The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.
The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.
The first chemical element in the periodic table. It has the atomic symbol H, atomic number 1, and atomic weight [1.00784; 1.00811]. It exists, under normal conditions, as a colorless, odorless, tasteless, diatomic gas. Hydrogen ions are PROTONS. Besides the common H1 isotope, hydrogen exists as the stable isotope DEUTERIUM and the unstable, radioactive isotope TRITIUM.
A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.
A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
A flammable, poisonous gas with a characteristic odor of rotten eggs. It is used in the manufacture of chemicals, in metallurgy, and as an analytical reagent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
A chemical system that functions to control the levels of specific ions in solution. When the level of hydrogen ion in solution is controlled the system is called a pH buffer.
A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up.
Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.
An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.
Gated, ion-selective glycoproteins that traverse membranes. The stimulus for ION CHANNEL GATING can be due to a variety of stimuli such as LIGANDS, a TRANSMEMBRANE POTENTIAL DIFFERENCE, mechanical deformation or through INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS.
A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.
Respiratory retention of carbon dioxide. It may be chronic or acute.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).
One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337)
A group of genetic disorders of the KIDNEY TUBULES characterized by the accumulation of metabolically produced acids with elevated plasma chloride, hyperchloremic metabolic ACIDOSIS. Defective renal acidification of URINE (proximal tubules) or low renal acid excretion (distal tubules) can lead to complications such as HYPOKALEMIA, hypercalcinuria with NEPHROLITHIASIS and NEPHROCALCINOSIS, and RICKETS.
A state due to excess loss of carbon dioxide from the body. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The movement of ions across energy-transducing cell membranes. Transport can be active, passive or facilitated. Ions may travel by themselves (uniport), or as a group of two or more ions in the same (symport) or opposite (antiport) directions.
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An acidifying agent that has expectorant and diuretic effects. Also used in etching and batteries and as a flux in electroplating.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
The amount of a substance secreted by cells or by a specific organ or organism over a given period of time; usually applies to those substances which are formed by glandular tissues and are released by them into biological fluids, e.g., secretory rate of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex, secretory rate of gastric acid by the gastric mucosa.
Interstitial space between cells, occupied by INTERSTITIAL FLUID as well as amorphous and fibrous substances. For organisms with a CELL WALL, the extracellular space includes everything outside of the CELL MEMBRANE including the PERIPLASM and the cell wall.
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A genus of chiefly Eurasian and African land snails including the principal edible snails as well as several pests of cultivated plants.
A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.
##### I apologize, but the term "turtles" is not a recognized medical term or concept. It is commonly referred to as a group of reptiles with a shell, and does not have any direct relevance to medical definition.
A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.
A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or group of atoms with a valence of plus 1, which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
The opening and closing of ion channels due to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a change in membrane potential (voltage-gated), drugs or chemical transmitters (ligand-gated), or a mechanical deformation. Gating is thought to involve conformational changes of the ion channel which alters selective permeability.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.
Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.
Electrodes which can be used to measure the concentration of particular ions in cells, tissues, or solutions.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.
A pyrazine compound inhibiting SODIUM reabsorption through SODIUM CHANNELS in renal EPITHELIAL CELLS. This inhibition creates a negative potential in the luminal membranes of principal cells, located in the distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Negative potential reduces secretion of potassium and hydrogen ions. Amiloride is used in conjunction with DIURETICS to spare POTASSIUM loss. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p705)
The ability of a substrate to allow the passage of ELECTRONS.
A trace element that is a component of vitamin B12. It has the atomic symbol Co, atomic number 27, and atomic weight 58.93. It is used in nuclear weapons, alloys, and pigments. Deficiency in animals leads to anemia; its excess in humans can lead to erythrocytosis.
Positively charged atoms, radicals or groups of atoms with a valence of plus 2, which travel to the cathode or negative pole during electrolysis.
A photoprotein isolated from the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea. It emits visible light by an intramolecular reaction when a trace amount of calcium ion is added. The light-emitting moiety in the bioluminescence reaction is believed to be 2-amino-3-benzyl-5-(p-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazine (AF-350).
Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.
Organic compounds that contain two nitro groups attached to a phenol.
A synthetic pentapeptide that has effects like gastrin when given parenterally. It stimulates the secretion of gastric acid, pepsin, and intrinsic factor, and has been used as a diagnostic aid.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Chemical agents that increase the permeability of biological or artificial lipid membranes to specific ions. Most ionophores are relatively small organic molecules that act as mobile carriers within membranes or coalesce to form ion permeable channels across membranes. Many are antibiotics, and many act as uncoupling agents by short-circuiting the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes.
Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Inorganic salts of sulfuric acid.
The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)
A trace element with atomic symbol Mn, atomic number 25, and atomic weight 54.94. It is concentrated in cell mitochondria, mostly in the pituitary gland, liver, pancreas, kidney, and bone, influences the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides, stimulates hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and is a cofactor in many enzymes, including arginase and alkaline phosphatase in the liver. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1992, p2035)
The lymph fluid found in the membranous labyrinth of the ear. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Cationic ionophore antibiotic obtained from Streptomyces lasaliensis that, among other effects, dissociates the calcium fluxes in muscle fibers. It is used as a coccidiostat, especially in poultry.
A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.
Derivatives of ammonium compounds, NH4+ Y-, in which all four of the hydrogens bonded to nitrogen have been replaced with hydrocarbyl groups. These are distinguished from IMINES which are RN=CR2.
The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
A group of peptide antibiotics from BACILLUS brevis. Gramicidin C or S is a cyclic, ten-amino acid polypeptide and gramicidins A, B, D are linear. Gramicidin is one of the two principal components of TYROTHRICIN.
Hydrogen cyanide (HCN); A toxic liquid or colorless gas. It is found in the smoke of various tobacco products and released by combustion of nitrogen-containing organic materials.
The decrease in a measurable parameter of a PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESS, including cellular, microbial, and plant; immunological, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, urinary, digestive, neural, musculoskeletal, ocular, and skin physiological processes; or METABOLIC PROCESS, including enzymatic and other pharmacological processes, by a drug or other chemical.
A trace element that plays a role in glucose metabolism. It has the atomic symbol Cr, atomic number 24, and atomic weight 52. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP85-002,1985), chromium and some of its compounds have been listed as known carcinogens.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
An element of the alkaline earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sr, atomic number 38, and atomic weight 87.62.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.
The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.
Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
A salt used to replenish calcium levels, as an acid-producing diuretic, and as an antidote for magnesium poisoning.
Stable potassium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element potassium, but differ in atomic weight. K-41 is a stable potassium isotope.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.
The dissociation of molecules in the air into positive and negative ions under the influence of an electric field.
Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
Liquid components of living organisms.
Positively-charged atomic nuclei that have been stripped of their electrons. These particles have one or more units of electric charge and a mass exceeding that of the Helium-4 nucleus (alpha particle).
A heavy metal trace element with the atomic symbol Cu, atomic number 29, and atomic weight 63.55.
A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.
The accumulation of an electric charge on a object
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
An order of the class Amphibia, which includes several families of frogs and toads. They are characterized by well developed hind limbs adapted for jumping, fused head and trunk and webbed toes. The term "toad" is ambiguous and is properly applied only to the family Bufonidae.
A trace element with the atomic symbol Ni, atomic number 28, and atomic weight 58.69. It is a cofactor of the enzyme UREASE.
Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.
A chelating agent relatively more specific for calcium and less toxic than EDETIC ACID.
Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.
A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.
A fluorescent calcium chelating agent which is used to study intracellular calcium in tissues.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The fluid inside CELLS.
Substances that dissociate into two or more ions, to some extent, in water. Solutions of electrolytes thus conduct an electric current and can be decomposed by it (ELECTROLYSIS). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.
The physical phenomena describing the structure and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.
Salts or ions of the theoretical carbonic acid, containing the radical CO2(3-). Carbonates are readily decomposed by acids. The carbonates of the alkali metals are water-soluble; all others are insoluble. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Substances produced from the reaction between acids and bases; compounds consisting of a metal (positive) and nonmetal (negative) radical. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

The chemical ecology of Biomphalaria glabrata: the effects of ammonia on the growth rate of juvenile snails. (1/46035)

When juvenile specimens of Biomphalaria glabrata were subjected to concentrations of ammonia ranging from 1-100 mug/ml in various media the following effects were observed: the addition of ammonia to borate buffered media caused mortality. Both borate and tris-buffered media caused a decrease in the growth rate of snails when compared with controls in SSW. The growth rates of the snails could be enhanced by increasing the concentration of ammonia to critical thresholds, but further increases beyond these thresholds resulted in growth inhibition. The toxicity of ammonia in ambient water was augmented by an an increase in pH. The possible causation and ecological significance of these effects are discussed. There are indications that the snails are physiologically well-adapted to utilize ammonia when required and also to control its excretion and uptake from the medium.  (+info)

Does gill boundary layer carbonic anhydrase contribute to carbon dioxide excretion: a comparison between dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). (2/46035)

In vivo experiments were conducted on spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in sea water to determine the potential role of externally oriented or gill boundary layer carbonic anhydrase in carbon dioxide excretion. This was accomplished by assessing pH changes in expired water using a stopped-flow apparatus. In dogfish, expired water was in acid-base disequilibrium as indicated by a pronounced acidification (delta pH=-0.11+/-0.01; N=22; mean +/- s.e.m.) during the period of stopped flow; inspired water, however, was in acid-base equilibrium (delta pH=-0.002+/-0.01; N=22). The acid-base disequilibrium in expired water was abolished (delta pH=-0.005+/-0.01; N=6) by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (5 mg l-1) to the external medium. Addition of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide (1 mmol l-1) to the water significantly reduced the magnitude of the pH disequilibrium (from -0.133+/-0.03 to -0.063+/-0.02; N=4). However, after correcting for the increased buffering capacity of the water caused by acetazolamide, the acid-base disequilibrium during stopped flow was unaffected by this treatment (control delta [H+]=99.8+/-22.8 micromol l-1; acetazolamide delta [H+]=81.3+/-21.5 micromol l-1). In rainbow trout, expired water displayed an acid-base disequilibrium (delta pH=0.09+/-0.01; N=6) that also was abolished by the application of external carbonic anhydrase (delta pH=0.02+/-0.01). The origin of the expired water acid-base disequilibrium was investigated further in dogfish. Intravascular injection of acetazolamide (40 mg kg-1) to inhibit internal carbonic anhydrase activity non-specifically and thus CO2 excretion significantly diminished the extent of the expired water disequilibrium pH after 30 min (from -0.123+/-0.01 to -0.065+/-0.01; N=6). Selective inhibition of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity using a low intravascular dose (1.3 mg kg-1) of the inhibitor benzolamide caused a significant reduction in the acid-base disequilibrium after 5 min (from -0.11+/-0.01 to -0.07+/-0. 01; N=14). These results demonstrate that the expired water acid-base disequilibrium originates, at least in part, from excretory CO2 and that extracellular carbonic anhydrase in dogfish may have a significant role in carbon dioxide excretion. However, externally oriented carbonic anhydrase (if present in dogfish) plays no role in catalysing the hydration of the excretory CO2 in water flowing over the gills and thus is unlikely to facilitate CO2 excretion.  (+info)

Inward rectification in KATP channels: a pH switch in the pore. (3/46035)

Inward-rectifier potassium channels (Kir channels) stabilize the resting membrane potential and set a threshold for excitation in many types of cell. This function arises from voltage-dependent rectification of these channels due to blockage by intracellular polyamines. In all Kir channels studied to date, the voltage-dependence of rectification is either strong or weak. Here we show that in cardiac as well as in cloned KATP channels (Kir6.2 + sulfonylurea receptor) polyamine-mediated rectification is not fixed but changes with intracellular pH in the physiological range: inward-rectification is prominent at basic pH, while at acidic pH rectification is very weak. The pH-dependence of polyamine block is specific for KATP as shown in experiments with other Kir channels. Systematic mutagenesis revealed a titratable C-terminal histidine residue (H216) in Kir6.2 to be the structural determinant, and electrostatic interaction between this residue and polyamines was shown to be the molecular mechanism underlying pH-dependent rectification. This pH-dependent block of KATP channels may represent a novel and direct link between excitation and intracellular pH.  (+info)

The disulfide-bonded loop of chromogranin B mediates membrane binding and directs sorting from the trans-Golgi network to secretory granules. (4/46035)

The disulfide-bonded loop of chromogranin B (CgB), a regulated secretory protein with widespread distribution in neuroendocrine cells, is known to be essential for the sorting of CgB from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to immature secretory granules. Here we show that this loop, when fused to the constitutively secreted protein alpha1-antitrypsin (AT), is sufficient to direct the fusion protein to secretory granules. Importantly, the sorting efficiency of the AT reporter protein bearing two loops (E2/3-AT-E2/3) is much higher compared with that of AT with a single disulfide-bonded loop. In contrast to endogenous CgB, E2/3-AT-E2/3 does not undergo Ca2+/pH-dependent aggregation in the TGN. Furthermore, the disulfide-bonded loop of CgB mediates membrane binding in the TGN and does so with 5-fold higher efficiency if two loops are present on the reporter protein. The latter finding supports the concept that under physiological conditions, aggregates of CgB are the sorted units of cargo which have multiple loops on their surface leading to high membrane binding and sorting efficiency of CgB in the TGN.  (+info)

Calorimetric studies on the stability of the ribosome-inactivating protein abrin II: effects of pH and ligand binding. (5/46035)

The effects of pH and ligand binding on the stability of abrin II, a heterodimeric ribosome-inactivating protein, and its subunits have been studied using high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry. At pH7.2, the calorimetric scan consists of two transitions, which correspond to the B-subunit [transition temperature (Tm) 319.2K] and the A-subunit (Tm 324.6K) of abrin II, as also confirmed by studies on the isolated A-subunit. The calorimetric enthalpy of the isolated A-subunit of abrin II is similar to that of the higher-temperature transition. However, its Tm is 2.4K lower than that of the higher-temperature peak of intact abrin II. This indicates that there is some interaction between the two subunits. Abrin II displays increased stability as the pH is decreased to 4.5. Lactose increases the Tm values as well as the enthalpies of both transitions. This effect is more pronounced at pH7.2 than at pH4.5. This suggests that ligand binding stabilizes the native conformation of abrin II. Analysis of the B-subunit transition temperature as a function of lactose concentration suggests that two lactose molecules bind to one molecule of abrin II at pH7.2. The presence of two binding sites for lactose on the abrin II molecule is also indicated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Plotting DeltaHm (the molar transition enthalpy at Tm) against Tm yielded values for DeltaCp (change in excess heat capacity) of 27+/-2 kJ.mol-1.K-1 for the B-subunit and 20+/-1 kJ.mol-1.K-1 for the A-subunit. These values have been used to calculate the thermal stability of abrin II and to surmise the mechanism of its transmembrane translocation.  (+info)

