Chest Tubes: Plastic tubes used for drainage of air or fluid from the pleural space. Their surgical insertion is called tube thoracostomy.Thoracostomy: Surgical procedure involving the creation of an opening (stoma) into the chest cavity for drainage; used in the treatment of PLEURAL EFFUSION; PNEUMOTHORAX; HEMOTHORAX; and EMPYEMA.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Empyema, Pleural: Suppurative inflammation of the pleural space.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Pleural Effusion: Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.Pleurodesis: The production of adhesions between the parietal and visceral pleura. The procedure is used in the treatment of bronchopleural fistulas, malignant pleural effusions, and pneumothorax and often involves instillation of chemicals or other agents into the pleural space causing, in effect, a pleuritis that seals the air leak. (From Fishman, Pulmonary Diseases, 2d ed, p2233 & Dorland, 27th ed)Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Thoracoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the pleural cavity.Chylothorax: The presence of chyle in the thoracic cavity. (Dorland, 27th ed)Pleural Cavity: Paired but separate cavity within the THORACIC CAVITY. It consists of the space between the parietal and visceral PLEURA and normally contains a capillary layer of serous fluid that lubricates the pleural surfaces.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Pleural Effusion, Malignant: Presence of fluid in the PLEURAL CAVITY as a complication of malignant disease. Malignant pleural effusions often contain actual malignant cells.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Paracentesis: A procedure in which fluid is withdrawn from a body cavity or organ via a trocar and cannula, needle, or other hollow instrument.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Pollen Tube: A growth from a pollen grain down into the flower style which allows two sperm to pass, one to the ovum within the ovule, and the other to the central cell of the ovule to produce endosperm of SEEDS.Talc: Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Pleural DiseasesThoracoscopes: Endoscopes for examining the pleural cavity.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Rib FracturesNeural Tube Defects: Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Instillation, Drug: The administration of therapeutic agents drop by drop, as eye drops, ear drops, or nose drops. It is also administered into a body space or cavity through a catheter. It differs from THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION in that the irrigate is removed within minutes, but the instillate is left in place.Neural Tube: A tube of ectodermal tissue in an embryo that will give rise to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, including the SPINAL CORD and the BRAIN. Lumen within the neural tube is called neural canal which gives rise to the central canal of the spinal cord and the ventricles of the brain. For malformation of the neural tube, see NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Fallopian Tubes: A pair of highly specialized muscular canals extending from the UTERUS to its corresponding OVARY. They provide the means for OVUM collection, and the site for the final maturation of gametes and FERTILIZATION. The fallopian tube consists of an interstitium, an isthmus, an ampulla, an infundibulum, and fimbriae. Its wall consists of three histologic layers: serous, muscular, and an internal mucosal layer lined with both ciliated and secretory cells.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Bronchial Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.Ketorolac: A pyrrolizine carboxylic acid derivative structurally related to INDOMETHACIN. It is an NSAID and is used principally for its analgesic activity. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Mass Chest X-Ray: X-ray screening of large groups of persons for diseases of the lung and heart by means of radiography of the chest.Eustachian Tube: A narrow passageway that connects the upper part of the throat to the TYMPANIC CAVITY.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Flail Chest: A complication of multiple rib fractures, rib and sternum fractures, or thoracic surgery. A portion of the chest wall becomes isolated from the thoracic cage and exhibits paradoxical respiration.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.
  • A chest tube ( chest drain , thoracic catheter , tube thoracostomy , or intercostal drain ) is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum . (wikipedia.org)
  • Chest tubes are a routine part of postoperative care for children undergoing many types of thoracic procedures. (medscape.com)
  • Presenting the findings for the first time at the Society of Thoracic Surgeons 50th Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, Professor Frank Detterbeck, MD Chief of Thoracic Surgery Yale School of Medicine stated, "This randomized trial demonstrates a statistically significant reduction in hospital stay by one whole day by using the Thopaz digital chest drainage system. (medela.com)
  • Vollmar SV, Kalender WA (2008) Reduction of dose to the female breast in thoracic CT: a comparison of standard-protocol, bismuth-shielded, partial and tube-current modulated CT examinations. (springermedizin.de)
  • Complications include bleeding, superficial site infection, deep organ space infection (empyema), dislodgement of the tube, clogging of the tube, re-expansion pulmonary edema, injury to intraabdominal organs such as spleen or liver, injury to the diaphragm, and injury to intrathoracic organs, such as the heart or thoracic aorta. (statpearls.com)
  • The Division of Thoracic Surgery has its own inpatient unit dedicated to the patient who has undergone or will be undergoing surgery in the chest. (massgeneral.org)
  • Interestingly, more than 80% of the clogging in the chest tube was seen in the internal portion of the tube (the invisible intra-thoracic portion), which makes the diagnosis of this complication by bedside visualization impossible (2). (techbriefs.com)
  • A thoracic tube was placed with a prediagnosis of empyema and antibiotic treatment was initiated. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Nine patients (10%) were referred to an advanced medical center after the first intervention was performed due to severe hemorrhagic drainage from the thoracic tube in six patients, persistent pneumothorax in one patient, and prolonged air leak in one patient. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Flail chest typically occurs when three or more adjacent ribs are fractured in two or more places, allowing that segment of the thoracic wall to displace and move independently of the rest of the chest wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the Surgical Service at Boston Children's Hospital, chest tubes are most often removed at the bedside by the general surgery nurse practitioner or resident using a standard chest tube removal protocol unless otherwise specified. (medscape.com)
