny of the Hymenoptera using supertree methods. (nih.gov)
  • Catalog of Hymenoptera in America north of Mexico. (tolweb.org)
  • The presence of Tamarixia radiata Waterston (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is reported for the first time in Northwestern Argentina. (scielo.org.ar)
  • La presencia de Tamarixia radiata Waterston (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) fue detectada por primera vez en el noroeste argentino. (scielo.org.ar)
  • Presencia de Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), parasitoide del psílido asiático Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) en cultivos cítricos de Corrientes. (scielo.org.ar)
  • Biological control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in Guadeloupe by imported Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae). (scielo.org.ar)
  • Comparative studies on the metapostnotal modifications in suborder Symphyta and Hymenoptera Parasitica. (tolweb.org)
  • All woodwasps, also known as horntails, belong to the family Siricidae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta). (ufl.edu)
  • Gibbons JRH (1979) A model for sympatric speciation in Megarhyssa (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae): competitive speciation. (springer.com)
  • As parasitoids, predators, and pollinators, Hymenoptera play a fundamental role in virtually all terrestrial ecosystems and are of substantial economic importance [1, 3]. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Thus, determination of specific IgE to Hymenoptera venom in patients without a history of systemic allergic reactions as screening test is not recommended. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Are the TTAGG and TTAGGG telomeric repeats phylogenetically conserved in aculeate Hymenoptera? (semanticscholar.org)
  • Aculeate Hymenoptera in Worcestershire. (wbrc.org.uk)
  • Stillwell MA (1967) The pigeon tremex, Tremex columba (Hymenoptera: Siricidae), in New Brunswick. (springer.com)
  • Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) is a major forestry pest in Pinus plantations in the Southern Hemisphere and has been detected in native pine trees in North America (Hoebecke et al. (ufl.edu)
  • Nuttall MJ (1973) Pre-emergence fertilisation of Megarhyssa nortoni nortoni (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). (springer.com)
  • Vinson S. These sequenced genomes represent only 15 of the 97 extant families The Hymenoptera is divided into 2 suborders. (opportunitygreen.com)
  • I highly recommend Hymenoptera and Conservationto anybody who works with Hymenoptera (including invasive species, biological control and honeybees) or in general conservation, and to anyone with an interest in entomology. (wiley.com)
  • Along with pharmaceutical drugs and foods, hymenoptera venom is one of the most common causes of anaphylaxis in humans. (frontiersin.org)
  • Determining the host specificity of the biological control agent Trichomalus perfectus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae): the importance of ecological host range. (gc.ca)
  • Honestly, i didn't think of Hymenoptera so a wasp or an ant it could be. (diptera.info)
  • This study investigates 105 pollen allergic subjects for the presence of specific IgE to honeybee or wasp venom, pollen, the MUXF3 carbohydrate epitope from bromelain and recombinant Hymenoptera venom components. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • 1999. Towards simultaneous analysis of morphological and molecular data in Hymenoptera. (tolweb.org)