A new alkali-resistant hemoglobin alpha2J Oxford gammaF2 in a Sicilian baby girl with homozygous beta0 thalassemia. (6/46035)

A 10-mo-old baby girl with homozygous beta0 thalassemia and alphaJOxford, presenting the clinical picture of homozygous beta thalassemia is described. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed three bands: the first two with the mobilities of hemoglobin Hb A2 (1%) and Hb F (69%), respectively, the third migrating a little faster than Hb A (30%). About 30% of her alpha chains were J Oxford which, bound to her gamma chains, produced a new alkali-resistant hemoglobin, alpha2 J Oxford gamma F2, which has not been described previously. Hemoglobin synthesis in vitro showed the absence of beta chain synthesis and an alpha/non-alpha ratio of 2. The patient's father was heterozygous for both the Hb J Oxford and beta0 thalassemia genes, the mother a carrier of beta0 thalassemia; four other relatives were carriers of Hb J Oxford, and one was a carrier of beta thalassemia.  (+info)

Phe161 and Arg166 variants of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase. Implications for NADPH recognition and structural stability. (7/46035)

Phe161 and Arg166 of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase from Pseudomonas fluorescens belong to a newly discovered sequence motif in flavoprotein hydroxylases with a putative dual function in FAD and NADPH binding [1]. To study their role in more detail, Phe161 and Arg166 were selectively changed by site-directed mutagenesis. F161A and F161G are catalytically competent enzymes having a rather poor affinity for NADPH. The catalytic properties of R166K are similar to those of the native enzyme. R166S and R166E show impaired NADPH binding and R166E has lost the ability to bind FAD. The crystal structure of substrate complexed F161A at 2.2 A is indistinguishable from the native enzyme, except for small changes at the site of mutation. The crystal structure of substrate complexed R166S at 2.0 A revealed that Arg166 is important for providing an intimate contact between the FAD binding domain and a long excursion of the substrate binding domain. It is proposed that this interaction is essential for structural stability and for the recognition of the pyrophosphate moiety of NADPH.  (+info)

Insulin-like growth factors I and II are unable to form and maintain their native disulfides under in vivo redox conditions. (8/46035)

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I does not quantitatively form its three native disulfide bonds in the presence of 10 mM reduced and 1 mM oxidized glutathione in vitro [Hober, S. et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 1749-1756]. In this paper, we show (i) that both IGF-I and IGF-II are unable to form and maintain their native disulfide bonds at redox conditions that are similar to the situation in the secretory vesicles in vivo and (ii) that the presence of protein disulfide isomerase does not overcome this problem. The results indicate that the previously described thermodynamic disulfide exchange folding problem of IGF-I in vitro is also present in vivo. Speculatively, we suggest that the thermodynamic disulfide exchange properties of IGF-I and II are biologically significant for inactivation of the unbound growth factors by disulfide exchange reactions to generate variants destined for rapid clearance.  (+info)

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Gastric acidity determination is a medical test used to measure the amount of acid in the stomach. This test is often performed to diagnose or monitor conditions such as gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. The test involves measuring the pH level of the stomach contents using a thin, flexible tube called a catheter that is passed through the nose and down into the stomach. In some cases, a small sample of stomach fluid may also be collected for further testing.

The normal range for gastric acidity is typically considered to be a pH level below 4. A higher pH level may indicate that the stomach is producing too little acid, while a lower pH level may suggest that it is producing too much. Based on the results of the test, healthcare providers can develop an appropriate treatment plan for the underlying condition causing abnormal gastric acidity.

Acid-base equilibrium refers to the balance between the concentration of acids and bases in a solution, which determines its pH level. In a healthy human body, maintaining acid-base equilibrium is crucial for proper cellular function and homeostasis.

The balance is maintained by several buffering systems in the body, including the bicarbonate buffer system, which helps to regulate the pH of blood. This system involves the reaction between carbonic acid (a weak acid) and bicarbonate ions (a base) to form water and carbon dioxide.

The balance between acids and bases is carefully regulated by the body's respiratory and renal systems. The lungs control the elimination of carbon dioxide, a weak acid, through exhalation, while the kidneys regulate the excretion of hydrogen ions and the reabsorption of bicarbonate ions.

When the balance between acids and bases is disrupted, it can lead to acid-base disorders such as acidosis (excessive acidity) or alkalosis (excessive basicity). These conditions can have serious consequences on various organ systems if left untreated.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

Bicarbonates, also known as sodium bicarbonate or baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. In the context of medical definitions, bicarbonates refer to the bicarbonate ion (HCO3-), which is an important buffer in the body that helps maintain normal pH levels in blood and other bodily fluids.

The balance of bicarbonate and carbonic acid in the body helps regulate the acidity or alkalinity of the blood, a condition known as pH balance. Bicarbonates are produced by the body and are also found in some foods and drinking water. They work to neutralize excess acid in the body and help maintain the normal pH range of 7.35 to 7.45.

In medical testing, bicarbonate levels may be measured as part of an electrolyte panel or as a component of arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis. Low bicarbonate levels can indicate metabolic acidosis, while high levels can indicate metabolic alkalosis. Both conditions can have serious consequences if not treated promptly and appropriately.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hydrogen" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol H and atomic number 1. It is the lightest and most abundant chemical element in the universe, making up about 75% of its elemental mass.

In a medical context, hydrogen can be discussed in terms of molecular hydrogen (H2) which has been studied for potential therapeutic benefits. Some research explores its use as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, but more studies are needed to confirm these effects and understand the mechanisms behind them.

Hydrogen bonding is not a medical term per se, but it is a fundamental concept in chemistry and biology that is relevant to the field of medicine. Here's a general definition:

Hydrogen bonding is a type of attractive force between molecules or within a molecule, which occurs when a hydrogen atom is bonded to a highly electronegative atom (like nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine) and is then attracted to another electronegative atom. This attraction results in the formation of a partially covalent bond known as a "hydrogen bond."

In biological systems, hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the structure and function of many biomolecules, such as DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates. For example, the double helix structure of DNA is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs (adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine). Similarly, the three-dimensional structure of proteins is maintained by a network of hydrogen bonds that help to determine their function.

In medical contexts, hydrogen bonding can be relevant in understanding drug-receptor interactions, where hydrogen bonds between a drug molecule and its target protein can enhance the binding affinity and specificity of the interaction, leading to more effective therapeutic outcomes.

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a colorless, odorless, clear liquid with a slightly sweet taste, although drinking it is harmful and can cause poisoning. It is a weak oxidizing agent and is used as an antiseptic and a bleaching agent. In diluted form, it is used to disinfect wounds and kill bacteria and viruses on the skin; in higher concentrations, it can be used to bleach hair or remove stains from clothing. It is also used as a propellant in rocketry and in certain industrial processes. Chemically, hydrogen peroxide is composed of two hydrogen atoms and two oxygen atoms, and it is structurally similar to water (H2O), with an extra oxygen atom. This gives it its oxidizing properties, as the additional oxygen can be released and used to react with other substances.

Potassium is a essential mineral and an important electrolyte that is widely distributed in the human body. The majority of potassium in the body (approximately 98%) is found within cells, with the remaining 2% present in blood serum and other bodily fluids. Potassium plays a crucial role in various physiological processes, including:

1. Regulation of fluid balance and maintenance of normal blood pressure through its effects on vascular tone and sodium excretion.
2. Facilitation of nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction by participating in the generation and propagation of action potentials.
3. Protein synthesis, enzyme activation, and glycogen metabolism.
4. Regulation of acid-base balance through its role in buffering systems.

The normal serum potassium concentration ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 mEq/L (milliequivalents per liter) or mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Potassium levels outside this range can have significant clinical consequences, with both hypokalemia (low potassium levels) and hyperkalemia (high potassium levels) potentially leading to serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and respiratory failure.

Potassium is primarily obtained through the diet, with rich sources including fruits (e.g., bananas, oranges, and apricots), vegetables (e.g., leafy greens, potatoes, and tomatoes), legumes, nuts, dairy products, and meat. In cases of deficiency or increased needs, potassium supplements may be recommended under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Sodium is an essential mineral and electrolyte that is necessary for human health. In a medical context, sodium is often discussed in terms of its concentration in the blood, as measured by serum sodium levels. The normal range for serum sodium is typically between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Sodium plays a number of important roles in the body, including:

* Regulating fluid balance: Sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cells, which is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and preventing dehydration.
* Facilitating nerve impulse transmission: Sodium is involved in the generation and transmission of electrical signals in the nervous system, which is necessary for proper muscle function and coordination.
* Assisting with muscle contraction: Sodium helps to regulate muscle contractions by interacting with other minerals such as calcium and potassium.

Low sodium levels (hyponatremia) can cause symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma, while high sodium levels (hypernatremia) can lead to symptoms such as weakness, muscle cramps, and seizures. Both conditions require medical treatment to correct.

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless, flammable, and extremely toxic gas with a strong odor of rotten eggs. It is a naturally occurring compound that is produced in various industrial processes and is also found in some natural sources like volcanoes, hot springs, and swamps.

In the medical context, hydrogen sulfide is known to have both toxic and therapeutic effects on the human body. At high concentrations, it can cause respiratory failure, unconsciousness, and even death. However, recent studies have shown that at low levels, hydrogen sulfide may act as a signaling molecule in the human body, playing a role in various physiological processes such as regulating blood flow, reducing inflammation, and protecting against oxidative stress.

It's worth noting that exposure to high levels of hydrogen sulfide can be life-threatening, and immediate medical attention is required in case of exposure.

In the context of medicine, particularly in relation to cancer treatment, protons refer to positively charged subatomic particles found in the nucleus of an atom. Proton therapy, a type of radiation therapy, uses a beam of protons to target and destroy cancer cells with high precision, minimizing damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The concentrated dose of radiation is delivered directly to the tumor site, reducing side effects and improving quality of life during treatment.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

A buffer in the context of physiology and medicine refers to a substance or system that helps to maintain stable or neutral conditions, particularly in relation to pH levels, within the body or biological fluids.

Buffers are weak acids or bases that can react with strong acids or bases to minimize changes in the pH level. They do this by taking up excess hydrogen ions (H+) when acidity increases or releasing hydrogen ions when alkalinity increases, thereby maintaining a relatively constant pH.

In the human body, some of the key buffer systems include:

1. Bicarbonate buffer system: This is the major buffer in blood and extracellular fluids. It consists of bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) and carbonic acid (H2CO3). When there is an increase in acidity, the bicarbonate ion accepts a hydrogen ion to form carbonic acid, which then dissociates into water and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide can be exhaled, helping to remove excess acid from the body.
2. Phosphate buffer system: This is primarily found within cells. It consists of dihydrogen phosphate (H2PO4-) and monohydrogen phosphate (HPO42-) ions. When there is an increase in alkalinity, the dihydrogen phosphate ion donates a hydrogen ion to form monohydrogen phosphate, helping to neutralize the excess base.
3. Protein buffer system: Proteins, particularly histidine-rich proteins, can also act as buffers due to the presence of ionizable groups on their surfaces. These groups can bind or release hydrogen ions in response to changes in pH, thus maintaining a stable environment within cells and organelles.

Maintaining appropriate pH levels is crucial for various biological processes, including enzyme function, cell membrane stability, and overall homeostasis. Buffers play a vital role in preserving these balanced conditions despite internal or external challenges that might disrupt them.

Acidosis is a medical condition that occurs when there is an excess accumulation of acid in the body or when the body loses its ability to effectively regulate the pH level of the blood. The normal pH range of the blood is slightly alkaline, between 7.35 and 7.45. When the pH falls below 7.35, it is called acidosis.

Acidosis can be caused by various factors, including impaired kidney function, respiratory problems, diabetes, severe dehydration, alcoholism, and certain medications or toxins. There are two main types of acidosis: metabolic acidosis and respiratory acidosis.

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid or is unable to eliminate it effectively. This can be caused by conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, kidney failure, and ingestion of certain toxins.

Respiratory acidosis, on the other hand, occurs when the lungs are unable to remove enough carbon dioxide from the body, leading to an accumulation of acid. This can be caused by conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and sedative overdose.

Symptoms of acidosis may include fatigue, shortness of breath, confusion, headache, rapid heartbeat, and in severe cases, coma or even death. Treatment for acidosis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, oxygen therapy, fluid replacement, and dialysis.

Chlorides are simple inorganic ions consisting of a single chlorine atom bonded to a single charged hydrogen ion (H+). Chloride is the most abundant anion (negatively charged ion) in the extracellular fluid in the human body. The normal range for chloride concentration in the blood is typically between 96-106 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

Chlorides play a crucial role in maintaining electrical neutrality, acid-base balance, and osmotic pressure in the body. They are also essential for various physiological processes such as nerve impulse transmission, maintenance of membrane potentials, and digestion (as hydrochloric acid in the stomach).

Chloride levels can be affected by several factors, including diet, hydration status, kidney function, and certain medical conditions. Increased or decreased chloride levels can indicate various disorders, such as dehydration, kidney disease, Addison's disease, or diabetes insipidus. Therefore, monitoring chloride levels is essential for assessing a person's overall health and diagnosing potential medical issues.

An ion is an atom or molecule that has gained or lost one or more electrons, resulting in a net electric charge. Cations are positively charged ions, which have lost electrons, while anions are negatively charged ions, which have gained electrons. Ions can play a significant role in various physiological processes within the human body, including enzyme function, nerve impulse transmission, and maintenance of acid-base balance. They also contribute to the formation of salts and buffer systems that help regulate fluid composition and pH levels in different bodily fluids.

Ion channels are specialized transmembrane proteins that form hydrophilic pores or gaps in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes. They regulate the movement of ions (such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride) across the cell membrane by allowing these charged particles to pass through selectively in response to various stimuli, including voltage changes, ligand binding, mechanical stress, or temperature changes. This ion movement is essential for many physiological processes, including electrical signaling, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and maintenance of resting membrane potential. Ion channels can be categorized based on their activation mechanisms, ion selectivity, and structural features. Dysfunction of ion channels can lead to various diseases, making them important targets for drug development.

Hydrochloric acid, also known as muriatic acid, is not a substance that is typically found within the human body. It is a strong mineral acid with the chemical formula HCl. In a medical context, it might be mentioned in relation to gastric acid, which helps digest food in the stomach. Gastric acid is composed of hydrochloric acid, potassium chloride and sodium chloride dissolved in water. The pH of hydrochloric acid is very low (1-2) due to its high concentration of H+ ions, making it a strong acid. However, it's important to note that the term 'hydrochloric acid' does not directly refer to a component of human bodily fluids or tissues.