  • The portable, or bedside, chest radiograph (PCXR) remains the most commonly ordered imaging study, particularly in intensive care unit patients, where valuable information can be gained at a low cost without the risk and expense of patient transport. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Bedside placement of small bowel feeding tubes (SBFT) may facilitate earlier feeding (1, 2, 3).Tube placement may induce bleeding in patients with coagulopathies or varicosities. (slideshare.net)
  • Based on the findings of this study, we have changed our practice guidelines to not obtain a chest radiograph after removal of a chest tube unless there is increased pain, respiratory symptoms, or clinical concern. (medscape.com)
  • Based on the findings of this study, we identified 18 of 281 (6.4%) patients who had any change in chest radiograph after removal of the chest tube. (medscape.com)
  • Chest tubes are utilized to evacuate shed blood after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation, however, they can become clogged, leading to retained blood. (clearflow.com)
  • The current situation in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein, is that all neonates undergo a daily routine X-ray (XR) (either chest or abdominal, or both). (scielo.org.za)
  • Adequacy of tube placement (intrapleural, unkinked, not in fissure) and incision length were recorded by investigators blinded to procedural technique. (springer.com)
  • An occlusive dressing with vaseline or xeroform gauze is preferred or placing a U-stitch around the incision site and tightening when the tube is discontinued is another option. (statpearls.com)
  • The most common causes of flail chest injuries are vehicle collisions, which account for 76% of flail chest injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another main cause of flail chest injuries is falling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Falls account for 14% of flail chest injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flail chest can also occur when ribs are fractured proximally in conjunction with disarticulation of costal cartilages distally. (wikipedia.org)
  • In children, the majority of flail chest injuries result from common blunt force traumas or metabolic bone diseases, including a group of genetic disorders known as osteogenesis imperfecta. (wikipedia.org)
  • After placement, the distal end of the tube is connected to a pleura-evac system. (statpearls.com)
  • and advancing the chest tube into the dilated opening such that a distal end of the chest tube extends through said opening into the pleural space. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Two and three lumen catheter tubes which comprise three unique distal catheter end structures are disclosed. (google.com)
  • the distal end effluent port means being closely juxtaposed the distal end entry port means whereby at least partial intermixing flow within a common region adjacent to the distal tip of the catheter tube is accommodated. (google.com)
  • 2. An aspirating apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the effluent port means comprise a plurality of effluent orifices open inwardly into the aspirating lumen means at the distal end of the catheter tube where said common region is located. (google.com)
  • Chest wall thickness is an independent risk factor for the development of PPP. (medscape.com)
  • Recently, surgical instrument and devices used in VATS have improved considerably, resulting in less injury to the chest wall than usual thoracotomy wound. (amegroups.com)
  • Chest wall pain was similar. (thetraumapro.com)
  • Her trachea was central, but decreased air entry was noted over the left hemithorax with no visible overlying chest wall injuries. (biomedcentral.com)
  • It discusses the advantages and disadvantages of certain surgical procedures in relation to the lymphatic system, thyroid gland, chest wall and parathyroid glands, as well as pulmonary endarterectomy. (springer.com)
  • It occurs when multiple adjacent ribs are broken in multiple places, separating a segment, so a part of the chest wall moves independently. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is due to the paradoxical motions of the chest wall from the fragments interrupting normal breathing and chest movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chest tube is inserted through a 1-inch (2.5 centimeters) cut in your skin between your ribs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • As we described last November when the software was first unveiled, "ClearRead +Confirm processes the radiograph, creating a second soft tissue image with the ribs and clavicles suppressed and increasing the contrast, sharpness and visibility of tubes, lines and cardiac wires. (medgadget.com)
  • In a prospective observational study, over 36% of patients had chest tube clogging after heart surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In chest tubes designed for pediatric heart surgery, the EDL is shorter, generally by only having 4 side holes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several previous researches have described that postoperative management without chest tube after thoracoscopic wedge resection surgery is safe and beneficial for patients, and it may contribute to an early recovery ( 3 , 4 ). (amegroups.com)
  • Potentiallylife-threateningbleedingwasdefined as 41,000 mLof chest tubedrainageover24hours.2 Packed redbloodcelltransfusion was defined asadministrationofredcellsinthe24hoursfollowing admissiontotheICU.Typeofsurgerywasclassified as1of3 categories:Coronaryarterybypassgrafting(CABG),valvesurgery (repair orreplacementofvalve),orcomplexsurgery(multiplevalve surgery orcoronaryarterybypassgraftingwithvalvesurgeryor surgery involvingtheaorticarch).Urgencyofsurgerywasclassified as 1of3categories:Elective(theprocedurecouldbedeferredwithout risk), urgent(surgeryindicatedwithin72hoursofangiographyorof unplannedadmission),andemergency(surgeryrequiredsameday).Re- do surgerywasdefined bythepatienthavingundergonecardiacsurgery on apreviousadmission. (oclc.org)
  • The teaching point is use your gloved finger for both Chest tube and Surgical airway! (capriles-urgencias.com)
  • The St.Vincent's HealthHumanResearchEthicsCommitteeapproved the useofdeidentified dataforthisstudyandwaivedtheneedfor individualpatientconsent.Theanesthetic,surgical,andintensivecare managementandassociationsbetweenchesttubedrainageandadverse outcomespreviouslyhavebeendescribed.2 Chest tubeswereplacedjustpriortosternalclosure.Chesttube drainage wasrecordedasthechestdrainlevelat24hoursfollowing admissiontotheintensivecareunit(ICU).Ifthepatientwasdischarged from theICUbefore24hours,thelastrecordedlevelwasused. (oclc.org)