Respiratory acidosis is a medical condition that occurs when the lungs are not able to remove enough carbon dioxide (CO2) from the body, leading to an increase in the amount of CO2 in the bloodstream and a decrease in the pH of the blood. This can happen due to various reasons such as chronic lung diseases like emphysema or COPD, severe asthma attacks, neuromuscular disorders that affect breathing, or when someone is not breathing deeply or frequently enough, such as during sleep apnea or drug overdose.

Respiratory acidosis can cause symptoms such as headache, confusion, shortness of breath, and in severe cases, coma and even death. Treatment for respiratory acidosis depends on the underlying cause but may include oxygen therapy, bronchodilators, or mechanical ventilation to help support breathing.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Osmolar concentration is a measure of the total number of solute particles (such as ions or molecules) dissolved in a solution per liter of solvent (usually water), which affects the osmotic pressure. It is expressed in units of osmoles per liter (osmol/L). Osmolarity and osmolality are related concepts, with osmolarity referring to the number of osmoles per unit volume of solution, typically measured in liters, while osmolality refers to the number of osmoles per kilogram of solvent. In clinical contexts, osmolar concentration is often used to describe the solute concentration of bodily fluids such as blood or urine.

Gastric juice is a digestive fluid that is produced in the stomach. It is composed of several enzymes, including pepsin, which helps to break down proteins, and gastric amylase, which begins the digestion of carbohydrates. Gastric juice also contains hydrochloric acid, which creates a low pH environment in the stomach that is necessary for the activation of pepsin and the digestion of food. Additionally, gastric juice contains mucus, which helps to protect the lining of the stomach from the damaging effects of the hydrochloric acid. The production of gastric juice is controlled by hormones and the autonomic nervous system.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Membrane potential is the electrical potential difference across a cell membrane, typically for excitable cells such as nerve and muscle cells. It is the difference in electric charge between the inside and outside of a cell, created by the selective permeability of the cell membrane to different ions. The resting membrane potential of a typical animal cell is around -70 mV, with the interior being negative relative to the exterior. This potential is generated and maintained by the active transport of ions across the membrane, primarily through the action of the sodium-potassium pump. Membrane potentials play a crucial role in many physiological processes, including the transmission of nerve impulses and the contraction of muscle cells.

Acetazolamide is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. It works by decreasing the production of bicarbonate in the body, which helps to reduce the amount of fluid in the eye and brain, making it useful for treating conditions such as glaucoma and epilepsy.

In medical terms, acetazolamide can be defined as: "A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used to treat glaucoma, epilepsy, altitude sickness, and other conditions. It works by decreasing the production of bicarbonate in the body, which helps to reduce the amount of fluid in the eye and brain."

Acetazolamide may also be used for other purposes not listed here, so it is important to consult with a healthcare provider for specific medical advice.

Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a medical condition that occurs when the kidneys are unable to properly excrete acid into the urine, leading to an accumulation of acid in the bloodstream. This results in a state of metabolic acidosis.

There are several types of RTA, but renal tubular acidosis type 1 (also known as distal RTA) is characterized by a defect in the ability of the distal tubules to acidify the urine, leading to an inability to lower the pH of the urine below 5.5, even in the face of metabolic acidosis. This results in a persistently alkaline urine, which can lead to calcium phosphate stones and bone demineralization.

Type 1 RTA is often caused by inherited genetic defects, but it can also be acquired due to various kidney diseases, drugs, or autoimmune disorders. Symptoms of type 1 RTA may include fatigue, weakness, muscle cramps, decreased appetite, and vomiting. Treatment typically involves alkali therapy to correct the acidosis and prevent complications.

Respiratory alkalosis is a medical condition that occurs when there is an excess base (bicarbonate) and/or a decrease in carbon dioxide in the body. This leads to an increase in pH level of the blood, making it more alkaline than normal. Respiratory alkalosis is usually caused by conditions that result in hyperventilation, such as anxiety, lung disease, or high altitude. It can also be caused by certain medications and medical procedures. Symptoms of respiratory alkalosis may include lightheadedness, confusion, and tingling in the fingers and toes. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the condition.

Ion transport refers to the active or passive movement of ions, such as sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), chloride (Cl-), and calcium (Ca2+) ions, across cell membranes. This process is essential for various physiological functions, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and maintenance of resting membrane potential.

Ion transport can occur through several mechanisms, including:

1. Diffusion: the passive movement of ions down their concentration gradient, from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration.
2. Facilitated diffusion: the passive movement of ions through specialized channels or transporters in the cell membrane.
3. Active transport: the energy-dependent movement of ions against their concentration gradient, requiring the use of ATP. This process is often mediated by ion pumps, such as the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase).
4. Co-transport or symport: the coupled transport of two or more different ions or molecules in the same direction, often driven by an electrochemical gradient.
5. Counter-transport or antiport: the coupled transport of two or more different ions or molecules in opposite directions, also often driven by an electrochemical gradient.

Abnormalities in ion transport can lead to various medical conditions, such as cystic fibrosis (which involves defective chloride channel function), hypertension (which may be related to altered sodium transport), and certain forms of heart disease (which can result from abnormal calcium handling).

In the context of medicine, and specifically in physiology and respiratory therapy, partial pressure (P or p) is a measure of the pressure exerted by an individual gas in a mixture of gases. It's commonly used to describe the concentrations of gases in the body, such as oxygen (PO2), carbon dioxide (PCO2), and nitrogen (PN2).

The partial pressure of a specific gas is calculated as the fraction of that gas in the total mixture multiplied by the total pressure of the mixture. This concept is based on Dalton's law, which states that the total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is equal to the sum of the pressures exerted by each individual gas.

For example, in room air at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) is approximately 160 mmHg (mm of mercury), which represents about 21% of the total barometric pressure (760 mmHg). This concept is crucial for understanding gas exchange in the lungs and how gases move across membranes, such as from alveoli to blood and vice versa.

Ammonium chloride is an inorganic compound with the formula NH4Cl. It is a white crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and can be produced by combining ammonia (NH3) with hydrochloric acid (HCl). Ammonium chloride is commonly used as a source of hydrogen ions in chemical reactions, and it has a variety of industrial and medical applications.

In the medical field, ammonium chloride is sometimes used as a expectorant to help thin and loosen mucus in the respiratory tract, making it easier to cough up and clear from the lungs. It may also be used to treat conditions such as metabolic alkalosis, a condition characterized by an excess of base in the body that can lead to symptoms such as confusion, muscle twitching, and irregular heartbeat.

However, it is important to note that ammonium chloride can have side effects, including stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional and should not be taken in large amounts or for extended periods of time without medical supervision.

Biological transport, active is the process by which cells use energy to move materials across their membranes from an area of lower concentration to an area of higher concentration. This type of transport is facilitated by specialized proteins called transporters or pumps that are located in the cell membrane. These proteins undergo conformational changes to physically carry the molecules through the lipid bilayer of the membrane, often against their concentration gradient.

Active transport requires energy because it works against the natural tendency of molecules to move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration, a process known as diffusion. Cells obtain this energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is produced through cellular respiration.

Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose and amino acids into cells, as well as the secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters. The sodium-potassium pump, which helps maintain resting membrane potential in nerve and muscle cells, is a classic example of an active transporter.

Cell membrane permeability refers to the ability of various substances, such as molecules and ions, to pass through the cell membrane. The cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin, flexible barrier that surrounds all cells, controlling what enters and leaves the cell. Its primary function is to protect the cell's internal environment and maintain homeostasis.

The permeability of the cell membrane depends on its structure, which consists of a phospholipid bilayer interspersed with proteins. The hydrophilic (water-loving) heads of the phospholipids face outward, while the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails face inward, creating a barrier that is generally impermeable to large, polar, or charged molecules.

However, specific proteins within the membrane, called channels and transporters, allow certain substances to cross the membrane. Channels are protein structures that span the membrane and provide a pore for ions or small uncharged molecules to pass through. Transporters, on the other hand, are proteins that bind to specific molecules and facilitate their movement across the membrane, often using energy in the form of ATP.

The permeability of the cell membrane can be influenced by various factors, such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain chemicals or drugs. Changes in permeability can have significant consequences for the cell's function and survival, as they can disrupt ion balances, nutrient uptake, waste removal, and signal transduction.

Secretory rate refers to the amount or volume of a secretion produced by a gland or an organ over a given period of time. It is a measure of the productivity or activity level of the secreting structure. The secretory rate can be quantified for various bodily fluids, such as saliva, sweat, digestive enzymes, hormones, or milk, depending on the context and the specific gland or organ being studied.

In clinical settings, measuring the secretory rate might involve collecting and analyzing samples over a certain duration to estimate the production rate of the substance in question. This information can be helpful in diagnosing conditions related to impaired secretion, monitoring treatment responses, or understanding the physiological adaptations of the body under different circumstances.

The extracellular space is the region outside of cells within a tissue or organ, where various biological molecules and ions exist in a fluid medium. This space is filled with extracellular matrix (ECM), which includes proteins like collagen and elastin, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans that provide structural support and biochemical cues to surrounding cells. The ECM also contains various ions, nutrients, waste products, signaling molecules, and growth factors that play crucial roles in cell-cell communication, tissue homeostasis, and regulation of cell behavior. Additionally, the extracellular space includes the interstitial fluid, which is the fluid component of the ECM, and the lymphatic and vascular systems, through which cells exchange nutrients, waste products, and signaling molecules with the rest of the body. Overall, the extracellular space is a complex and dynamic microenvironment that plays essential roles in maintaining tissue structure, function, and homeostasis.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Potassium chloride is an essential electrolyte that is often used in medical settings as a medication. It's a white, crystalline salt that is highly soluble in water and has a salty taste. In the body, potassium chloride plays a crucial role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, nerve function, and muscle contraction.

Medically, potassium chloride is commonly used to treat or prevent low potassium levels (hypokalemia) in the blood. Hypokalemia can occur due to various reasons such as certain medications, kidney diseases, vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive sweating. Potassium chloride is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquids, and it's usually taken by mouth.

It's important to note that potassium chloride should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can be harmful and even life-threatening. Hyperkalemia can cause symptoms such as muscle weakness, irregular heartbeat, and cardiac arrest.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "turtles" is not a medical term. It refers to the group of reptiles that have a shell and include various species such as tortoises and terrapins. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try to help with those!

Sodium bicarbonate, also known as baking soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. It is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste and is commonly used in cooking as a leavening agent.

In a medical context, sodium bicarbonate is used as a medication to treat conditions caused by high levels of acid in the body, such as metabolic acidosis. It works by neutralizing the acid and turning it into a harmless salt and water. Sodium bicarbonate can be given intravenously or orally, depending on the severity of the condition being treated.

It is important to note that sodium bicarbonate should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can have serious side effects if not used properly. These may include fluid buildup in the body, electrolyte imbalances, and an increased risk of infection.

Sodium Chloride is defined as the inorganic compound with the chemical formula NaCl, representing a 1:1 ratio of sodium and chloride ions. It is commonly known as table salt or halite, and it is used extensively in food seasoning and preservation due to its ability to enhance flavor and inhibit bacterial growth. In medicine, sodium chloride is used as a balanced electrolyte solution for rehydration and as a topical wound irrigant and antiseptic. It is also an essential component of the human body's fluid balance and nerve impulse transmission.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Electrophysiology is a branch of medicine that deals with the electrical activities of the body, particularly the heart. In a medical context, electrophysiology studies (EPS) are performed to assess abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as medication or pacemakers.

During an EPS, electrode catheters are inserted into the heart through blood vessels in the groin or neck. These catheters can record the electrical activity of the heart and stimulate it to help identify the source of the arrhythmia. The information gathered during the study can help doctors determine the best course of treatment for each patient.

In addition to cardiac electrophysiology, there are also other subspecialties within electrophysiology, such as neuromuscular electrophysiology, which deals with the electrical activity of the nervous system and muscles.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

In the context of medicine, there is no specific medical definition for 'metals.' However, certain metals have significant roles in biological systems and are thus studied in physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. Some metals are essential to life, serving as cofactors for enzymatic reactions, while others are toxic and can cause harm at certain levels.

Examples of essential metals include:

1. Iron (Fe): It is a crucial component of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and various enzymes involved in energy production, DNA synthesis, and electron transport.
2. Zinc (Zn): This metal is vital for immune function, wound healing, protein synthesis, and DNA synthesis. It acts as a cofactor for over 300 enzymes.
3. Copper (Cu): Copper is essential for energy production, iron metabolism, antioxidant defense, and connective tissue formation. It serves as a cofactor for several enzymes.
4. Magnesium (Mg): Magnesium plays a crucial role in many biochemical reactions, including nerve and muscle function, protein synthesis, and blood pressure regulation.
5. Manganese (Mn): This metal is necessary for bone development, protein metabolism, and antioxidant defense. It acts as a cofactor for several enzymes.
6. Molybdenum (Mo): Molybdenum is essential for the function of certain enzymes involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and drugs.
7. Cobalt (Co): Cobalt is a component of vitamin B12, which plays a vital role in DNA synthesis, fatty acid metabolism, and nerve function.

Examples of toxic metals include:

1. Lead (Pb): Exposure to lead can cause neurological damage, anemia, kidney dysfunction, and developmental issues.
2. Mercury (Hg): Mercury is highly toxic and can cause neurological problems, kidney damage, and developmental issues.
3. Arsenic (As): Arsenic exposure can lead to skin lesions, cancer, neurological disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.
4. Cadmium (Cd): Cadmium is toxic and can cause kidney damage, bone demineralization, and lung irritation.
5. Chromium (Cr): Excessive exposure to chromium can lead to skin ulcers, respiratory issues, and kidney and liver damage.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

A monovalent cation is a type of ion that has a single positive charge. In the context of medical and biological sciences, monovalent cations are important because they play crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as maintaining electrical neutrality in cells, facilitating nerve impulse transmission, and regulating fluid balance.

The most common monovalent cation is sodium (Na+), which is the primary cation in the extracellular fluid. Other examples of monovalent cations include potassium (K+), which is the main cation inside cells, and hydrogen (H+) ions, which are involved in acid-base balance.

Monovalent cations are typically measured in milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) in clinical settings to express their concentration in biological fluids.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

A chemical model is a simplified representation or description of a chemical system, based on the laws of chemistry and physics. It is used to explain and predict the behavior of chemicals and chemical reactions. Chemical models can take many forms, including mathematical equations, diagrams, and computer simulations. They are often used in research, education, and industry to understand complex chemical processes and develop new products and technologies.

For example, a chemical model might be used to describe the way that atoms and molecules interact in a particular reaction, or to predict the properties of a new material. Chemical models can also be used to study the behavior of chemicals at the molecular level, such as how they bind to each other or how they are affected by changes in temperature or pressure.

It is important to note that chemical models are simplifications of reality and may not always accurately represent every aspect of a chemical system. They should be used with caution and validated against experimental data whenever possible.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Ion channel gating refers to the process by which ion channels in cell membranes open and close in response to various stimuli, allowing ions such as sodium, potassium, and calcium to flow into or out of the cell. This movement of ions is crucial for many physiological processes, including the generation and transmission of electrical signals in nerve cells, muscle contraction, and the regulation of hormone secretion.

Ion channel gating can be regulated by various factors, including voltage changes across the membrane (voltage-gated channels), ligand binding (ligand-gated channels), mechanical stress (mechanosensitive channels), or other intracellular signals (second messenger-gated channels). The opening and closing of ion channels are highly regulated and coordinated processes that play a critical role in maintaining the proper functioning of cells and organ systems.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

A cation is a type of ion, which is a charged particle, that has a positive charge. In chemistry and biology, cations are formed when a neutral atom loses one or more electrons during chemical reactions. The removal of electrons results in the atom having more protons than electrons, giving it a net positive charge.

Cations are important in many biological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and enzyme function. For example, sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), and magnesium (Mg2+) are all essential cations that play critical roles in various physiological functions.

In medical contexts, cations can also be relevant in the diagnosis and treatment of various conditions. For instance, abnormal levels of certain cations, such as potassium or calcium, can indicate specific diseases or disorders. Additionally, medications used to treat various conditions may work by altering cation concentrations or activity within the body.

In medical terms, acids refer to a class of chemicals that have a pH less than 7 and can donate protons (hydrogen ions) in chemical reactions. In the context of human health, acids are an important part of various bodily functions, such as digestion. However, an imbalance in acid levels can lead to medical conditions. For example, an excess of hydrochloric acid in the stomach can cause gastritis or peptic ulcers, while an accumulation of lactic acid due to strenuous exercise or decreased blood flow can lead to muscle fatigue and pain.

Additionally, in clinical laboratory tests, certain substances may be tested for their "acidity" or "alkalinity," which is measured using a pH scale. This information can help diagnose various medical conditions, such as kidney disease or diabetes.

Hypercapnia is a state of increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the blood, typically defined as an arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) above 45 mmHg. It is often associated with conditions that impair gas exchange or eliminate CO2 from the body, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe asthma, respiratory failure, or certain neuromuscular disorders. Hypercapnia can cause symptoms such as headache, confusion, shortness of breath, and in severe cases, it can lead to life-threatening complications such as respiratory acidosis, coma, and even death if not promptly treated.

Lactates, also known as lactic acid, are compounds that are produced by muscles during intense exercise or other conditions of low oxygen supply. They are formed from the breakdown of glucose in the absence of adequate oxygen to complete the full process of cellular respiration. This results in the production of lactate and a hydrogen ion, which can lead to a decrease in pH and muscle fatigue.

In a medical context, lactates may be measured in the blood as an indicator of tissue oxygenation and metabolic status. Elevated levels of lactate in the blood, known as lactic acidosis, can indicate poor tissue perfusion or hypoxia, and may be seen in conditions such as sepsis, cardiac arrest, and severe shock. It is important to note that lactates are not the primary cause of acidemia (low pH) in lactic acidosis, but rather a marker of the underlying process.

Ion-Selective Electrodes (ISEs) are a type of chemical sensor that measure the activity of specific ions in a solution. They work by converting the chemical response into an electrical signal, which can then be measured and analyzed. The electrode is coated with a membrane that is selectively permeable to a particular ion, allowing for the detection and measurement of that specific ion in the presence of other ions.

ISEs are widely used in various fields such as clinical chemistry, biomedical research, environmental monitoring, and industrial process control. In medical diagnostics, ISEs are commonly used to measure the levels of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium in biological samples like blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid.

The response of an ISE is based on Nernst's equation, which relates the electrical potential across the membrane to the activity of the ion being measured. The selectivity of the electrode for a particular ion is determined by the type of membrane used, and the choice of membrane depends on the application and the specific ions to be measured.

Overall, Ion-Selective Electrodes are important tools in medical diagnostics and research, providing accurate and reliable measurements of ion activity in biological systems.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

A Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter (NHA) is a type of membrane transport protein that exchanges sodium ions (Na+) and protons (H+) across a biological membrane. It is also known as a Na+/H+ antiporter or exchanger. This exchange mechanism plays a crucial role in regulating pH, cell volume, and intracellular sodium concentration within various cells and organelles, including the kidney, brain, heart, and mitochondria.

In general, NHA transporters utilize the energy generated by the electrochemical gradient of sodium ions across a membrane to drive the uphill transport of protons from inside to outside the cell or organelle. This process helps maintain an optimal intracellular pH and volume, which is essential for proper cellular function and homeostasis.

There are several isoforms of Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporters found in different tissues and organelles, each with distinct physiological roles and regulatory mechanisms. Dysfunction or alterations in NHA activity have been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions, such as hypertension, heart failure, neurological disorders, and cancer.

Amiloride is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called potassium-sparing diuretics. It works by preventing the reabsorption of salt and water in the kidneys, which helps to increase urine output and decrease fluid buildup in the body. At the same time, amiloride also helps to preserve the level of potassium in the body, which is why it is known as a potassium-sparing diuretic.

Amiloride is commonly used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, and edema (fluid buildup) in the body. It is available in tablet form and is typically taken once or twice a day, with or without food. Common side effects of amiloride include headache, dizziness, and stomach upset.

It's important to note that amiloride can interact with other medications, including some over-the-counter products, so it's essential to inform your healthcare provider of all the medications you are taking before starting amiloride therapy. Additionally, regular monitoring of blood pressure, kidney function, and electrolyte levels is necessary while taking this medication.

Electric conductivity, also known as electrical conductance, is a measure of a material's ability to allow the flow of electric current through it. It is usually measured in units of Siemens per meter (S/m) or ohm-meters (Ω-m).

In medical terms, electric conductivity can refer to the body's ability to conduct electrical signals, which is important for various physiological processes such as nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction. Abnormalities in electrical conductivity can be associated with various medical conditions, including neurological disorders and heart diseases.

For example, in electrocardiography (ECG), the electric conductivity of the heart is measured to assess its electrical activity and identify any abnormalities that may indicate heart disease. Similarly, in electromyography (EMG), the electric conductivity of muscles is measured to diagnose neuromuscular disorders.

Cobalt is a chemical element with the symbol Co and atomic number 27. It is a hard, silver-white, lustrous, and brittle metal that is found naturally only in chemically combined form, except for small amounts found in meteorites. Cobalt is used primarily in the production of magnetic, wear-resistant, and high-strength alloys, as well as in the manufacture of batteries, magnets, and pigments.

In a medical context, cobalt is sometimes used in the form of cobalt-60, a radioactive isotope, for cancer treatment through radiation therapy. Cobalt-60 emits gamma rays that can be directed at tumors to destroy cancer cells. Additionally, small amounts of cobalt are present in some vitamin B12 supplements and fortified foods, as cobalt is an essential component of vitamin B12. However, exposure to high levels of cobalt can be harmful and may cause health effects such as allergic reactions, lung damage, heart problems, and neurological issues.

Divalent cations are ions that carry a positive charge of +2. They are called divalent because they have two positive charges. Common examples of divalent cations include calcium (Ca²+), magnesium (Mg²+), and iron (Fe²+). These ions play important roles in various biological processes, such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and bone metabolism. They can also interact with certain drugs and affect their absorption, distribution, and elimination in the body.

Aequorin is a bioluminescent protein found in certain jellyfish species, such as Aequorea victoria. It emits light when it undergoes a conformational change in the presence of calcium ions (Ca^2+^). This property makes aequorin a valuable tool in studying intracellular calcium levels and dynamics in various biological systems, including cells and model organisms.

The reaction that leads to light emission involves the binding of Ca^2+^ ions to aequorin, which then triggers the oxidation of coelenterazine, a chromophore molecule, to produce coelenteramide along with the release of energy in the form of blue light (approximately 469 nm). The intensity of the light emitted is directly proportional to the concentration of Ca^2+^ ions, allowing researchers to monitor and measure calcium levels in real-time.

Aequorin has been widely used in various research fields, such as neuroscience, cardiology, and cell biology, to investigate calcium signaling pathways and their roles in numerous physiological processes and diseases. Additionally, aequorin-based biosensors have been developed to study calcium dynamics in vivo, providing valuable insights into the complex interplay between calcium homeostasis and cellular functions.

Gastric mucosa refers to the innermost lining of the stomach, which is in contact with the gastric lumen. It is a specialized mucous membrane that consists of epithelial cells, lamina propria, and a thin layer of smooth muscle. The surface epithelium is primarily made up of mucus-secreting cells (goblet cells) and parietal cells, which secrete hydrochloric acid and intrinsic factor, and chief cells, which produce pepsinogen.

The gastric mucosa has several important functions, including protection against self-digestion by the stomach's own digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid. The mucus layer secreted by the epithelial cells forms a physical barrier that prevents the acidic contents of the stomach from damaging the underlying tissues. Additionally, the bicarbonate ions secreted by the surface epithelial cells help neutralize the acidity in the immediate vicinity of the mucosa.

The gastric mucosa is also responsible for the initial digestion of food through the action of hydrochloric acid and pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins into smaller peptides. The intrinsic factor secreted by parietal cells plays a crucial role in the absorption of vitamin B12 in the small intestine.

The gastric mucosa is constantly exposed to potential damage from various factors, including acid, pepsin, and other digestive enzymes, as well as mechanical stress due to muscle contractions during digestion. To maintain its integrity, the gastric mucosa has a remarkable capacity for self-repair and regeneration. However, chronic exposure to noxious stimuli or certain medical conditions can lead to inflammation, erosions, ulcers, or even cancer of the gastric mucosa.

Dinitrophenols (DNP) are a class of chemical compounds that contain two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a phenol group. Dinitrophenols have been used in the past as industrial dyes, wood preservatives, and pesticides. However, they have also been misused as weight loss supplements due to their ability to increase metabolic rate and cause weight loss.

The use of DNP for weight loss is dangerous and has been linked to several fatalities. DNP works by disrupting the normal functioning of the mitochondria in cells, which are responsible for producing energy. This disruption causes an increase in metabolic rate, leading to a rapid breakdown of fat and carbohydrates, and ultimately weight loss. However, this increased metabolism can also produce excessive heat, leading to hyperthermia, dehydration, and damage to organs such as the heart, liver, and kidneys.

Due to their potential for serious harm, DNP-containing products are banned in many countries, including the United States. Medical professionals should be aware of the dangers associated with DNP use and advise patients accordingly.

Pentagastrin is a synthetic polypeptide hormone that stimulates the release of gastrin and hydrochloric acid from the stomach. It is used diagnostically to test for conditions such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a rare disorder in which tumors in the pancreas or duodenum produce excessive amounts of gastrin, leading to severe ulcers and other digestive problems.

Pentagastrin is typically administered intravenously, and its effects are monitored through blood tests that measure gastric acid secretion. It is a potent stimulant of gastric acid production, and its use is limited to diagnostic purposes due to the risk of adverse effects such as nausea, flushing, and increased heart rate.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

Ionophores are compounds that have the ability to form complexes with ions and facilitate their transportation across biological membranes. They can be either organic or inorganic molecules, and they play important roles in various physiological processes, including ion homeostasis, signal transduction, and antibiotic activity. In medicine and research, ionophores are used as tools to study ion transport, modulate cellular functions, and as therapeutic agents, especially in the treatment of bacterial and fungal infections.

Gastric acid, also known as stomach acid, is a digestive fluid produced in the stomach. It's primarily composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl), and sodium chloride (NaCl). The pH of gastric acid is typically between 1.5 and 3.5, making it a strong acid that helps to break down food by denaturing proteins and activating digestive enzymes.

The production of gastric acid is regulated by the enteric nervous system and several hormones. The primary function of gastric acid is to initiate protein digestion, activate pepsinogen into the active enzyme pepsin, and kill most ingested microorganisms. However, an excess or deficiency in gastric acid secretion can lead to various gastrointestinal disorders such as gastritis, ulcers, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

In the context of medicine and biology, sulfates are ions or compounds that contain the sulfate group (SO4−2). Sulfate is a polyatomic anion with the structure of a sphere. It consists of a central sulfur atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement.

Sulfates can be found in various biological molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, which are important components of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix. Sulfate groups play a crucial role in these molecules by providing negative charges that help maintain the structural integrity and hydration of tissues.

In addition to their biological roles, sulfates can also be found in various medications and pharmaceutical compounds. For example, some laxatives contain sulfate salts, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) or sodium sulfate, which work by increasing the water content in the intestines and promoting bowel movements.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of sulfates can be harmful to human health, particularly in the form of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels. Prolonged exposure to SO2 can cause respiratory problems and exacerbate existing lung conditions.

In the context of medical terminology, "solutions" refers to a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances, in which one substance (the solute) is uniformly distributed within another substance (the solvent). The solvent is typically the greater component of the solution and is capable of dissolving the solute.

Solutions can be classified based on the physical state of the solvent and solute. For instance, a solution in which both the solvent and solute are liquids is called a liquid solution or simply a solution. A solid solution is one where the solvent is a solid and the solute is either a gas, liquid, or solid. Similarly, a gas solution refers to a mixture where the solvent is a gas and the solute can be a gas, liquid, or solid.

In medical applications, solutions are often used as vehicles for administering medications, such as intravenous (IV) fluids, oral rehydration solutions, eye drops, and topical creams or ointments. The composition of these solutions is carefully controlled to ensure the appropriate concentration and delivery of the active ingredients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "thermodynamics" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a branch of physics that deals with the relationships between heat and other forms of energy. However, the principles of thermodynamics can be applied to biological systems, including those in the human body, such as in the study of metabolism or muscle function. But in a medical context, "thermodynamics" would not be a term used independently as a diagnosis, treatment, or any medical condition.

Manganese is not a medical condition, but it's an essential trace element that is vital for human health. Here is the medical definition of Manganese:

Manganese (Mn) is a trace mineral that is present in tiny amounts in the body. It is found mainly in bones, the liver, kidneys, and pancreas. Manganese helps the body form connective tissue, bones, blood clotting factors, and sex hormones. It also plays a role in fat and carbohydrate metabolism, calcium absorption, and blood sugar regulation. Manganese is also necessary for normal brain and nerve function.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for manganese is 2.3 mg per day for adult men and 1.8 mg per day for adult women. Good food sources of manganese include nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, and tea.

In some cases, exposure to high levels of manganese can cause neurological symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease, a condition known as manganism. However, this is rare and usually occurs in people who are occupationally exposed to manganese dust or fumes, such as welders.

Endolymph is a specific type of fluid that is found within the inner ear, more specifically in the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear. This fluid plays a crucial role in maintaining balance and hearing functions. It helps in the stimulation of hair cells present in the inner ear which then transmit signals to the brain, enabling us to hear and maintain our balance. Any disturbance or changes in the composition or flow of endolymph can lead to various vestibular disorders and hearing problems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. Mathematics is not a medical term; it is a branch of science dedicated to the study of numbers, shapes, and structures. However, mathematics does have many applications in medicine, such as in modeling disease spread, analyzing medical images, or designing clinical trials. If you have any questions related to mathematics in a medical context, I'd be happy to help clarify those for you!

Lasalocid is defined as an ionophore antibiotic, which is used as a growth promoter in animals and also as an anticoccidial agent. It works by increasing the permeability of the cell membrane to sodium ions, resulting in an imbalance of electrolytes within the cells and ultimately leading to the death of the organism. Lasalocid is available in a variety of forms, including feed additives, boluses, and premixes, and is used primarily in poultry and ruminants. It is important to note that lasalocid is not approved for use in animals intended for human consumption in all countries, and its use should always be in accordance with local regulations and guidelines.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is vital for the functioning of over 300 enzymes and involved in various biological processes in the human body, including protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, immune function, wound healing, and cell division. It is a component of many proteins and participates in the maintenance of structural integrity and functionality of proteins. Zinc also plays a crucial role in maintaining the sense of taste and smell.

The recommended daily intake of zinc varies depending on age, sex, and life stage. Good dietary sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, nuts, dairy products, and fortified cereals. Zinc deficiency can lead to various health problems, including impaired immune function, growth retardation, and developmental delays in children. On the other hand, excessive intake of zinc can also have adverse effects on health, such as nausea, vomiting, and impaired immune function.

Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are a group of disinfectants and antiseptics that contain a nitrogen atom surrounded by four organic groups, resulting in a charged "quat" structure. They are widely used in healthcare settings due to their broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. QACs work by disrupting the cell membrane of microorganisms, leading to their death. Common examples include benzalkonium chloride and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. It is important to note that some microorganisms have developed resistance to QACs, and they may not be effective against all types of pathogens.

Electrochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the interconversion of electrical energy and chemical energy. It involves the study of chemical processes that cause electrons to move, resulting in the transfer of electrical charge, and the reverse processes by which electrical energy can be used to drive chemical reactions. This field encompasses various phenomena such as the generation of electricity from chemical sources (as in batteries), the electrolysis of substances, and corrosion. Electrochemical reactions are fundamental to many technologies, including energy storage and conversion, environmental protection, and medical diagnostics.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Gramicidin is not a medical condition but rather an antibiotic substance that is used in medical treatments.

Here's the scientific and pharmacological definition:

Gramicidin is a narrow-spectrum, cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from gram-positive bacteria of the genus Bacillus. It is an ionophore that selectively binds to monovalent cations, forming channels in lipid bilayers and causing disruption of bacterial cell membranes, leading to bacterial lysis and death. Gramicidin D, a mixture of at least four different gramicidins (A, B, C, and D), is commonly used in topical formulations for the treatment of skin and eye infections due to its potent antimicrobial activity against many gram-positive and some gram-negative bacteria. However, it has limited systemic use due to its potential toxicity to mammalian cells.

Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) is a chemical compound with the formula H-C≡N. It is a colorless, extremely poisonous and flammable liquid that has a bitter almond-like odor in its pure form. However, not everyone can detect its odor, as some people lack the ability to smell it, which makes it even more dangerous. It is soluble in water and alcohol, and its aqueous solution is called hydrocyanic acid or prussic acid.

Hydrogen Cyanide is rapidly absorbed by inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact, and it inhibits the enzyme cytochrome c oxidase, which is essential for cellular respiration. This leads to rapid death due to hypoxia (lack of oxygen) at the cellular level. It is used industrially in large quantities as a pesticide, fumigant, and chemical intermediate, but it also has significant potential for use as a chemical weapon.

In the medical field, Hydrogen Cyanide poisoning can be treated with high-concentration oxygen, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate, which help to restore the function of cytochrome c oxidase and enhance the elimination of cyanide from the body.

I couldn't find a medical definition for "Depression, Chemical" as it is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide you with information about chemical imbalances in the brain that are associated with depression.

Major depressive disorder (MDD), commonly referred to as depression, is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. While there is no definitive evidence that depression is solely caused by a "chemical imbalance," neurotransmitter irregularities in the brain are associated with depressive symptoms. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that transmit signals in the brain and other parts of the body. Some of the primary neurotransmitters involved in mood regulation include serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine.

In depression, it is thought that there may be alterations in the functioning of these neurotransmitter systems, leading to an imbalance. For example:

1. Serotonin: Low levels of serotonin are associated with depressive symptoms. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a common class of antidepressants, work by increasing the availability of serotonin in the synapse (the space between neurons) to improve communication between brain cells.
2. Norepinephrine: Imbalances in norepinephrine levels can contribute to depressive symptoms and anxiety. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are medications that target norepinephrine to help alleviate depression.
3. Dopamine: Deficiencies in dopamine can lead to depressive symptoms, anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure), and motivation loss. Some antidepressants, like bupropion, work by increasing dopamine levels in the brain.

In summary, while "Chemical Depression" is not a recognized medical term, chemical imbalances in neurotransmitter systems are associated with depressive symptoms. However, depression is a complex disorder that cannot be solely attributed to a single cause or a simple chemical imbalance. It is essential to consider multiple factors when diagnosing and treating depression.

Chromium is an essential trace element that is necessary for human health. It is a key component of the glucose tolerance factor, which helps to enhance the function of insulin in regulating blood sugar levels. Chromium can be found in various foods such as meat, fish, whole grains, and some fruits and vegetables. However, it is also available in dietary supplements for those who may not get adequate amounts through their diet.

The recommended daily intake of chromium varies depending on age and gender. For adults, the adequate intake (AI) is 20-35 micrograms per day for women and 35-50 micrograms per day for men. Chromium deficiency is rare but can lead to impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

It's important to note that while chromium supplements are marketed as a way to improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control, there is limited evidence to support these claims. Moreover, excessive intake of chromium can have adverse effects on health, including liver and kidney damage, stomach irritation, and hypoglycemia. Therefore, it's recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before taking any dietary supplements containing chromium.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Strontium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol Sr and atomic number 38. It is a soft silver-white or yellowish metallic element that is highly reactive chemically. In the medical field, strontium ranelate is a medication used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. It works by increasing the formation of new bone and decreasing bone resorption (breakdown).

It is important to note that strontium ranelate has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, so it is not recommended for people with a history of these conditions. Additionally, the use of strontium supplements in high doses can be toxic and should be avoided.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Enzymes are complex proteins that act as catalysts to speed up chemical reactions in the body. They help to lower activation energy required for reactions to occur, thereby enabling the reaction to happen faster and at lower temperatures. Enzymes work by binding to specific molecules, called substrates, and converting them into different molecules, called products. This process is known as catalysis.

Enzymes are highly specific and will only catalyze one particular reaction with a specific substrate. The shape of the enzyme's active site, where the substrate binds, determines this specificity. Enzymes can be regulated by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of inhibitors or activators. They play a crucial role in many biological processes, including digestion, metabolism, and DNA replication.

In medicine, "absorption" refers to the process by which substances, including nutrients, medications, or toxins, are taken up and assimilated into the body's tissues or bloodstream after they have been introduced into the body via various routes (such as oral, intravenous, or transdermal).

The absorption of a substance depends on several factors, including its chemical properties, the route of administration, and the presence of other substances that may affect its uptake. For example, some medications may be better absorbed when taken with food, while others may require an empty stomach for optimal absorption.

Once a substance is absorbed into the bloodstream, it can then be distributed to various tissues throughout the body, where it may exert its effects or be metabolized and eliminated by the body's detoxification systems. Understanding the process of absorption is crucial in developing effective medical treatments and determining appropriate dosages for medications.

Osmosis is a physiological process in which solvent molecules move from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, through a semi-permeable membrane, with the goal of equalizing the solute concentrations on the two sides. This process occurs naturally and is essential for the functioning of cells and biological systems.

In medical terms, osmosis plays a crucial role in maintaining water balance and regulating the distribution of fluids within the body. For example, it helps to control the flow of water between the bloodstream and the tissues, and between the different fluid compartments within the body. Disruptions in osmotic balance can lead to various medical conditions, such as dehydration, swelling, and electrolyte imbalances.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Calcium chloride is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula CaCl2. It is a white, odorless, and tasteless solid that is highly soluble in water. Calcium chloride is commonly used as a de-icing agent, a desiccant (drying agent), and a food additive to enhance texture and flavor.

In medical terms, calcium chloride can be used as a medication to treat hypocalcemia (low levels of calcium in the blood) or hyperkalemia (high levels of potassium in the blood). It is administered intravenously and works by increasing the concentration of calcium ions in the blood, which helps to regulate various physiological processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and blood clotting.

However, it is important to note that calcium chloride can have adverse effects if not used properly or in excessive amounts. It can cause tissue irritation, cardiac arrhythmias, and other serious complications. Therefore, its use should be monitored carefully by healthcare professionals.

Potassium isotopes refer to variants of the element potassium that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei, while having the same number of protons, which defines the element. The most common and stable potassium isotope is potassium-39 (39K), which contains 19 neutrons and 20 protons. However, there are also other naturally occurring potassium isotopes, including potassium-40 (40K) with 21 neutrons and potassium-41 (41K) with 22 neutrons.

Potassium-40 is a radioactive isotope that undergoes both beta decay and electron capture, making it useful for various scientific applications such as dating rocks and determining the age of archaeological artifacts. It has a half-life of approximately 1.25 billion years.

In medical contexts, potassium isotopes may be used in diagnostic tests or therapeutic procedures, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, where radioactive potassium-40 or other radioisotopes are introduced into the body to help visualize and diagnose various conditions. However, it's important to note that the use of potassium isotopes in medical settings is relatively rare due to the availability of other more commonly used radioisotopes.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

Air ionization is the process by which air molecules are electrically charged, either positively or negatively, through the removal or addition of electrons. This can occur naturally, such as through the action of sunlight, wind, and water, or it can be induced artificially through the use of electrical devices known as ionizers or air ionization generators.

In medical terms, air ionization is sometimes used as a therapeutic intervention, particularly in the treatment of respiratory conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and allergies. The negative ions produced by air ionizers are believed to help neutralize airborne pollutants such as dust, mold, bacteria, and viruses, making it easier for individuals with respiratory issues to breathe more easily.

However, it's worth noting that the scientific evidence supporting the use of air ionization as a medical treatment is still limited, and more research is needed to fully understand its potential benefits and risks. Additionally, some studies have suggested that certain types of air ionizers may produce harmful byproducts such as ozone, which can irritate the lungs and exacerbate respiratory symptoms. As with any medical intervention, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider before using air ionization as a treatment option.

Chelating agents are substances that can bind and form stable complexes with certain metal ions, preventing them from participating in chemical reactions. In medicine, chelating agents are used to remove toxic or excessive amounts of metal ions from the body. For example, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a commonly used chelating agent that can bind with heavy metals such as lead and mercury, helping to eliminate them from the body and reduce their toxic effects. Other chelating agents include dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and deferoxamine. These agents are used to treat metal poisoning, including lead poisoning, iron overload, and copper toxicity.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Body fluids refer to the various liquids that can be found within and circulating throughout the human body. These fluids include, but are not limited to:

1. Blood: A fluid that carries oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and waste products throughout the body via the cardiovascular system. It is composed of red and white blood cells suspended in plasma.
2. Lymph: A clear-to-white fluid that circulates through the lymphatic system, helping to remove waste products, bacteria, and damaged cells from tissues while also playing a crucial role in the immune system.
3. Interstitial fluid: Also known as tissue fluid or extracellular fluid, it is the fluid that surrounds the cells in the body's tissues, allowing for nutrient exchange and waste removal between cells and blood vessels.
4. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): A clear, colorless fluid that circulates around the brain and spinal cord, providing protection, cushioning, and nutrients to these delicate structures while also removing waste products.
5. Pleural fluid: A small amount of lubricating fluid found in the pleural space between the lungs and the chest wall, allowing for smooth movement during respiration.
6. Pericardial fluid: A small amount of lubricating fluid found within the pericardial sac surrounding the heart, reducing friction during heart contractions.
7. Synovial fluid: A viscous, lubricating fluid found in joint spaces, allowing for smooth movement and protecting the articular cartilage from wear and tear.
8. Urine: A waste product produced by the kidneys, consisting of water, urea, creatinine, and various ions, which is excreted through the urinary system.
9. Gastrointestinal secretions: Fluids produced by the digestive system, including saliva, gastric juice, bile, pancreatic juice, and intestinal secretions, which aid in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food particles.
10. Reproductive fluids: Secretions from the male (semen) and female (cervical mucus, vaginal lubrication) reproductive systems that facilitate fertilization and reproduction.

Heavy ions, in the context of medicine, typically refer to charged particles that are used in the field of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. These particles are much heavier than electrons and carry a positive charge, unlike the negatively charged electrons or neutral photons used in conventional radiotherapy.

The term "heavy ions" is often associated with carbon ions or other ions like oxygen or neon. The high mass and charge of these particles result in unique physical properties that allow for more targeted and precise cancer treatment compared to traditional radiation therapy methods.

When heavy ions pass through tissue, they deposit most of their energy at the end of their range, creating a narrow, highly-damaging track known as the Bragg peak. This property enables clinicians to concentrate the dose of radiation within the tumor while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissues. The result is a potentially more effective and less toxic treatment option for certain types of cancer, particularly those that are radioresistant or located near critical organs.

It's important to note that heavy ion therapy requires specialized equipment, such as particle accelerators and gantry systems, which limits its availability to a smaller number of medical facilities worldwide.

Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu (from Latin: *cuprum*) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. Copper is found as a free element in nature, and it is also a constituent of many minerals such as chalcopyrite and bornite.

In the human body, copper is an essential trace element that plays a role in various physiological processes, including iron metabolism, energy production, antioxidant defense, and connective tissue synthesis. Copper is found in a variety of foods, such as shellfish, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and organ meats. The recommended daily intake of copper for adults is 900 micrograms (mcg) per day.

Copper deficiency can lead to anemia, neutropenia, impaired immune function, and abnormal bone development. Copper toxicity, on the other hand, can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and in severe cases, liver damage and neurological symptoms. Therefore, it is important to maintain a balanced copper intake through diet and supplements if necessary.

The urinary bladder is a muscular, hollow organ in the pelvis that stores urine before it is released from the body. It expands as it fills with urine and contracts when emptying. The typical adult bladder can hold between 400 to 600 milliliters of urine for about 2-5 hours before the urge to urinate occurs. The wall of the bladder contains several layers, including a mucous membrane, a layer of smooth muscle (detrusor muscle), and an outer fibrous adventitia. The muscles of the bladder neck and urethra remain contracted to prevent leakage of urine during filling, and they relax during voiding to allow the urine to flow out through the urethra.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but static electricity is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Static electricity is an electrical charge that builds up on the surface of objects. This occurs when there is an imbalance of electric charges within or on the surface of a material. It can be caused by certain conditions, such as friction, which can build up an electric charge.

While not a medical term, static electricity can have various effects in different settings, including medical ones. For instance, it can cause issues with electronic equipment used in healthcare settings. Additionally, some people may experience a shock or spark when they touch a conductive object that has been charged with static electricity. However, these occurrences are not typically considered medical conditions or issues.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

"Anura" is a term used in the field of zoology, particularly in the study of amphibians. It refers to a order that includes frogs and toads. The name "Anura" comes from the Greek language, with "an-" meaning "without," and "oura" meaning "tail." This is a reference to the fact that members of this order lack tails in their adult form.

The Anura order is characterized by several distinct features:

1. They have short, powerful legs that are well adapted for jumping or leaping.
2. Their forelimbs are smaller and less specialized than their hind limbs.
3. Most anurans have a moist, glandular skin, which helps them to breathe and absorb water.
4. Anura includes both aquatic and terrestrial species, with varying degrees of adaptations for each environment.
5. They lay their eggs in water, and their larvae (tadpoles) are aquatic, undergoing a process called metamorphosis to transform into the adult form.

Anura contains approximately 7,000 known species, making it one of the largest orders of vertebrates. They have a cosmopolitan distribution and can be found on every continent except Antarctica. Anurans play essential roles in many ecosystems as both predators and prey, contributing to the regulation of insect populations and serving as indicators of environmental health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nickel" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol Ni and atomic number 28. Nickel is a hard, silvery-white lustrous metal with a slight golden tinge. It is one of four elements that are ferromagnetic and is used as a common component in various alloys due to its properties such as resistance to corrosion and heat.

However, in a medical context, nickel may refer to:

* Nickel allergy: A type of allergic contact dermatitis caused by an immune system response to the presence of nickel in jewelry, clothing fasteners, or other items that come into contact with the skin. Symptoms can include redness, itching, and rash at the site of exposure.
* Nickel carbonyl: A highly toxic chemical compound (Ni(CO)4) that can cause respiratory and neurological problems if inhaled. It is produced during some industrial processes involving nickel and carbon monoxide and poses a health risk to workers if proper safety measures are not taken.

If you have any concerns about exposure to nickel or symptoms related to nickel allergy, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and treatment.

Fluorescent dyes are substances that emit light upon excitation by absorbing light of a shorter wavelength. In a medical context, these dyes are often used in various diagnostic tests and procedures to highlight or mark certain structures or substances within the body. For example, fluorescent dyes may be used in imaging techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence angiography to help visualize cells, tissues, or blood vessels. These dyes can also be used in flow cytometry to identify and sort specific types of cells. The choice of fluorescent dye depends on the specific application and the desired properties, such as excitation and emission spectra, quantum yield, and photostability.

I apologize, but I am not able to provide a medical definition for "Egtazic Acid" because it is not a term that is recognized in the field of medicine or pharmacology. It is possible that you may have meant "Egтарic Acid," which also does not have a specific medical meaning, or "Ethylene Glycol Tetraacetic Acid (EGTA)," which is a chemical compound used in research and medicine for its ability to bind calcium ions. If you have any other questions, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

In the context of medicine and physiology, permeability refers to the ability of a tissue or membrane to allow the passage of fluids, solutes, or gases. It is often used to describe the property of the capillary walls, which control the exchange of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The permeability of a membrane can be influenced by various factors, including its molecular structure, charge, and the size of the molecules attempting to pass through it. A more permeable membrane allows for easier passage of substances, while a less permeable membrane restricts the movement of substances.

In some cases, changes in permeability can have significant consequences for health. For example, increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier (a specialized type of capillary that regulates the passage of substances into the brain) has been implicated in a number of neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and traumatic brain injury.

Ouabain is defined as a cardiac glycoside, a type of steroid, that is found in the seeds and roots of certain plants native to Africa. It is used in medicine as a digitalis-like agent to increase the force of heart contractions and slow the heart rate, particularly in the treatment of congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Ouabain functions by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase) in the cell membrane, leading to an increase in intracellular sodium and calcium ions, which ultimately enhances cardiac muscle contractility. It is also known as g-strophanthin or ouabaine.

Fura-2 is not a medical term per se, but a chemical compound used in scientific research, particularly in the field of physiology and cell biology. Fura-2 is a calcium indicator dye that is commonly used to measure intracellular calcium concentrations in living cells. It works by binding to calcium ions (Ca²+) in the cytoplasm of cells, which causes a change in its fluorescence emission spectrum.

When excited with ultraviolet light at specific wavelengths, Fura-2 exhibits different fluorescence intensities depending on the concentration of calcium ions it has bound to. By measuring these changes in fluorescence intensity, researchers can quantify intracellular calcium levels and study how they change in response to various stimuli or experimental conditions.

While Fura-2 is not a medical term itself, understanding its function and use is essential for researchers working in the fields of physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, and other biomedical disciplines.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Intracellular fluid (ICF) refers to the fluid that is contained within the cells of the body. It makes up about two-thirds of the total body water and is found in the cytosol, which is the liquid inside the cell's membrane. The intracellular fluid contains various ions, nutrients, waste products, and other molecules that are necessary for the proper functioning of the cell.

The main ions present in the ICF include potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg2+), and phosphate (HPO42-). The concentration of these ions inside the cell is different from their concentration outside the cell, which creates an electrochemical gradient that plays a crucial role in various physiological processes such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and cell volume regulation.

Maintaining the balance of intracellular fluid is essential for normal cell function, and any disruption in this balance can lead to various health issues. Factors that can affect the ICF balance include changes in hydration status, electrolyte imbalances, and certain medical conditions such as kidney disease or heart failure.

Electrolytes are substances that, when dissolved in water, break down into ions that can conduct electricity. In the body, electrolytes are responsible for regulating various important physiological functions, including nerve and muscle function, maintaining proper hydration and acid-base balance, and helping to repair tissue damage.

The major electrolytes found in the human body include sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. These electrolytes are tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including the kidneys, which help to maintain their proper balance in the body.

When there is an imbalance of electrolytes in the body, it can lead to a range of symptoms and health problems. For example, low levels of sodium (hyponatremia) can cause confusion, seizures, and even coma, while high levels of potassium (hyperkalemia) can lead to heart arrhythmias and muscle weakness.

Electrolytes are also lost through sweat during exercise or illness, so it's important to replace them through a healthy diet or by drinking fluids that contain electrolytes, such as sports drinks or coconut water. In some cases, electrolyte imbalances may require medical treatment, such as intravenous (IV) fluids or medication.

Salinity is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, salinity refers to the level of salt or sodium content in a substance, usually measured in parts per thousand (ppt). In a medical context, salinity might be discussed in relation to things like the body's fluid balance or the composition of certain bodily fluids, such as sweat or tears.

It is worth noting that in some cases, high salinity levels can have negative effects on health. For example, consuming water with very high salt content can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, which can be dangerous. Similarly, exposure to high-salinity environments (such as seawater) can cause skin irritation and other problems in some people. However, these are not direct medical definitions of salinity.

"Physicochemical phenomena" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in general terms, physicochemical phenomena refer to the physical and chemical interactions and processes that occur within living organisms or biological systems. These phenomena can include various properties and reactions such as pH levels, osmotic pressure, enzyme kinetics, and thermodynamics, among others.

In a broader context, physicochemical phenomena play an essential role in understanding the mechanisms of drug action, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity. For instance, the solubility, permeability, and stability of drugs are all physicochemical properties that can affect their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) within the body.

Therefore, while not a medical definition per se, an understanding of physicochemical phenomena is crucial to the study and practice of pharmacology, toxicology, and other related medical fields.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Physical chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the fundamental principles and laws governing the behavior of matter and energy at the molecular and atomic levels. It combines elements of physics, chemistry, mathematics, and engineering to study the properties, composition, structure, and transformation of matter. Key areas of focus in physical chemistry include thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy.

In essence, physical chemists aim to understand how and why chemical reactions occur, what drives them, and how they can be controlled or predicted. This knowledge is crucial for developing new materials, medicines, energy technologies, and other applications that benefit society.

Carbonates are a class of chemical compounds that consist of a metal or metalloid combined with carbonate ions (CO32-). These compounds form when carbon dioxide (CO2) reacts with a base, such as a metal hydroxide. The reaction produces water (H2O), carbonic acid (H2CO3), and the corresponding carbonate.

Carbonates are important in many biological and geological processes. In the body, for example, calcium carbonate is a major component of bones and teeth. It also plays a role in maintaining pH balance by reacting with excess acid in the stomach to form carbon dioxide and water.

In nature, carbonates are common minerals found in rocks such as limestone and dolomite. They can also be found in mineral waters and in the shells of marine organisms. Carbonate rocks play an important role in the global carbon cycle, as they can dissolve or precipitate depending on environmental conditions, which affects the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

In the context of medicine, "salts" often refers to ionic compounds that are formed when an acid and a base react together. The resulting product of this neutralization reaction is composed of cations (positively charged ions) and anions (negatively charged ions), which combine to form a salt.

Salts can also be formed from the reaction between a weak acid and a strong base, or between a strong acid and a weak base. The resulting salt will have properties that are different from those of the reactants, including its solubility in water, pH, and taste. In some cases, salts can be used for therapeutic purposes, such as potassium chloride (KCl) or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), while others may be harmful and pose a risk to human health.

It's important to note that the term "salts" can also refer to organic compounds that contain a functional group consisting of a single bond between a carbon atom and a halogen atom, such as sodium chloride (NaCl) or potassium iodide (KI). These types of salts are not formed from acid-base reactions but rather through ionic bonding between a metal and a nonmetal.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

A cell membrane, also known as the plasma membrane, is a thin semi-permeable phospholipid bilayer that surrounds all cells in animals, plants, and microorganisms. It functions as a barrier to control the movement of substances in and out of the cell, allowing necessary molecules such as nutrients, oxygen, and signaling molecules to enter while keeping out harmful substances and waste products. The cell membrane is composed mainly of phospholipids, which have hydrophilic (water-loving) heads and hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails. This unique structure allows the membrane to be flexible and fluid, yet selectively permeable. Additionally, various proteins are embedded in the membrane that serve as channels, pumps, receptors, and enzymes, contributing to the cell's overall functionality and communication with its environment.

The influence of hydrogen ion concentration. Physiologia Plantarum, 6, 848-858. Olsen, C. (1954) Hvilke betingelser må være ... 2] Olsen, C. (1923) Studies on the hydrogen ion concentration of the soil and its significance to the vegetation, especially to ... Olsen, C. & Linderstrøm-Lang, K. (1927) On the accuracy of the various methods of measuring concentration of Hydrogen ions in ... Olsen, C. (1921) The concentration of hydrogen ions in the soil. Science 54 (1405), 539-541. [1] Olsen, C. (1921) The ecology ...
The concentration of hydrogen ions and pH are inversely proportional; in an aqueous solution, an increased concentration of ... A hydrogen ion is created when a hydrogen atom loses an electron. A positively charged hydrogen ion (or proton) can readily ... The hydrogen ion is recommended by IUPAC as a general term for all ions of hydrogen and its isotopes. Depending on the charge ... the ions produced by the reaction of these cations with water as well as their hydrates are called hydrogen ions: Hydronium ion ...
In 1923, she worked with Edna H. Fawcett to publish a paper concerning the hydrogen-ion concentration in culture mediums. Their ... Quirk, A.J. & Fawcett, E. H. (1923). Hydrogen-ion concentration vs. titratable acidity in culture mediums. Quirk, A.J. & Smith ... Agnes J. Quirk (1923). Hydrogen-ion concentration vs. titratable acidity in culture mediums. Retrieved 30 March 2012. "Norwich ...
Brandis K. "2.6 Regulation of Intracellular Hydrogen Ion Concentration". Acid-Base Physiology. Anaesthesia Education Website. ... Since the microelectrode has fluid with a high H+ concentration inside, relative to the outside of the electrode, there is a ... Intracellular pH is typically lower than extracellular pH due to lower concentrations of HCO3−. A rise of extracellular (e.g., ... Based on the ratio between the concentrations of protonated, compared to deprotonated, forms of phosphate compounds in a given ...
McClendon J. F. New hydrogen electrodes and rapid methods of determining hydrogen ion concentrations. Amer. J. Physiol., 1915, ... The hydrogen ion concentrations of the contents of the small intestine. J. of Biological Chemistry, Feb 19, 1918. XXXIV, No 1. ... McClendon J. F. A direct reading potenciometer for measuring hydrogen ion concentration. Amer. J. Physiol., 1915, 38, 2, 186. ... stomachs and duodenums of adults and infants plotted with the acid of imported methods of measuring hydrogen ion concentration ...
The hydrogen ion concentrations of the contents of the small intestine. Journal of Biological Chemistry, Feb 19, 1918. XXXIV, ...
Menten, M. L.; Crile, G. W. (1915). "Studies on the hydrogen-ion concentration in blood under various abnormal conditions". Am ... This relationship between reaction rate and enzyme-substrate concentration is known as the Michaelis-Menten equation. After ... but also that the rate of reaction rate increases to saturation as the substrate concentration increases. The constant K m {\ ... in terms of the substrate concentration a {\displaystyle a} and constants V {\displaystyle V} and K m {\displaystyle K_{\mathrm ...
1924 The Electrical Charge on a Clay Colloid as Influenced by Hydrogen-Ion Concentration and by Different Salts. With W. C. ... 1917 The Effect of Hydrogen and Hydroxyl Ion Concentration on the Growth of Barley Seedlings. Soil Sci., 3(6) :547-560. 1918 ... Arrhenius, O. (20 September 1922). "Absorption of nutrients and plant growth in relation to hydrogen ion concentration". ... Hydrogen-Ion Effects and the Accumulation of Salt by Barley Roots as Influenced by Metabolism. With T. C. Broyer. Am. J. Bot., ...
Thomas, A. W., & Kelly, M. W. (1923). The influence of hydrogen-ion concentration in the fixation of vegetable tannins by hide ... Thomas, A. W. (1920). Tabulation of hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations of some acids and bases. Journal of the American ... Influence of hydrogen-ion concentration upon enzymatic activity of three typical amylases. Journal of the American Chemical ... Contrasting effects of chlorides and sulfates on the hydrogen-ion concentration of acid solutions. Journal of the American ...
Arrhenius, O. (1922). "Absorption of nutrients and plant growth in relation to hydrogen ion concentration". Journal of General ... In Arnon's revision of 1950, only one concentration (Mo 0.011 ppm) was changed compared to 1938 (Mo 0.048 ppm), while the ... The Hoagland solution, originally intended to imitate a (nutrient-) rich soil solution, has high concentrations of N and K so ... Due to relatively high concentrations in the aqueous stock solutions (cf. Tables 1 and 2) the Hoagland solution is very good ...
The average concentration of hydrogen ions was 0.0001 milligrams per liter. The total concentration of nitrogen in the waters ... The concentration of hydrogen ions in the waters of Fishing Creek near Bloomsburg between 2002 and 2012 ranged from 0.00001 to ... The date of the lowest concentration of hydrogen ions at that location was on March 1 and July 16, 2003. The date of the ... highest concentration of hydrogen ions at the location on the creek was December 17, 2003. ...
The sudden change of the indicator during a typical titration means, as is known, that the concentration of hydrogen ions in ... "hydrogen ion exponent" and the notation p H {\displaystyle p_{\mathrm {H} }} . By the hydrogen ion exponent ( p H {\ ... die colorimetrische Methode genannt." (There are still two procedures by which the hydrogen or hydroxyl ion concentration of a ... On the measurement and the importance of hydrogen ion concentration during enzymatic processes]. Biochemische Zeitschrift (in ...
Arnon, Daniel I.; Johnson, Clarence M. (1942). "Influence of hydrogen ion concentration on the growth of higher plants under ... Hydrogen ions have a single charge and one-thousandth of a gram of hydrogen ions per 100 grams dry soil gives a measure of one ... Plant nutrient availability is affected by soil pH, which is a measure of the hydrogen ion activity in the soil solution. Soil ... milliequivalent of hydrogen ion. Calcium, with an atomic weight 40 times that of hydrogen and with a valence of two, converts ...
McClendon J. F. New hydrogen electrodes and rapid methods of determining hydrogen ion concentrations. - Amer. J. Physoil., 1915 ...
"The Absorption of Water by Plant Tissue in Relation to External Hydrogen-Ion Concentration" (PDF). The Journal of Experimental ...
This results in decreased gastric acid secretion and gastric volume, and reduced hydrogen ion concentration. Ranitidine's acid- ...
Heathcote RS (1935). "Hexamine as an Urinary Antiseptic: I. Its Rate of Hydrolysis at Different Hydrogen Ion Concentrations. II ...
Soil acidity (or alkalinity) is the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) in the soil. Measured on the pH scale, soil acidity is ... If the concentration occurs repeatedly, the soil becomes cement-like, with little or no structure. Extended exposure to high ... In addition, this ion has negative effects on nitrifying microorganisms, thus affecting nutrient availability in the soil. ... In high levels, sodium ions break apart clay platelets and cause swelling and dispersion in soil. This results in reduced soil ...
When the pH (or equivalent e.m.f., E).is measured, the free concentration of hydrogen ions, [H], is obtained from the measured ... Constant-boiling hydrochloric acid may also be used as a primary standard for hydrogen ion concentration. The most widely used ... A solution of known hydrogen ion concentration may be prepared by standardization of a strong acid against borax. ... With aqueous solutions the concentrations of proton (hydronium ion) and hydroxide ion are constrained by the self-dissociation ...
Redman, Thirza (1929). "The hydrogen ion concentration and the calcium and phosphorus content of the faeces of rachitic ...
... is the result of a process reducing hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood plasma (alkalemia). In contrast to ... Compensatory mechanisms for this include release of hydrogen ion from tissue buffers and excretion of bicarbonate in the ... Metabolic alkalosis is usually accompanied by low blood potassium concentration, causing, e.g., muscular weakness, muscle pain ... It may also cause low blood calcium concentration. As the blood pH increases, blood transport proteins, such as albumin, become ...
In water the concentration of hydroxide is related to the concentration of hydrogen ions by the self-ionization constant, Kw. K ... The concentration, or activity, of the hydrogen ion is monitored by means of a glass electrode. The data set used for the ... Hence by following the hydrogen ion concentration during a titration of a mixture of M and HL with base, and knowing the acid ... Under conditions of equal copper concentrations and when then concentration of methylamine is twice the concentration of ...
... s are adapted to live in an environment where the hydrogen ion concentration is at equilibrium. They are sensitive ... to the concentration, and when the pH become too basic or acidic, the cell's proteins can denature. Depending on the microbe ...
pH meter, a tool that uses an electric current to determine the concentration of hydrogen ions in solution. Oxygen electrode, ... Litmus paper, disposable pH indicator strips that determine hydrogen ion concentrations by color changing chemical reaction. ... Acceptable concentrations for the individual nutrient ions, which comprise that total ppm figure, are summarized in the ... ions is used as a key parameter to estimate the remaining proportions and concentrations of other essential nutrient ions to ...
The borate-guar reaction is reversible, and depends on the pH (hydrogen ion concentration) of the solution. This reaction is ... Guar gum is often crosslinked with boron or chromium ions to make it more stable and heat-resistant. The crosslinking of guar ... Thus, it exhibits a great hydrogen bonding activity having a viscosifying effect in liquids. Guar is drought-tolerant and sun- ... PHGG as sold commercially is completely soluble, acid and heat stable, unaffected by ions, and will not gel at high ...
The research measured the rate of bromite decomposition as a function of hydrogen and bromite ion concentrations. The ... Bromous acid is an intermediate stage of the reaction between bromate ion (BrO− 3 ) and bromine (Br−): BrO− 3 + 2 Br− → HBrO2 ...
pH A logarithmic measure of the concentration of hydrogen ions in an acid or base solution. Phase (matter) In the physical ... Molar concentration Molar concentration (also called molarity, amount concentration or substance concentration) is a measure of ... Osmosis The spontaneous movement of molecules or ions through a semi-permable membrane, tending to equalize concentration on ... two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom; H2O). Atoms and complexes connected by non-covalent interactions, such as hydrogen ...
In the 1970s, the concentration of hydrogen ions ranged from 0.00004 to 0.00101 milligrams per liter. The pH ranged from 6.0 to ... The concentration of nitrogen in the form of nitrite was 0.030 milligrams per liter. The concentration of magnesium in the ... The concentration of organic nitrogen was once measured to be 0.13 milligrams per liter, while the concentration of nitrogen in ... The sulfate concentration in filtered water ranged from 10.0 to 12.0 milligrams per liter and the chloride concentration in ...
Chemoreceptors in the body sense a change in partial pressures and pH (hydrogen ion concentration) in the blood. Chemoreceptors ... leading to lowered plasma calcium ions (Hypocalcaemia), causing increased nerve and muscle excitability. This explains the ...
La Mer, V. K.; Sherman, H. C.; Campbell, H. L. (1921). "The Effect of Temperature and of the Concentration of Hydrogen Ions ... Sherman, H. C.; La Mer, V. K.; Campbell, H. L. (1921). "The Effect of Temperature and of the Concentration of Hydrogen Ions ... LaMer, V. K.; Campbell, H. L.; Sherman, H. C. (1922). "The Effect of Temperature and the Concentration of Hydrogen Ions Upon ... La Mer, Victor K. (1921). The effect of temperature and hydrogen ion concentration upon the rate of destruction of the ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration / Antineoplastic Agents / Sulfuric Acid / Hydrogen-Ion Concentration / Antineoplastic Agents / ... Hydrogen-Ion Concentration / Molecular Sequence Data / Anthozoa / Animals / Ecosystem / Amino Acid Sequence / Hydrogen-Ion ... Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Nocardioides caricicola sp. nov., an endophytic bacterium isolated from a halophyte, Carex ... Hydrogen-Ion Concentration / Biofilm / Ocean acidification / Rocky Shores / Seawater / Ecosystem / Carbon Dioxide Vent / Water ...
The influence of hydrogen ion concentration. Physiologia Plantarum, 6, 848-858. Olsen, C. (1954) Hvilke betingelser må være ... 2] Olsen, C. (1923) Studies on the hydrogen ion concentration of the soil and its significance to the vegetation, especially to ... Olsen, C. & Linderstrøm-Lang, K. (1927) On the accuracy of the various methods of measuring concentration of Hydrogen ions in ... Olsen, C. (1921) The concentration of hydrogen ions in the soil. Science 54 (1405), 539-541. [1] Olsen, C. (1921) The ecology ...
McClendon J. F. New hydrogen electrodes and rapid methods of determining hydrogen ion concentrations. Amer. J. Physiol., 1915, ... The hydrogen ion concentrations of the contents of the small intestine. J. of Biological Chemistry, Feb 19, 1918. XXXIV, No 1. ... McClendon J. F. A direct reading potenciometer for measuring hydrogen ion concentration. Amer. J. Physiol., 1915, 38, 2, 186. ... stomachs and duodenums of adults and infants plotted with the acid of imported methods of measuring hydrogen ion concentration ...
The hydrogen ion concentration plays a decisive role in each one of the above mechanisms.The adsorption of solutes from aqueous ... The hydrogen ion concentration plays a decisive role in each one of the above mechanisms. ... Therefore, the concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution should also be monitored to elucidate the mechanism of ... Therefore, the concentration of calcium and phosphate ions in solution should also be monitored in order to elucidate the ...
Hydrogen ion concentration, nmol/L (35-50 nmol/L). 43 + 2. 40 + 3. 45 + 3. ...
pH is an estimate of the hydrogen ion concentration in a solution. It is measured by a number of devices, both with electronic ...
Serum bicarbonate, PCO2, hydrogen ion concentration (H+), and urinary pH. * Liver function tests ...
... the hydrogen ion concentration by a factor of 10. Seawater with a pH of 8.2 has just under one tenth the amount of H+ in ... Acidic solutions have more H+ (hydrogen ions), and pH is a measure of these ions. Specifically, the pH of a solution is defined ... It is often used, for example, to describe the concentration of ammonia, nitrite, or nitrate ions in aquaria. It can also be ... To convert molar concentration into ppt (parts per thousand), multiply the molar concentration by the molecular weight of the ...
The analytical parameters, metal ion and hydrogen ion concentrations, were investigated. Metal ion concentrations were ... The distribution of copper (7440508) between a buffered aqueous solution of the metal ion and an organic solution of tobacco ...
Measured on a scale from 0 to 14, pH is based on the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution.…. ...
European Union, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/methods, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Osmolar Concentration, Polycyclic ... Aqueous concentrations of ETBE in pipe leachate ranged from a low of 23 microg/L to , 100 microg/L. The concentrations ... The use of GC-MS determination in the full scan mode, in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and in the GC-MS-MS mode ... Panelists were able to smell ETBE at a concentration of 5 microg/L and assigned a rating of a weak odour. The need for taste ...
This is especially true in stroke, where the proton concentration in the afflicted a … ... Hydrogen-Ion Concentration * Mutagenesis, Site-Directed * Neuroprotective Agents / chemistry * Neuroprotective Agents / ... This is especially true in stroke, where the proton concentration in the afflicted area can increase by an order of magnitude. ...
pH hydrogen ion concentration. PMN polymorphonuclear leukocyte. po orally. Po2 oxygen partial pressure (or tension). PPD ... MIC minimum inhibitory concentration. mIU milli-international unit. mL milliliter. mm millimeter. mmol millimole. mo month. mol ... MCHC mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. mCi millicurie. MCV mean corpuscular volume. mEq milliequivalent. Mg magnesium ...
... tables are given showing the colour changes of various indicators for the determination of the hydrogenion concentration of ... C. H. Lees.-The Influence of Gases on the Emission of Electrons and Ions from Hot Metals: Prof. O. W. Richardson. -The Band ... It appears to be due to pure hydrogen, for successive improvements in purity due to the removal of oxygen, water vapour, and ... This was found to hold good for hydrogen, helium, and Photographs were obtained of the spectra of these three gases in vacuum ...
... : Definition ✓ Importance ✓ Example ✓ Function ✓ Difference ✓ Biology , StudySmarter ... Hydrogen ions and pH: the concentration of hydrogen ions determines pH. Maintaining pH is key for enzyme-controlled reactions. ... The average number of hydrogen ions in the body. The concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. ... Organic ions contain carbon, whilst inorganic ions dont.. Examples of inorganic ions. There are many inorganic ions in the ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration (MeSH) * Male (MeSH) * Middle Aged (MeSH) * Oxygen (MeSH) * Physical Exertion (MeSH) ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity ... DrugMutationHydrogen-Ion ConcentrationPhosphorylationProtein FoldingMolecular StructureTime FactorsCross ReactionsSignal ... is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and ... Hydrogen Bonding. A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration * Ion Transport * Membranes, Artificial * Sulfates * Trichloroacetic Acid * Trihalomethanes * United ... Even though the model developed does not account for ion coupling and cannot be applied in a purely predictive mode, it can ... Evidence for coupled transport of divalent inorganic ions is also presented. ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Seawater. Water Microbiology. Water Pollutants, Chemical.  Metadata. Show full item record ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. *Female. *Egg Yolk. *Cholesterol. Citation. APA Chicago ICMJE MLA ...
MeSH headings : Bentonite; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Lakes; Lanthanum; Phosphates; Phosphorus TL;DR: The results indicate ... Junction Potentials Bias Measurements of Ion Exchange Membrane Permselectivity ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 52(8), 4929- ... TL;DR: The results demonstrate that high hydrogen recovery and production rates are possible in a single chamber MEC without a ... author keywords: Ion exchange; Transformation; Nutrient removal; Wastewater; Advanced oxidation process (AOP); Direct electron ...
hydrogen ion concentration. In chemistry, pH is a measure of the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution. ... Chlorine residual will react chemically and biologically as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) or hypochlorite ion (OCl-). This does not ...
Hydrogen-ion concentration 1 Invertebrates 1 Invoices 1 Linguists 1 Low German philology 1 Manners and customs 1 Middle East 1 ...
Hydrogen ion concentration (pH value). *Total hardness. *Carbonate hardness. *potassium. *Calcium. *magnesium ...
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration/drug effects, Methane/metabolism, Propionates/metabolism, Rumen/metabolism, Ruminants, Salts/ ...
... involves modelling the hydrogen concentration profile of the surface versus depth, whereas the age determination is reached via ... very low ion current, a top mono-atomic layer analysis), and dynamic mode (a high ion current density, in-depth analysis). ... Where, Ci is the intrinsic concentration of water, Cs is the saturation concentration, dC/dx is the diffusion coefficient for ... Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) procedure[edit]. In case of measuring the hydration rim using the depth profiling ...
The pH indicates a concentration of hydrogen ions. High pH is poor in hydrogen ions. By being released into the water of your ... of iopool decreases the concentration of hydrogen ions and increases the basicity of your pH. ...
... the hydrogen ion concentration is equal to K 2, and the ph is Accurate calculations of concentrations of species during ... HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION - ph VALUES AND BUFFER SOLUTIONS 1. INTRODUCTION Water has a small but definite tendency to ionise. ... ph: Measurement and Uses One of the most important properties of aqueous solutions is the concentration of hydrogen ion. The ... Acids produce hydrogen ions in aqueous solutions 2. Bases produce hydroxide ions in aqueous solutions B. Bronsted-Lowry ...
Despite the significance of the concentration of hydrogen ions. folder_open Uncategorized ...
  • In connection with acids, "hydrogen ions" typically refers to hydrons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Serum AG is affected by the concentrations of all anions and cations which are not included in its calculations: i.e., albumin, globulin, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and organic and inorganic acids. (karger.com)
  • Acids have a higher concentration of hydrogen ions, while alkaline substances have a lower concentration. (freedrinkingwater.com)
  • Acids are compounds that give out hydrogen ions or a proton when mixed in an aqueous solution and have a pH below 7. (vedantu.com)
  • These acids generally contain dissociable protons or hydrogen groups, also called acidic hydrogen that readily dissociates in solution or in presence of bases. (vedantu.com)
  • Strong acids HA have high dissociation due to the presence of highly acidic hydrogens. (vedantu.com)
  • Acids in solution provide hydrogen ions and bases furnish hydroxide ions so we refer to both of them. (indiabix.com)
  • Students build connections linking the rate of reaction to the hydrogen ion concentration and pH scale as they "discover" the properties of strong and weak acids. (flinnsci.com)
  • It is a measure of the concentration of bicarbonate, carbonate, and hydroxide ions in the water. (freedrinkingwater.com)
  • Depending on the charge of the ion, two different classes can be distinguished: positively charged ions and negatively charged ions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionized calcium binds to negatively charged sites on protein molecules, competing with hydrogen ions for the same binding sites on albumin and other calcium-binding proteins. (medscape.com)
  • Sodium, chloride, bicarbonate, and albumin are quantitatively the major ions in the extracellular fluid compartment and are therefore used to calculate the AG. (karger.com)
  • Ocean acidification is the direct consequence of elevated concentrations of hydrogen ions and carbonate saturation from significant absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) by the world's oceans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hach kit that reveals the magnesium concentration in units of ppm calcium carbonate equivalents probably takes the prize in the "dubious units" contest. (reefkeeping.com)
  • The adsorption of solutes from aqueous solutions generally involves ion-exchange with the apatite surface, and may be affected by the concentrations of potential determining ions (CA 2+ , phosphates, H + , etc.) in the solution. (nist.gov)
  • The hydrogen ion concentration plays a decisive role in each one of the above mechanisms.The adsorption of solutes from aqueous solutions generally involves ion-exchange with the apatite surface, and may be affected by the concentrations of potential determining ions (Ca[u2+], phosphates, H[u+], etc.) in the solution. (nist.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride is available commercially as an anhydrous gas or as aqueous solutions (hydrochloric acid). (cdc.gov)
  • Direct contact with aqueous solutions of hydrogen chloride or with concentrated vapor can cause severe chemical burns. (cdc.gov)
  • By definition, an acid is an ion or molecule that can donate a proton, and when introduced to a solution it will react with water molecules (H2O) to form a hydronium ion (H3O+), a conjugate acid of water. (wikipedia.org)
  • For simplistic reasoning, the hydrogen ion (H+) is often used to abbreviate the hydronium ion. (wikipedia.org)
  • pH+p OH = 14, ph is the negative reciprocal of the hydronium ion, but if the concentration of the hydroxide ion is known. (indiabix.com)
  • Adsorption of polymers seems to be determined primarily by their multiple hydrogen bonding, their relative molar mass, and their ability to self-associate. (nist.gov)
  • From there you multiply -log 10 by the molar hydrogen ion concentration. (mometrix.com)
  • The hydrolysis of amgydalin releases hydrogen cyanide. (cdc.gov)
  • This happens when hydrogen ions get pushed across the membrane creating a high concentration inside the thylakoid membrane and a low concentration in the cytoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bases are compounds that produce hydroxyl ions when mixed in an aqueous solution. (vedantu.com)
  • A strong acid or a strong base is one which dissociates completely in the aqueous medium furnishing hydrogen or hydroxyl ions in large amounts. (vedantu.com)
  • Strong bases BOH are compounds that dissociate completely in solution producing large concentrations of hydroxyl ion . (vedantu.com)
  • Similar to pH, pOH is associated with hydroxyl ion concentration. (vedantu.com)
  • Being a negative logarithm of hydroxyl ion concentration, a strong base furnishing large amounts of hydroxyl ion would have low pOH. (vedantu.com)
  • Hydrogen anions are formed when additional electrons are acquired: Hydride: general name referring to the negative ion of any hydrogen isotope (H−) Protide: 1H− Deuteride: 2H−, D − Tritide: 3H−, T − Hydrogen ions drive ATP synthase in photosynthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The salt effect cannot be described in terms of Debye screening, but involves the ion-specific sequestering of anions within the narrow channel. (lu.se)
  • Hydrogen forms the only cation that has no electrons, but even cations that (unlike hydrogen) still retain one or more electrons are still smaller than the neutral atoms or molecules from which they are derived. (wikipedia.org)
  • The solute in aqueous solution may be removed by two other mechanisms, either by formation of a surface complex or by chemically reacting with calcium or phosphate ions to form a new phase that precipitates out of solution. (nist.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride is produced commercially by any of the following reactions: heated hydrogen gas with calcium chloride, sulfuric acid with sodium chloride, sodium chloride with sulfur dioxide and steam, and hydrogen burned in chlorine. (cdc.gov)
  • Measurement of ionized calcium is by ion-selective electrodes. (medscape.com)
  • In the image at left the hydrogen atom (center) contains a single proton and a single electron. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hydrogen anion, with its loosely held two-electron cloud, has a larger radius than the neutral atom, which in turn is much larger than the bare proton of the cation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each element has a different number of protons, e.g. hydrogen has 1 proton, carbon 14. (rapidlearningcenter.com)
  • Moreover, the bases can be powerful proton acceptors, so in an aqueous solution, they can steal a proton from a water molecule H 2 O producing an OH - ion. (vedantu.com)
  • Acid are proton donor and base is accepter, so on the base of proton concentration we can determine PH of solution. (indiabix.com)
  • The rubber tube is connected at K with a tube, L, leading from a hydrogen generator, and a slow stream of H2 passes down the rubber tube and out at G, thus converting the platinum wire from H to F into a hydrogen electrode. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many reference ranges of the AG have been reported from about 5 to 14 mEq/L, with autoanalyzers using an ion-selective electrode. (karger.com)
  • It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (musc.edu)
  • Due to its extremely high charge density of approximately 2×1010 times that of a sodium ion, the bare hydrogen ion cannot exist freely in solution as it readily hydrates, i.e., bonds quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • in an aqueous solution, an increased concentration of hydrogen ions yields a low pH, and subsequently, an acidic product. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the concentration of hydrogen ions decreases, pH increases (solution becomes more basic)! (transformationtutoring.com)
  • Adsorption Coefficient (Koc)-- The ratio of the amount of a chemical adsorbed per unit weight of organic carbon in the soil or sediment to the concentration of the chemical in solution at equilibrium. (cdc.gov)
  • The distribution of copper (7440508) between a buffered aqueous solution of the metal ion and an organic solution of tobacco smoke condensate (TSC) in 4-methyl-2-pentanone (MIBK) has been studied. (cdc.gov)
  • pH is the concentration of hydrogen ions [H+] in solution. (rapidlearningcenter.com)
  • The solution has a moderate concentration of hydrogen ions and PH less than 7. (persistencemarketresearch.com)
  • The pH is associated with the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. (vedantu.com)
  • The concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution is related to what extent the acid dissociates and releases the protons. (vedantu.com)
  • Generally, the acidity of a solution is defined by the concentration of hydronium ions in it. (mometrix.com)
  • The higher the concentration of hydronium ions, the more acidic the solution . (mometrix.com)
  • For instance, a solution with a 0.5 M concentration of hydronium ions is more acidic than a solution with a 0.05 M concentration of hydronium ions. (mometrix.com)
  • pH is a measure of how acidic or basic an aqueous solution is based on the amount of hydrogen ions in the substance. (mometrix.com)
  • pH measures how acidic or basic a solution is based on its hydrogen ion content. (mometrix.com)
  • Synonyms for an aqueous solution of hydrogen chloride include chlorohydric acid, hydrochloric acid, and muriatic acid. (cdc.gov)
  • We argue that monomeric crystals form at high pH despite a high decamer population in solution, because the ion pairs that provide the critical decamer-decamer contacts are disrupted at high pH. (lu.se)
  • McClendon J. F. Acidity curves in the stomachs and duodenums of adults and infants plotted with the acid of imported methods of measuring hydrogen ion concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are polar if they are between different types of atoms e.g. oxygen and hydrogen as in H2O. (rapidlearningcenter.com)
  • Ionic Bonds: atoms become ions when they gain or lose electrons and are weaker than covalent and dissociate in water. (rapidlearningcenter.com)
  • The urinary solubility of uric acid depends on its concentration in urine and the urinary pH. (medscape.com)
  • Persons exposed only to hydrogen chloride gas do not pose significant risks of secondary contamination. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride is a colorless, corrosive, nonflammable gas that fumes in air. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride is not absorbed through the skin, but when hydrogen chloride gas comes in contact with moisture, it forms hydrochloric acid, which is corrosive and can cause irritation and burns. (cdc.gov)
  • At room temperature, hydrogen chloride is a colorless to slightly yellow gas with a pungent odor. (cdc.gov)
  • Commercial concentrated hydrochloric acid contains 36% to 38% hydrogen chloride in water. (cdc.gov)
  • Inhalation is an important route of exposure to hydrogen chloride. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride vapor is heavier than air and may cause asphyxiation in enclosed, poorly ventilated, or low-lying areas. (cdc.gov)
  • Children exposed to the same levels of hydrogen chloride as adults may receive larger dose because they have greater lung surface area:body weight ratios and increased minute volumes:weight ratios. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, they may be exposed to higher levels than adults in the same location because of their short stature and the higher levels of hydrogen chloride found nearer to the ground. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride is not absorbed through the skin. (cdc.gov)
  • Hydrogen chloride can be formed during the combustion of many plastics. (cdc.gov)
  • Bases are also compounds that can steal or accept hydrogen ions, thus, bases can also be defined as compounds which are hydrogen acceptors. (vedantu.com)
  • Bioconcentration Factor (BCF)-- The quotient of the concentration of a chemical in aquatic organisms at a specific time or during a discrete time period of exposure divided by the concentration in the surrounding water at the same time or during the same period. (cdc.gov)
  • However, only 50% of exposed persons can perceive hydrogen chloride's odor at the OSHA permissible exposure limit (5 ppm), and odor may not provide adequate warning in the workplace . (cdc.gov)
  • Protective indoor ventilation practices can reduce the airborne viral concentrations and the overall viral exposure to occupants. (cdc.gov)
  • The effects of these exposures on hormone concentrations, and markers of function and/or injury in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus and testes were measured after 1, 8 and 30days exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • The vapor is corrosive, and air concentrations above 5 ppm can cause irritation. (cdc.gov)
  • This interplay of hydrogen bonding in conjunction with chemical and structural characteristics of the adsorbed molecules controls their reversibility and the orientation on the surface. (nist.gov)
  • Hydrogen Bond: are weak intra or inter molecular attractions between molecules with a net dipole. (rapidlearningcenter.com)
  • Hydrogen ions concentration, measured as pH, is also responsible for the acidic or basic nature of a compound. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (musc.edu)
  • We have used magnetic relaxation dispersion to study bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) self-association as a function of pH, salt type and concentration, and temperature. (lu.se)
  • Ceiling Value-- A concentration of a substance that should not be exceeded, even instantaneously. (cdc.gov)
  • Indoors, the concentration of viral particles is often higher than outdoors. (cdc.gov)
  • Although it isn't known exactly how much the concentration of viral particles in air needs to be reduced to start reducing risk of viral infection, ventilation mitigation strategies still provide a reasonable approach to reducing risk. (cdc.gov)
  • RESULTS: The target amiloride concentration in the central nervous system required for maximal ASIC inhibition was achieved with a 75-mg intranasal amiloride dose. (bvsalud.org)
  • At the same time, explore the correlation between patient genetic polymorphisms and chloroquine steady-state concentration, therapeutic effects and adverse reactions in the body. (researchsquare.com)
  • Soil pH is an abbreviation for "Potentiometric Hydrogen ion concentration. (lovetoknow.com)
  • Accordingly, the decamer population increases with increasing pH, as cationic residues are deprotonated, and with increasing salt concentration. (lu.se)
  • Leckband but monodisperse and tetrameric at high salt concentrations and Israelachvili, 2001), has not proven to be a fruitful (near the BPTI solubility limit). (lu.se)
  • Chemical reaction is totally based on exchange of ion so for that we can mention the acid base concentration. (indiabix.com)
  • These hydrogens are usually connected to highly electronegative groups (often halogens like chlorine, fluorine , and iodine). (vedantu.com)
  • McClendon J. F. A direct reading potenciometer for measuring hydrogen ion concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The analytical parameters, metal ion and hydrogen ion concentrations, were investigated. (cdc.gov)
  • Metal ion concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. (cdc.gov)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Hydrogen-Ion Concentration" by people in this website by year, and whether "Hydrogen-Ion Concentration" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (musc.edu)
  • Mathematically, pH is represented as the negative algorithm of the concentration of hydrogen ions. (vedantu.com)
  • pH means negative log of hydrogen ion concentration. (indiabix.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for amiloride, an acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) antagonist, and to simulate its pharmacokinetics in plasma and the central nervous system following intranasal administration in a virtual human population. (bvsalud.org)
  • A true "ion gap," however, does not exist in vivo which makes the AG a fundamental tool to evaluate acid-base disorders [ 1 ]. (karger.com)
  • Because of the narrow extracellular concentration, most ions are omitted from the calculation. (karger.com)